35 Burst results for "Nafta"

Elise Stefanik: From Republican Moderate to Trump Favourite

NBC Meet the Press

03:08 min | 4 hrs ago

Elise Stefanik: From Republican Moderate to Trump Favourite

"Coming leadership ouster of liz. Cheney is about much more than the sacking of the number three house republican it is an unconditional surrender by one of our two major political parties to former president trump. And his big lie that the twenty twenty election was somehow stolen. Cheney's crime is not that she isn't conservative. It's that she's not conservative as defined by today's republican party which apparently means unquestioning loyalty to the defeated former president. She stands accused of telling the truth that the election was not stolen and for criticizing trump citing the january six capital interaction. This episode is just the latest chapter in the party's purging of its legacy the bushes the mccain's the romney's and now the chains names that appeared on eight of nine presidential tickets for one thousand nine hundred eighty two thousand twelve all now. Essentially excommunicated by the party's base and leadership and for one reason only the message go along with donald trump and his lies or just go away. Will this help. Republican election prospects in the short term. Perhaps but what does it mean for. Democracy when a great political institution refuses to accept free and fair election. Results and rejects. Its own who choose principle over party. I have heard from members concerned about her ability to carry out the job as conference chair congresswoman lizzie cheney facing a vote as soon as wednesday to ouster from leadership after criticism of donald. Trump's big lie at the election was stolen and his role in the capital attack. We will not forget what happened on january six and that the single greatest threat to our republic is a president who would put his own self interest above the constitution sherry me writing in the washington post this week. The question before us now is whether we will join trump's crusade to de-legitimize and undo the legal outcome of the twenty twenty election. The house republican leaders have answered. That question you know i. I've lost confidence boosting. New york's elise stefanik who trump has endorsed. My vision is to run with support from the president. What they're saying is if you don't go along with the big lie. You basically need to go so phonic voted with president trump. Just seventy eight percent of the time. Criticizing is border wall opposing him on nafta and trade even voting against his signature. Twenty seventeen tax cuts. Cheney voted with trump ninety three percent of the time once trump critic has been insulting women stefanik became a high profile trump defender during his first impeachment when she opens that mouth you at killing them. Elise trump meanwhile has denounced cheney unremittingly. This week he called her a warmongering fool who has no business and republican party leadership. The good news is in her state. She's been censured all seventeen. Republicans who voted to impeach or convict. Donald trump have faced censure votes or rebukes at home. Utah senator mitt. Romney wants the party's nominee for president booed at a state convention last weekend though the vote to censure him fail.

Cheney Lizzie Cheney Republican Party LIZ Donald Trump Elise Stefanik Romney Mccain Stefanik Washington Post Elise Trump Nafta New York Senator Mitt
Topps to go public through SPAC deal as baseball card company ventures into NFTs

MarketFoolery

02:15 min | Last month

Topps to go public through SPAC deal as baseball card company ventures into NFTs

"Going to start with tops. yes tops. The company best known for baseball cards and bazooka gum is going public with mudrick capital acquisition. Corp so yes people. We have another spac on her hands. Michael eisner who used to be the person running the walt disney corporation is the chairman of tops. Eisner is going to remain in that position. You tell me. What can i interest you in a few shares of tops. Yeah i'm interested. You know chris. I sometimes make fun of so many that are coming out. We all talk about spanky stocks but to me this was because it gives you an entry into the collectibles market now there are some publicly traded collectibles companies funk. Oh comes to mind. They make those great bobblehead collectibles. You can purchase online or in stores but the opportunity to embrace to invest in baseball card. Collectibles is really neat. You know tops is not a small company more. It's been around for a decades sales last year. Rose twenty three percent year over year. Two five hundred sixty seven million bucks. This is going to be not an immaterial deal. The company will have about five hundred seventy one million cat in cash from the merger. I really like that. Tops is branching out into the most cutting edge type of collectible stare into. Nafta's non fungible tokens for those of you who are crypto enthusiasts. They have digital collectibles. I think last month. They introduced a godzilla. And if t collectible so this is not your father your grandfather's tops anymore. And this is what. I like about spags as much as i. I make fun of them personally. Sometimes they're giving you opportunities as investors opportunities to take part in sectors of the economy that we might not be able to aspects of introduced a lot of us to new avenues into alternative investments in the cloud cope. Collectibles market is an alternative investment avenue. That i've been interested for a long time.

Walt Disney Corporation Michael Eisner Baseball Eisner Corp Chris Nafta
How Do Bees Make Honey?

Imagine This

02:09 min | Last month

How Do Bees Make Honey?

"Maddalena. We've got something on our minds. Do you know how bees make honey. Well i depends on what kind of be. We're talking about thousands of times. The kind that makes a lovely honey we eat is called the honey in here on. The flowers is a great place to watch them. Kin hat i wanted to guest on. Wanna get stung either. It's okay to be scared and some people are allergic to bees. So it's good to give them some space but most of the time they won't bother you b.'s. Only sting when this interview. So they want. Think steen if we're dental. They worked day jones. Gangly goes beep gray okay. i'll be right to. What am i doing that. This sucking up poland guns around nba's opioid today house. It flies out to highs it lands on route and seven older. Yes now make a sweet watery. Jews called nectar and b's love it. It is so delicious. I fly from flower. Flower filling up on it and at the same time that also getting convert in poland conlon eater covered coveted pollen if they drink nectar from the flowers. What do they need the pollen for. Well it's all part of a balanced diet babies. They need protein to grow up. Big and strong flower on is full of routing for bees one. The famous growing that don't need protein anymore but they do need sugar for energy. that's why they drink nectar. Okay so they've got their nafta and as much as they can carry nip so whereas all the honey yes you can use would colony cut any

Maddalena KIN Poland Steen Jones NBA
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

WSJ What's News

03:23 min | 2 months ago

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"A digital artwork has set a new record at christie's selling for sixty nine point. Three million dollars that's higher than bids for artwork by frida kahlo and salvador dali. Our ceylan off says the collage by artist. People also set a record for the non fungible token market. She'll explain simply put an. Nf nafta is just this digital token that conveys ownership. so you can think of f. as digital collectibles the idea is that you have this asset online and there is only one owner of it and because of that that gives it some level of scarcity it gives it some value where it gets more technical is the fact that that authenticity is guaranteed through information conveyed on blockchain which is the same technology that underlies bitcoin. It's just saying here. Is these specific. Asset here's data. it was created. Here is the name of the work of art in this case. And here's all of that information preserved so that you can actually track who owns this digital asset because assets online. You know if you have an image you can share it. You can make an. Mimi can do all sorts of things with it and there really hasn't historically been one owner and this lets you do that.

Frida Kahlo Salvador Dali Christie Blockchain Nafta Mimi
Market Power To The Beeple

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:38 min | 2 months ago

Market Power To The Beeple

"So after digital artist mike biebel winkelmann decided to get into the marketplace for tease. He set up an initial auction on an nfc platform called nifty gateway last october. These platforms are sites. That administers the supply of new tees and oversee their exchange and in addition to a couple of individual and. Ft's mike put up for auction. He also set up a kind of price experiment to give us fans cheap way into nfc ownership well also testing out the market. He decided to create a limited set of one hundred identical. Nfc's and to sell them for a dollar a piece. I i knew they were worth more than a dollar. But i thought they were. Maybe worth like maybe fifty or a hundred dollars and so these instantly sold out. And freddie immediately people started trading them because the thing with. Nfc's is you can immediately sort of resell them through the different platforms and because nfc transactions are conducted in the blockchain are all in public view. Blockchain is basically like an open ledger system where everyone can see every time. One of these unique ownership tokens changes hands. And for how much and this technology this wide open. Ledger holds a huge appeal for artists. Because every time an nfc is sold these platforms are able to offer a ten percent cut to people like people as a condition of selling their work in the first place and makes us within hours. People were flipping. Those one dollar tokens for thousands of dollars so fast forward to today those one dollar additions recently. This week sold for three hundred thousand dollars. You know when it resells ten percent is automatically goes into my wallet just to reiterate every time. somebody resells mike's an ts on one of these platforms. He's automatically cut into the deal for ten percent but she points out is a pretty marked improvement from how earnest get paid in the normal art market about a month after that first auction mike set up another. Nafta drop as they're called a series of about twenty separate nafta auctions that he scheduled to play out over the course of a weekend and makes his family win over to his brother's house for a kind of weakened watch party in the backyard. How much have you made by the end of that weekend. In december we it grossed three point five million and then after fees and everything kinda ended up to be about three point three million that i kind of take home not a bad in the backyard. That was a pretty good week. It wasn't too long after the success of those auctions before mike got word that a prominent member of that highfaluting art establishment that had long ignored his kind of art. Wanted to get in on. The action

Mike Biebel Winkelmann NFC Blockchain Mike Freddie Ledger Nafta
New All Time Highs For Bitcoin

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

02:45 min | 4 months ago

New All Time Highs For Bitcoin

"Killing rotten now. Thirty six thousand four hundred one dollars on bitcoin as it stands pushing on to new all time highs six point seven two percent up on the diane starting to come back into that cradles. We saw in two thousand seventeen as we we we do. See these quick snapback pullbacks that the do occur on the markets. And we say that carrying at the mind you know. He's so two days ago that quick snap back It was a twenty percent that twenty seven seven one or twenty seven seven hundred where it pulled back to now. Of course we've moved of a nine thousand dollars since then a that is a sort of place where if you look into bond will bitcoin so bad idea to set some limits whilst also the lacoste in on the way ed just depends on what you're trying to shave now that's via long-term holdings for may of course i'm trying so i'm looking to delacoste averages. Well but on doing that based off the back of profits from the trades. I'm taking now familiar. I haven't had any trends this year. And it's not. Because i haven't been there is because i've been committed to himself and my family. It's going to be a big year. They're always big years but I just wanted to make sure. I had a break. And it's as as i'm still doing bits and pieces at the nine minutes not a clean break. It's nice don't have to be sitting around all day staring at computer computers now with today being a bit of a rainy day a may just because Yeah it's been a while on definitely getting the each. The members in my community have been blowing out doing extraordinarily well sue. Start of theory of now. One thousand one hundred and ninety two dollars up another eight percent today looking very very strong wants to clear out through the highs that were the moment and we get through those levels. And you know what i'm saying at that point is better simplicity and better tried ability not sort of nafta on alexa. It's up ten point nine percent. Beyonce honest pretty dead. It's come very very heavily. It is moving quite frequently out the down than up and down and almost interested. It's up ten point. Six twenty five cents flat. Bitcoin cash has continues to push on came back to test. That three seven hundred level spoke of as resistance tested on the noise pretty much and since then it has run a good seventy bucks. Four hundred fifty dollars so for and fifty one dollars up seven and a half percent just waiting for pull bucks on his low friends law Delap has slowed a little bit but a very very solid trend in dade hundred sixty seven dollars ninety cents five point four percent a off another booming day or the biggest booming dash. We've really had of light. Eighteen point five percent on very keen on now just started kick its engines into into gear on. It's moving very very well. Field and forty four cents eighteen point two seven the senate jose right now across the top ten that he's not the top before.

Nafta Delap Beyonce Dade Senate
Modern and fast APIs with FastAPI

Talk Python To Me

06:00 min | 7 months ago

Modern and fast APIs with FastAPI

"There. Obviously, it's all about consuming API's these days API's are everywhere in a Zappia in there like we integrate with you know however many thousand different. Api In points that you might WanNa work with and IT'S It's all pretty crazy but of course, creating API's is super important. So focusing on that side, how have you seen the evolution of API frameworks come not because the early days that I spoke of it was like things were web frameworks, and then if you wanted, you could somehow manage to put a Web Api in it. Yeah. Absolutely. Excited I. think that's the key difference I think that's The difference. Yeah because yeah. So for example, this framework is basically I don't know I would think it was something like Api I mean obviously, it's in the name, but there's a bunch of them like that these days that are coming out words, the building blocks talk in terms of API's not in terms of web templates and whatnot. Yeah, exactly. So like I guess for a very long time, the more established frameworks inviting specifically have been flask and Jangle. For at the is it will be in Jangly will be JANGLED WRIST FRAMEWORK They're bunch of plug. INS that can be combined together to make something that works very well. The same with general framework visiting is, as you were saying, these frameworks were made mainly to handle templates in the back. So they accept the extra functionality was on dope around the ways that the I was able to do things. So as you were saying like the, there was this bunch of extra frameworks that came afterwards like even of the same thing sort of and they know the a sink wave game with a bunch of all their frameworks past the I, ended up later end up last wave I guess but it was mainly from the learnings of all these reviews. Frames I was using a bunch of those fingers for a long time. A bunch of floggings have combinations trying Wednesday in friend dealer. I had like something that was kind of stable, but it's very difficult to maintain quite fragile. Yeah. You said that you didn't really want to build fast. API finally decided alright. Yeah. I. Need the thing I went to exist so here we go. Yeah I, like the Nemov Hey I build another framework is heaven like every Waco's. And I was trying really hard to avoid that and I was like, no I just find the thing that I'm looking forward on finding. That will do that if we should not that I need and at some point when I was like, yeah, I'm not finding the right thing I found it and it was eight. The I star wasn't thing right atheist our framework build by dungarees. The great guy is in creator of the Framework Yeah exactly successor Django risk framework but from scratch exactly exactly and there's Aba Star Nafta Star was trying to be compatible with. An aggregate sold like the Canonical Standard Specification or interface for web frameworks, which is wealth flask untangle air based on and at the same thing with Ascii, which was the new standard that was also born at Jangle for do wet sockets these asynchronous saints right it's probably maybe we're just pointing out to people who are not deep in the web hosting side like Whiskey is this common API that all the different web frameworks, blast gender and? So, on talk to or implement, and then all the web servers like microwave Guizhou Unicorn. So on know how to talk to anything that does whiskey, and that's how you can run other frameworks on these various web servers. But none of those were capable of supporting ase, INC programming, which is super important for scale ability on the server side because the way that thing was written is incompatible with that, and so there's a new standard I think. Maybe Thomas. Even partially involved in like the finding the standard. Sure but. A SGI FOR ASE INC gateway interface and that's the GI that you're talking about right. So Api star is trying to do both of those things. Yeah. Exactly and complementing or were you were saying like these specifications of how to interact with the server on the on the framework I like totally like quite simple is mainly of one page jobs as like there has to be a function that is going to be cold with these armadillos and is basically that, but then they finding what the shape. Of that function, what are the parameters that is going to save old? That is like the main of interaction between a server like UNICORNS and a framework like flask. So these new Disney will these new standard as he is the one that support for acing weight and all these things and I was trying to have support for both things wild being an API, I framework and having like a bunch of extra features. The Dump Christie added on it was great. I was just trying to have some. Indication ideas to able to integrate them with Aba I themes, and at that point. He was also building starlet, which is the microphone more slash toolkit for building a B. is in asking these new feeling like wave applications of doing whip stuff using these new data. So he's like the bare bones thing is kind of in the middle of flask on a lower level. It will kind of the same things and because he was focusing on that, he had to deprecate most of the Aba Star components like the server components and made it just like. Ceased him on a set of tools to validate scheme us for API's right. Now that point I had found the perfect tool and it had to be deprecated. So I guess. Cute. Like okay. Let's try this. At the same you know that is

Whiskey Zappia Guizhou Unicorn Ase Inc Disney Waco Thomas Christie
A Shop Divided: Union Members Split Over Biden And Trump

Here & Now

04:59 min | 7 months ago

A Shop Divided: Union Members Split Over Biden And Trump

"It's here and now Democratic nominee Joe Biden and met with the president of the United Steelworkers yesterday on a whistle stop tour through Pennsylvania and Ohio. Biden is trying to win back union working class voters in the Midwest that helped President Trump win the election in 2016. The president is making the pitch that he's saved American manufacturing, But there are 66,000 fewer manufacturing jobs in Michigan, compared to July 2019 and 48,000 fewer in Ohio. Let's check in with a few union voters. Now Tim Petrovsky is the president of the United Steelworkers. Local 1900, South Lyon, Michigan. Tim. Welcome here now. Thank you. Thanks for having me Joe Biden, clearly making an effort to reach unions and working class voters in this campaign. But do you think he has a chance to get back some of that support that Democrats lost four years ago? I think he has the opportunity. I think it's a tough climb, but I do believe it can happen. Early on 2016 the manufacturing here in Michigan Steel business. It took a pretty good boom. A lot of that was already building but you know, the credit was given that way. You know, one of the things now, obviously, with the mishandling of the Corona virus and everything, a lot of our shops were shut down. The steel is not what it was promised to be the opportunity to speak with Vice President Biden two weeks ago when he was in doing his tour of Detroit, he met with four of us US W workers in one of the things we talked about was the ways to bring manufacturing jobs back to Michigan, he seemed he had a good plan to bring back good paying union jobs, not just jobs. Like it. Our mill we sell Yusa made pipe in our steals bought here in America, and one of the things he promised was to spend government money on products made in America. Right, so if they're going to use steel, they're going to use our steel. But, you know, I remember one of the very early executive orders that President Trump issued was promised to do just that to use US steel in pipelines, for instance, and he's made a big show of supporting the steel industry. Over the years, President Trump has he's slapped tariffs on Chinese steel. He's blamed People like Joe Biden for supporting trade deals like NAFTA. That he says is outsourced American jobs. I mean, what do you make of the argument that President Trump has been good for the American steel industry? Listen, I'm not goingto sit here and say that I don't believe in the beginning that it It was good. You know, it's a released it appeared that way. You know 16 17 even on into 18. The steel was good. I mean, our shop definitely was on optics. We hired 100 people. So we went from 140 ish people, The 2 50. But here we are 2020 in October now And we're down over 100 people. We actually have less people working than we did during that that rise where we're seeing that union leaders are likely to stick with Democrats this election. Just like they did in 2016, But with the rank and file, Tim, what about that? What? You're hearing from the rank and file your coworkers. The guys you work next to Now that's where it's. It's different. Obviously, the higher ups at the U. S W A W Things like that They support Democratic candidates. But there's a lot of people in our shop 20 years ago, this place would have been 95% Democrats. And now it's really split that I'd probably have to say something like 60 40 Republican over Democrat now, So on a lot of that is because of the up flux we had over the last couple of years. They gave that credit there. But now that you know, we're not working as much with the Corona virus or whatever reason. You know they're not willing to associate the blame as well. Right? So it's a really It's a shop divided anymore with the rank and file. I'm curious when you got to work yesterday were people talking about Tuesday's presidential debate. What? What did you hear from folks? Oh, man, it's ah, you know, as the union president at our shop, knowing that our shop is divided I try to avoid the politics conversation honestly at work, but no, it was. It was the big talk. I mean, that that debate was it was something right. I mean, it was Ah. I think it It was not good on believe not good on both sides here at work, even though Trump supporters were not happy with the way he handled himself. And the Biden supporters here were not happy with the lack of message. So, yeah, I mean, it's it's really divided. Tim Petrosky, president of the United Steelworkers, Local 1900 in south Lie in Michigan. Tim, Thanks for taking time out of your day to speak with us. No problem.

Joe Biden President Trump United States United Steelworkers TIM Michigan Democrats Michigan Steel Tim Petrovsky Vice President South Lyon Midwest Ohio Tim Petrosky America Yusa
Trump warns in Michigan that 'globalist sellout' Biden will send American jobs overseas

Houston's Morning News

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

Trump warns in Michigan that 'globalist sellout' Biden will send American jobs overseas

"The campaign trail. Joe Biden stays in his basement while President Trump goes to Michigan. Joe Biden surrendered your jobs to China. And that we want to surrender our country to the violent left wing mob. And you're seeing that every night Trump carried his America first message to working class folks at his airplane hangar rally in Michigan last night supported every disastrous globalist sellout. For over a half a century, including NAFTA, China and DPP. You know that Joe Biden surrendered your jobs to China. He says that the Michigan voters need to support him in the upcoming November election on November 3rd, Michigan, You better vote for me. I got you so many damn car plants,

Joe Biden President Trump Michigan China Nafta America
Trump says he'll use his own cash to fund his campaign if needed

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

02:01 min | 8 months ago

Trump says he'll use his own cash to fund his campaign if needed

"Finally, there's some talk of. A cash crunch. Now for the trump campaign incumbents generally have a financial advantage but there's reporting that that the trump campaign has raised one point one billion dollars since the beginning of twenty, eight nineteen and has spent more than eight hundred million of that already, and some questioning of why the trump campaign for example, spent money at a super ad long before average voters are tuned. In and meanwhile Jason the Biden campaign raised three, hundred, sixty, five, million dollars in August alone, which is a new one month record for fundraising like that and I. Mean obviously money is not everything trump was outspent in in two thousand sixteen but it's it's interesting to wonder whether the management of these campaigns could play play a role in the dynamic in these last few weeks to. Share and I think you know the Biden people. They have a lot of support in among wealthy people. I think Kamala Harris has been probably a good fundraiser among California's well to do, and so I think you know a lot of a lot of people have decided. that you people who run companies and so on. Have decided that you know they don't want any more of the trump show and I do think that they're going to give Biden a fundraising advantage I saw that the president is thinking about spending. Hundred million dollars of his own money by. You know I think I think that that's that that's a red flag for him. If he doesn't have enough if they don't have enough, for example, the contest in Michigan Nafta books on other states and that's also. Going back to what Kim said about the Senate not just going to hurt the president but hurt Republican chances in the Senate if the trump campaign has to pull back in be more selective about where they're spending.

Biden Donald Trump President Trump Senate Kamala Harris KIM Jason California Michigan
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 8 months ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

Erin Burnett OutFront

03:47 min | 8 months ago

A Kennedy is on the ballot in Massachusetts. Here's why he's not guaranteed a victory.

"And out front up next we're. Just. From one of the most closely watched primaries this year a young Kennedy on the ballot in Massachusetts but can he unseat a seventy four year old incumbent? Because it's about ideas I am the youngest guy. In. This race. Tonight and the fight for twenty twenty a usual dynamic emerging Massachusetts ahead of tomorrow's Democratic Senate primary. The incumbent in his seventies was support from progressives, his challenger young and Kennedy Manu. Raju is out front. The Hiroshima Political Dynasty the grandson of the leap Robert F Kennedy campaigning to serve in the Senate like his famous great uncles and grandfather before him the. Certainly. I think you're doing great job. Hello. The candidate he's right there. For Life Magazine. Thirty nine year old Joe. Kennedy is facing something unexpected. Seventy four year old senator who has been in Congress for almost forty four years. Has Managed to galvanize support of young voters. Ahead of Tuesday's Massachusetts Senate primary I think that a lot of young people that are our age at least. From from our town have been similarly really inspired by Ed Markey polls show Senator Ed Markey as the favourite threatening to make the four term. The first Kennedy to lose a race in Massachusetts unlike other primaries this year were democratic incumbents have been ousted by liberal newcomers. Marquis has managed to turn that dynamic on its head because it's about ideas. I am the youngest guy. In this race Alexandria, it's been murky seizing the mantle of the insurgent, touting his support of liberal causes at the green new deal and endorsement of the progressive firebrand. Alexandria Cossio Cortes such the green new deal that I introduced Alexandria Cossio. Healthcare justice is on the ballot. That's Medicare for all that I next the Bernie. Sanders. When he introduced it yet, it's been Kennedy with the badging of the party establishment leader Speaker Nancy Pelosi Allies have been frustrated that marquee has not been held to account for full record over four decades like his backing of the Iraq war in two thousand and two the NAFTA deal in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three, his position on racial issues like school desegregation dating back to the nineteen seventies progressive willing to look those hurdles that's up to a progressive movement. Out. I think an awful lot of folks in many parts of Massachusetts have a different view of that records and what that means to our communities after going door to door in working class Boston neighbors weekend. Kennedy. Accused Marquis of abandoning the state. He's been less time in the state than anybody else delegation in an interview with CNN Marquis fired back there is. No real record of Congressman Kennedy in his eight years leading on issues of of generational change in Washington Kennedy has waited until late in the campaign to stress that it's his family I. Guess It's a fighting. His blood wants to continue in the Senate tried to be really clear that it's GonNa Balance It's not my father, my grandfather brothers or anybody else and. You vote for me you're going to get now Kennedy does pull off an upset on Tuesday night it could be thanks in part to the fact that he is allies have spent more on television advertising than Markey and his allies roughly two million dollars more. But if he loses what Kennedy will do next still an open question we posed that question to him he didn't want to entertain it and said, he looks forward to running through the finish line and celebrating on Tuesday night.

Congressman Kennedy Kennedy Manu Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey Robert F Kennedy Marquis Massachusetts Senate Senate Democratic Senate Alexandria Cossio Alexandria Hiroshima Political Dynasty Senator Life Magazine Raju CNN Speaker Nancy Pelosi Iraq Sanders
Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:10 min | 8 months ago

Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

"Jesse Thorn. Our guest is Alex Winter you probably know him best as bill from bill and Ted along with Keanu reeves he starred in bill and Ted's excellent adventure bill and Ted's bogus journey and the brand new movie bill and Ted face the music. Alex is also a director who's made several documentaries. His latest just came out a couple of months ago it's called show biscuits. It features interviews with former child stars about how their time working in the entertainment industry affected them. Let's get back to the conversation. There's a lot in this in this movie also about parenthood and the ties that bind to their and in particular how children kind of actualize the dreams of their parents in some ways for good and bad. I saw that theme also and show Biz kids. Your documentary that made me wonder if you saw parallel there to do you find that particularly compelling. I was raised by two artists. My parents were modern dancers. My mom had company in London, which is where I was born in my dad ultimately had a company in the Midwest. which is still going on when we moved to the states house quite young. I started out as a child actor professionally by like nine or ten I was working professionally by twelve thirteen I was in two long running probably shows back-back. Took me all the way into college so. My relationship to. My parents and to my family and the complexity of that and this idea of I wouldn't call destiny. That's the sort of of the movies that. But you know this idea of expectation and what is your life supposed to be, and of course, it's never going to be that and it shouldn't be that and and and how do the children affects the parents? How do the parents affect the children and of course now I'm a dad and so how'd now it's a triple layer cake right And Those are all those drams or fusing together and crazy ways and I had really wanted to make a film that allowed people who had experienced this firsthand meaning people that come up as child actors. I wanted them to be able to express the very nuanced layers of of that experience. Intimately I just had not seen that done and I had. you know obviously had done it myself in private, but I'd never kind of attacked at. So you that was very satisfying to be able to make and it was really odd to try to make show Biz because for the first time about ten years ago I couldn't find financing and it was exactly the concept. So it was very very strange to. Lovely. But strange to start making the film, shoot a bunch of interviews go away, make bill and Ted be dealing with you know Ted's problems with his dad our issues with our daughters live and our destiny that didn't end up the way it was supposed to in how did that impact everybody and you know, and then of course, like acting for the first time gangs I left act the acting business in after doing Dylan Ted to really Very consciously, and so acting again and I'm making a movie about child actors about parents and their children and it was it was like Oh did this all really need to happen at once was that necessary? I my Gosh. Every aspect of my entire life right now. So Yeah it was lovely and heavy Frankly yeah. Tell me about that decision to kind of I. Think you said, disappear for a minute and then come back and be doing more behind the scenes work than acting. Well. We talk about it in in show Biz kids and it's really not uncommon. It's. It's you know I had started acting I had a very, very public life from around ten years old to about twenty five on nonstop even through college. I was still acting on TV and doing commercials and TV shows. Nonstop and after bill and Tattoo amid and other film called freaked I was just psychologically. I was just worn out and I knew. That I was not I had some friends around me that were crashing hard at a couple that actually died. It was a pretty heavy scene. For Lot of us that had come up because we're all around the same age. So a lot of us were trying to transition from from you know sort of youth in the business too young adult business. We're not having the best time of it and and at the same time I gone to film school and was very very committed to my work as a writer director But it you know for me, I needed to make a conscious decision to get out of the public eye and just go live some normal life and I didn't feel like I'd really gotten to do that through pretty. Formative Adolescence and postal license and. Evan Rachel Wood speaks about this really well in the in the movie sodas will we? All everyone had the same experience I was sitting across from Diana Kerry, the hundred year old woman who was baby peggy, and she literally laid out my entire life story was completely jaw dropping. And that's what had happened to her when she had to really figure life out and she had to get away from the business and. And just be in the world and that's what I did I left. I left my acting representation and I moved and started a production company in London and I just shot commercials and wrote scripts and had a kid and live like regular Joe and. Got My head together and did some growing up and when I felt comfortable again, I started training again to act that was a while ago I just wanted to act for myself I didn't WanNA act. NAFTA, worry about it for paycheck I trained for a long time and it was just coincidentally had started kind of rumble back into life. But it was really lovely. It was a great way to come back can't owner. He's like, what am I, very, very dearest and closest friends in the world and. Everyone on that sat was family and if they weren't, they were really gracious and very happy to be there. So it was extremely sweet environment to step back into but Yeah, it was fun. But I I guess I needed the twenty five year break I I took it.

Dylan Ted Alex Winter Jesse Thorn London Director Nafta Keanu Reeves Evan Rachel Wood Midwest. Diana Kerry Peggy Writer JOE
Why We Need International Students

Why It Matters

06:18 min | 9 months ago

Why We Need International Students

"And. We've been planning to do an episode on national students visas and the education system for the past few months. It seems like an underreported topic that people should know more about, but then it became part of the news. Students. Who the schools plan to online only classes in the fall, we'll have to transfer or leave the country or face possible deportation several prestigious American universities are now suing the trump administration the trump administration back down but I don't think it's the end for what we might save from this administration. You could be forgiven for thinking that student visas classic partisan issue in American politics liberals pushing for cultural diversity in a more open society while conservatives warn of dangerous to national security American jobs. But the real story is quite different for decades Republicans and Democrats agreed that a steady pipeline of the world's best minds into American. Universities is essential for our economy innovation and competitive advantage. But the rest of the world it was a system that largely worked. The trump administration has taken a different perspective and the pipeline of international students in into American businesses, hospitals and research facilities has begun to constrict as this happens other nations have begun picking up the slack. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today international students and American competitiveness under threat. All right. So I'm a student in another country. Why do I want to come to school in the United States? I mean if you look at the list of the world's one, hundred best universities more than half of those are in the United States you know if you come here and you graduate with a degree from top American University, that's worth a tremendous amount throughout your life. My name is Edward Alden. I'm a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations I'm also the Ross distinguished visiting professor at western Washington University in Bellingham Washington. All is a leading voice on immigration innovation and US competitiveness. He spends a lot of time studying the contributions of immigrants to the US economy. secondarily, even if you're not coming to the best institutions in the United, states has a global reputation as a dynamic innovative place, and if you were a talented ambitious foreign students, it's a place you wanna be mean finally education is in English and English remains the universal language of business. So. To the extent that you come out from an American education with a strong grass with the English language. That's something also going to be very helpful in your life. There are liberal arts colleges, their research institutions, institutions, large and small that can cater to many different types of learning and covering many different styles. My name is extra Brenner. Director and CEO OF NAFTA THE ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS So, bright soon around the world know they can come here and get a great education, and perhaps the most exciting things is the dynamism of the American classroom. That is very rare that idea of having an interactive classroom where students and professors are talking to each other where the learning is shared it's not just the professor lecturing I'll tell you as someone who is a former professor I, love that environment and indeed it something where we even put out a publication on introduction to the American classroom to help students get used to the idea that they will have to defend their ideas. Okay. so you decide you want to come to school in the US how does the system actually work? What are the options for getting a visa? Well you need to be admitted to the university that you wish to attend. So that's the same thing in American student would face. You have to apply to the university and right your admissions essay all the things that American students do when they want to attend a university. So if you are admitted than you need to apply for what's called an F. One student visa, the visa does not allow you to remain in the United States permanently does not allow you to work for income with some exceptions while you're in the United States temporary visa that permits you to come here and study. Alongside the F one, there are also J. One visas and a few other lesser known options together they account for roughly one point, one, million foreign students in the US for anyone who's done it or help someone do it? You know that apply to college is not easy even with some assistance from family or a guidance counselor. For an international student, it also means traveling to an embassy or consulate in their home country and going through a meticulous and costly process to get a visa. And, it isn't as though they get to breathe a sigh of relief once they're accepted or even after they arrive. For many students may be their first time out of their home country. Maybe their family has all saved up their money to send the bright child to the US that's a big commitment by the child in the family when they get to the United States, their institutions, of course, comply with the law and some people may not realize but every international student is actually in effect tracked by institution and there is an official. At each institution that has to know where that student is and be able to file documentation on them. So unlike any other visitor to the United States business travelers only international students are actually recorded and tracked with that level of detail. So the student has a lot of obligations a lot of costs and their institutions have additional obligations as well. It's a big commitment of very big commitment, but it's a life changing

United States American University Donald Trump Council On Foreign Relations Gabrielle Sierra Republicans United Western Washington University F. One Edward Alden Professor Distinguished Visiting Profess Nafta Brenner Senior Fellow Bellingham Washington Ross Official Director
The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 9 months ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
Google's Nearby Share goes live

All About Android

05:01 min | 9 months ago

Google's Nearby Share goes live

"I'm Jason. Howell. And I'm Ron Richards. And I'm a very flustered, Florence I on today's. Days in it. Street. They're not only in the android world, but just like in life. It has been a three time and honestly I do feel like after a couple of weeks of like slow Android News, all of a sudden, the past two days like I could not keep the plates spinning. I, was like Whoa and this and this. and. It's not because tomorrow. Me and James Nafta to get up early. Wait this way me and Jason have to get up early. It's going to be regular time for you. There's a Samsung, event. Yeah. It's GonNa be nuts like seven am and mind you like as I've said, many times at this point, he probably sick appearing me say my podcast studio station is in our bedroom. So it's basically like kicking failure, the roof before had so that I can make sure that I'm up at ready for seven. Am Call to follow Samsung News which there's going to be a lot. So I'm definitely looking forward to, but what a week from Samsung to Pixel, which we'll talk about later. This is a big. I mean. We've got so much phone news happening right now. It's kind of ridiculous. I mean, it's really weird after what has been a quiet summer like it is just like it went from zero to sixty late yesterday after job total. Good. which is Kinda normal riot. Usually, it seems like about the time of the the note event is win this next phase of the phone season kicks in, and then at this point, we don't hear from Google until like Tober, but this time that's different. Anyway, we're. We're spoiling the the the ending here or at least the middle. Before, we get there. We've got some news to talk about taking us to the news. please. We have a week purchased doesn't even violence? Say it. I don't blame them at all. I, don't blame me at all burke. Let's get into the news like we said it's been head-spinning these past couple of days. We'll get to the pixel stuff in the hardware blocks of stay tuned. We haven't forgotten about that but I off. One of the hotly anticipated things all summer in the world of android. In fact, a couple of weeks ago. When Dave Burke from android. From Google and Android was on the show, he teased that nearby share file sharing aspect of android would be rolling out soon, and soon is today how about that? So, basically, if you're familiar with IOS airdrop this airdrop for android. It's file share between ANDROID devices. You can share files, images, links, etc. Through fast transfer process. You can select your visibility determine who can see you and share with WHO and who can't It does work off line, which is fascinating. Transfers by either Bluetooth, Bluetooth L. E. Web RTC, or peer to peer Wifi, whichever is fast as and you can check out hands on android episode twenty, one for deep dive into the new feature, which I'm sure we'll get you as Jason goes deep into file sharing with nearby sharing. Jason. What is your experience in nearby sharing? Is it? What is it living up to the hype? I. Think, Yeah. I think in in my experience with it and try and I should I should stay that really I've only used it around the time when I was creating the hands on android episode. So I haven't found myself in a situation since then or like I needed to use nearby sharing to send a file to myself and I certainly haven't found myself in a situation where I'm sharing directly like with my wife like quite frankly we're not going anywhere. So we're just here. Why, don't you just send her files Willy Nilly because think about it. That can be fun. We have nothing going on right now, and you know your everyone's stuck at home and you know. Why not send her random files, sent her gifts in memes through the nearby share and. Response like I. think that's a good idea. I'll ask her to set it up because it would be weird if I just set it up and started dropping are things that suddenly appeared out of nowhere. It up and it'll be it'll be a nice way to kind of lighten the load on weeks such as this one but. was going to say about nearby sharing is in my time playing with it. For that episode hands on Android I tested transferring a good amount of files, large files, small files, and yet it works pretty seamlessly. Just kind have to do the work in advance of setting it up to say, Hey, I, trust this person's device, and then if you happen to have your device near near an that person's device at any given point, you can get a little notification. Notification. That says, Hey. So and so's nearby and it makes it really easy for you just tap and share directly to them because you've all you both already kind of open those gates to say, yes, this is possible.

Jason Samsung Dave Burke Google James Nafta Ron Richards Samsung News Howell Florence Willy Nilly Tober
Trump, Lopez Obrador visit is about trade, but politics too

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:18 sec | 10 months ago

Trump, Lopez Obrador visit is about trade, but politics too

"President Trump will be welcoming Mexico's president under his Manuel Lopez Obrador to the White House today to celebrate a new North American trade deal. The U. S. Mexico Canada Agreement replaces the 19 nineties NAFTA deal that effectively eliminated tariffs between the nations. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is skipping the meeting.

President Trump U. S. Mexico Canada Agreement Manuel Lopez Obrador Justin Trudeau Mexico Prime Minister White House
White People Talking About Whiteness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:52 min | 11 months ago

White People Talking About Whiteness

"Guys many, if not most white people don't think of themselves as racialist race, we might tell ourselves is a reality for people who have different skin colors than ours Black People Hispanic people, Asian people, Indigenous People, etc, but of course white is a race. Quick important side note here. Race is not a biological thing. It is socially constructed. Sadly the white people who seem to have most clearly grasped that white is race or white nationalists. But now it is time for the rest of US white people to actually see whiteness and to talk to each other about it. This many people in the racial justice world would argue. Is the key first step toward white people engaging fully in creating a more equitable society. My guest today is Eleanor Hancock. She's the executive director of group called White, awake which employs and I'm quoting here educational resources and spiritual practices. To engage white people and I'm quoting here again in the creation of just and sustainable society an quote. Eleanor was recommended to me by seven Selassie, who's one of the court teachers on the ten percent happier APP, and was on the show last week, and really powerful episode which I recommend you check out. In this episode Eleanor, and I talk about why this work is so important. Why so many white people resist it? The barriers white people face when they actually do begin the work. The role of meditation, and the problematic aspects of white woke kness in the discussions here we go eleanor Hancock. Nice to meet you virtually. Thanks again for doing this absolutely. So I'd be curious to hear how you came to this work. How and why you can't? I would star with just a little bit about my background and the different stages in my life that have led up to it. I grew up in West Texas. kind of a mid sized city very conservative environments. I'm solid GENENTECH's so I, didn't I was we had an integrated public school system? But that said there's I think a lot of kind of just default segregation that happens socially so I developed awareness of the differences that folks of color the differences of their experiences in the united. States in particular verses, my experience as a white person that began to happen for me in graduate school. It was a variety of different circumstances that led to that. One of them like. Having a roommate that was reading the autobiography of Asada Shukor, and just realizing I, knew about I knew about Amnesty International and that there could be folks who are imprisoned for political reasons, but I it was shocking to me to realize that was something that happened here in the United States, and then the other thing is very influential to me to jump in I. Hate interrupting my guest, but it might be worth explaining a little bit of a Sasha core in that back story just oh! So she's. Part of the Black Panthers and during this entire time period where the FBI. was, targeting civilians through their coin tell pro program and a lot of just extreme aggression on many different levels, including the outright murder of Fred Hampton while he was sleeping in his bed at night, and it was a really it was a political assassination, and during that time period they were able to capture Asada and create these charges against her that kept her in prison for a long time and. She escaped to Cuba. All of that history I would really encourage people to read about that. You can look up quantel pro and the FBI and understand. The destruction that occurred to a lot of the movements that brought a so much during the sixties, the fifties, sixties and seventies the ways that they were destroyed. And part of what happens when you infiltrate and destroy a movement from within is. All only harm it. Externally you create so much paranoia and violence within that then people also began to destroy one another in different ways, so in terms of my own. You know just how I came to this work I try not to Belabor the story too much, but I was in a series of classes and graduate school with a Chicano professor who was teaching performance our, and this was in the late nineties and I really. Learned a lot about what at the time we would have simply called identity politics through art. So. Yeah, being part of those performance art classes for the entire time. I was in graduate school, was really an eye opener that was also during this apetit Easter rebellion, and so we were all just starting to get online, and that was part of it was incredible about that time period. APETIT ZAPPA of southern Mexico, who are indigenous people who had risen up against their own governments specifically in response to Nafta the North American. Free Trade Agreement. And there are a lot of aspects of my world view that developed during that time period, and then as I lived in my life. You know I have a biracial daughter. Her father's African American during the time that we were married I had the privilege of spending a lot of time with his family and developing strong relationships with them, and experiencing myself as the minority I think that that's a unique experience that not every a lot of people don't have that opportunity to be inside of somebody else's space racially speaking and have to understand their norms and their experience and adapt to that. I think that's a really valuable experience.

Eleanor Hancock White United States Apetit Zappa Asada Shukor Genentech Black Panthers FBI Quantel Executive Director West Texas. Selassie Mexico Fred Hampton Cuba Amnesty International Professor Murder
"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The new Nafta deal is done and being welcomed as a win win win really the US rush is it exporting US goods. Mexico isn't exporting goods. Candidates and exploited Canadian goods were exporting goods. Gives the thing about the big trade deal we also known as the US MCA. We don't really know yet how different it is from the old Nafta Air. Lots the bad things that were originally NAFTA STOLNIS deal. The big question is is it better enough to try and stop the damage also in Madrid this week. Climate activists want to know who's taken the lead now that the US is not the EU China cooperation in this context. Because more important I'm Marco Werman those stories and more today. You're on the world I'm Marco Marco Werman. This is the world it took some time but the deal got done Nafta two point Oh also known as the US MCA officials from the US. Canada and Mexico met to finalize a deal in Mexico City where US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer described it. This way. The resolved I think is the best trade agreement agreement in history together. All of our teams did this. And it's something that's going to bake North America richer. It's going to make America. Richard is GonNa make Canada richer. And it's going to make Mexico richer. The deal still has to be passed by legislators all three countries but what does the US MCA a change from. The Old Nafta will have used from all three partners to the deal starting here in the. US Lori Wallace is with Public Citizen and Consumer Advocacy Group in Washington. She gave me her. Take on. Who Wins and who loses with Nafta two point? Oh the winners. Are Ostensibly the Working People in North North America if it works after twenty six years of Nafta we see wages in Mexico lower than before Nafta and forty percent lower than manufacturing wages in China this has drawn a billion. US government certified million outsourced US jobs so the goal was to try and stop. Stop some of that damage so in your opinion is the US MCA better for us. Workers and consumers than NAFTA. It's better than the original Nafta in that. The outrageous investor state dispute settlement system where multinational corporations can sue against domestic environmental and health laws. Does it get unlimited compensation from taxpayers. That outrageous regime is largely removed from Nafta the big open question question is are the environmental and labor standards and their enforcement strong enough to stop Nafta's original sin of job outsourcing the main sticking points for House Democrats were environmental concerns are also labor rights and costs of pharmaceuticals. What specifically were? They worried about. Well the problem with Nafta after dirty little secret is it's not mainly about trade sets up all kinds of rights and privileges for corporations and so the Democrats were trying to get the bad things things out of Nafta and to add affirmative labor and environmental standards that basically set a floor of conduct but again this is an agreement about fixing existing bad agreement. And trying to mealy rate it's ongoing damage. This is not the template for a good modern agreement. It's it's better to have a better agreement than the agreement you know is dreadful but it's outstanding question about whether the new agreement is going to make enough of a difference and and if not I think there's going to be clamoring two or three years to renegotiate again. Laurie Wallich Public Citizen with the consumer advocacy take on the US S. MCA north of the border. The Canadian government is taking a victory lap. Here's deputy prime minister. Christiaan freeland all of us together have finally accomplished accomplished what we.

US Nafta Mexico North North America Marco Marco Werman MCA Canada Mexico City Canadian government Madrid Consumer Advocacy Group Christiaan freeland Lori Wallace Laurie Wallich prime minister China Washington Robert Lighthizer Richard
"nafta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:42 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi Adrienne Hi Jamie welcome to you front burner. It's nice to have you here. Yeah it's good to be here okay. So let's do this use Macara I I guess that's how we're pronouncing it smack. I can go with a AH. US MCA. I have to admit I tried to follow this story. Like the old you know iterations of the story all the updates dates and I I found myself kind of falling off of that so I'm really happy that you're here today and hopefully you explain it to me first of all you know why. Why should I care about you smack? I guess the main thing is yeah the actual details of it can be pretty Nerdy and Waukesha specific specifics. Cool I'm I'm into that but yeah yeah some people are But I think you know like the the overarching kind of the the reason it's important is that governs earns over a trillion dollars worth of trade between Canada the US and Mexico and so basically what it did what. When Nafta was first brought into to force and in Nineteen ninety-four Bassi got rid of just about all the tariffs between those three countries which basically meant that it was much easier and much cheaper to trade goods back and forth across all all three countries Bush could bring more jobs and prosperity? We are creating the largest richest and most productive market in the entire world. The stretches five thousand miles from Alaska and the Yukon to the Yucatan Peninsula. It might it might seem like this kind of academic exercise but the basic like like you know some total of it is that it makes consumer products Exactly talking about here just about everything I mean. Cars for instance are one of the the big examples that was one that came up all the time during you know during these negotiations basically you know this made it possible for companies building cars to create supply chains across all three countries. C- you say okay. I can get this part made most efficiently and most Raymond Michalik in right exactly right. So he's like I can get this specialty thing done in Canada. I can get this this other this intellectual property this computer chip whatever Designing the United States I get the frame in Mexico. I can put them all together into a car. And that's much cheaper than say okay. We have to do all of this in Canada or more likely. You know if we didn't have this deal. We we have to all this in the US and then exported into into Canada through a tariff barriers. So Ben we would have to pay a ton of taxes on it and then it would be more expensive for us. Exactly that's right and so the idea is that you know. On top of the the goods being cheaper it just makes the economy more efficient which essentially means as you know overall essentially more jobs more you have more disposable income that you're not spending on that car that you bought and so then you can spend it on other goods and services you know in in Toronto in your in your community That's GONNA create more jobs. Okay perfect and I should say we've been calling it used Bac I use. Mika like the Canadians are also calling it. Cousteau now the Kennedy. US Mexico Mexico Agreement on trade so just for people listening because by all these names you can call it. I guess whatever you want okay. So you know you've just painted a very helpful system that makes goods cheaper for us. But Donald Trump came out guns blazing after he was elected. One of the worst deals ever made by any country having to do with economic development economic undeveloped as far as our countries can why did he think that the Nafta that we had before was such a lousy deal basically he blamed Nafta and trade deals generally for taking manufacturing jobs out of the United States. His argument was that not because of Nafta because it suddenly became cheaper to import things from Mexico that that meant all these factory jobs had left the four Mexico so we let people go we fire fire everybody they make cars. They make products that make everything in another country. They send them into the United States noattacks and he may he may be partly correct in that in the sense that you know traders. It's one of many many different factors including automation. Yeah exactly and just like the general kind kind of globalization of the economy over the last twenty thirty years that have have led to these kinds of shows manufacturing base. What he didn't sort of appreciate was that yes maybe maybe the auto jobs left the US and went to Mexico but there are other jobs that are replaced them in the innovation economy in the other things that people are spending money on because they have the money left over after buying a cheaper car but in his mind all that really mattered? Were these manufacturing jobs and Elson is mind he felt that the the primary culprit and maybe the only culprit your worthies trade deals. And that's why he wanted some basically he on. The campaign trail vowed to either radically overhaul NAFTA or completely to get a much better matter. Deal for America and we'll walk away if we don't get that kind of a deal with the notion that this would magically make all of Seabees factory jobs leave Mexico and come back to the US okay so very negative You know in his campaign and after he's elected and he wanted to clawback Aubrac big parts of Nafta you know they've had a deal for a year. Now what did he generally succeed at doing. First of all he promised just sort of radical a radical. Overhaul of Nafta and you smack it is not that you know you smack. Actually preserves a good probably eighty percent or so maybe ninety percent even of what was in the original Nafta's the basic the basic framework of of no tariffs Free Trade Virginia three countries all that was successfully preserved on by Canada and Mexico at the bargaining table. What what he did get in? US MCA were a few changes. Basically meant to give the US advantage over Mexico and the single largest one was he essentially got a rule rule. Put in that said you know between forty and forty five percent of everything that goes into making a vehicle. Within North America has to come from factories where workers are paid at least sixteen eighteen dollars an hour because Mexican auto workers make about three or four bucks an hour typically most cases that basically that this would give factories in in the US mostly but it also candidate or certain extent advantage over over workers over factories in Mexico and so that was kind of meant Basically Constrain Mexico a little bit you know give us a little bit more of an incentive to to put their plants in the US. Does that make like cars more expensive for US presumably. Yeah it's such a small change in some ways to very specific thing that I'm not sure I'm not sure you're going to see I a massive effect from that. Yes that's the notion that it will it will all to make vehicles a bit more expensive.

Mexico United States Nafta Canada Adrienne Toronto Donald Trump Alaska Raymond Michalik Yucatan Peninsula North America Mika Yukon Ben Bassi Elson Bush Cousteau
"nafta" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Big 98

"NAFTA school. Scene. What's new and next with the Sunday morning news? Nashville is number one for new country. Day starts with the cows. For. Ready? So she's never. Camphor? Gets then. Canner? It scares me. That she dragged. Draft me. Crazy. Amaze me. Dance chances. Tracey's berry. On me. Plans for the weekend. Cain way to go. Juicy changes. Stay on the couch. She falls asleep. Crazy. Amaze me away. Chances anyway. Snow? Hey. Beautiful. Crazy. Easy. Crazy. Crazies phone a. Crazies beautiful. Can be cool seeing that guy the twenty one thousand nine hard country fest over in Texas, Tim McGraw, Danny shea Bobby bonds, and the raging idiots will all be there too. Big eight nationals number one.

tim mcgraw nationals texas nashville nafta
"nafta" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on Latino USA

"The Mexican government has declared diabetes a national health emergency. And it's imposed a tax on soda while. It's trying to improve both prevention and medical care. It's also trying things like this. Super Zuma classes or if you can't make it to class. There are fifteen minute move it sessions, you could do during your breaks at work. There's an ideology there's an understanding of the onset of disease that basically places it as a problem of personal behavior. And no point by the way, do I kind of I think, you know, make a causal argument that NAFTA causes diabetes. But what I what I am trying to point out is that all of these things are happening in the same timeframe, and the explanations that were being handed or not satisfactory. There are also Mexicans who say that NAFTA has actually made Mexicans healthier. What do you say to that? So there's an idea that is quite commonly held among those who see NAFTA's being a really wonderful shift for the Mexican economy. There are those who basically say that diabetes and obese. City are diseases of prosperity. And that if a policymaker needs to you know, assess the difference between diseases prosperity and diseases of poverty that who wouldn't want to die of disease of prosperity, right? So better die of diabetes because that means that you've had a lot to eat and lot of sweet stuff then to die feeling hungry and in poverty, right? Throughout the campaign. I promise to renegotiate NAFTA. And today we have kept that promise the US Mexico and Canada are now in the process of establishing a new trade agreement with incredible new US, Mexico Canada agreement called US MCA sort of just works MCI, but all of these public health issues that we've been talking about they're not a main concern in the negotiations between the trade representatives. Still a leash. Gotta this wants people to understand how something as complicated and as huge as NAFTA can affect individual people's lives. People don't think this has anything to do with them. And they think that it's such an obscure kind of trade deal that Sperry wonky and difficult to to understand how it kind of relates to our lives. And so I think this is one way to get at it. You know that it's. On our plates. And it's in our bodies. Thank you so much for joining us on the USA..

NAFTA diabetes Mexican government US Zuma Sperry Mexico Canada MCI fifteen minute
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And this is with both its improvements and it's and it's actual worsening this is another version of nafta this is not any type of reinvention which you know trump would have you believe the rebrand he's trying to make the claim that he has totally replaced nafta this is not the transformation replacement of the napa model it should be called nafta two point oh the question and the test in the end is can we get the additional improvements made so that this agreement its revised version if in the end can be a deal that can stop some of nafta serious ongoing damage so if this were blank slate like with t._p._p. where you either had into agreements where you didn't have a new agreement this agreement would not be something people be fighting to make better necessarily differences we gotta nafta in place it's causing ongoing damage every damn week every week more middle class jobs are being outsource and here's the thing we don't begrudge people in mexico good job the problem is nath is like a machine that turns middle-class jobs into sweatshop job because jobs in mexico pay a buck fifty to two dollars an hour for jobs that folks in the u._s. we're getting paid fifteen twenty twenty five dollars an hour for and by the way it's not just manufacturing i mean the newest thing is like a._t. and t. is putting a big.

trump t. napa nafta mexico fifteen twenty twenty five dol two dollars
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Right direction also some horrible nafta rules force countries to export natural resources that they wanted to conserve was removed some actual trade rules that allowed a lot of products basically made in china to sneak through under the nafta duty free benefits were tightened up that's important and interesting new rules added that for products to get the nafta benefits a portion of automobiles value has to be made by workers making sixteen dollars an hour or more that's first time that wage levels had been linked to market access that's super important another big fix was a big problem on urano nafta of basically requiring trucks and mexico and canada that didn't meet u._s. environmental or safety standards they had to be allowed on you it's roads back got removed so now the safety standards and also the worker driver that worker driver our safety rules all that stuff can be reapplied so those are important improvements the problem is that the environmental and labor improvements needed to get rid of to at least lessen the incentives to outsource jobs are not yet sufficient and they added new monopoly rights for big pharma so i wanna get yeah we'll get those i want to actually before we get to that what are specifically the new monopoly rights for big pharma so here's what the agreement dead it has it has rules that would guarantee for pharmaceutical corporations that basically forever 'cause trade even generally don't have termination periods the new nafta does have a six year review provisions which is important corporations hate it there is a way that it can be sunset it's not easy to use but the current nafta goes on forever and improvement in the new agreement is there is this review impossible onset but basically lost a country got out there would be forever a requirement that all governments provide the pharmaceutical companies the exact policies now in place in the u._s. that caused the high prices so for instance ten years of what's called marketing exclusivity for what are called biologic medicines those are all the cutting edge new drugs that are used to treat cancer diabetes.

china nafta mexico canada cancer sixteen dollars ten years six year
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Not all being polio night welcome back to the majority report michael brooks here joining us now is lori wallach she's the director of public citizen's global trade watch and twenty five year veteran of congressional trade battles starting with one thousand nine hundred fight over nafta i did want to say i just because in your bio i mentioned in the office this morning during prep that when i was i think i was about you know about fifteen or sixteen years old i went to my one of my first major protests and it was a world bank i._m._f. protest i think in two thousand and i remember i was probably reading some your articles in the nation and it's talking with you thanks for being here i was only twelve when i wrote those no i know you were precocious you are known as called you the child prodigy of global trade critiques remember that so now you're now yeah i mean i it was embarrassing actually because i said my god she's twelve years old and five years old and her and she's already writing great critiques of the general and on trade and tariffs in the nation now with after getting renegotiated now getting renegotiated can you give us a history of nafta before we get to the renegotiations whereas this trade agreement come from where did it start what was agreed to in the nineties the short version of it is that nasa effectively hijacked the the concept of trade agreements and use them branding to implement set of binding international rules that created a whole set of new rights empowers for corporations and limited government rights to regulate on a lot of things unrelated to trade so when senator elizabeth warren talks about corporate rid trade agreements that is precisely accurate in that prior to nafta trade agreements dealt with cutting border taxes call tariffs on physical goods that would cross borders so any imported product with nasa the corporations who under u._s. procedures had a special insider role there are more than five hundred official corporate advisors to the nafta negotiations and with a closed door process congress in the press and public reluctant out they affectively hijacked that process no one was paying a lot of attention to border taxes fell asleep thinking about it insert a whole different agenda so nafta became this incredibly elegance trojan horse where for instance the pharmaceutical industry inserted new monopolies anti competitive rules in a free trade agreements to give them protections against competition from generic medicines to keep drug prices high who are the agribusiness industries can the rules that that got rid of the policies had been in place for fifty years that said imported food had to meet u._s. standards not anymore under nafta and all the companies that are looking to outsource production to export lua wages in mexico got a whole set of special investor protections and privileges that basically made it much less risky and cheaper to outsource jobs and that whole package got sold as trade and the results that louis have been even more devastating than the coalition of environmental and labor and family firm and consumer groups and progressive democrats who fought in the early nineties predicted so can we just we'll get back to specifically nafta second but i mean this is also part of a whole kind of broader set of global trade regime that were particularly prevalent in the nineties like i'm thinking of of gatt general green and on trade and tariffs but then also very similar to the obama administration pushing t._p._p. and i wanna just put one other thing on the table just briefly because your work i think always showed this because you were an are so good at basically yeah i mean translating technical things that seem really boring but actually big impact on everybody's life and there's this new scholarship from quin slow dane slobodan excuse me and i'm forgetting the name of his book but he his argument is basically that when we say when we accept the neo liberal or nasal lazy fair ideas that they're advocating for less government less interference.

michael brooks twenty five year sixteen years twelve years fifty years five years
"nafta" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"So this new deal has to be signed off by congress. Right. And presumably this is going to happen when a situation where? The Democrats control the house. Do we have any sense that congress is fully on board with this? No, Democrats would say that the deal that's been negotiated. Thus far is a good start. But they are not perfectly happy with the way it is. But President Trump is going to try to force their hand. He told us on Air Force One that he is planning to pull out of NAFTA that'll be germinated. And so congress will have a choice of the US MCA or three NAFTA which worked very well. You go out you into go shit you deals and worked very well. I mean, congress are going to have a choice either way the choice right now is between the old NAFTA. And the new NAFTA President Trump wants to make the choice between the new NAFTA. And no trade agreement at all what's the timeline in in all of this in terms of both win the new US MCA will take effect. But also when you know, the old NAFTA will be out what we do expect that the new. Oh, NAFTA will be considered by the new congress that is a democratic majority in the house and a slightly larger Republican majority in the Senate and the president if he goes through on his threat to announce he's withdrawing from NAFTA that starts a six month clock. So basically that would give lawmakers six months to approve the new NAFTA before the old NAFTA went away and the in terms of win he might sign this thing to pull out of NAFTA. He said it would be in the next short period of time, which is two weeks. It's sort of a Trump language for unclear and you know, with all these trade negotiations. Now, we are kind of getting a feel for what the m of this president is when it comes to trade negotiations. I if you look at the US MCA or NAFTA negotiations if you look at what he's trying to do now with China, if you look at some of the talks he's had with the European Union in each case, the president comes out with. A very strong protectionist threat to tear up NAFTA or impose really punitive tariffs on imports. He creates a lot of anxiety in the business community, and maybe by consumers and our trading partners. Then he takes a step back from the brink. He doesn't go all the way he doesn't make good on all the threats that he that he threw out there. But he makes good on some of them. And then he cuts a sort of face saving deal, which is often somewhat less than what he's promised. All right. Well, that was a lot of broccoli. And you know, who loves broccoli. No. He doesn't stop the late President Bush hated broccoli famously. And I hated it broccoli to when I was a kid, but I kind of like it. All right. Well, that is a rat. For today. We'll be back soon at the very latest by Wednesday with a recap of George H W Bush's funeral until then be sure to subscribe to our newsletter can head to NPR dot org slash politics newsletter to get a digest of all of our best digital stories. I must Mukalla political reporter, I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. And I'm Scott Horsely. I also cover the White House. Thank you for listening to the NPR politics podcast.

NAFTA congress President Trump president US George H W Bush White House NPR Scott Horsely tamra Keith Senate reporter European Union China six months six month two weeks
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"We are back. Sam cedar on the majority report on the phone. It is a pleasure to welcome to the program, the author of eating NAFTA trade food policies in the destruction of Mexico. She is a professor of Latin American and Latino studies at City University of New York and an anthropologist by training Alicia Galvez. Welcome to the program. Thanks, so much a pleasure to be here. So our obviously, our relationship with Mexico has been in the news trade has been in the news recently, Donald Trump, I guess tentatively renegotiated NAFTA. Just I guess let's just start with the question of why approach NAFTA. And this relationship between Mexico and the United States. From from the perspective of of food and eating. Well, it's one of the ways that trade. That's true us, really, it's it's one of the most direct ways that our lives are impacted by trade deals. Most of us are not, you know, dealing and you know, chips or circuitry or car parts or airplane parts, but all of us eat. So it's one of the best ways that we have to kind of see how these things operate. And so does that particular in terms of our relationship with Mexico? I mean, or is it particularly with our relationship with Mexico? Yeah. It's not exclusive with Mexico, but there's no country that we have a closer relationship to in terms of our food systems. So we get I live in New York City, and you know, much of fresh fruit and vegetables that I eat comes from from Mexico, and if you other trading partners, we also got stuff obviously from Chilean from New Zealand and things like that. But there there is a lot of the produce that gets consumed in the United States is coming from Mexico, and they're consuming a lot of our commodity grain is a lot of corn. And soy, and we that gets produced in the United States is being consumed on the Mexican side in the form both of processed foods and beverages, but also animal feed, which is contributing to, you know, large growth in terms of that the market for for me. So let's give let's go. Go back and give us a little bit of the sort of the pre NAFTA history. I guess and and then we'll go into NAFTA. Because that dynamic of this exchange of food is. Largely a function of NAFTA in many respects, right? Well, NAFTA's really a product of the thinking of Hugh, mainly university of Chicago educated economists who were operating in all three countries. So Mexico's economic policymakers typically have studied in the university of Chicago as have US policy makers, and and as well, I and we have a, you know, Milton Friedman, you know, motivated or an tation towards the free market towards taking down barriers to trade and the interest of the expansion of capitalism that, you know, really comes to dominate thinking about economic development and economic policy and the twentieth century and not thinking, you know, basically. Prefers foreign direct investment taking away any sort of barriers to cross-border trade getting rid of terrorists than subsidies and things like that. So that capital and goods can flow freely across borders that sort of thinking was so dominant that, you know, Margaret Thatcher famously said at one point there is no alternative, you know, this is kind of the bottle that Reagan Thatcher is I'm produced, and we see it, you know, turning into very concrete policy proposals. So NAFTA is one of those policy proposals and the idea is to sort of knit together. Three countries of North America into a single economic market. Unlike you know, other examples, we can think of the European Community that took away barriers to the circular of people. We never really had a serious conversation about taking away barriers to people. But we did try to take away barriers. To goods and capital to try to create a single unified market. And that was where NAFTA came from, you know, and we should say this was a long time libertarian. Policy agenda in many respects, this internationalism. This is one of the things I think that came out of Mont pelerin was this this notion of of bringing down these barriers to capital, and on some level sort of fighting against the sovereignty of nations, at least in this respect. Right. It's and and I think actually we interviewed someone about it..

NAFTA Mexico United States City University of New York professor Sam cedar Margaret Thatcher New York City Mont pelerin Alicia Galvez Donald Trump university of Chicago North America Reagan Thatcher European Community Milton Friedman
"nafta" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"A split. Congress will have several issues to wrangle with including US trade policy and Democrats taking the house majority could complicate those efforts joining us now from Washington with the details is Wall Street Journal reporter will Maldon will the US and Mexico agreed to a rewrite of the North American Free trade agreement earlier this year and Canada came aboard in September. But this is not a done deal and even more. So now that congress is split. That's right and Marie. It's never easy to get a trade agreement through congress. Anybody who tells you that it's easy is probably not seen some of the latest trade battles? So it's especially difficult, though, if a president from one party who negotiated the deal is trying to get it through chamber of congress headed by the other party in this case, the house of representatives, and the house speaker has a special ability to derail what would ordinarily be a pretty simple process where at least considering the agreement, and what are some of the major concerns of Democrats at this point. And what is the likelihood the label to push Republicans on meeting them in the middle? Well, the the interesting thing is that most democratic lawmakers are actually similar in trade policy to the Trump administration. They're a bit skeptical. They want better deals that that favor American workers rather than businesses. And so some of the elements in the new trade agreement were designed to appeal to people like many of the House Democrats at that took over. But the problem with that is House Democrats really want high labor standards in Mexico, especially and this agreement would be an improvement on that in comparison with your original NAFTA, but Democrats aren't satisfied with the enforceability of those new labor provisions. They wanted airtight where if Mexico violates a labor standards or Canada or anyone else that they'll be an enforceable mechanism to hold that country to account and we've also heard from unions on the new US Mexico Canada agreement with the AFL CIO saying it had. Downst- the deal would help working families. How much is that input likely to have an effect here? Well, we don't have the final card yet from the unions. We do have some initial reactions, and they do want more labor enforceability like we mentioned with the Democrats, and certainly the unions in the past have been the key to at least have explained the democratic votes. But some unions are happy the Teamsters got some good things. Other unions may be happy with the deal. But it's it's it's a little bit too early to say at this point and a lot of it depends on politics. You know, how much are the unions willing to work with this administration on something like NAFTA, they did work very closely in the negotiation stage. But whether they got enough to make them fully support the deal is one thing. However, it may be possible to push through the agreement. If unions don't get in the way, and don't actually go out and rally against it. What are we hearing from the president? And Trade Representative Robert lighthizer on the prospects of a deal now that congress is split. Well. No that'll be interesting to see because it remains to be seen. How exactly they'll structure their congressional push. Typically, the US trade Representative is more political figure Robert lighthizer is a long-term trade expert and trade lawyer, and he designed.

House Democrats Congress US Teamsters Mexico Trade Canada NAFTA president Wall Street Journal Robert lighthizer Representative Washington reporter Marie AFL
"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Oh she hit it and now the us has sort of thinking well maybe it was a mistake i should've stayed would have been better fight state maybe the same thing would happen with nafta if the us decides to withdraw but almost all of the companies i advise and the people i talked to foreign investors in in mexico they're not pulling out there not even postponing investment decisions they believe that this integrated global supply chain that we created in north america benefits them and if there is no nafta or if the nafta free trade part disappears they don't care they will continue to produce where they feel it's convenient to do so where they liked the workforce they like whatever it is that gives them the advantage in producing there i want to talk about the politics has come up that mexico is going to have an election on july one you'll elect a new president and you'll also elect a new congress the new congress will be seated september one the president doesn't take the oath baba's until december one one of the scenarios i've heard percolating around washington is that they will get a they're shooting to get an agreement in principle here in mid may unless soon for second it were to happen that would then happen is that they would spend the next two months or so turning that into a an actual greement with all of the commas and semi colon periods and that mr pena nieto who would be the incumbent lame duck president would call a special session of the existing current mexican congress which would then approve the agreement in then what would happen here in the united states is the trump administration would meet a bunch of targets in the counter for notifying congress.

mexico president congress washington mr pena nieto united states north america two months
"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"For that reason this is the whole it's a classic consumer versus specific supplier kind of issue that in trade we know happens that the benefits go to many many people but in small amounts and the costs of some kind of change are concentrated in a vocal group that can make its voice on the other is back to the time to to how long does ambi nafta situation last the thinking would be that we have mexican elections in july there will be us midterm elections in november and presidential elections a couple of years thereafter presumably zombie zombie nafta isn't forever i'm not saying it's a good thing that we have two years or more uncertainty but keep in mind that trade deals are made for the long term and political cycles come and go so i think if i were an investor in north america depending on the region and the sector and so on i still think this is a very good market to be investing in if i want to be selling products in canada us mexico and the facts bear the south jim because for example in mexico over these last fifteen months sixteen months of the trump administration we opened up our our energy sector years ago and the amount of interest in the energy sector by us companies including others from other parts of the world but specifically us companies is is huge they look at it from the long term they're looking at it for ten fifteen twenty thirty years we will continue to have the existing nafta unless of course the us decides to withdraw in which case it will continue to be enforced between canada and mexico and you'll have a situation like tpp the us pulled out but the remaining eleven decided to have a treaty based on what had been the.

mexico us canada north america ten fifteen twenty thirty year fifteen months sixteen months two years
"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Which is what trump is pushing well let's let's talk about the future of nafta in this my takeaways you're not expecting any rapid movement on a nafta agreements assume that it plays out that way who's hurt more by that the united states or its trading partners canada mexico cyber actually heard a lot of people talking about their fear of ending up with zombie nafta that we don't get a new nafta but nobody believes in the existing nafta the net result of that is that companies postponed making investment in canada in mexico and the united states benefit i think actually president trump may have tweeted words that effect saying that delay serves america's economic interests while they're going i'm sorry from the mexican point of view i think i think that's not a valid argument because given these uncertainties what has happened is the mexican currency together with the canadian currency has devalued which means our exports are more competitive and we are selling more to the united states than we ever have before so much kind of for that visit with mexico is growing strives the value of the mexican peso down which may it more attractive for americans to buy things from mexico which or to mexico or to or to highly recommend being having been there twice this year ensemble nafta i think i think james that is a risk but this two or three things here number one currently this of steel and luminary tariffs are in abeyance and are being held against canada and to an extent mexico until the deal is agreed to so if we don't have a deal at some point presumably the us could come down hard by resuming those tariffs that would not be good for anyone and we wouldn't have nafta either why but i think people in the united states you work in the steel and loan industry say that will be good for them because plants would expand or old plants would be opened up and people who work making steel or making aluminum will get to work longer hours you'll get called that consume steel and aluminum aluminum will be more expensive so you know it's working still you still using aluminum using industries may lose their jobs precisely.

united states canada mexico trump america james canada mexico president
"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Jobs here in arizona and if without a effective nafta the that goes away but would it i spoke with a chief technology officer for loosened motors who said there closely monitoring the situation but he said there would have to be very severe changes for lucid rethink its entire business model in arizona in other words it depends on what trade negotiators come up with or what a world without nafta would mean for a border state still big unknowns we've never backed out of a trade agreement in this country before so we would be an uncharted territory eric lead directs the north american research partnership out of phoenix he says if nafta is cancelled expect years of litigation tariffs could rise entrusted trade programs could be hampered now all of this isn't to say that reopening nafta was a foolish move lee and most everyone agreed that the 23yearold trade deal could benefit from some updating especially workers dawn schuman is with the teamsters local one o4 in phoenix we spoke at the union hall she sits under a photo of the teamsters general president james hoffa taken about 25 years ago that rally was in southern california to bring out an expose nafta for what it really does than it kills jobs in america and it takes away good bluecollar jobs in american sends them to other countries she says nafta is hollowing out the middle class in america and adding to income inequality and now traditionally democratic union leaders are supporting the republican presidents push to renegotiate the treaty maybe some of that works but a lot of it doesn't and it's time that we bring jobs back to america and it's time that we provide for our own middle class that's very much what president trump has said and that's what he got elected on so was popular among her among the teamsters or no.

arizona chief technology officer eric lead phoenix lee teamsters james hoffa california nafta america trump north american dawn schuman president 25 years
"nafta" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

"I think that uh nafta withdrawal would would do that well i look this is classic trump righty punches you in the face in any sits back and he sees how you responds to that plunged in the face and that's kind of how i see a lot of his negotiating tactics so whether it's with north korea or here when he's negotiating international trade but then you raised an important point visavis us foreign policy which is that by stitching these economies together and in improving growth and prosperity for all three nations we are increasing our security because the last thing that we want for instance is a mexico that falls back into economic distress were you have thousands of people rushing toward the us mexico border desperate to find work in fact if you care about things like immigration nor illegal immigration rather and you want the wall well you know you should really love nafta because nafta prevents verve hints really the the need for that that wall and so that that's another important aspect tear but in before we let you go uh the president this week in meetings with prime minister justin trudeau a man of the left suggested that if he did get rid of nafta eu we owe the us could just negotiate bilateral deals monaco amano with canada and with mexico separately uh how long would it take to negotiate something like that easy it feasible in in what would happen to the ordinary american in the meantime if the trump white house engaged on such in such a pursuit.

north korea foreign policy mexico president justin trudeau eu us canada white house nafta prime minister
"nafta" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

Tech Policy Podcast

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

"Every trade agreement no matter what it was negotiated matters for companies whether they're in the technology sector not the first thing you have to remember is that businesses love predictability and certainty and trade agreements like nafta are one of those principal ways that you can provide predictability and certainty and in the trading environment particularly in a market like north america so at nafta the regional nafta did was it made the trading relationships between all three countries crystal clear and enabled us companies the united states canada and mexico to uh form better relationships with one another to trade more seamlessly across borders to really establish a new and innovative supply chains enabled it innovation to take place even if you couldn't conceive of the inner of an internet back then i think just the roots of the technologies that we use today really started even prior to nafta existing so i mean i think there are pieces in enact the regional nafta that were important to the the tech sector one of which is the elimination of tariffs though customs duties whatsoever a dutyfree environment and does that matter for importing parts are things like that um assembling equipment is that the kind of stuff that that we saw is that it was cheaper to buy the the building blocks of processors and things like that that's right just cuts the costs those types of costs out of the supply chains entirely uh which makes it cheaper to.

technology sector nafta north america united states principal canada mexico
"nafta" Discussed on No Jargon

No Jargon

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on No Jargon

"Because of nafta we are now flooding there market with the cheap starchy practically inedible corn that we grow in iowa basically we've supplanted their heirloom landrace coined that they've eaten for thousands of years with a product that is mainly useful as animal feed is corn syrup and corn villers and so it's really not a onetoone exchange um and so even though mexico sought to protect its pointing this tree basically what nafta has met is that the average person can no longer eat that traditional foreignbased diet rich at now is eating more fast foods and so it's really it's it's quite a sinister exchanged that we've seen happen or i want to say that this is a a criticism or critical view of nafta but it's completely be opposite critical view of nafta than the one that were used to hearing most famously from president trump who as oh the united states of epa gadgil uses the of the united states is getting slaughtered phnom bye bye nafta or americans are getting slaughtered meaning people in the united states um but would you to talking about people getting slaughtered eat you've documented actual negative health outcomes in the mexican population is that right that's cracked the us mexican consumers are any a similar position where we have basically been given the task of sustaining the economies of both of our countries by eating the access calories that our economy is producing where does the rubber hit the road what are the specific health outcome differences for mexicans so since nafta was passed diabetes and other diet related illnesses have taken the lead in terms of causes of death.

mexico united states nafta iowa president