30 Burst results for "Nadine"

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:17 min | 9 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

"<Speech_Female> They <Speech_Female> consume their television <Speech_Female> in very different ways. <Speech_Female> So, you <Speech_Female> know, fast forward <Speech_Female> another, <Speech_Female> you know, 6 or <Speech_Female> 7 years. <Speech_Female> One is the horizon <Speech_Female> going to look like. <Speech_Female> And you know, the BBC <Speech_Female> will it have a license. <Speech_Female> So, well, do you <Speech_Female> think it should? <SpeakerChange> I mean, ideologically, <Speech_Female> it looks <Speech_Female> from back then that <Speech_Female> goes to <Speech_Female> it. So <Speech_Female> at the moment we're in <Speech_Female> discussion about <Speech_Female> the settlement <Speech_Female> of the license <Speech_Female> fee. Those discussions <Speech_Female> about how the <Speech_Female> BBC is <Speech_Female> funded in the long term. <Speech_Female> I'm not coming <Speech_Female> up until the chartering <Speech_Female> eel, which is another <Speech_Female> for 5, 6 years <Speech_Female> away. So <Speech_Female> that discussions for <Speech_Female> the future. <Speech_Female> And but <Speech_Female> actually, I think <Speech_Female> what we all <Speech_Female> need to do <Speech_Female> is to <Speech_Female> do we want the BBC <Speech_Female> to survive. Yes, <Speech_Female> we do. Is <Speech_Female> the BBC <Speech_Female> a fantastic <Speech_Female> global institution <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> based here in the <Speech_Female> UK yes it <Speech_Female> is. Everyone across <Speech_Female> the world knows <Speech_Female> those <Speech_Female> three letters, the BBC. <Speech_Female> How <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is the BBC going <Speech_Female> to survive? <Speech_Female> It competing against <Speech_Female> organizations <Speech_Female> like Netflix today <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Amazon Prime <Speech_Female> and all the others <Speech_Female> that are <Speech_Female> going to be coming over <Speech_Female> the next years. <Speech_Female> A few years, <Speech_Female> how will the BBC <Speech_Female> survive in that <Speech_Female> changing environment <Speech_Female> of how people <Speech_Music_Female> watch and consume <Speech_Female> their entertainment <Speech_Female> their news? Their <Speech_Female> television, <Speech_Female> they are going to be discussions <Speech_Female> for the future <Speech_Female> because you <Speech_Female> want the BBC <SpeakerChange> to survive. <Speech_Female> I also want the BBC <Speech_Female> to survive. <Speech_Female> I'm British. <Speech_Female> You know, it's the best of <Speech_Female> British, of course I want <Speech_Female> the BBC to survive. <Speech_Female> But, you know, <Speech_Female> sitting in my job <Speech_Female> where I am in my chair, <Speech_Female> I see <Speech_Female> that changing landscape. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> I can see what's happening. <Speech_Female> Not what's <Speech_Female> happened in the past. <Speech_Female> But what's happening <Speech_Female> in the future? <Speech_Female> And know what's coming <Speech_Female> down the line. I <Speech_Female> want the BBC to <Speech_Female> survive. That's <Speech_Female> why we have to have those <Speech_Female> really hard discussions <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Female> how do we enable it <Speech_Female> over the long <Speech_Female> term <Speech_Female> to remain that <Speech_Female> global <SpeakerChange> institution <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> it is. If, <Speech_Female> for example, Facebook, <Speech_Female> meta, as it's <Speech_Female> called now, it <Speech_Female> doesn't rain itself in. <Speech_Female> Can you see <SpeakerChange> Mark Zuckerberg <Speech_Female> going to jail? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> I'm not going <Speech_Female> to be drawn on a question <Speech_Female> like that. <Speech_Female> But what I will <Speech_Female> say is this <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> there are <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a number of principles <Speech_Female> around this bell and the most <Speech_Female> important principle in <Speech_Female> that belt is protecting <Speech_Female> young people <Speech_Female> and children. <Speech_Female> And in order <Speech_Female> to trust them <Speech_Female> with your grandchild <SpeakerChange> with their <Speech_Female> children or to <Speech_Female> do that, <Speech_Female> we are <Speech_Female> looking out and <Speech_Female> considering <Speech_Female> making somebody <Speech_Female> within an organization, <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Female> Facebook <Speech_Female> or meta <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> rebranding doesn't <Speech_Female> work, by the way. <Speech_Female> Or one of <Speech_Female> those organizations <Speech_Female> criminally responsible. <Speech_Female> That is something we <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> considering including <Speech_Female> in this bill. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> would somebody <Speech_Female> be criminally liable? <Speech_Female> Yes, they would. <Speech_Female> And will they be criminal <Speech_Female> libels soon after the <Speech_Female> bill received rollers and <Speech_Female> yes they will <Speech_Female> and should therefore <Speech_Female> online platforms <Speech_Female> now <Speech_Female> start doing what they can <Speech_Female> to remove <Speech_Female> the harmful <Speech_Female> algorithms <Speech_Female> which affect young <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> impact upon them <Speech_Female> so dramatically, <Speech_Female> should they be doing <Speech_Female> that now? Yes, they should. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> They've had noticed <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they've got fair warning. <Speech_Female> This bill <Speech_Female> is coming, <Speech_Female> abide by your terms <Speech_Female> and conditions now. <Speech_Female> Remove <Speech_Female> your harmful algorithms <Speech_Female> now. <Speech_Female> You know, there's 20,000 <Speech_Female> engineers that you're <Speech_Female> going to put onto the <Speech_Female> metaverse, <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> put them on making <Speech_Female> Facebook <Speech_Female> a place which is safe <Speech_Female> for young <Speech_Music_Female> people to <SpeakerChange> go to. <Speech_Music_Female> Now. <Speech_Music_Female> BBC sounds music, radio podcasts

BBC Netflix Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Facebook UK
"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:59 min | 9 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

"Holding them to account that we also carve out protect freedom of speech within that particularly for the press as well. So it's the basis of our democracy freedom of speech. And that's why we need to protect it in a way that we do. Because what happens if we don't? What happens to Britain? Do you look to America and worry? So. The erosion of freedom of speech and if it did disappear? Well, I don't really. My mind doesn't even want to go to where we'd be. I just think I have one objective, and that's through bills that we pass in my department to make sure that that element is protected. And I suppose, you know, people might say, all of this sort of defending values plays into your hands in a sense when actually, you know, culture is a way to unite people and that, you know, some things that are called woke that you might call woke are actually about being kind or listening to different perspectives. Yeah, and I totally buy that idea. And that's what's important to protecting freedom of speech that people do listen and people do understand. And actually that people are just kind and listening to other people's views. So I totally get that that kind of perspective of woke. But I'm not, and I completely agree with you. There's this kind of image that's been painted of me that I'm going to go out and kind of charge out with some kind of culture war battle. It just isn't true. And it's what other people say about me, not what I say. And that just isn't true. And I think listening, particularly to young people to their perspective on many issues, that some describe as well, because actually quite important. But you know, you can talk about left wing snowflakes and they're congenital. It's quite aggressive. Well, there are some people who are politicized that and that's what I'm talking about when I do that. So, you know, there are people who, you know, we both know. And it campaigners who kind of hijacked the space that young people would like to occupy to talk about some serious issues who some of the left you've hijacked that space, and that's who my comments are targeted at. Not young people who actually do want to engage in debate and do want to talk about these issues. Seriously..

Britain America
"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:26 min | 9 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

"Because it was very important that taxpayers money was targeted in the right way to ensure there hasn't been any fraud. Exactly. So we want to have which not as far as we're aware, we wanted to know which theaters were the ones who really needed the help to keep going and which because you'll hear some people in theater sector say, you know, we didn't get any of that money, but they are still standing, and they are still running with plays back up and. Which is testament to the fact that they didn't need the funding because they are still here. They have the funding that you're doing now. The funding we're doing now is to help people through the recovery period. We know they need to support right through the past 20 months. They still might. No, no. I'm just getting back on their feet. And we want to just pull their hands and make sure they get up and run. They can't just go from zero to heroes overnight with plays and with quite complex programs that they run in places like this. So they just couldn't do it overnight. So we've kept them functioning throughout COVID. Now it's important that we hold our hands and get them right up to the point where they're running and able to continue going by themselves. And that's what this third phase is for, and that's why we're doing it. And I wonder, you know, if we have a look at what I've taken on board anywhere about part of your agenda, a lot of it seems to be around who controls cultural institutions. You know, are they too elite? How can we broaden access to them? I wonder, have you changed your mind since you talked about left wing snowflakes, killing comedy, suppressing free speech? Well, no, I'm actually a lot of the people a lot of people are coming out and saying that who came out just last week a famous comedian and said, comedy is almost dead..

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:00 min | 9 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

"Every policy, every decision we take has a filter, laid over that decision, and that is, does this policy help those from socially deprived areas to access both arts and culture and sport? Is what we're doing because those people in those backgrounds are of every color and every sexuality. But are we looking after everybody when we talk about diversity? I guess nobody would say that was a bad idea, right? Everybody thinks that the access to the art should be widened. I guess what I'm confused about is that, you know, you want to widen access to the arts, but the conservatives. Well, to all these culture and institutions to everything that counts, right? That makes us who we are, in a sense, right? It's really important for everyone. But the conservatives will be in power for 11 years. And over that time, you know, of course, figures show a dramatic drop. And for example, kids doing art subjects at GCSE and a level. So in the last ten years, it's performing arts down by nearly two thirds, dance down by half. Lots of teachers say that's as a direct result of funding cuts and the fact that schools are having to make these difficult decisions. So those are surely the very kids that you want to get into these kind of sectors. So it's not something that's happened just over the last ten years. It's been something that's been happening for a very long time. It's been getting 25 years and very much under the conservative government. So the difference in the number of people being involved today, I think in those kind of disciplines that you talked about, which are drama and dance and their music and performing arts in schools. I think more relates to the fact because actually, although they may have dropped in some schools, we have more schools now which are actually dedicated just to lipa is one of the first ones I think of in Liverpool. But there are a number of schools we have one in my constituency in whitton, which actually really focus on those particular disciplines. So you will find in those schools, a huge percentage of young people are actually there in that school because they want to be part of performing arts and are part of the whole artistic experience. You don't want it to be those children. You want it to be across the board. No, absolutely. And, you know, if you're looking at my constituency, if you wanted to do, if you were somebody who wants to go into your 6th form and do performing arts, you would go over to that school if you didn't you would probably go to a different school. So I think the way schools function today and the way they offer particularly at 6 film GCSE, the way they offer courses is very different. And that's possibly cutting the structure I think. Do you think it's been wrong to cut school funding? I'm in these areas. So. Casey, I can't I don't know how I don't know what you're describing in terms of school funding cuts. What I don't recognize that, what I recognize is the increased performance that we have from pupils in schools, both at GCSE and a level, the number of passes that we have the number of young people who are going into apprenticeships and to university and into higher education..

conservative government lipa whitton Liverpool Casey
"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Media Show

"Congratulations on your appointment. Fantastic job. Came as a surprise to you, I think. And to lots of people. And I guess it's fair to say, wasn't welcome by everyone in the sector. I was having a look. One comedian said, it's great to have someone who's written more books than they've read. Another called you the most intellectually vapid MP of the modern era. And a crime writer said, the closest you get to cult you get to culture is if you're eating a pot of yogurt. What do you think is going on? Lovely. Friendly. Well yeah. Very friendly and actually it's really interesting because you could I think one of my comments at the time was that you could hear the almond milk latte cups hitting the floor across the BBC. When my job was announced, but, you know, all I take that as is a form of snobbery and it's very much a form of left wing snobbery. And it also kind of highlights a thread of nastiness across politics and the kind of that left wing divide in politics. I think doesn't do as any favor. So I was disappointed, but I think, you know, as many people have said to me, all the right people were angry. So who are the right people? Fine, I've just got on with. Well, those who want to engage in culture wars, which I don't actually. And I think, you know, so that comment that, you know, I've written more books than I've read and, you know, something about being I found this comments quite misogynistic. And I also found them absolutely. It looked at me and looked at my background. They would have known that that wasn't true. So people were making those comments for political attack and nothing else. So, you know, they weren't going to the person who said that I've written more books, has no idea what books I've read. Or what my capabilities are in terms of literature or anything else. So I just found them thoroughly unpleasant. And you know, they're not comments that I would make or I think anybody else has ever made one appointment has been made. And obviously your supporters were saying the opposite, they were saying, she's perfectly cultured secretary because she writes novels amongst other things. But it's a change to have somebody in a role that say, you know, I was a nurse and I was put into the prime minister put me into health, which I could really see that that was a fit and everybody said, no rampaging round hole. And you know, I'm also a novelist who sold to three quarter million books and he put me. I've got one of the things that I'm reading out I wonder quite a lot of people are probably reading your book, you having got this job. I mean, it is really interesting. It's based so much on your life growing up in Liverpool, which probably a lot of our audiences don't know about, that you did come from a very deprived background in that sense, and that's reflected in this book. How do you think it's shaped you? So I come from a background, which is one of the poorest wards in the country. I was born in Breck road in Anfield in Liverpool within the sound of the cop. And it certainly had an influence on my role now. It could cost it shaped me throughout my life. You know, it's hugely contributed to what I write and how I write. Because I almost in a way it's a social documentary on what life was like in the 1950s and 60s in the poorer parts of Liverpool. Which I think people would be amazed now days to know what that was like..

BBC Liverpool Anfield
"nadine" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

01:36 min | 10 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Nadine, this has been fabulous having you on the show and before you go, we always love to ask our guests just these couple closing questions. The first is what's just one self care practice you try to do every day to stay healthy. I love either being in the sun, sun like sunbathing or aiming to if it's not cloudy like seeing the sunrise or sunset. So some moment with the sun every day. Now obviously there's cloudy days, but that's like very, very key for me. Yeah. So important and that's interesting as I consider you a bit of a beautician. You know, there's a lot of beauticians that are like never go in the sun. You know, ruin your skin and I like to hear you do not have that approach. Yeah, I don't. And I did a deep dive on that in renegade beauty and dedicated a chapter, whole chapter that so we could understand it and figure out how we can interact wisely with the skin and reap all the benefits with the sun. Yeah, in a wise way that we can get what we need from that relationship. Love that. Finally, what's just one thing we should all ditch completely and replace with something healthier today. Well, let's just keep up with the theme of the foaming soapy cleansers on the face. Love it. Love it. All right, Nadine, this has been fabulous. You mentioned earlier that you do consultations and whatnot. What's the best way for people to claim those or find you on the Internet and be a part of.

Nadine
"nadine" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

The Essential Oil Revolution

03:59 min | 10 months ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Essential Oil Revolution

"Your body and simplifying going back to basics which to me means just going back to the plants and doing less sometimes less is more absolutely to me. That's the approach that I wish I could see people take because it breaks my heart when I see people like kind of catering to this multi-billion dollar industry of oh you need 10 billion different products on your face every day and they each cost 50 bucks a month or whatever. That's not what we need. And it's really I mean, I can get on a bit of a soapbox about how we can target women and cosmetics and this whole industry that mostly men profit from from making us feel like crap if we don't have this certain face, all kind of wrapped into this money thing anyway. End of myself there. That's a huge Pandora's box there, but yeah. And now, you know, and of course we're deep into social media decades, which are adding fuel to that fire. Exactly. But you know, I think I would too is like now and then there's just and now, of course, we've seen even men's grooming and cosmetics for men. Just growing and growing and growing because it's just like more markets, right? Right. Right. Exactly. Yeah. Somehow men were okay with just like simple things in the 70s. But now. And they have beautiful skin. They have, you know, I look at my husband and he's got better skin than I do. And he doesn't do anything, you know? Because men were not like, it's funny when you look at most men faces. And that's kind of what we go to first and foremost when we talk about skin care and the whole reason that we put so much energy behind this as women is like we want beautiful skin on our face. And we want wrinkle, no wrinkles, and no blemishes and all these things. Like, look at the men in your life that don't do crap. They don't do anything for their face. Are their faces really that messed up looking? No, you know. Or even if they are somehow we have way more tolerance. You know what I mean? Exactly. If a man is on camera with acne or something, I just feel like there's a lot more leeway. And it would be great if we could just give leeway to all on that. Because it's a lot, there's a lot of pressure and it's certainly, you know, I was thinking and writing about this stuff in the 90s. Definitely expanding. Yeah, yeah. Amen to that. Nadine, this has been wonderful and you've given us so many great tips and I really encourage people to check out your website. I mean, like you said, it doesn't have to be complicated. You can really do this stuff, DIY, and you can go a long way, your book renegade beauty has brilliant recipes in there, but also for those that just want to quick solution. They don't want to make anything themselves. You've got great products at living libations, dot com. Is there any last tips you want to give our listeners about skin care and essential oils any quick, quick things they can do to benefit their skin care today? Well, I guess just don't worry to step back and allow the bacteria to be your beautician and yeah, it's a really simple place to start with that oil cleansing and it really can be revolutionary. And just know if you're not feeling too confident about your skin or anything like that, just know it's totally can evolve and there's so many solutions. And if you really had anybody feel free to email us questions, healthcare skin care, I mean, I'm like, yeah, dental care is what I'm trying to say. And we also do consults. Totally low pressure, no pressure environments, and it's really a lot of fun. We have multi generational families, couples, moms, and daughters and best friends and a lot of fun those consults. Support.

Nadine acne
"nadine" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"nadine" Discussed on Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

"Living libations dot com of course will have that in the show notes so nadine. Welcome to the podcast. No thank you for having me for sure. While i know you're a legend you've been doing a natural health work now for many many years And i remember. I was probably fifteen years ago or so. Just seeing you on david wolfe stage actually saw some of his his content that he was putting out. You're out there talking about natural beauty oral health things like that and You know i was reading through your holistic dental care vote. Which by the way guys with. You're looking for a book to learn more about how to take care of your mouth. Which i think by the end of this interview. You'll realize show much more important than he thought it was. This is the best book. I've ever read on non reading books every single day in a natural space. I never read a book as well done. It's it's really easy. Read lots of great images and really two quaint. You guys will get so much out. It's called holistic dental care. And so needy. What really inspired you to write this book. Well i found that in my house journey. Which i feel like. I've been studying and making natural products. Since the nineties. And i understood a lot that i could do with my body like now right because i mean when you get to this. I don't know like if people have been living normally before and then you're like oh my god so if i have a stomach ache or headache there's like a whole bunch of other things i can do besides grabbing aspirin and pepsico bisbo so that it's sort of been my journey in the nineties. I i really understood. Sort of beauty level of house level like all the things do my buddy the cheat. It was hard to find research and that kind of stuff but there was a holistic dentist in the city that i live but they weren't to holistic but the The hygienist was and so. I went from checkup again. I'm in my early twenties. I'm a young entrepreneur. I'm not on the parental dental plan anymore. So goya dentist is not fun. It's not really where you wanna put your budget. no and i'm like a smells and the chemicals. I still have a natural pack air but the hygienics was really awesome and she saw the start of a cavity on tooth and i was very used to the kids. Thank where the lecture in like just that whole thing. We all grew up with and she said go home and like mixture things. You know you all your concoctions and then come back in six months and we'll see where it's at and so that's when i created what is now called happy gumdrops which is dental sarum which was wasn't existent before which i would code on the chief u. The gums brush with it with baking soda. And then also floss some getting that sarum up into the gum line. Everything well not only did like the whole gum health. And you know everything improving my mouth. Just amazingly the cavity. The beginning of the cabinet has gone showed no x ray so that was like i understanding like the.

david wolfe nadine headache cabinet
Remembering 'Girls Aloud' Singer Sarah Harding

GSMC Social Media News Podcast

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Remembering 'Girls Aloud' Singer Sarah Harding

"So sarah harding. I saw this on twitter. Actually no i saw this on e. news online. And i wanted to talk about who. Sarah harding is as a person i because people probably won't know about her since she's over from the uk. So sarah harding was born sarah. Nicole harding on november seventeenth nineteen eighty-one. She has an english singer model and actress. Who rose to fame in late. Two thousand two when she successfully auditioned for the it reality series popstars the rivals and this is kind of relevant with some topics that i've talked about in the past as far as love island because love ireland. Uk like the original. Love island is based in the k. And there's people from all over the uk on that show and it also is on tv. So i have a feeling. That's kind of like the mtv of the us em tv of the uk but mtv loss in the us if that makes sense The program announced that harding had won a place as a member of the girl group girls aloud which girls aloud is a british irish pop. Girl group that was created through the icy be talent. Show in two thousand two and it comprised seniors cheryl cole nadine coyle sarah harding nicola roberts in kimberley walsh. They achieved a string of twenty consecutive top ten singles in the united kingdom including four number. Ones they also achieve seven certified albums of two. I'm sorry of which to reach number one. They've been nominated for five awards winning the two thousand nine best single for the

Sarah Harding Nicole Harding UK Love Island Twitter Sarah Ireland Harding MTV Nadine Coyle United States Nicola Roberts Kimberley Walsh Cheryl Cole United Kingdom
"nadine" Discussed on Everything Happens with Kate Bowler

Everything Happens with Kate Bowler

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"nadine" Discussed on Everything Happens with Kate Bowler

"Nadine's work reminds me that there really is no such thing. As other people's children we all belong to each other. We're actually wired that way providing a way toward hope and healing and justice just by setting up some heilige environments and yes. I promised to continue using that metaphor in very uncomfortable situations if you're somewhat an caregiving role. Parents teachers doctors nurses social workers pastors people who see the pain and broken systems up. Close we see you and our leaders and institutions. Need to do better to go back to the well to get to the source of the problems making it easier for all of us to love and teach and serve each other. And if you're someone who's wondered if your past will always be stuck with you and these next words are for you. Here's a blessing for if you've had a painful childhood sauce just settle in and let this one wash over you. Blessed are you who come with your sorrow allowing your pain to convey all its truth for here in the arms. Jesus is where reality is a welcome guest. Era is where grief is understood at its core or the dark shadow of betrayal is seen from the inside.

Nadine
"nadine" Discussed on Wild Yoga Tribe

Wild Yoga Tribe

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"nadine" Discussed on Wild Yoga Tribe

"Namaste and welcome to this episode of the wild yoga tribe. I am so excited. I am actually over the moon to welcome onto the show Nadine McNeill. She's a yoga teacher from Jamaica and is a global gallivant who goes by the moniker universal Empress. For nearly two decades prior to her deep dive in yoga in 2008 in a dean traveled the world in service of the UN UNICEF global volunteer network and organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons. She was the former UN chief of operations in the Central African Republic and UNICEF humanitarian who has now based in Bali as a yoga instructor and personal coach at yoga barn in ubud. Nadine is the founder of the bad asana series which is a yoga with weights continuing education certification program through yoga alliance and it's her mission Nadine's mission as a yoga teacher speaker wisdom enter and humanitarian is to ignite infinite possibility and people around the world and share yoga especially with diverse underserved communities. So thank you so much Nadine for joining me on the show today. Thank you so much for inviting me. The joy to be here. So Nadine I would love to just start off by asking you how yoga first came into your life. The $1 million question that we all ask. How did yoga come into my life? I think that. Yoga found me at the most perfectly imperfect time what do I mean by this? I had come largely from a fitness background. I had worked in James run a couple of half marathons. I've always been very exercised oriented. And I was living in the Netherlands at the time I was first introduced to yoga and in fact I went to Pilates before yoga. And a friend of mine suggested me trying it out at sort of flat lined at the gym I was born safe. But she said why don't you try adding some yoga to your program and so I did. And it's kind of comic code because for the first several tries I absolutely hated it. But yet I still kept going back. So something had me coming back. The practice that I really sort of took you initially and followed for quite some time was in fact Vikram. And while maybe football three or four years I did pick from consistently 6 days a week. And then on Sundays I would do a double whammy and do two classes. And you know with that like with everything else that you deepen enough practice something as opens up. And so from there I was born to ashtanga. And so my general practice you know having entered through a physical old life was initially very physical. And then somewhere I started practicing shortly after 9 11. I'd also had a major breakup with an engagement heartbreak. And so I had some point around 2008. I felt like I wanted to learn more about the philosophical aspect. Of this practice that was having. Or creating deep and meaningful shifts in my life. Wow I didn't know that you came to the yoga practice through bikram. And to do double whammies on Sundays oh my goodness that's normally a day of rest in the ashtanga tradition. How I've was taught was that Sunday is the day to rest and to absorb all the practice. So it definitely seems like you did come to yoga through the physical route but clearly now I feel that yoga for you Nadine really has is transformative. It goes beyond the asana. I know that you do a lot of other. Modalities of yoga like women circles and different practices. So would you like to talk a little bit about beyond the asina? Like how that has captured you. Absolutely and I love that term beyond the asana songs like a podcast tied to begin with that's really interesting. You know it's funny what you just said about knowing when to rest in these practices and these strong practices. Because over time and over the years I have moved away from a very young practice though I do teach quite young practices for example my yoga with wings which I'm sure we'll talk about later on. And so. As I deepened in the philosophies and started to learn more and you know see the impact of pranayama breath work and meditation that became more of my yoga and so for me when I think of yoga it's an integration of life experiences. It's the physical it's the mental it's the psychological it's the spiritual. And the body is our access we are our gateway to many of the suckler elements of our lives. So one of the things I am very. Foundational on in my teachings and practice is what is your body telling you? Because the body knows something before the cognitive gets involved and starts to analyze and purchase and judge and try to figure things out. Your body was speak to you first. You know we need someone we talk about the butterflies in the stoma. We get fright or flight. We talk about a pounding heart. We talk about not being able to express ourselves conscription at the throat. And as you and I know in many of our listeners will what I'm actually touching on there is that such a shock resistant. So if we can understand the messages of our body first then we are able to apply tools breath for meditation such a movement et cetera to unlock or unpack whatever it is the bodies then trying to tell us. And then from that place we can receive spaces like women circles you know where women come to see and be seen and to be in a very safe intimate and vulnerable space that allows them to courageously allows us to really justly share our truth. You said that so beautifully about yoga being an integrative experience and the art of listening to the body to unlock and unpack what it's trying to tell us I think is absolutely vital to the practice of yoga and to all of the asana the pranayama the meditation. When you draw it is all about getting to those subtler subtler levels of our unconscious to try to access those truths because I really do think we already have the answers to all of the questions we're trying to ask and pray for and search for. I think those answers are we don't need to look outside for them. They're already.

Nadine Nadine McNeill UNICEF global volunteer networ yoga barn yoga alliance UN Central African Republic ubud UNICEF Jamaica Bali Vikram the Netherlands bikram James football
"nadine" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

GayBarchives Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"nadine" Discussed on GayBarchives Podcast

"Yet. The panhandle is very very conservative. I remember taking a on the basketball team and we were taking a we. Were driving through. Port saint joe and i remember that the bus driver of the coach told us to slide down in her seat so they could not see our faces up through the window. If we were black they should shoot up the windows. If they see your face and it wasn't done as a you know it was done in a matter of fact way that gave me the impression that that's just how things were. When i graduated from high school there was still in in the heart of city. A an area called the called hundred acres of modern homes for colored people and it was just a collection of ramshackle housing You you literally had the the train tracks that divided the city and You know racist slurs homophobic. Slurs you you would hear on a routine basis not just from students but also from Teachers coaches why parents. My mother was from england my father from mississippi and the new york mothers by racial but they choose assumed to be white and so therefore my parents could only be stationed. My father's the air force and air force facilities that allow integrated states. And so you know. There's a long legacy appointed racism in my family. And i was. I was raised to as my parents would say. Never think you're better than anyone but never let anyone think that they're better than you. And so they knew they were teaching a young black girl living in the south how to stand up for herself. They didn't know they were instilling. Those same messages and lessons in a young lesbian is well

nadine smith Florida england new york Today lgbt hundred acres one bar Port saint joe panama city florida panhandle florida panhandle mississippi center
Interview With Nadine Smith, Black LGBTQ Activist

GayBarchives Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Nadine Smith, Black LGBTQ Activist

"Yet. The panhandle is very very conservative. I remember taking a on the basketball team and we were taking a we. Were driving through. Port saint joe and i remember that the bus driver of the coach told us to slide down in her seat so they could not see our faces up through the window. If we were black they should shoot up the windows. If they see your face and it wasn't done as a you know it was done in a matter of fact way that gave me the impression that that's just how things were. When i graduated from high school there was still in in the heart of city. A an area called the called hundred acres of modern homes for colored people and it was just a collection of ramshackle housing You you literally had the the train tracks that divided the city and You know racist slurs homophobic. Slurs you you would hear on a routine basis not just from students but also from Teachers coaches why parents. My mother was from england my father from mississippi and the new york mothers by racial but they choose assumed to be white and so therefore my parents could only be stationed. My father's the air force and air force facilities that allow integrated states. And so you know. There's a long legacy appointed racism in my family. And i was. I was raised to as my parents would say. Never think you're better than anyone but never let anyone think that they're better than you. And so they knew they were teaching a young black girl living in the south how to stand up for herself. They didn't know they were instilling. Those same messages and lessons in a young lesbian is well

Port Saint Joe Panhandle Basketball Air Force And Air Force Mississippi England New York
Bitcoin Plunges 30% to $30,000 at One Point in Wild Session

CNBC's Fast Money

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin Plunges 30% to $30,000 at One Point in Wild Session

"We start out. Today's crypto carnage. It was a gut check. Moments in the crypto currency market names. Bitcoin ether light coin. Even doj coin getting slammed. Today's thinking double digits shedding millions of dollars off the market caps and the selling was fast and furious. Bitcoin quickly plunging below thirty thousand dollars before bouncing. Well off that low. It is now down forty percent from its april. All time high so is today's crypto collapse. Just froth coming out of this trade much more pain. Had james mcdonald kickoff. We saw breakdown a bitcoin below the fifty thousand dollar level without a rebound studying the security or if we can call it a security this enthusiastic asset class. We've seen a dip in rip pattern every time. Bitcoins come down that they've come back and bought it We didn't see that at the may sixteenth breakdown below fifty thousand. That was a sign of things to come and then again on the sixteenth excuse me the twelfth and the sixteenth we saw a lack of buying support come in and that was kind of a clue that the sentiment had shifted and everybody knows what an asset swells to the level of did. It's gotta stop at some point. Think those were the clues looking for the next level. We think the twenty seven thousand level the next level carter braxton worth the current quarter start macro is on earlier this week saying you know. Drawdown of fifty five percent is garden variety when it comes to bitcoin nadine and i'm curious i mean a fifty five percent down his garden variety. We're pretty much still within that garden. Variety spectrum doesn't feel too good though now in fact we probably only have one or two clients who don't care about that kind of draw down and chew believers for the long haul in crypto versus almost all of our other clients who preferred us to trade it. And so just as we're talking about just now. We saw some breakdowns not just in bitcoin and below fifty thousand but also in the related stocks whether is gray scale or ms. You saw that breakdown. It was actually broke our short term trading range line. And that's when we knew we actually had to trim so it wasn't a surprise to us. Also this is happening.

Bitcoin James Mcdonald DOJ Carter Braxton Nadine
TYOS POD EP. 2 PT. 1 | Overcoming Social Norms and How We Were Raised w/ Hannah Garcia! - burst 2

TY Old Self Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

TYOS POD EP. 2 PT. 1 | Overcoming Social Norms and How We Were Raised w/ Hannah Garcia! - burst 2

"Hello and welcome to episode of the thank. You also hot. Cast iron your host mobile store and mayor of cosy town nadine. Oh sorry hi. Good to y'all what's being on the new anyway as you could probably tell stream conceive for my audio listeners. I have guests today. I have my friend hannah with me for today's podcast for almost seven years. Now yeah that's fine easy. You'd we're twenty three. Yes and twenty four two and four. Wow bro while my words my have been out of it. And it's not. She inherited bad knees. Learn the past weekend that i probably inherited really bad leg jeans so my knees are giving it. They're they're getting they're they're. They're prepping her for future stretcher. You're gonna hide from your family for off my god. But that's this podcast not about hermes status about embracing our true selves and opposing capitalistic. Noriega's societal norms in general. Because i feel like we're shifting into a completely different direction than what was supposed to be done guess to do. You're a sense. Yeah so from social norms. Yeah thank you. So cheers to a whole. I a whole new podcast. First guest for the pod you cheers. Y'all so question for you here who are you. I'm hannah i everyone. I was from the bay area. And then i moved down here for our school. I studied animation

Growing Up Tyoldselfpod Nadineosaurus Funny Friendship Hannah Noriega Bay Area
4 Stocks Ready to Ride the 2020 Infrastructure Boom

CNBC's Fast Money

05:07 min | 1 year ago

4 Stocks Ready to Ride the 2020 Infrastructure Boom

"As extreme cold grips. The south and texas tries to cope with massive power failures infrastructure plays or heating up. Checkout names like report. Macaroni neither rental soaring. Today has all this. Wild weather made that infrastructure investments story even more compelling karen wedges. What do you say well certainly sort of brings to light how we need. crept infrastructure upgrades. And then i think there's also some policy as we battle it out with china you know. How can we rely on this. Worldwide trade that the globalization. That's happened over the last ten or twenty years. We need to start bringing stuff. Poem that of course would be very inflationary if everybody needs to manufacture their own stuff but as it relates to infrastructure have been hoping for this for a long time position. Like united rental. This is just absolutely the holy grail for them to think about their business model. They have fixed costs very low variable costs so if you get utilization pricing way up. That's fantastic for them. All that having been said this is as expensive as as i've ever seen uri. So there is optimism already in there. We need an infrastructure bill trade down. But i think we've got one. It would continue to trade higher. Yeah nadine where the opportunities are you and karen hopped up on the midday call talking about infrastructure because if there was ever a time where we're the american Consumer the american voter out there was convinced that infrastructure needed attention needed investment. Now is the time in what is going on in texas melissa. I think you and karen are right. Here is what you have in texas as a supply shock. And you have the governor saying listen we need a winter is our state. Look at my own state. Will we need to protect against fire against floods and so that understand infrastructure is a really big deal so you see biden coming out saying we need a big plan today see the house transportation and infrastructure chair saying we need a one point five. Trillion dollar caught a spend and people are saying. That's not enough. So those two things along with what karen said. Which is china threatening to limit exports for precious metals and technology. All of those things very inflationary but it means that the probability of infrastructure spending just went up. yeah so where are the values jeff karen. How deluded to your uri. What she thinks is overvalued. There are a lot of stocks out there that may already be taking into consideration the possibility of an infrastructure bill we were valued if there is no infrastructure sorry overvalued if there is no infrastructure if there is infrastructure then it's a okay all right. Jeff what do you say. Yeah absolutely no. I agree with karen. And that's really exactly where i was going to go just to echo the sentiments of everyone else you know i think that there was this concern building that if we were to get a really big stimulus bill right. Now it'll be more difficult to pass infrastructure Climate spending things of that nature a little bit later in the year. I think that has changed now. Given what happened in texas. I think there's political capital to push some of that spending through but let's not forget. I mean there are fundamentals. That are supporting this story to. We got manufacturing today for the us for europe both very strong. So i think that's part of the story as well and i look at stocks like cat and volkan. These are names that i've been mentioning over the last couple of months. They're really nice. Steady uptrend just breaking out now to new highs over the last couple of months and i would say the same thing. Maybe for some of the rails. Npr norfolk southern. I think they end up participating in all of this The last thing i'll say is just relative. The small caps been such a big story. This year Definitely overbought. there's. There's no question about that. But i think the valuation gaffe still exists and when you look at the s. l. y. That's how we would prefer to play small caps almost twenty five percent and industrials and materials. So i think that also benefits from this trend. We're talking about see if this is also wrapped up in the in the rotation that you've been advocating which is away from the growth away from technology and into the cyclical plays on the bet that the economy will reopen is reopening soon. So if you look at the i. Wm so i'll pick up where we're jeff left off the wm's since november first. They're up forty seven percent against the snp. that's up twenty one percent outperformance. That's what you're looking for so where you started out saying that. This is about infrastructure shore. But i think it's only about twenty percent about infrastructure. I think the balance eighty percent is about rates. This is about the reflation trade. I know it's all sort of mixed up in the sausage making the ten year. Tenure went from fifty basis points to one point three three percent now. I know that it's a huge move. It's one hundred. Sixty three percent move based on a percentage of the percentage. That's what it's about. Think about this senate. The house are tied up with the covid relief. Reconciliation bill that's going to take us another couple of months. We're not getting infrastructure until june or july.

Karen Texas Jeff Karen China Nadine Biden Melissa Jeff Europe United States Senate
"nadine" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

The Toxin Terminator

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Toxin Terminator

"Living Oh. Sorry. I thought you called it something else? I'm so sorry. Lese out. Again. Gatien and and honestly her back story is beautiful. You guys need to go check out her website and this really has a lot of meaning for her she shared with me that her mother actually passed away from breast cancer back in two thousand and fourteen ladies. One eight of us are affected by breast cancer, and let me tell you on my guest by the way Nadine Artemis. So. Welcome. Thank you. All Time here and What a great subject that we can dive into absolutely because I'm you know my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer not even a week after the passing of my brother. And that was twelve years ago now, and she's a survivor and thankfully. But this is something that touches every single woman because if it hasn't affected you, it's affected somebody that you know. So honestly, I think we can dive into topics like. You know screenings look. Like you we as women need to be doing for screenings. What we need to learn about what we've been told you know some of the myths behind breast cancer, and then certainly we're both about good clean beauty.

Gatien Nadine Artemis
Can Walmart+ Beat Amazon Prime?

Reset

04:12 min | 2 years ago

Can Walmart+ Beat Amazon Prime?

"When you think of a Walmart what comes to mind. Probably, not that it's some tech savvy subscription company but tomorrow, the retail giant is launching its subscription service called Walmart plus and some see that as a player take background from the company's big rival Amazon Dot. com. I'm here with Jason Del Rey senior correspondent here at recode Jason thanks for being with us. Teddy. So, how big a deal is the launch? Of Walmart plus. So we'll see how the launch actually goes off, but the idea of Walmart loss and the fact that Walmart after all these years is finally putting paid membership out there in a big way that is a big deal. Walmart's trying to lean into what they do really well, and that is mainly really really low prices on groceries. So the core of Walmart plus. Is a same day or next day delivery service focusing on. Fresh groceries that said the idea is that you beyond groceries. To. Many. Many of the Nadine, most popular products that you would find in a Walmart store. I think Walmart. Has said you know a selection of over one hundred thousand items, but on top of that. Walmart. Plus is hoping to add perks that maybe Amazon can't match. So one of them is at launch. Discounts on gas at one gas stations and other partnering gas stations. It's something like no more than five cents a gallon. But if you're someone who drives a lot shops at Walmart. Over the course of the year maybe that makes a difference to you. And over time while they're not talking about details I'd expect to see. Other. Perks that may be are more Walmart like and more geared toward sort of the long-term Walmart customer than. Some of the other perks we see in prime such as you know, prime music, for example. So the sounds like Disney plus it feels and looks like Amazon prime. But like taking a step back here, why is Walmart doing any of this? Why is it getting into the subscription business in the first place? So I think there's a couple reasons. Starting really with Amazon prime big companies have trained basically everyone in this country to start consuming via subscriptions. So of course, you have prime with more than one, hundred, fifty, million paying customers around the world. But you also have the rise of. Subscription services like Netflix. So like spotify and the like and what you find is often when you subscribe to something, you want to get the most out of it. Right. So what does that mean for Amazon Amazon that means prime customers spend more and shop more frequently than Amazon than nine prime customers do. They also often price compare less. So they're sort of like absorbed into this Amazon only World Walmart is trying to build sort of deeper relationships. They probably would call it with their customers, make them great customers, and then with their customers make sure you know that this sort of locks them in. So they don't Fly Amazon in the first place. There's a couple of other reasons for fast. Delivery is really expensive same day next day delivery. It's really expensive. So Walmart's hoping to maybe subsidize some of that expense through these subscription fees, and then one of the last things I'll mention is just that I think they do feel whether they admitted or not that they need to do something as an alternative to Prime I reported earlier this year that more than half of Walmart's top spending families are now Amazon prime customers maybe they can win some of them back with this. It is about twenty one dollars cheaper a year. And there are trade-offs but maybe they went some back and maybe more importantly they just sort of stem the tide of. Existing customers who haven't switched to prime yet from going there in the first place.

Walmart Amazon Amazon Dot. Jason Del Rey Netflix Disney Spotify Nadine
President Trump to Visit Kenosha Wisconsin After Police Shooting

Mark Thompson

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

President Trump to Visit Kenosha Wisconsin After Police Shooting

"Concerned over whether President Trump scheduled visit to their city, following days of unrest over a police shooting may increase tensions. White House press secretary Kaylie Mecca Nadine minutes ago confirming the president will travel to Kenosha, but would not elaborate. If the president thinks the shooting was justified. There's a investigation ongoing. So, um, I spoke to him earlier and he was not willing to weigh in more than he had Video showing a Kenosha police officer shooting 29 year old Blake in the back. His family says he's paralyzed in California. More

President Trump Kenosha Kaylie Mecca Nadine Donald Trump Press Secretary White House Blake Officer California
Toxic Stress

PODSHIP EARTH

06:04 min | 2 years ago

Toxic Stress

"Just as we saw light at the end of the covid tunnel, we now find ourselves back in the darkness. The psychological impacts of this pandemic being felt acutely. We live in fear of losing a loved one to the virus, a friend being killed by the police because of the color of their skin. Parents and kids exhausted of being cooped up together. Certainly told school will be online this fall millions who have lost their jobs a terrified by having to choose between buying food or paying the rent. Essential workers as stressed by the lack of effective protective equipment. The list of legitimate to worry about has grown nearly endless. Stress takes many forms and manifesto, myriad of symptoms at its was stress can elicit a toxic shock to our system that changes who we are at the very fundamental level. During covid acts of abuse neglect in household dysfunction are all on the rides while the stay at home orders help stem the tide of the pandemic. There's a mounting evidence that lead to violence in the home, becoming more severe and frequent. When we think of environmental factors that contribute to health problems like asthma, the impacts of stress from abused neglected dysfunction are often overlooked in the last decade understanding of both adverse childhood, experiences and toxic stress as adults has evolved. In large part, this is due to the work of Dr Nadine. Bug Harris an award-winning physician, researcher and advocate dedicated to changing the way society responds to Childhood Trauma. Doctor Doug Harris was appointed as California's first ever surgeon general by Governor Gavin Newsom in January twenty nine team. As California in general Nadine has had a bold goal to reduce adverse childhood experiences also known by the acronym ace or aces by half in one generation Dr Buck. Harris's career has been dedicated to serving vulnerable communities and combating the root causes of health disparities. After completing residency at Stanford she founded a clinic in one of San Francisco's most undeserved communities, Bayview hunters point it was Ed's. That Buck Harris observed that despite the implementation of National Best Practices for Immunizations Asthma. Obesity treatment and other preventive health measures a patient's still faced outsized risks for poor health, development and behavioral outcomes. In Two thousand eleven, she founded the Center Youth Wellness and subsequently grew the organization to be a national leader in the effort to advance pediatric medicine raise public awareness and transform the way society responds to children exposed to adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress. Dr Bernard Harris Is Talk. How Childhood Trauma Effects Health across the lifetime has been viewed more than six million times have book. The deepest will healing the long term effects of childhood adversity was called indispensable by the. New York Times I stopped by asking. What is like to be surgeon general during the time of Kobe? It's a little crazy. Yeah, it's a new role within government. It also feels really important. Because in this moment I think a lot of people are recognizing the importance of public health, and it's coming to a new level of awareness for a lot of people and so i. think that creates a lot of opportunities that I'm really grateful for. We will say this, but we kind of take our health for granted. Nadine we. We we go about our lives and this has been such a shock to the system. That is nearly all that we think about now for a lot of us. We're not just in this moment of covert nineteen, which is has been this incredible health crisis, but it's also showing all the cracks in our safety. Net it showing how much there are so many people who can't live without paycheck at. At showing how many folks are on the front lines it showing how dependent we are on healthcare, it's also showing how mental health is a huge issues, the stress of the pandemic and it's also showing up in the racial disparities right when we look and see that black and Brown folks are dying at a higher rate like there's a pandemic that comes across our country across the globe and yet. Yet in the United, states what see is that black and Brown people are dying at a substantially greater rate than others when I see the racial disparities around Kovin I feel outraged every day and I think about my kids and everything that I'm working for to ensure that they live in a state and in a country where they simply have equal opportunity right now. I'm not asking for a leg. Asking for any kind of you know anything special, and simply asking for equal opportunity for my children to be healthy, and well for my children to have their God given right to grow up and make themselves whatever it is that they will make of themselves, and so from that standpoint, it's been terribly challenging time if I'm speaking honestly because you know, we're all working around the clock, fighting Covid, and then we also have to be fighting all these other pieces fighting racial discrimination structural inequalities, all of these different pieces and for me, the fight has never felt more important and it. It feels like we're right on the front

Dr Nadine Doctor Doug Harris Covid Tunnel Dr Bernard Harris Buck Harris California Covid Governor Gavin Newsom New York Times Stanford Obesity Asthma Dr Buck San Francisco United Researcher Center Youth Wellness Kobe ED
"nadine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"nadine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome the very funny Nadine far side thank you I'm in lockdown and I have the particular joy slash terror of being in lockdown with a seventeen month old the start of her terrible twos corresponded with a global pandemic which is poetic to put it kindly and as tough as it's been with her it's still easier than the day she was born the delivery was intense what's supposed to happen in a normal delivery is it the babies in your uterus the cervix is like a door to the uterus it pops open the baby falls right through lands on its feet and is ready to play tennis that's what's supposed to happen but I had complications and a real jerk of the cervix so after twenty five hours of labor thank you I'm a martyr my doctor comes in and is like I'm impressed you have a really high pain threshold and I was like well I'm a comedian so that tracks she said okay at this point you have two options you can have a C. section or you can die those are your options I'll give you a moment to discuss it with your husband spoiler alert I chose the C. section so they had to give me an at the Doral to numb my bottom half what they do is tap your spine to give you the epic Doral so they tap my spine and meet and immediately I'm like oh my god this is a great should we don't book anybody feels like cotton candy even though I feel so much better I still have window just window in my abdomen that the epic Durrell could not access sort of like a man and their empathy they keep tapping my spine to give me new at the girls and eventually it's just like maple syrup that's coming out Hey Vermont listeners that one was for you so they had to put me under and they suggested came to me and I was like do you the club drug ketamine because I didn't bring my glow sticks to this C. section rave and they're like yes that can mean and you'll be going into a K. hole and I was like cable is the medical term because this is Mount Sinai and I feel like you're moments away from using the term late incorrectly so naturally Skrillex administers the special K. in the first thing I say is I go under is rule my god this is Eric's medially go through space and time and multiple dimensions of the universe I question myself a question conscience it I question consciousness I got real Albert Camus real fast then I had a kind yay am I a Muslim Jesus moment at one point I ran into a bunch of historical figures Gandhi was like I am a collage artist now he gave me the distinct vibe that he was peddling essential oils to make ends meet that's right you guys Gandhi had a day job and my K. hole I also ran into Abraham Lincoln he spoke to me from inside one of those colorful war Holly in repeat images sort of like Marilyn Manson only Abraham Lincoln it says to me I did they get a win would remember me do we talk about you all the time how are you the most insecure president like how many elementary schools need to be named after you for you to turn off that self critical voice ape I'm in the middle of having a baby here and I have to deal with your issues come up and then I landed in the anchor point of my cable which was a space shuttle that was obviously being harmed by the actor Emma stone who you might know from such films as aloha Emma stone was like hi I have Google Nigel's can we hang out like we're having a brunch and people watch space at some point I get catapulted back to the ER and I realize that the operation is still going on because there's a couple of doctors rummaging around my abdomen exploring all the nooks and crannies doing a little like redecoration of my organs you're now looking for a baby and I suddenly realized that I can feel everything the organs shifting around the open wound the pain every thing so I start screaming bloody murder at which point the anesthesiologist says out loud well see when you scream like that it makes me look bad he gives me more academy I go back into my K. hole right back into the Emma stone space shuttle for some reason you never start totally dissing London how the weather in London sucks and the most interesting thing about the English is that they pronounce vitamins vitamins and we're just like laying into the U. K. so we're finally done in my consciousness is brought back to the ER and the first thing my doctor says to me as well you really don't like London huh here's the thing about a K. hole here in their rates your K. hole so I was doing everyone's dialogue I was doing and the stones dialogue Abraham Lincoln's dialogue everyone's dialogue turns out my cable sounded like a really bratty trip advisor post which brings a whole new meaning to trip advisor and then they were like oh yeah yeah you have a baby girl she's healthy and has all ten fingers and ten toes I held her in my arms and I said you better be worth it I had to go to space with Emma stone for you turns out she is worth it that was the far side the legendary poet moved on from this plane of merry all over all over four two is acceptable in invitational inexpensive she took the time to explore and reveal the magical world hidden from all of us in plain sight her passing is aptly marked by her numerous words to play with a fragile mortality such as the often quoted tell me what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life here in the cradle of some of our finest centers of.

Nadine
"nadine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"nadine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The very funny Nadine far side thank you I'm in lockdown and I have the particular joys slash terror of being in lockdown with a seventeen month old the start of her terrible twos corresponded with a global pandemic which is poetic to put it kindly and as tough as it's been with her it's still easier than the day she was born the delivery was intense what's supposed to happen in a normal delivery is that the babies in your uterus the cervix is like a door to the uterus it pops open the baby falls right through lands on its feet and is ready to play tennis that's what's supposed to happen but I had complications and a real jerk of a cervix so after twenty five hours of labor thank you I'm a martyr my doctor comes in and is like I'm impressed you have a really high pain threshold and I was like well I'm a comedian so that tracks she said okay at this point you have two options you can always see section or you can die those are your options I'll give you a moment to discuss it with your husband spoiler alert I chose the C. section so they had to give me an at the Doral to numb my bottom half what they do is tap your spine to give you the epic Doral so they tap my spine and meet and immediately I'm like oh my god this is a great should we start a book anybody feels like cotton candy even though I feel so much better I still have a window just window in my abdomen that the epic Durrell could not access sort of like a man and their empathy they keep tapping my spine to give me new at the girls and eventually it's just like maple syrup that's coming out Hey Vermont listeners that one was for you so they had to put me under and they suggested can I mean and I was like do you the club drug ketamine because I didn't bring my glow sticks to this C. section rave and they're like yes that can mean and you'll be going into a K. hole and I was like cable is the medical term because this is Mount Sinai and I feel like you're moments away from using the term late incorrectly so naturally Skrillex administers the special K. and the first thing I say is I go under is rule my god this is Max Amy Lee go through space and time and multiple dimensions of the universe I question myself a question conscience knit I question consciousness I got real Albert Camus real fast then I had a kind yay am I a Muslim Jesus moment at one point I ran into a bunch of historical figures Gandhi was like I am a collage artist now he gave me the distinct vibe that he was peddling essential oils to make ends meet that's right you guys Gandhi had a day job and my K. hole I also ran into Abraham Lincoln he spoke to me from inside one of those colorful war Holly in repeat images sort of like Marilyn Manson only Abraham Lincoln Abe says to me I did they get a win would remember me like do we talk about you all the time how are you the most insecure president like how many elementary schools need to be named after you for you to turn off that self critical voice ape I'm in the middle of having a baby here and I have to deal with your issues come up and then I landed in the anchor point of my K. hole which was a space shuttle that was obviously being helmed by the actor Emma stone who you might know from such films as aloha Emma stone was like hi I have local knowledge rules and we hang out like we're having a brunch and people watch space at some point I get catapulted back to the ER and I realize that the operation is still going on because there's a couple of doctors rummaging around my abdomen exploring all the nooks and crannies doing a little like redecoration of my organs you're now looking for a baby and I suddenly realized that I can feel everything the organs shifting around the open wound the pain every thing so I started screaming bloody murder at which point the anesthesiologist says out loud well see when you scream like that it makes me look bad he gives me more can I mean I.

Nadine
Seattle - King County issues directive urging public to wear face masks in most public spaces

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Seattle - King County issues directive urging public to wear face masks in most public spaces

"County residents will be required to wear a mask when they go to the store or any other indoor public space in Spokane it's likely be to be the next order masking come was currently Johnson has more the state health department recommends it and health experts say as the economy slowly begins to re open if the majority of people are not wearing masks it's likely to trigger a second wave of the virus Spokane county health officer Dr Bob Lutz there are stronger requirements and recommendations to wear masks and I think that'll be something that you will be seeing forthcoming hopefully in Spokane Spokane mayor Nadine Woodward said this week she would support a public mask mandate it for health officer felt it was best at the king county directive applies to grocery stores pharmacies retail restaurants and public transportation a homemade cloth mask is fine and no one's going to be issued a ticket if they're not wearing one king county and Seattle are distributing about a hundred sixty thousand masks mostly in immigrant communities

Spokane Johnson Officer Dr Bob Lutz Nadine Woodward King County Seattle Spokane County Spokane Spokane
Tian Dayton, MA, PhD, T.E.P. Adult Children of Alcoholics, Psychodrama, Soulful Journey of Recovery

The Healing Place Podcast

08:56 min | 2 years ago

Tian Dayton, MA, PhD, T.E.P. Adult Children of Alcoholics, Psychodrama, Soulful Journey of Recovery

"I'm your host Terry while Brock and very much looking forward to my conversation today with Tian Dayton and I'm going to read all of this amazing stuff that I told her before. We hit record earlier that I could get lost on her website for months because there is just so much amazing stuff there so I'll be sure on the video to put the Her website and so you can access it. And then we'll talk about it on audio when we when we get in so psychologist author of fifteen books psycho dramatist blogger senior fellow at the meadows and so much more so welcome to day. I I I know your most recent book and I'm going to read that title as well. Has it been released or is it about to be released? Iginla FALL LATE FALL. Okay so late fall. So it's the soul journey of recovery a guide to healing from a traumatic past for adult children about golics codependence or those with adverse childhood experiences in. Yes Powerful book. I'm sure I can't wait to get my hands on him. It's going to go to. It's sort of an if you were headed. Gorey's you know this is what happened to you and also this is how how to get out of it. It's not just as what happened to you. It's this is why this is how to mind and gifts in. This is how to turn the tide. This is how to change things through them around then on the website. I have A TAB that says soulful journey in their guided imagery there are certain things you can do in the bull on the website and they're also a lot of film that I've done over the years and some of them are You know about specifically being an adult child or certainly. All of them are children. Read Bruce Childhood experiences that sort of thing. Yeah beautiful while I know I think we connected through ACIS connection and which is a great wonderful resource. The thirty thousand strong now but adverse childhood experiences are just exploding onto the mental health seen to have a resource this that addresses. Not just what happened but a guide for now? What will you know I think I put this on the website too if you take that one. Great way baking at that. Nadine Burke uses is taken together with the resilient inventory for example. I have a very high a score but I have a perfect resilience score. So that's number one. Is that understand way? Strengths have been through this and the other I would say is You know figure out. How did newspaper round? There is Dr Vincent Feleti who was running a weight. Loss program is nude is nude to your viewers. Is this useful? We've talked about it in bits and pieces so certainly yes. Talk about it again. He had a weight loss program and he was very successful in helping people lose way but then they would drop out of the program and he started review. He kept mind which is key and he started to interview people and realize that to a person They had experienced sexual abuse and child. Spouted dressing childhood trauma. The the waitress came right back on people experienced it. A safety your. They were eating their feelings. Or whatever why ever that happened and then Robbie ended Dr robbed ended the CDC met. I think they mended inner. Started talking about that and rob recognized that. This should be a big long-term study and they so they created what they called. East questionnaires what are your experiences It could be where you live. Harvey Social Influences Family Divorce Illness. All of this thing and alcohol's living with parental alcoholism up over and over and over again is a primary ause of a High. A score in this came as a complete surprise to them. They weren't looking for it but it's not for matic. It is Bianca era. Yes well I to score a high a score including growing up in a home with an alcoholic parents. And but my resilient score. I remember people asking me. How did you live through all that Terry and I for so long I would say I don't know like I don't know and then once once I came across the ACIS questionnaire and then the resilience questionnaire as well and I advise people if you're going to look erastus or make sure you look at your resilience or as well And my grandma. Kitty was a very powerful presence in my life and Made me feel loved and safe in worthy and valued and She you know I credit her with so much of what I was able to make it through and come out on the other side Research bears that out. Yeah the one bonded relationship and generally within the family system most often the GRANDPAR- yeah. Let's go and teachers. I think teachers huge impact. Yeah sure on a grandparent at work to do grandparents have worked to. We're not you know I'm a grandparent. Internet finished yeah. Yeah well and you know and it was so simple with my grandma because it wasn't anything spectacular that she did because she had had a rough life Eight kids in poverty and You know so much more but she just loved me. I mean it sounds so simple. But she loved me and she didn't yell at me and she didn't hit me and she did those things that were happening in my life from the violence to the alcoholism to You know being sexually molested stings happening that she was unaware of but she was just this gentle presence as I call it in that really life altering yes for sure. All right What are the things? I noticed him. Just have crazy random notes. All over my papers. I love your coloring books with affirmations. Little left turn. Oh my gosh. I am such a huge adult coloring book fan when I fly having anxiety flying in so I will bring my coloring books with me with my Gel pens and these last couple of flights that I've taken I've had no issues at all because I just lose interest so thanks unto make I just had a break in the project and I I might grandchildren. Were born so coloring books. Sink to fund it and I loved doing them and I love affirmations. I've done affirmations book all on my adult life so I wanted to combine them for finance. I think they'd be good at treatment. Centers see the thing that really sold me on them is what they do socially for people for example treatment. Centers have a lot of downtime. Right groups have downtime. And if you sit around and color together you are interacting. You're you're building social skills snow. I think treatment centers of should never be without a stack of coloring books and a lot of colors. Because you are busy. You're but you you are learning new social skills in the most easy relaxed way and it's funny silly and it's creative so it gets the right side of your brain kind of flowing which is probably what happens for you when you fly so that the I do know wh what happens when you fly. It's curious why do these work so well? I wonder

Terry Senior Fellow Iginla Tian Dayton Dr Vincent Feleti Nadine Burke Gorey CDC Bruce Bianca Era Brock Robbie ROB Kitty
US grinds to a halt as Americans lock down to stop the spread of coronavirus

Ben Shapiro

09:37 min | 2 years ago

US grinds to a halt as Americans lock down to stop the spread of coronavirus

"Coronaviruses freaking everybody out well in corona virus news the British health minister and conservative member of parliament parliament Nadine Dorries has been diagnosed with corona virus now so the health minister of Great Britain has coronavirus mystery says she's been self isolating at home labour MP Rachel Maskell said she's been told to do the same **** met mysteries that apartment health in Britain said mysteries first showed symptoms on Thursday the same day she attended an event hosted by the prime minister right now U. K. had a documented total of three hundred eighty two cases as of yesterday six people with the virus have died in the U. K. in the United States the total number of cases now has surpassed one thousand cases in the United States we have twenty nine deaths so far the the clusters are happening on the coast mainly in Massachusetts New York Santa Clara California and up in Seattle Washington the first known US front of Irish cases announced January twenty first in Washington state the pace of diagnosis has quickened significantly in recent weeks at the start of the month seventy cases have been reported in this country most of them tied to overseas travel since then new cases have been pouring in by the dozens and then by the hundreds the coronavirus updates are coming fast and furious the mayor of New York bill de Blasio he said that there are lots of cases coming in at like dozens per day in New York City as testing is made available it is obvious that there are a lot of people who are least carrying corona virus without knowing that they are carrying corona virus or the the German public has now been warmed up to seventy percent of Germans face the possibility of infection that's going to Angola Merkel and of course the top US health official Dr Dr Anthony Fauci he said this is going to get worse so Dr Fauci said all hands are basically on track with this thing these are really simple keep the workplace safe keeping the home safe keeping the schools safe and keeping commercial establishing safe this should be universal for the country everyone should be doing that where do you live in his own that as communities spread or not when you have community spread you obviously going to ratchet up the kinds of medications that you have but at a minimum this is the minimum that we should be doing so everybody should say all hands on deck this is what we need to do in a non shocking news thanks to again the up and down of the corona virus news the stock market in creamed again it's just up and down insanely was up like a thousand points and then is dumped again back down a thousand points pretty amazing how the stock market is bouncing around like a yo yo no we're not gonna know honestly where anything stands until the end of April Megan McArdle has an interesting column over the Washington post a lot of people might really like everyone is looking around going I don't see a lot of car owners out there yeah we had a grand total of like four thousand deaths worldwide if you look at the flu every year and kills like a hundred thousand people worldwide minimum maybe hundreds of thousands of people worldwide every year so why are we also worried about coronavirus Megan McArdle has this statistical dot experiment to remind you that when there's an exponential growth factor things move really quickly right you don't see anything in the C. everything right it let let's say you have a pond with lily pads example that you get statistically and it explains why were also worried today if you have a pond with lily pads and the lily pads are going to overtake the pond as they grow in each day the lily pads double the number of lily pads double so let's say that day one it's one to which to death rates for right to keep stumbling on the very last day the lily pads cover the entire pond the question is at what point did lily pads cover half the pond at what point it really has got a half upon and the answer is the day before they cover the entire contract if they're doubling every day and that means that half the town was covered yesterday and today boom suddenly the entire pond is covered that is how exponential growth works okay that is what people are feeling in terms of coronavirus is that we have exponential growth of coronavirus what you end up with is no one around me has it oops everyone I think that's it right that that that is what people are fearing is that sudden is that sudden object and this is what is being feared by the trump former homeland security adviser Tom Bossert he says hospitals are basically ten days away from being creamed he suggested in an op ed that we are we are in trouble in terms of our our hospital facilities as officials must pull the trigger on aggressive interventions said aggressive internet interventions put off and ease the burden on hospitals and other healthcare infrastructure and that of course is true as one of my wrists wells then the hospitals that need to be prepared as I already said mayor bill de Blasio said that things are happening intensely in New York City and the governor Jay Inslee has no restricted gathers more than two hundred and fifty people in king county as well as several as well as you know how much and Pierce counties which are the the biggest counties in Washington state that means no soccer games means no it means no baseball games it means that basically all major gatherings ought to be canceled according to Jay Inslee the governor of Washington state Dr foundry has suggested there be no crowds at NBA games so basically if you have tickets for opening day in the United States for baseball you can fairly bank that that is not going to happen why colleges are canceling events I would not be surprised if my college events this semester for example are canceled that would not be a great shock again I think that all of this makes a certain amount of sense like better caution and they have this viral outbreak you want to reduce the size of the the spread and the and the quickness of the spread is to give us time right now we're bargaining for time but we don't know what the death rates are on this thing we just don't and what that means is that every attempt to slow the spread of the virus buys a day for people to develop vaccines they're going to be more effective in slowing or stopping the spread of the virus of becomes just another seasonal problem instead of becoming an overwhelming threat to western populations so this is it it is in this light it is important to recognize that when the federal government fails along this along these lines you can be absolutely disastrous there's a a piece from The New York Times that is just devastating talking about how the federal government did in fact blow the month the president trump was a president trump said very early on we're shutting down travel from China and a lot of people unless I'm not this is racist on this is terrible ten people were saying you have virus when buyers is racist you can see when my wrist is a drum said no we're sitting down travel that was a very good thing it was a very smart thing was the right thing to do the problem is that only buys you time because it turns out that some people are going to get in and any other problem so what did the federal government do with a month and president trump bought them by shutting down travel from from when the answers basically nothing according to Dr Helen chew infectious disease expert in Seattle she knew the United States and not have much time in late January the first confirmed American case of coronavirus have landed in her area critical questions need answers have been infected anyone else according to The New York Times was the deadly virus already working in other communities and spreading as luck would have a doctor to have a way to monitor the region for months as part of a regional research project into the flu she and a team of researchers have been collecting nasal swabs residents experiencing symptoms throughout the Puget Sound region three purpose the test for monitoring coronavirus they would need the support of state and federal officials but nearly everywhere Dr Jew turned officials repeatedly rejected the idea interviews and emails show even as weeks called by an average margin countries outside of China where the infection begin by February twenty fifth Dr Chu and her colleagues could not bear to wait any longer they began performing coronavirus test without government approval but came back in from the worst fear they quickly had a positive test from a local teenager with no recent travel history the corona virus had already established itself on American soil without anybody realizing it Dr she recalled thinking it must've been here this entire time is just everywhere already in fact officials later discovered through testing the virus had already contributed to the deaths of two people guns killed twenty more in the Seattle region over the following days federal and state officials said the flu study could not be repurposed because it didn't have explicit permission from research subjects labs are also not certified for clinical work well now Jeannie affable questions doctor should others argue there should be more flexibility in an emergency very much so many lives could be lost this is correct I mean like if you give permission for somebody to do a nasal swab for flow and that is repurposed enables one for coronavirus I honestly fail to see how any reasonable person would consider that a violation of privacy I nobody must know that I had grown up at night they're not gonna release your specific rotavirus task it just allows the state to do something on Monday night state regulators told them to stop testing altogether the failure to tap into the flu study detailed here for the first time was just one in a series of missed chances by the federal government to ensure more widespread testing during the early days of the outbreak when containment would've been easier instead local officials across the country were left to work in the dark as the crisis go undetected exponentially now so I think this is from so now I don't I don't think trump is monitoring local level task I think this is the fault of the massive regulatory bureaucracy that prevents people from doing reasonable things it turns out that the federal government well it is well placed to issue brought national guidelines is not well placed to deal with local testing that has to be done it turns out the local communities maybe the the fastest to react to the sort of thing right voluntary shut downs right now happening across the country with regard to major public events and those are happening on the local and state level without the federal government even doing anything it turns out the people who see federalism is the obstacle to this sort of thing they're doing it wrong local and state officials are more answerable to local populations and are in fact more likely to request the people do responsible things in fact is that porn was yesterday in the in the Jewish community basically every pore institute that I've heard of in my area meaning every big poor meal with big gatherings lots of kids those were basically shut down voluntarily without any guidance from the federal state or local officials is so the notion that the federal government needs to be running this thing in extraordinarily top down fashion the federal government should be coordinating all the officials letting them know sort of the minimum of what they expect but standing in the way of local officials doing what they need to do to Tampa's thing down is a completely different thing and that is a testament to the stupidity of bureaucracy generally

Nadine Dorries
UK Health minister Nadine Dorries diagnosed with coronavirus

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

UK Health minister Nadine Dorries diagnosed with coronavirus

"Well let's have a look at our top stories we start here in the U. K. the conservative junior health minister Nadine Dorries has become the first MP to be diagnosed with the virus the sixty a two year old confirmed that she was self isolating at home but had started to become unwell on Thursday that's the same day she attended a Downing Street event hosted by the prime minister Boris Johnson meanwhile the National Health Service is increasing the number all of that kind of us tests that it processes to ten thousand per day an increase of five hundred percent the escalation comes as the number of cases in the U. K. top three hundred and seventy and a sixth British pace in a patient a person with underlying health conditions cool coronavirus in the U. K. died of the

Nadine Dorries Boris Johnson National Health Service Prime Minister
"nadine" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"nadine" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"You're listening to another wonderful episode with a grey storyteller. Candice Nadine Brain is of West African descent Cameroon and Bannon and she wears many hats specifically three. They will talk about but she wears many hats. She's an author she's a survivor. She's a former English teacher. She's a wife and a mother raising her family. She returned to school and earned a master's in human services with a focus on marriage and family counseling. So she's a great listener. She was a real estate agent for a few years but she says that she founded unfulfilling stressful and time consuming so after taking time to open up about herself to her True Path. She buried herself and metaphysical studies earning a master's of science and doctorate in metaphysics. This human being does not stop But she's also just a fantastic storyteller. She's the author of several books Some for adults young adults for children and she's an inspiring storyteller so let's get to Kansas knitting.

Candice Nadine Brain Bannon Kansas
"nadine" Discussed on Talk About Talk

Talk About Talk

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"nadine" Discussed on Talk About Talk

"Notes plus several Meta learnings or general learnings that Nadine mentioned throughout our conversation and here are three that I just want to draw your attention to quickly. The first is the fact that everything is interconnected are breathing our posture her as well as our nervous system or circulatory at other systems not to mention our thoughts. What's going in our heads? The second Meta learning is the significance of being self aware that is breathing and using posture with intent and last Nadine reminds us that growth is uncomfortable changes as uncomfortable. But it's this discomfort that means we're making positive change in our bodies and you can start making some positive changes for yourself right now just by listening into this episode. Thank you so much for joining us here today to talk about reaping and posture can help us with our communication and very honored to be here injury. Yeah thank you for having me. I have to tell you that I've been thinking a lot about how this podcast topic in particular is GonNa make a huge impact of course to everybody whether it's professional or personal context but also immediately right literally as I'm sitting here thinking about how I'm breathing and my posture sure. I'm a very practical girl. So that's I believe in not just insult Eric Information but information that we can really use in our daily lives. Well I think this has to be at the top of the list. We born with an innate sense of of how we should be than and how we should sit and how we should stand but I know there's also all sorts of research that can inform us about how to do that better so let's get into that. Why don't we start with breathing? So my question is what the benefits of breathing quota will properly. You're absolutely correct in saying that as babies he watch baby.

Nadine Eric Information
"nadine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"nadine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That put a smile on my face and made me happy and so I needed the door handle and it was a very selfish pursuit I didn't care what other people thought I wanted the little did I know that people that would pass by my shop we're also sort of intrigued in affected by it and they would walk in and ask me about it and I really did not realize that it would have this kind of effect on other people here's mag deciding on the Ted stage. so clearly the reaction was interesting and intriguing and I thought what else can I do can I do something like in the public domain that we get the same reaction so I wrap the stop sign pole near my house their actions while it was like people would park their cars in and and get out of their cars and stare at it and take pictures of it and take pictures next to it and all of that was really exciting to me and I wanted to do every stop sign pole in the neighborhood and the more that I did the stronger the reaction. so this point I'm smitten I'm huts this was also directive I found my new passion any urban environment was my playground and I realized something we all live in this fast paced digital world we still crave and desire something that's relatable I think we've all become desensitized by our over developed cities that we live in and and billboards and and advertisements in giant parking lots and we don't even complain about that stuff anymore so when you stumble upon a stop sign pole that's wrapped in Nadine and and it seems so out of place and then it gradually weirdly you find a connection to it that is the moment that isn't all that I love and that at the moment I love to.

Nadine
Syrian rebels lose string of south-west towns

The California Report

03:33 min | 4 years ago

Syrian rebels lose string of south-west towns

"The trump administration argues it should be allowed to detain families for longer because of another court order this week a federal judge in san diego ordered the administration to reunify migrant families separated at the border within thirty days in order to comply with that ruling the department of justice says the administration wants to keep those families in detention for as long as their immigration cases take which could be months or years it's not clear how the judge overseeing the florida settlement will react to the government's plan which is also likely to draw more legal challenges from immigrant rights advocates joel rose npr news in syria forces allied with president bush shara lozad have recaptured large swaths of land from opposition forces in the southwest dhara province npr's lama laurean reports rebels appear to be backing down the opposition is quickly losing power over one of its last strongholds in syria syrian state tv is playing videos of rebels in and around various tons and data surrendering their weapons and waving syrian and russian flags a syrian regime troops swoop in and retake control and some of the remaining opposition we're in talks with russia early on saturday to negotiate a ceasefire but the rebels have rejected the terms of the agreements calling them humiliating according to opposition sources the deal offered by the russians contains the same terms rebels agree to in other parts of syria the offer says rebels must evacuate to the north of the country in areas controlled by turkey or accept the return of state rule lemonade lemon npr news this is npr from kiki weedy news i'm tiffany cam high as you just heard marches against the trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy are taking place today in hundreds of cities across the nation here in the bay area thousands of protesters are expected to take to the streets in the families belong together rally that's calling for the reunification of migrant families separated at the us mexico border cake nadine so by is in oakland near lake merritt where one of those protests is just wrapping up nineteen how many people came out to the protest today and what were you seeing there there were hundreds of people here at a park near lake merritt there were families so many families around a children of older people there was a whole bunch of around here and the people who came out to the rally did they say how or why they were moved to protest today i see one of the biggest things that they didn't wanna see families separated at the border adults didn't come alone they came number one shows solidarity with their entire family but they want us to see some numbers at the border come together just like their family and were you able to talk to any of the children that came actually i met not this one girl her name is dewey as she lives in berkeley and she's eight years old and she came up to me and she told me that she wrote a letter to president trump in the letter she said why are you separating families at the border and she's really passionate about this issue your child understand what you're going through and she really wants to see this fun that was nadine by reporting from oakland's lake merritt in a minute we'll have more on the immigration rallies happening in the bay area and across the state and alive california reports special i'm tiffany cam high.

Eight Years Thirty Days