35 Burst results for "NYU"

How 9/11 Unfolded at Aviation Week

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:23 min | Last month

How 9/11 Unfolded at Aviation Week

"Fran tell us about what you saw that day in new york and how you reacted beautiful tuesday morning and i was at home which was about a mile away from the world trade center. And it's a beautiful day. And i was contemplating playing hooky and conjuring up a medical appointment when i got a call from The new york office. Michael stearns who said turn on your tv a plane has just crashed into the world trade center. Well being a pilot and knowing that that midair alley I assumed it was a small plane that had gone into the world trade center only to discover. Of course it was not. We didn't know what was happening at the time b. then joined forces with the washington bureau on telephone conversation and i was eventually dispatched a downtown but how to get downtown. Because subways have closed down. So i walked about a mile to the world trade center. We're hundreds of people had gathered clear. Jay students from nyu friends and family of those who are in the world trade center trying to find out what had happened but not knowing what had happened. Of course the un no longer a reporter An external force Trying to piece together a story but you. You're a victim as well and i had to battle my own personal fears of terror. We did not know what was happening and The one beautiful thing there with that The clergy with comforting people all types of clergy. It was a beautiful moment where there was a lot of love extended to people who totally panicked so now what started with trying to find out factual information which was few and far between the tv tower had gone down in the tax and We were just piecing together various bits of data that were coming in from all over from local authorities from rescue teams From the military from the faa and from Lower manhattan when there was nothing else to do. We walked back to the office which is about three miles to see the world changing. They were armed. Guards national guardsmen with rifle drawn. Their fighter jets flying overhead. And this was no longer the world we knew. Then we're back to the office. We started scrambling to get The factual

Michael Stearns New York Fran World Trade Center NYU JAY Washington UN Lower Manhattan FAA
CEO Joseph Maxwell Shares How Parlance Helped NYU Langone Health Improve Service Levels During the Pandemic

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:26 min | Last month

CEO Joseph Maxwell Shares How Parlance Helped NYU Langone Health Improve Service Levels During the Pandemic

"So I want to share with you now a few examples of how parlance is working with some of the health systems that we've partnered with to deliver some of these great experiences to both callers and agents. And our first one is start with some work that we're doing with NYU langone. At the start of the pandemic, NYU langone was challenged to maintain effective staffing levels. Their operators were unable to consistently report to work, whether it was due to illness or their inability to leverage public transportation due to some of the travel restrictions when New York was in their lockdown. But we partnered with NYU langone to help improve and maintain their service levels to college in the midst of these varying staffing levels. By allowing college to simply just use their voice to naturally engage and get connected, we were able to shift the burden of managing those calls away from the operators and agents over to the modern IVR solution, which is always available. And though NYU langone is a large and complex organization, they have a lot of services and they attend to a broad array of patients. We were able to implement quickly and effectively for them. Today, call us can easily navigate to over 46,000 destinations within the health network. By just using their

Nyu Langone NYU New York
Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

"The quickly approaching fall semester has America's colleges under pressure to decide how far they should go to guard their campuses against the corona virus at New York University Monday marked their first in person college tours in sixteen months and there was lots of talk about mandatory vaccines says assistant VP of admissions Jonathan Williams the universe is crying all students to be vaccinated NYU is one of hundreds of colleges nationwide that have told students they must be fully vaccinated but seventeen year old Jessica Abraham who's considering the school still has not gotten one public school I really wanted many more colleges have held off on vaccine mandates in many Republican led states governments have banned such requirements or school leaders face political pressure to limit their anti virus actions I'm Julie Walker

NYU Jonathan Williams Jessica Abraham America Julie Walker
"nyu" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh virtual reality is here but does it work for everyone. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute boss wrokers associate professor of psychology at nyu. Abu dhabi examines the science behind the tech. What if you could walk into a room full of strangers and see names another elephant details floating above everyone's head. Augmented reality can make such world possible. The technology may soon be built into glasses. For example so does virtual content can be superimposed on our view of the real world. Engineers are close to solving many challenges involved in augmented reality at the same time however our understanding of the conditions on the which our brains can or cannot take advantage of the additional information is relatively limited in a recent study at the university of wisconsin madison and newark university. I would dhabi manipulated. The virtual content displayed. We found it under naturalistic. Viewing conditions the brain exploits. Small involuntary had movements which we call head jitter to improve visual perception for augmented reality devices to work well debt for they should record your head jitter and update the virtual content accordingly as an imported aside. We founded commonly available virtual reality headsets. Do not work well for large fraction of the population. Specifically some popular. Headsets provide a poor fit to women. As a result females tend to report a poor visual experience and greater motion sickness. I work informs the design of new virtual and augmented reality devices and may help us. Better understand deniro. Mechanisms that are disrupted in perceptual disorders. That was best. Route.

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg university of wisconsin madiso newark university nyu Abu dhabi dhabi deniro
Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi Takes Your Brain Through Virtual Reality

The Academic Minute

01:32 min | 2 months ago

Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi Takes Your Brain Through Virtual Reality

"What if you could walk into a room full of strangers and see names another elephant details floating above everyone's head. Augmented reality can make such world possible. The technology may soon be built into glasses. For example so does virtual content can be superimposed on our view of the real world. Engineers are close to solving many challenges involved in augmented reality at the same time however our understanding of the conditions on the which our brains can or cannot take advantage of the additional information is relatively limited in a recent study at the university of wisconsin madison and newark university. I would dhabi manipulated. The virtual content displayed. We found it under naturalistic. Viewing conditions the brain exploits. Small involuntary had movements which we call head jitter to improve visual perception for augmented reality devices to work well debt for they should record your head jitter and update the virtual content accordingly as an imported aside. We founded commonly available virtual reality headsets. Do not work well for large fraction of the population. Specifically some popular. Headsets provide a poor fit to women. As a result females tend to report a poor visual experience and greater motion sickness. I work informs the design of new virtual and augmented reality devices and may help us. Better understand deniro. Mechanisms that are disrupted in perceptual disorders.

University Of Wisconsin Madiso Newark University Dhabi Deniro
What is Financial Therapy?

The Mental Health and Wealth Show

02:03 min | 3 months ago

What is Financial Therapy?

"What is financial therapy. And who should go to financial therapy him. And what kind of things do you discuss. Yeah you know. I say who should go to financial therapy. All y'all everybody knows it is so like just always say. Imagine coming into a place where you can talk about money without any judgment an abundance of compassionate curiosity and without anyone trying to sell you anything. So it's not a product based service. It is therapy where we talk about money. It's a therapy session. Where often one of the first questions i'll ask is. Hey what did you notice in your money. Transactions this week and then we're off to the races so to speak because every transaction has the potential to bring up a lot of emotional depth When there's anxiety when there's avoidance all the different things financial therapy. It's just a a new way to walk into that space especially if it's causing you any kind of distress if you're totally a hundred percent fine with money and feeling really good about it. Maybe don't need to call us right away but you know everyone can benefit from a conversation with it but it's a really great place to get support and also where we get some idea of. How can i do things differently. If you're really not enjoying relationship with money in by money. I need spending saving getting earning investing. Like all of those different pieces that go into it. Yeah i so wish. I knew about financial therapy a decade ago when i graduated from. Nyu and i was so severely depressed about my dad. And i did go to therapy at a local college at a reduced rate because he was very broke at the time and it did help. But i felt like they didn't quite understand that the money portion because i was kind of spinning my wheels. Where would have been so nice. Probably go to financial therapist. Who would have understood why. I'm spinning my

NYU
Youth of the Pandemic Revisited: Hopeful, Resilient, Nervous

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Youth of the Pandemic Revisited: Hopeful, Resilient, Nervous

"The AP caught up with some young people first contacted at the start of the pandemic makayla CO from Palo alto California isolated in her bedroom in March of last year she was sick staying in my room for long periods of time used to be the dream for me and I used to want that but now that I have it it's less than ideal no one else in the family got sick this year makayla graduated from high school in the fall will begin her freshman year at NYU with the semester in Paris if there's an opportunity for like memory making you have to like go for it because there could be a chance that that opportunity will disappear as a young black man in Chicago seventeen year old Freddie golden not only have the pandemic to think about but the deaths by police of George Floyd and others the pandemic has made me tougher mentally bomb and just be in a different situation than I'm usually in a flight home where I'm comfortable they always makes you stronger I'm at

Palo Alto California AP Makayla NYU George Floyd Paris Chicago
What Cops Are Doing With Your DNA

Slate's If Then

01:57 min | 4 months ago

What Cops Are Doing With Your DNA

"Morning. Everybody for those. That don't know my name. Is anne marie schubert. I'm the district attorney of sacramento county. I remember watching this press conference. Susan was april of two thousand eighteen. The da came out to make our announcement. She's standing in front of a crime lab surrounded by a bunch of cops and he was there to say that finally almost cinematic investigators had found a golden state killer. This man who had terrorized california's throughout the seventies and eighties. There were upwards of fifty rapes twelve murders crimes that spanned ten years across at least ten different counties nor decades had passed law enforcement. Hit dead ends and then regrouped amateur on the internet swap theories and then after more than forty years abroad got him and done it by putting his dna profile on genetic. Teeny apology websites. It is fitting that today is national. Dna we found the needle in the haystack. And it was right here. In sacramento joseph jams. Dangelo was arrested. We'd guilty disturbing twenty six life. Sentences and his case was billed as a triumph for crime solving and genealogy and it marked a seismic shift in how investigators used dna in cold cases. Do you remember what you thought. When you heard that genetic genealogy had been such a big part of that case. I was really intrigued Because i have a biology background before i went to law school and i never thought that you would sort of come together in this way. That's nilo bala. She's a senior attorney the policing project at nyu law school and she studies. How technology and policing come together.

Anne Marie Schubert Sacramento County Dangelo Susan California Sacramento Nilo Bala Nyu Law School
A Buddhist Approach to Patience With Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:11 min | 5 months ago

A Buddhist Approach to Patience With Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche

"How do you define patients generally speaking when we speak a patients it is sort of understood largely as a green in bed with whatever is happening but in the buddhist teachings in the buddhist a practice of course maybe initially you might have to kind of do that. A little bit y. You're being agitated while you're being irritated. Nyu feel few need to react. And you pass beyond that point if you could just be present with what's happening in your in the mental and emotional level then is much. Do actually with the hull. Do you actually constructively respond to the situation. Thou is always close this from this book. If there's something you could do why to worry all why to lose your temper if there's nothing you could do. Then what's the benefit so you come to sort of explore y'all own sort of internal innate wisdom to see whether there is something that you could and if there is something you could remedy then tried to sort of get on with that. Skillful means and then not lose your self to the kind of emotional self destructive any kind of pain fool state of hangul resign mental even if you don lash it out because he should should out. Then it's going to be much more problematic but even if you don lash out if you just kind of stained state sort of eats up a lot of your own peace and a lot of your own sense of well being so in tried to sort of move on with what you do to kind of remedy the situation and then come to the other side so much to do you know applying yourself to kind of find this malaysians rather than sort of be stuck with emotion.

Don Lash NYU
Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:22 min | 6 months ago

Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

"Welcome alex i. It's great to have you here to talk about viola. I'm so excited to hear your picks but first a little bit of background viola. When she won her first oscar for best supporting actress for fences and twenty seventeen. She became the first black person to win the so so-called triple crown of acting a competitive advantage emmy and tony award because of this in how omnipresent she's been over the last decade including her turn in the blockbuster period piece the help and as the shady complicated lawyer least keating in the long running series how to get away with murder. It might be easy to forget that. She has more than paid her dues to get where she's at. Now she graduated from juilliard in nineteen ninety-three and bounce between theater and screen throughout the rest of that decade by the early offs. She'd become a reliable supporting actor. Popping up in steven soderbergh movies like solaris and playing rations on the mom rule or the urban professional. She spoken candidly about how being dark skinned. Black woman has impacted her career like in this interview. She did with tina brown in twenty eighteen. I have a career that's probably comparable to meryl streep julianne moore. Let's sigourney weaver. They all came out of jail. They came out of juilliard. They came on nyu. They had the same path as me and yet i am nowhere near them. Not as far as money not as far as job opportunities. Nowhere close to

Emmy And Tony Award Viola Oscar Alex Steven Soderbergh Meryl Streep Julianne Moore Tina Brown Weaver NYU
The Case Of The Pricey Fritos

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:52 min | 6 months ago

The Case Of The Pricey Fritos

"So we are on the case for scott horsely following the fritos clue number. One fritos is owned by pepsi. Pepsi owns frito-lay which makes free does in fact the vending machine scott uses in. The white house is all pepsi products and all of the products and the machine. Not just the fritos got more expensive so we called pepsi. they would not comment. They declined to comment. Okay find out thanks. i know. Luckily there was a second clue. A note left the scene of the crime. There is a note on the vending machine from the the people that stock the machine to are valued patrons effective in the next couple of weeks. The prices in the vending machine may be adjusted to offset increases. We have received in product costs from manufacturers so presumably the wholesale cost of the fritos have gone up and they're passing those along to us but it is kind of curious at a time when corn prices are down. And you know there's only three things in a frito. There's there's corn corn oil and salt. Well how naive to think vaga free does. Caroline dimitri is an applied economist at nyu who specializes food studies and seem kind of offended by the idea that might only have three corn prices at anything to do with the price of corn chips right by the way we tried calling the vending machine company. Sometimes yeah but they would not call us back. Nobody wants to give us a comment so we turn to. The experts and caroline is an expert. She says the price of a processed food like fritos has almost nothing to do with well. food prices. Just break that idea that you have that food actually. The food costs are an important component of any food product. That you buy in the grocery

Pepsi Scott Horsely Frito Caroline Dimitri White House Scott NYU Caroline
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 7 months ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
"nyu" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

03:39 min | 8 months ago

"nyu" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

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Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

The WoMed

05:42 min | 8 months ago

Mother Wit With Certified Nurse Midwife Tanya Tringali

"Tanya thank you so much for joining me on the woman today. I'm so excited to speak with you. Happy to be here tiny. I think you are our first midwife on the podcast. You very cool yeah. I've had a couple of different fertility. Experts instead steph combat now knowing that's a certified nurse midwife so welcome as my first day. That's so cool. I always knew that you know women and children were going to be the focus of my nursing career. But before i fell into the nikki world i was definitely researching the nurse midwife route. 'cause berth itself is just so cool it is it is. I don't think anyone really gets it unless they're actually a delivery room. I i totally agree. And there's so much you just don't think about ever until you're pregnant. I mean i. I have a twenty year old at this point so my birth and i only have one child. Mike was a long time ago. But i am definitely one of those people that didn't think midwives existed when i was first pregnant. I really thought that you only heard midwife. In historical novels such And so such a learning curve for me to be pregnant. I was young. I was pregnant. But i was notably unhappy with my experience from the very first visit. There's gotta be a better way. And then i was in prenatal yoga class and heard somebody say midwife and my ears perked up it was like what is going over there and before you knew it. I was like sitting in the corner arms and noble reading every book. Get my hands on and kind of knew where i was going to go. Navigating a pregnancy and a new career path essay in time. But it's amazing. How many people. That don't know what a midwife is or if they do they think we only attend home births like all those minds of misconceptions that are you know fun to answer all this questions. So is that kind of what drew you into. Midwifery where are you a nurse. I already at this point or not. I went to performing arts high school. I moved to new york with the state. Can hundred bucks. When i was seventeen years old and then i was pregnant at nineteen years old. It was very sort of meant to be kind of situation. Like i never doubted the moment i was pregnant. I never doubted that thing never crossed my mind to do anything else. I've no judgments about what anybody does ever but for me it felt right even though it was really strange. I didn't think it was supposed to feel right. And you know very quickly. I realized that these two experiences. We're going to be very late to figure it out about midwifery. By the time. I was twelve weeks pregnant. And i was on a hat so like i was my first birth as a dula when i was six weeks postpartum and i went to a few births and i said screw it and i was a nursing school and then i got through nursing school with the sole intention of being a midwife by ban i needed to come up for air for a minute. Yes i waited. I worked for two years. The labor and delivery nurse waiting for my kid to be old enough to go to kindergarten and i went to midwifery school while she was intended artem in first grade. So that's that's how it all happen. So those two journeys were intimately linked for me. I'm going to sound just like alexis on shits creek. But i really loved this journey. Well kids. I can't say i know the reference because i tried to watch a few episodes of ships creek like when it first came out and for whatever reason i didn't get into it and everyone says how amazing it is and how the pandemic has changed the way the show comes across and i feel like i have to give it another. Go definitely definitely give it another go. I think the first time. I watched the whole season through or like the whole first thing like shits creek as a as a whole i am. I watched it all the way through. It wasn't really until the second season that i was like. Okay yeah i really get it. And then i just started rewatching watching it all again because it's sometimes need to turn on those. Those calming lake funny shows like parks and rec is gone off netflix. Now and i still have shits creek and meant just. It's great to have on during the day. And i'm just laughing but off now so i'm gonna have to give it another go with all my free time i would. So what was midwifery school like for you. Like what's all involved in that so midwifery school kind of ties into another big piece of my life. I think i guess. I tend to Dotson things at the same time. I so i went to nyu new york university for nursing. Okay and when it came time to go to midwifery school. I wasn't super excited about going to one of the campus based programs in new york like it wasn't about that i thought i wouldn't get a good education at all the new york based schools. But i knew that they would put me in a clinical site and that it wouldn't be my choice and i had really clear beliefs about time to wipe. I wanted to be and where i wanted to train. I had i gave for a free standing birthing center and i was really interested in doing center. Work home birth. Were all of that. And i just at the time did not really want to be in the hospital understandable. I figured out that there were some distance education programs. And that at some of the distance. Ed programs you actually had to find your own clinical site and while that might be a deterrent for some people for me gave me the freedom to figure it out

Shits Creek Tanya Steph Nikki Artem Mike New York Alexis Nyu New York University For Nu Netflix Dotson
Diving More Deeply Into Diversity

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

06:24 min | 8 months ago

Diving More Deeply Into Diversity

"Welcome to this special episode of. Yeah that's probably an ad. I'm coat m. your community editor and this week is a really special one. We have some inspiring guests in our room with us as it is black history month and as we continue these important conversations about race racial injustice social justice within our marketing and advertising communities so I'd like to introduce jason. Rosario who is chief diversity equity and inclusion At bbdo worldwide gabriel director of global diversity and inclusion at abercrombie and fitch company and jasmine cruise brand manager at beach. La and head of marketing and brand strategy at in her shoes movement. Thank you so much guys for being with me today I have excited to chat absolutely so before we kind of dive deeply into the conversation Let's start with jason Tell us more about kind of what you do. And what you're trying to do such a question i'll try my best to answer it as distinctly as possible. But i think i'm a jack of many trades but specifically at bbdo. My remit is to lead a global diversity efforts across the network on an enterprise level. And so what that means is to. My job is to figure out how we might be able to apply inclusive principles to every aspect of the organization from recruiting and retention and partnering with hr on kind of core cultural diversity equity inclusion initiatives. All the way through to pot a week rate more inclusive representative Client output in. How do we advise our clients to think through these lenses if you will so Broadly speaking that's my role Outside of that. I'm an advocate for a masculinity in mental health I started a or launched. An agency called the lives of men which uses the conversation around modern masculinity to explore. has implications on diversity equity and inclusion allied ship and the intersection of those conversations and mental health. So that is a sickness. I can put it Thank you for all that you do in the various spaces that you're a part of What about you gabby Where are you at with this new gig in terms of What you're trying to do within nf yet. I've been A diversity equity inclusion blinding practitioner for the last ten years in really this new hampshire with. Nfl has been really really exciting. discussed really the more fascinating part to me In having an opportunity to lead the effort goes beyond just diversity as a practitioner For me it's really all the other parts that keep me up at night The parts that would influence Candidates employees associates to wanna stay within an organization. So it's really around the side of the house that deals more with inclusion More equitable workforce building that sense of cultural belonging in an organization. And that means that are focused. Can't just beyond diversity for the sake of boxes but migiro really is rather to try and influence and create the type of environment where employees associates feel that they can bring their full selves to work each and every day in creating more accessible equitable workforce and in addition to that. I mean you know abercrombie and fitch. It's really really interesting. Time to work in the space where our mission is really been dedicated to amplify engaging in power empowering folk small different backgrounds and really foster in an open environment where folks can come together. Listen learn and really take action to move from conversations toward action and influencing the products that we're creating to reflect our global customer so it's been really fascinating You know i start my career in higher education working in nyu and columbia then pivoted to citi group Leading our diversity inclusion efforts early career talent and then transitioning to the fashion industry which is really really exciting opportunity to make a make an impact end create product that has the opportunity to create social change right across our across our communities in really interesting way. I have so many questions About kind of what you all have seen so far but first jazzman How do you include that d. i. lens as somebody who's on the agency side and also trying to you know achieve more equity in the greater world. Yeah i. I'm just so to be part of this conversation and hearing from jason gabby amongst inspiring folks so I think as an account manager really partnering with clients and but also partnering with leadership in how we infused diversity equity inclusion not just from an internal perspective but so that emanates within How we partner with clients We just ensuring that yes. We're being responsible and that brands are being responsible but also Figuring out how what we can do to not just check the box like abbie said but actually make tangible change. And so i think for me personally. It's just something that i've always been about which led me to Being part of the in her shoes movement A nonprofit base-year l. a. And so i have this unique Intersection where i get to see What does social impact look like from grassroots Point of view but then also in my day job like how. How can we partner with clients in doing this. Great work in continuing this great work especially with brands that wants to create

Bbdo Worldwide Gabriel Global Diversity Fitch Company Jasmine Cruise Brand Jason Rosario Bbdo Migiro Abercrombie Citi Group LA Beach New Hampshire NFL Fitch Jason Gabby NYU Columbia Abbie
Did Alec Baldwin Know about Hilaria?

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

08:37 min | 10 months ago

Did Alec Baldwin Know about Hilaria?

"Did alec baldwin really know and i. I don't really know. I really. I think i think he's a weird guy You know he was awful to kim bassey basing her his wife he was. You know awful to the daughter. When she was about thirteen is the famous. You know voice message that he left her. They were going through very very contentious divorce. And a lot of lawyers involved a lot of custody battles between alec and kim. And i think it was about thirteen and i think either she flaked on their time alone or didn't wanna go over to the dad's house which happens a lot when kids are about that age and their parents are separated and he left her. The message saying your little pig. And i guess kim did submit it in her divorce findings and it went public. And i mean there's even a youtube video of door the explorer like with the voice of it. I remember my sons went saw. It went very viral since then ireland. A very pretty girl also very popular and instagram. She is an adult now. kim has really not been acting. I haven't seen her in much. She's sixty seven years old. I did not realize that she was actually older than alec But i don't know what she's up to but when this story broke down a couple days after christmas who was the girlfriend. That is like kim coming over with a bottle of wine and let us fuck and talk even if she didn't care about hillary under five kids and that you know because obviously she was nicer daughter ireland. But there's just got to be some satisfaction in knowing that your ex husband's wife is been proven to be full of shit as far as this still doesn't mean she's not a nice person. A charitable person. But this is weird in a nutshell. She grew up in boston. She went to high school here. Her parents are white her. She's relatives all the way from like the revolutionary war or whatever. There is no spanish in her blood at all. The dad got into teaching some spanish studies. The data and the mom who are still married moved to spain in two thousand and eleven. And i think the brother might have gone there as well and visited or whatever and she went on in so many interviews so many things to say that her family lives in spain so in one interview. They're like now wait. What happens like i came here. I came here when i was nineteen to go to school at nyu. And the two female interviewers are like. Oh from spain yes. My family lives in spain. now. She didn't say i was born in spain and then she tried to say in correcting that when she didn't think it was going to be a big deal like the first day this broke. She did an instagram Tv like right to camera and then she took it down and that's when she said What i meant was. I moved from boston to nyu when i was nineteen because all these people went to high school with hillary in boston so i thought that was really interesting now. They met her and alec met. According to. everything's been researched. Is he walked into a restaurant. New york was there and she was there and she was speaking perfect spanish to a waiter and he said i must tell you and she said you must know me now. I think he just was like loved that little sexy spanish. You know much like a selma hayek. Who was his love. Interest in thirty rock for in two thousand eight two thousand and nine. He met hillary in two thousand and eleven. And i think that just was kinda like hot. It's like it's like the couple. Let's see we're here. They are getting married. I'm looking on my youtube for those of you. That like to watch on youtube all the photos from their wedding and she kept very much with the spanish theme. She has this long traditional spanish. Veil that covers your head. It's very you know it's from that type of style and they. I think they had a spanish speaking priest. They found eight. Spanish church catholic church in in new york to get married in and she did interviews forty people from my family over from spain so it was crazy. You can imagine how crazy it was with the spaniards here. Well those people are just people that live in their vacation home that like retired there and came over and then she said oh my god and my relatives there like how do we say your new. New name is baldwin baldwin. They don't their spanish. They don't know how to save baldwin. I mean it just continues on alec. Baldwin goes on david letterman and starts imitating his wife spanish accent and he goes and it's not being racist because she is from spain and she you know and so he's doing he's playing into it and i just think people sitting back loved it and the more that they loved it and encourage it. I think he just went along with it. I don't know that he ever really asked her about her high school life. He might be one of those guys. That doesn't really ask. I don't know. I ask a lot of questions. But you know. I just interviewed emily simpson from real housewives of o see and. She said she's never really asked her husband about his mormonism and they've been together twelve years so i don't know how other couples work but i think he loved the package so kelly just said what do you think when he met the parents and they didn't have an accent. I don't know that he really cared to get to know the parents a lot of you know there. He's an older guy. He has his wife. She's popping out babies. She's really sweet to him. She's down to boehner many time she can whip up a nice meal. I dunno and you know he has to. He's one of these guys that works a lot and he kind of has to. I don't think he's enormously wealthy as a star you know. He needs to take the. He does like a show with celebrity. Some game show. I forgot the name of it to the truth or to tell the truth. I don't know what it and he said. I take paycheck like i. There's jobs i take straight up. I need the paycheck. I've got you know six kids including ireland. And you know home in the hamptons home in new york i think he has really expensive lifestyle and But i think he totally loves and loves what she was. and i don't know i just. I don't know that. I think she was kind of used to presenting herself. Like that was starting to get into it and then like on their first date you know she said oh for the first five weeks we just held hands and then you know five months into the relationship. We got an apartment together and so it's just fascinating. I want to see a movie made about this. I really do of when do you go. When do i stop. Or for some people like madonna. Who picked up an english accent. When she was living in england did she just become so used to it that she kind of forgot her old way of speaking. Like if i had to do an impression of drew barrymore war. I could do her for an entire week and then i could. I do for a month. Yeah could do for year. Probably and then. Maybe i'll just forget if it was part of my life if i had to do this just like when somebody became becomes an actor in a really intense movie. They sometimes say i'm not going to get out of this character the entire three months. I'm doing this movie. I'm going to be like this one. It's break time at lunch. I'm gonna. That's what i'm gonna do because that's how i do it so i don't know it just fascinating and then at first ireland defended her and i'm so sick of people bullying you know and being cruel. What do you care and stay at people's lives. You don't know well. I think it's one thing to be an actor and you put yourself out there as an actor but in this day and age. If you're an actor or television personality that also goes and makes a huge presence on instagram. Then i really think you cannot bitch because if you're going to open your life on instagram if you're going to profit from instagram than people do know you those nine hundred thousand people that follow you do feel like they know you and they feel deceived

Spain Alec KIM Kim Bassey Hillary Ireland Boston NYU Youtube Selma Hayek Alec Baldwin Spanish Church Catholic Church Baldwin Baldwin Emily Simpson David Letterman New York Baldwin Boehner
As Americans start to receive Moderna vaccine, questions arise about a new COVID-19 strain

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:15 min | 10 months ago

As Americans start to receive Moderna vaccine, questions arise about a new COVID-19 strain

"Tonight. The cdc says this corona virus variant this new strain found circulating in the uk could already indeed be circulating in our country. Undetected pfizer. Says it's highly likely that its vaccine effective against the new strain. It'll take roughly two weeks to know for sure but the company says it could produce a new vaccine to match the new strain in six weeks. Well for more we welcome back to our broadcast dr. Selene ghandour clinical assistant professor of medicine and infectious disease at the nyu still of medicine in bellevue hospital in new york. She was recently named to the president-elect's corona virus advisory board a doctor gander. First of all. It's great to have you back. Second what is your level of concern on this new strain. And what's the truth about. Existing testing will the testing. We have if you're lucky enough to get one. Expose it well brian. There's a lot that we still don't know about this variant. But i do think that we need to take this very seriously as a potential new threat We don't know if this new variant is in fact more transmissible we think it may be based on modeling that we don't have concrete data on that yet we don't know if this new variant could be more deadly most of those who have been infected with it in the uk so far has been on the younger side and they tend to have milder cases of coronavirus to begin with. So it's a little hard to say whether there's going to be a significant difference in severity of illness and finally we don't know for sure. If the vaccines that have been developed by pfizer by madonna and others will protect against this new variant. We think they probably will. But if there are further mutations that accumulate in these variance where the change even more. It is possible. They could evade the vaccines we've developed. Thus far i heard someone say today. We can try to use the defense production. Act to make more vaccine to keep the pipeline full of pp which just don't know how to make any more doctors and nurses a personnel staffing as becoming the issue. We have ground them all down between spikes of this disease. What are we going to do in these hospitals these regions that are running above full. Tilt we we really can't defense production act our way out of this one. You can't manufacture doctors and nurses and while you can play around the margins by promoting medical students to first year residents or trying to bring people out of retirement. That's not gonna make a huge dent in this what you really need to do. It's a supply and demand problem right and we have a major demand across the country. What is driving that is transmission and really the only way to get ourselves out of. This situation is to flatten the curve. It's what we've been talking about for months. Now which is reduced the number of cases so that health care systems. Doctors nurses can cope with the number of patients that are being asked to care for. Where do you come down on shot shaming. We have a report later in our broadcast uses as an example thirty one year old member of congress from new york in perfect health. Got her inoculation Before doctors and nurses across the country some of them who are begging for there's and putting hands on patients every day. How should people view these lines and the notion of cutting in line. I think when you have enough an elected official who steps up and wants to get vaccinated. I do think there is very important symbolic value in that to show the american people that they trust the process by which this vaccine was developed and you factored approved by the fda and so i think the value of that messaging is worth it for. Somebody like that to be back. Stated early dr selene gander. Thanks for your work. Thank you very much for agreeing to come on and take our questions. We always appreciate having you. Thank you very

Selene Ghandour Bellevue Hospital Pfizer UK Infectious Disease CDC NYU New York Brian Madonna Congress Dr Selene Gander FDA
Cant Deport a Movement

In The Thick

05:03 min | 10 months ago

Cant Deport a Movement

"What's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Race and culture from a poc perspective money. Sam and i'm lorella joining us as a special guest. All the way from brooklyn is a daas. She's an immigrant rights lawyer professor at new york university school of law and co director of the. Oh so important. Nyu immigrant rights clinic alina. Welcome to in the thick. Thank you so much for having me. You are the author of the recent book. No justice in the shadows. Which is what we've been saying. You know people in the shadows is not a good thing for democracy and your book you write that. Roughly three hundred thousand people are formerly deported from the us every year with a million more turn back. Just you know. Within the border area you talk about how the immigration criminalization and deportation systems are intertwined desire to maintain the racial status quo in other words the white supremacy and white majority of this country. You talk about how the use of the terms like criminal alien one of our favorites. Yeah falsely separates immigrant communities into categories of good versus bad right. And we've also had this presidential election where one candidate didn't denounce white supremacists and in this mist of a nationwide protest for black lives and a pandemic that has disproportionately affected black and communities following the election right. it was declared that joe biden had one right. Donald trump who previously had said. He wouldn't commit to a peaceful. Transfer refuse to concede and his allies started referring to vote as what a surprise quote legal or illegal and they especially tried to discredit the vote counting in cities with large black populations detroit philadelphia atlanta. This idea of like even votes now becoming good and bad legal and illegal criminal or non-criminal. It just permeates throughout our entire electoral politics so alina. Can you talk about how the immigration system has been set up to protect a particular type of immigrant absolutely and this is one of the things i focus on in. The book is really a historical perspective. Because we're told that our country is a welcoming country in that people who face deportation must be facing this. Because they've broken the law. They violated the laws where the laws are actually written and the foundation of the laws are designed to treat immigrants a- suspects to exclude them and to exploit them and we know this from the very origins of this country right there first naturalisation law that congress row because the constitution required them to come up with a universal naturalization law was limited to free white persons that's the foundation of our rules about membership in belonging and we police migration in this country initially focused on black people an indigenous people right so for the first century when voluntary immigration was mostly why congress was focused on fugitive slave laws that allowed black people to be removed from free state's to slaveholding states and the indian removal act that allowed indigenous people to be removed from their ancestral lands to make room for property white man and those are the tools that congress picked up on when it decided to focus on immigrants because they had chinese immigrants arriving in large numbers but eventually that led to the national origins quotas where we explicitly used racism to decide who could get a visa a spot in this country and mexicans in particular were actually exempted in order for southern businesses to use them for cheap labor so instead of excluding them that's why in the nineteen twenties southern segregation has proposed criminalizing unlawful border crossings. So that when people's labor was no longer needed they could be easily police imprison than deported. And that's the legacy of our immigration laws and while we may have gotten rid of the national origins quotas in nineteen sixty five. We replaced it with a system that essentially perhaps immigration including mexican immigration for the first time to twenty thousand nieces when hundreds of thousands of people have been going back and forth and the laws created this kind of undocumented population at created this false sense of illegality and as a backlash to legal immigration suddenly coming from asia africa. The caribbean you saw this rise of law and order policies nineteen seventies eighties war on crime. The war on drugs suddenly treating immigrants as criminals. And that's really what's laid the foundations for the modern immigration system today where police have been taken over as essentially immigration agents to create a pipeline for deportation and that replicates all of the racism that we see in policing generally and combined so that immigrant communities kind of double ranked in their communities.

Lorella New York University School Of Alina NYU Congress Brooklyn Joe Biden Donald Trump SAM Detroit Philadelphia Atlanta United States Caribbean Asia Africa
Why the Treasury wants its money back

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:40 min | 11 months ago

Why the Treasury wants its money back

"There are days of which this is one when we are obliged by the news to get just detached down in the weeds so we will because we have to. But we'll do it gently back in march in the cares act. Congress authorized the treasury department to let the federal reserve us about four hundred and fifty billion dollars to fund. A bunch of fed lending programs programs that would and remember back in march and april. The fear factor was pretty high in this economy. Right these programs would stabilize credit markets. And in a way thus backstop the whole economy. Well yesterday treasury secretary steven mnuchin. Told jay powell. He wants the money back. In other words those lending programs the secretary said are none the fed not known for its political loquaciousness. Said in a statement. Yesterday afternoon it would prefer the money and the emergency programs. Stay where they are. But after noon sherpao roach secretary mnuchin and told him the money's on the way so we will get to the what it all means thing with lopez and genus smile. Like in a minute but first marketplace abbreviation shore with what exactly these programs did in different ways. These programs all allowed the fed to get down and dirty in the mud of credit market so for example a couple of them allowed the fed to actually buy corporate bonds another loved the fed to buy short-term bonds from state and local governments another allowed to indirectly by up car loans and student loans they essentially stood there and said you know we'll be a buyer of these things will support these markets yousef obasi is global market strategist at stone ex. Now the reason we care that the fed could buy these securities. Is that for a while. They're in this pandemic. It was looking like nobody else would and if nobody wants to buy up for example loans. People aren't going to get as many loans and loans are what kept some businesses. Live and local governments functioning. You're talking about essentially the entire credit markets could've yearly froze if the fed didn't step in with these facilities the fed supported credit market so credit markets could support people. Chris campbell is chief strategist at duff and phelps and former assistant secretary of the treasury they allow for serbia liquidity or money available to banks or institutions to have them to be able to lend you money by all accounts. These programs worked. Edward altman is professor of finance emeritus at nyu. The treasury felt that it has succeeded so well that it's no longer necessary. Oldman sees that is. Ill advised to give them the looming threat of further shutdowns but secretary mnuchin has said businesses need grants now not loans. The four hundred and fifty. Five billion dollars in question could be re purposed into a miniature stimulus. Deal before a new president is sworn

Federal Reserve Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuc Jay Powell Mnuchin Treasury Department Yousef Obasi Stone Ex Congress Lopez Chris Campbell Edward Altman Treasury Duff Phelps Serbia NYU Oldman
Its time to talk about voting technology. No, not that kind of voting.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:29 min | 1 year ago

Its time to talk about voting technology. No, not that kind of voting.

"The pandemic has forced lawmakers around the world to get creative about passing legislation but in the us members of congress still have to show up to vote in person or have another member cast a proxy vote on their behalf but a report out last week by the house administration committee says congress could conduct remote voting if it wanted to securely and with existing technology beth. Simone novak studies the impact of technology on governing as a professor at new york. University's tannin school of engineering. She says remote voting is already happening in other countries and in several. Us states via apple or roll. Call by phone. You know when we have our voices or our faces that's the best form of authentication of who we are. It's no different in many ways as we've seen from all of us working online that we can simply of express our opinion out loud this on zoom the same way we do in real space. It's really not the technology so much. That's the issue at the technology exists for members of congress to securely vote remotely during the ongoing coronavirus epidemic and we've already seen lots of uses of zoom and other of videoconferencing technologies to allow for example committees to me and the business of lawmaking. Go on around the world to if the house administration committee says it safe and already available. Why the pushback. So we've seen over the course of the pandemic. there were a lot of people from both sides of the political aisle who were worried about turning congress into a museum but people felt that really. This went against tradition. This went against the way the people were used to doing things. Don't forget that from legislators used to doing business in the hallways and face to face doing zoom meeting or doing a webex or getting online to have a meeting that was completely new and in fact training was needed to get people used to the idea of having a committee meeting online then part of it. Frankly is party politics and just objecting for the sake of objecting. One of the advantages of virtual committee meetings that you've had more openness. It's been more accessible to people who may not be able to fly to washington to testify for example do you see voting also potentially increasing If you don't have to be there in person. So we've seen examples from around the world of legislatures who have seen their attendance rates and participation rates. Go way up not needing to miss a vote. Because they're in their home district or need to be a need to be somewhere else. So i think we definitely have seen instances of greater rates of participation. We've also seen the ability for for example committees to bring in witnesses from all over the world. Something very difficult today to do today during covid but even pre covid would have a hearing with a few witnesses who would usually come a potentially from where it's convenient near in the beltway area or the usual suspects. We have the ability to have much more diverse participation and more participation in hearings and. I think what's really exciting. Is those legislatures that are turning to technology not simply to do what they do offline but do it online it's those who are really using technology to innovate in new ways to do what i like to call crowd law in other words to use technology to engage the public in the legislative process. So we're seeing lots of examples of this kind of crowd law innovation taking advantage of new technology to hear from more people more diverse people and to engage ordinary people in a process. That's typically been done of really far away from them and often to much behind closed doors but lawmakers could have problems connecting to the internet right. I mean we've seen some government officials lose their connections during committee meetings. Is the infrastructure ready for this. We have to take some baby steps to ensure that we have backup plans in place right. That's why in brazil they have a system that both works with an app and with the telephone. So there's a backup plan. I've been a witness in a congressional hearing and the person who testified with me had to do so frankly from her car because it was the only place that she could get reliable connectivity we have the tools and techniques and the processes in place that can allow us to develop procedures that will work including with backup plans so that people can for example is they're doing in other countries vote maybe not during the hearing but afterwards so they have a window of time in which they can actually register their participation if they can't get online then well and a reminder of the stakes here which is you know if you have people talking in the halls and having having backroom meetings that's potentially spreading covid. Do you think there will be more pressure on the house to adopt to take this step. In the coming months i think with especially with a change in administration and a posture. That will be really much more proactive. In terms of things like mask mandates social distancing requirements and public health and safety measures. I think we're also going to see some a changing culture and when you keep in mind the fact that the average age of a senator is sixty three. The average age of a member of the house is fifty eight and again. The cove is rising all over the united states. I think we're going to see both the necessity of really instituting procedures that help keep people safe but also really a change in culture in really trying to demonstrate for the american people the right ways to work safely and to act safely and that's going to create pressure. I hope for greater uses of these technologies. Frankly it's not cova today. It could be a natural disaster tomorrow. We have to be prepared to continue operations of government even the event of a disaster. We don't wanna be without the ability to legislate to provide the american people with services that they need to provide them with their stimulus checks and importantly to conduct oversight over the executive branch Especially in a crisis you know. We have the world's arguably most powerful national legislature and it deserves to have a modern and safe digital infrastructure. Beth novak directs the governance lab at. Nyu's hand school of engineering

House Administration Committee Congress Simone Novak United States Beltway Apple New York Washington Brazil Beth Novak NYU
"nyu" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"There was talk that is taking it back to work as a preventative measure all rights I know some of those trials mixed results that it was effective so that's I I I looked into this trial I think at NYU last week and what they discovered is that there's a certain point that if you give the hydroxyl core Quinn with zinc and with that is it from my sin early enough it'll have some affect in national the number of days you have symptoms what is this I take inside camp that said stop the gas too at the first sign of a cold right feel like your throat getting kinda itchy and scratchy need takes I can't do this and get it but it's yet if you take it on day three it's not gonna work and they found that at first they were trying it out on patients who were in late stages of the disease and it didn't work but then they backed it up and they're doing and you know what right after you get to the hospital right before you really going to a decline so it just might have a limited might help for a limited number of people if you it's about the right point do you think you did more than just to try to prove his point that he made like a month and a half ago that this looks like a breakthrough drugs it's effective so to prove it I'm gonna take a rest yeah he does give up he decides he's right on something he's gonna all right let's let's talk about several wolf and I bet you're wondering who Sarah wolf is John Yahoo Sarah wolf well I founder in this Associated Press story on what we were just talking about LA is offering virus test wall but has many unused kits it's a story they ran over the weekend remember the yoga pants announced I have a couple weeks ago that you could now get a test for free you don't have to have any symptoms just drive through and they're still testing thousands of people but not as many as they have kids for so the reason I mention Sarah wolf is that she's early on in this article she was shocked she says she knows people on the east coast that are waiting and waiting to be tested and she doesn't understand why people here don't care and then at the end of the article by the way she tested negative but she says in here and here's the quote you just don't know how many people have gotten don't have symptoms I would hate it if I was doing an errand and passed it on if I had it and didn't know it see I found her laying up somebody said she did it because it could be a symptomatic insects like he might be spreading it to other people unknowingly you never know when you find yourself in a nursing home after I haven't run into that person yet I haven't crossed paths with paths with us sorry yet no name I mean that it didn't end well I brought this up over the weekend to somebody else who felt like you did he said well why would you and another Lister said well why would you want to be tested because if you're positive the quarantine you will exactly I'm if if I'm I believe it's right if I'm positive then what next fourteen days and I don't have any even if you're a systematic that keep you they want to stay and yes stay out stay away from people yes even in your own home remember in Ventura county can even share a bath right they did somebody might come and take me out of my home because it makes no difference whether symptomatic or asymptomatic if you have corona virus you can pass it that's that's the lettuce that's what they said yeah that's the latest I don't think it'll be something else I did heads like that because the promo for CBS news this morning the TV network news and I got to admit the anchor is looking at a doctor found she and she goes are we making this up as we go along well yeah they are they did they do that that's why there's been so much conflicting advice white white masks remember I love how we were told for weeks and weeks don't wear masks don't act it's actually bad all you're gonna you're gonna take them from people who need them don't wear masks and then as soon as they said wear masks people became fanatical about it and then if you didn't wear a mask suddenly your shouted at screamed at and chased now people are so weird there is here's what they had they have seventy five thousand tests available each week to use that they're a drive thru sites open six days a week although they also tested homeless shelters and they're conducting a weekly average of fifty seven thousand test so you can see the difference there is the unused tests that's yeah the call was making that that doesn't surprise me I just don't think it's human nature to go get tested when you when you don't feel sick I do we we're always scolded that we're supposed to be doing things for the public good none of us want to that's what all I guess what it's really like yeah I know but it's ours it's okay this virus yield spread the virus to scolds from the gaur said now people I think stayed indoors because they don't want to get it save themselves yeah that the fear of getting it I think it's ten thousand times stronger than the fear of giving it to somebody he's a horrible person Disney Deborah John yeah I mean did you hear the conversation yes I did well national so you will you don't no no no no.

NYU
"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the NYU and New York Presbyterian Hospital systems but surveys suggest that most employers especially in the healthcare industry haven't been paying hazard pay at all so some elected officials want the government to make sure that frontline workers get extra compensation they're calling for federal dollars to go to businesses that can't afford it I think that there is something to say about the general solvency of our businesses the government should be thinking about how we help our small businesses but also climb aboard for years if that seems to be the problem that's New York state senator Jessica Rommel's she and a colleague sent a letter to governor Cuomo asking him to direct federal stimulus funds to essential workers but so far most of these government proposals haven't moved forward in the meantime Romo says companies like city M. D. which are not on the verge of bankruptcy need to step up paying your workers shot your Hey during a pandemic it's not a dual nature it is duly recognized compensation for their work during an unprecedented disaster a day after WNYC contacted city M. D. they reversed the decision they're bringing back hazard pay they say business has picked up considerably since they started offering it to body test last week the city M. describe is relieved but she has a different explanation for the reversal I think that happened because it was about to be public that they cut our hazard pay when the hazard wasn't over what it looks really really bad in an email to employees the company said this pay bump will last until at least may thirtieth George Joseph W. NYC news and you're listening to WNYC you've been tuned in the morning edition coming your way in just a moment it is the marketplace morning report and then in about ten minutes at nine o'clock on ninety three point nine FM it's the BBC news hour let's take a moment to check in with wanted to see what they're working on good morning WNYC I'm resit following today's news out of the U. N. appeals for six point seven billion dollars to protect millions of lives and stem the spread of the virus in fragile countries Brazil is in that list and it has announced a record death toll in the past twenty four hours the.

NYU New York Presbyterian Hospital senator Jessica Rommel governor Cuomo Romo M. D. WNYC Brazil New York George Joseph W. NYC U. N.
"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Eighth and twenty ninth more at NYU Skirball dot org what's up with Shelley from accounting you mean her warm glow yeah that's what it is she finally became a member of W. NYC and got a warm glow as a thank you gift a warm glow are you making that up no it's a term from economics describing the positive emotion some people feel when they help others I'm a sustainer so I automatically get a warm glow every month it comes member of W. in my seat right intermediate we received your warm glow as a thank you gift it feels both warm and like your growth it's yours free when you contribute any amount feel great and support the news we all rely on and I also got the umbrella the common number right now here's how you can call one eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine two that's one eight eight eight three seven six W. NYC or go to W. NYC dot org and click on donate your listing all of it this is W. N. Y. C.'s winter fundraiser analysis here and with me today is Jacqueline Cincotta Jacqueline it is our steam program director well thank you else and it's so great to be here and I want to take a moment to thank everybody who's made a contribution so far during our winter fundraiser we appreciate every single pledge I can't say that enough regardless of the amount that you give we really appreciate your ability to fork over a few to a few dollars for W. NYC and show your support if you can eight eight eight three seven six nine six nine two is our telephone number we should probably get that out there and also else it is you probably know today we're really focusing on trying to encourage new members to come into the fold to jump into the public radio pool excellent so if.

Shelley W. NYC W. N. Y. C. program director NYU Skirball Jacqueline Cincotta
"nyu" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And sleep medicine here at the department of NYU Winthrop, and she's going to discuss this morning with us signs and symptoms. That probably affect many of us, and I hear this time and time again for my own patients that getting up at night. And a lot of times, I think, you know, as Iran, while it's probably the bladder the prostate, but it may not be. And so we're going to talk to her, and she's also going to discuss new approaches to treating sleep apnea and particularly something that's fascinating to me, a new implantable device and other things that we're going to get into this morning. She is wonderful person. She had outstanding credentials. I could be on the on the phone here for you know, the whole show talking about all of the work and credentials, that she's done, but she is a physician and fellow of the American Academy of sleep medicine. She won numerous awards in this area and also very involved in media on the news quite a bit, and has also written some very interesting novels so welcome to the show once again documents. So glad. That you could be with us this morning. Good morning. He can't pleasure. Good morning. How are how have you been? It's been a long time since we had you on the show, I think it has. But we were together discussing sleep at you'll mend health conference here in garden city. So it's wonderful to be back and on Sunday morning. Most of your listeners may be listening to you while they are still getting ready to get out of bed, one of the communist sate disorders. Hey, we are in the city that doesn't sleep is sleep deprivation..

American Academy of sleep medi garden city NYU Iran
"nyu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Professor at NYU stern discussing his new book, the algebra of happiness. I have to reference, a disclaimer, you have fairly early in the book, I have no academic credibility credentials to indicate I should counsel people on how to live their lives. So why did you write this? So this has been a journey of personal discovery. We were talking about this off. Mike. I struggle from loosely, call mild, depression, and issues with anger. And my sister, summarize the problem perfectly a couple years ago when I was speaking to her who said, why are you so pissed off all the time? And when I look at my blessings, and I look at my mood, they don't put to one another and I decided that I would do some research around. What are the best practices around people who are able to take stock their blessings, and translate that to their mood and their satisfaction with their own life? And there's a tremendous amount of great research out. There, there's best practices, there's worst practices, and I try and summarize them for the kids and turn it into a class. But it's also been a great personal journey for me to try and figure out. Okay. How can I ensure that I take that, again, my blessings foot to my mood, so on that there's a huge body of research about the positive power of gratitude on a resume discuss that in the book how, how does one live a more grateful life? Well, they're supposedly tricks and one of them is just writing down supposedly write them down. They cement them, but I think there's other things too. I think with, especially with men, we have a problem communicating admiration and affection for other people as young men, especially when I grew up in the seventies and eighties affection, meant one of two things you were trying to have sex with that person where you were homosexual and in the seventies or eighties for heterosexual man, both of those things, where considered either suspect or bad thing. Right. So changed times have changed, and I think faction if you look at mammals if you look at where we're happy. If you look at what we're meant to do, we're pack animals, and we're meant to touch each other. Now, unfortunately because of some outrageous and criminal behavior in the workplace, we've completed masculinity with toxicity, and we've said affection in the workplaces of bad thing. And I understand that. But I think men need to take back affection, and be affectionate with their children expressive faction to their friends, and the reality is it just doesn't take a ton of common sense to recognize when affection isn't welcome. But affection is a wonderful thing. And also just verbal admiration berry. I think you're in oppressive guy. I think you have a really interesting career and I love the fact that you talk about your hobbies you just seem like you seem like a guy that would be a great mentor. Great uncle, the guy people want to hang out with saying that most men when they say that feel as if they're giving up something that admiration is a currency when I say that, that somehow takes that away from me, especially young men. So what I encourage people to do. Our young men is to say, look, one of the greatest things that can take you off track. Is that don't assume that people in your life or telepathic thinking loving thoughts about your friends and family doesn't make you a loving person? You have to express these things and the greatest untapped resource in the world is the good things you feel about other people that you don't articulate. We assume that people telepathically understand that we admire them that we were spec them that we're fond of them. And I think the fastest way to increase your short term happiness, is to find the courage to when you when you feel good things about other people to express them and quite frankly, it's a little bit embarrassing. You make yourself vulnerable. Sometimes it can even be off putting the other person. But on the whole, I think it's one of the greatest hacks to feeling more grateful, and being more happy as expressing all the good thoughts that run between your ears every day. So you're suggesting an individual can decide to be happy can decide to be grateful can implement hacks in order that state. So I think there are best practices, and I don't think there's an equation, and I also don't want to. I'm going to disclose that. I think there's certain forms of depression, Rossi's require outside intervention. But there are through there is no one acquaintance. So the title is a little bit misleading. One happiness is say, tion, we were talking about conham before when I'm really talking about is the decisions in investments, you make through the course your life, such that the arc or the narrative, your life is a little bit more satisfying in the highs and lows that we all experience swing on a higher plane. So I don't think there's any one question people have to find their own route, but there are best and worst practices. So the Harvard grant study large study of its kind on happiness, found worst. They tracked one hundred four hundred men over seventy five years over eight years. And it's interesting started I think, in the twenties, and it which gives you sort of insight into the way we thought about people, most important in the twenties. We decided to four hundred men right like about women's happiness, nineteen twenty and no women, of course surprised by that. And we waited till we tracked him for eight years. Scientists track them for eighty years, everything they ate, what they did at work, all of their relationships are sporting activity or lack there their media, and then query them on a regular basis. Their levels of happiness and satisfaction in the Nagara gated largest data said on longitude and happiness, ever, and then said, what are the best practices among the people who are happiest or seem more satisfied? What are the worst practices among people who seem we satisfied one, and they had a swap out four principal scientists? So let's start with the worst practice. The one thing that was prevalent are consistent, most often across the cohort with the lowest level of happiness and he guesses alcohol one hundred. Alcohol, and that's the prize me, by the way, this is what I call a do what I say, not what I do. I love alcohol. I feel as if I've gotten more out of alcohol, then it's gotten out of me a great Churchill quote. Although, although you write in the book that in your twenties, and thirties, alcohol mess with you. Yeah. I did it did. And I'll I'll come back to that. But basically alcohol was seen in a lot of instances ruining relationships taking people's health op track careers coming undone, and what I when I look back when I first moved to New York in the eighties, and I took a job at Morgan Stanley every night I'd go out and get pretty much drunk with other people that felt like they were successful, not a quote by sound town, and it had sort of what I call artificial relevance and fabulous to it. And I found that over time I was less effective at work. I lost touch with a lot of people. I wasn't investing in relationships with my family, and I decided after two years of that I was just going to dial it back in the problem. I find with young people. Is that their litmus test, whether they have a problem with substances, as they say? Am I addicted have I had an intervention? Am I living under a bridge, and if they have a job, and they're well liked, and they're doing well? They think I don't have a problem with substances and let's not that black and white. There are nuances here and eighty to ninety percent of substance abusers are functioning substance abuse. The better question is if I dialed down X Y substances, whether it's transfats whether it's hall, whether it's pot whether chopping wood, I just be better at a bunch of things, and what I counsel, my kids on my students is take stock of external substance and imagine you did a half two thirds eighty percent more because there's also I think this narrative it has to be zero or one totally give it up, or you don't have a problem. Everything in moderation one hundred percent. So, but for me it was something where I felt a lot, healthier a lot better. And but yeah, that's definitely the one thing they found the best practice if there is a hack. And of course, the students want to get to the one thing is they found that the cohort. Was happiest it was pretty pretty straightforward. It was based on depth and number of meaningful relationships in their live. Coming up, we continue our conversation with.

NYU Mike Professor Nagara Morgan Stanley Rossi New York Harvard Churchill principal eight years one hundred percent seventy five years eighty percent ninety percent eighty years two years
"nyu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Joe? I cannot wait to listen to the entire six part series. So tell us a little bit about how you came to the story. Well, the shrink next door began because when I bought a little place in the Hamptons in two thousand ten I was under the impression that the guy next door was a big time New York psychiatrist. And that little guy dressed in green, who mowed the lawn was his caretaker. And I went to a party, I had drinks with the shrink and his wife and then I got there, the following summer and discovered that this rink disappeared and the little guy, I thought was the caretaker came over and told me a he was the owner of the house and be he was the shrinks patient or had been for twenty nine years. And when you hear that in your journalist, like I kind of want to know more about this. So what did you learn? Why are these people? Well, the, the, the, the name, Isaac Hirsch cough. And he has a fairly prominent practice here in midtown east around thirty seven th street. And the, the patient is run to small fabric company, which is now in New Jersey. His name is Marty Markowitz company is called American fabric. It's very tiny thing now that the Chinese have pretty much taken over the fabric industry, and he basically, he found himself under his psychiatrist thumb for decades, and he cut ties with every member of his family with all his friends until the psychiatrist was the only person in his life. And it is an astonishing story, the, the patient, winds up, acting as a secretary seeing confidential information about other patients, including Courtney love. That's an eight listening. Thank you. So it's gotta be other names. And you think about the Hamptons. But curriculum anyway, this is the this is what it was like for him for thirty years. And then finally, he this went on for thirty years. Yeah. Went on for thirty. So what was he like the psychiatrists you must have been a very or what who the person posing as one? He's the real deal. NYU. He was the head of the NYU medical school alumni association for a couple of years, what was he? Like he's, he's charming, but he's also demanding and. The way the way I analyze it. He understood that people who had certain vulnerabilities could be taken advantage of he understood that he understood how to do that. And so one of the shocking things I found out about the story is there were more than one person that this happened to there are several people who made out there will to his wife or to his children. I mean things that you just cannot believe a psychiatrist would do or would allow this guy. Did he? And he's sixty eight now. He's still practicing. Marnie has had a complaint with the department of health for three and a half years. And they haven't done thing. So this is he still practicing as he, there's been no legal recourse here. He is still practicing. This statute of limitations has long gone. I met someone else very recently who is a more recent patient and said his tactics haven't changed. Do you still have the she's still have the house? Yes. And so does Marty instead as Martin still my next door neighbor next door neighbor? This is such a fascinating story. I cannot wait to listen to the entire podcasts. It sounds absolutely tremendous, Geno. Sarah's a communist Bloomberg opinion. His new podcast, the shrink next store. You can download Joe's podcast at wondering, I tunes, and Bloomberg dot com and is a six part series about this therapist. It's the number one podcast on apple. It's the number one podcast, apple and not to shabby. They're plenty of people who clearly are incredibly intrigued, and I imagine I will be. To the jersey shore this weekend. Yeah. Absolutely. I'm going to on my way to Florida this week in judo, Sarah. Great, great work. And I'm really looking forward to hearing it coming up. We're gonna be talking about the municipal bond market. And how some people at increasing number of people are worried that perhaps it's overheating. Plus, we'll have a conversation with guitar center's chief executive officer, plus a riff from my own colleague, Paul Sweeney. He's going to sing for us. But right now it's head over to.

Marty Markowitz Bloomberg Joe Sarah apple Paul Sweeney NYU New York New Jersey Isaac Hirsch guitar center secretary Marnie chief executive officer Courtney Florida Martin thirty years
"nyu" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"I hope you'll join the you feel twenty nineteen PHD Facebook group, that I started so that we can support each other in the years to come, and I am so proud so proud of NYU's chapters of students for Justice in Palestine, and Jewish voices, and of g sock, and of the NYU student government, and of my colleagues in the department of social and cultural analysis for supporting the boycott divestment and sanctions movement against the apartheid state government that Israel. Tenured professor. Giving a confrontation speech. Absolute radical nut shop this is what's going on, on our college campuses. You're Jewish student. Conservative student. Evangelical student. You're in danger. You're in danger. What was his clowns name again? I can't see it on my paper here. Steven thrasher. Listen to the hey, you wanna one you wonder why anti-semitism is on the rise in this country. Anti-christianity is on the rise in this country. You're hearing it. These are the propaganda that are called professors who get tenure and you see it's only their academic freedom that counts they'd be my next book. It's going to be on the academy. I'm flirting with it. But I'm too busy with this when it goes. It's crucially important. Pretty shocking. Isn't it? And then alien Omar takes to the floor of the house of representatives dope. Open her big bigoted mouth. To attack Christians, and orthodox Jews and others who oppose abortion? I thought many Muslims did cut nineteen. Go religious fundamentalists are currently trying to manipulate state laws in order to impose their believes on an entire society, excuse me. So in a state passes a law, they're trying to impose their beliefs when an entire society. That's not how it works. Knucklehead. You must be confusing. These states with the activists on the supreme court, but go ahead. All with complete disregard for voices and the rights of American women. Really some American women support what's being done. Many American women support what's doing being done in these in these states. As a matter of fact, and, you know, who supports at the most but can't be heard the female babies. Oh, yes. Go ahead. We efforts. Like they'll shut up you weady, I don't even know why the hell I'm playing you. I don't even know why put you on the air. You're a left wing throwback. That's exactly what you are. Jew hater anti-semite, you break that cultural rot into this country. You refused to assimilate into our culture. That's what I mean, Philip bump over there at the Washington Post. That's what I mean. Anal. Lisa Quinn over there, NPR, and all the rest of you, clowns you like this. I'll be right back..

NYU PHD Facebook group Israel Lisa Quinn Steven thrasher professor Washington Post Omar NPR Philip
"nyu" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:12 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"I hope you'll join the NYU Fe twenty nineteen PHD Facebook group that I started so that we can support each other in the years to come, and I am so proud so proud of NYU's chapters of students for Justice in Palestine, and Jewish voices for peace. Gee, sock, and of the NYU student government, and of my colleagues in the department of social and cultural analysis for supporting the boycott divestment and sanctions movement against the apartheid, another Juma hater anti-semites bigot on he goes Trump hater. And of course no controversy no police needed to protect him. Nothing. And our friends over at the free big point out in two thousand eighteen Northwestern University named Thrasher, it's inaugural. Daniel H Wren Berg chair, and according to an announcement from north Western's Miguel school of journalism media integrated marketing communications, you wanna one. You wonder why the media are what the media are today. Thrasher, will quote focus on social Justice in reporting with an emphasis on issues relevant to the LGBTQ community. This is what I keep explaining. This is what I explained. In my book. This is the new journalism, which is no journalism at all. This is radical left wing. Progressive ideologically driven. Propaganda. The guy is the chair. He gets a chair from north Western's meadow, school of journalism, media, integrated marketing communicate. I'm not done a campus newspaper paper, storing following announcement stated Thrasher hopes to quote established programs and classes that examine media coverage of sexual and gender minorities Washington free beacon contacted northwestern school for its views on thrash, was comments about the BCS movement at declined to comment. And during the convocation ceremony thrash replaced his political causes at the center of the university's mission. This is what we are called to do. He said, this is our NYU legacy that we are connected in radical love. Thrasher. Previously received his bachelor's degree in dramatic writing and film TV production from NYU in the interim, I want you listen to me, he worked as a journalist and at NBC Saturday Night Live. He worked as a journalist at an NBC, set it in live, exactly what I'm explaining in the book on freedom of the press. It's incredible. Isn't it? Let's go to somebody who's actually saying. You know this attorney general bar. Is so good. He's just so good. I'm a could not be more proud of this man. And he's speaking the American law institute the other day, and he said, some very profound things. And since you're not gonna hear this on TV. I wanna play some of this for you tonight. No better than on this show with this stuff really matters to all of us, doesn't it? Cut one go these days, clashes between congress and the executive steal the headlines as I know very well. But clashes between the judiciary and the political branches are also very weighty. And while the framers had concerns about the unelected judiciary encroaching on the prerogatives of the political branches Hamilton promised in the federalists, seventy eight that the least democratic branch would also be the least dangerous branch because courts have quote, no influence over you the sword or the purse neither force nor will, but merely judgment. Today that assurance doesn't instill much confidence. We have seen over time in expansion of judicial willingness to review executive action, and then combine that with the strategies of sophisticated public interest lawyers, and the growing use of nationwide, injunctions, and legal community and the broader public should be more concerned, particularly about this trend of nationwide injunctions, where one federal district judge can reverse the president's decision reversed even congress and impose his or her will throughout the country. That's new. The nature of doing this is new. There's seven or eight hundred of these judges. Cut to go to district judges in Californian, New York. Nevertheless issued nationwide. Injunctions against the recision. That is requiring the government to reinstate the non enforcement policy in Dhaka notwithstanding. The president's contrary exercise of discretion. Appeals have been ongoing for nearly two years and a half, but the injunctions remain in place. This saga highlights number of troubling consequences. Of the rise of nationwide and junctions I these injunctions, have frustrated presidential policy for most of the president's term with no clear and incite. We're more than halfway through the president's term, and the administration has not been able to rescind the signature immigration initiative of the previous administration, even though it rests entirely on executive discretion. The Justice department is tried for more than a year to get the supreme court to review, the lower court decisions ordering us to keep docking place. But the court has not granted any of those requests, and they languish on the conference docket, unless the court acts quickly and decisively. We are unlikely to see a decision before mid two thousand twenty at the earliest that is right before the next election, hard to imagine a clearer example of the stakes of nationwide injunctions. Cut three. Please second. These injunctions have injected the courts into the political process, the first injunction from the northern district of Kelly -fornia came down on January ninth two thousand eighteen in the middle of high profile legislative discussions hours earlier that day, President Trump had allowed cameras into the cabinet room to broadcast his negotiations with bipartisan leaders from both houses of congress over the dream act border security, and broader immigration reform, and most people at that point thought that all the pieces of a grand compromise were on the table, which would involve on the one hand concessions, on the dream act and on the other increased border security. But of course, once district court forced the executive branch to maintain DACA nationwide for the indefinite future, the president Louis virtually all the leverage in the Goshi aces with congressional leaders who wanted him to maintain doc in nationwide are let's stop there after the break. I'll explain it more, but DACA was not legislation. Dhaka's not in the constitution DACA was issued by the secretary of DHS at the direction of prior administration. So this administration should be able to reverse course, the Obama judges will not allowed. And they put in place in nationwide injunction. They did that many presidents actions with respect to them, the Gration with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency. These are the radical Obama judges coming out a law schools and other places where using their power undermining the of. Here's something you probably don't know about erectile dysfunction, fifty two percent of guys over forty experience ED..

president Thrasher NYU executive congress DACA Miguel school of journalism Trump Dhaka Northwestern University Obama Daniel H Wren Berg PHD Facebook NBC Environmental Protection Agenc American law institute New York
"nyu" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"This. I hope you'll join the NYU twenty nineteen PHD Facebook group that I started so that we can support each other in the years to come, and I am so proud so proud of NYU's chapters of students for Justice in Palestine, and Jewish voices for his of G sock. And of the NYU student government, and of my colleagues in the department of social and cultural analysis for supporting the boycott divestment and sanctions movement against the apartheid state government in Israel. Tenured professor. Giving convocation speech. Absolute radical nuts shop. This is what's going on, on our college campuses. You Jewish student. Conservative student. Evangelical student. You're in danger. You're endanger. What was his clowns name again? I can't see it on my paper here. Steven thrasher. Listen to the hey, you wanna one you wonder why anti-semitism is on the rise in this country. Anti-christianity is on the rise in this country. You're hearing it. These are the propaganda that are called professors who get tenure and you see it's only their academic freedom, the counts, maybe my next books going to be on the academy. I'm flirting with it. But you know I'm too busy with this one because it's crucially important. Pretty shocking. Isn't it? And then Illinois, Omar takes to the floor of the house of representatives dope, and her big bigoted mouth. To attack Christians, and orthodox Jews and others who oppose abortion? I thought many Muslims did cut nineteen. Go religious fundamentalists are currently trying to manipulate state laws in order to impose their believes on an entire society, excuse me. So in at state passes a law, they're trying to impose their beliefs on an entire society. That's not how it works. Knucklehead. You must be confusing. These states with the activists on the supreme court. But go ahead. All with complete disregard for voices and the rights of American women. Really some American women support what's being done. Many American women support, which doing being done in these in these states. As a matter of fact, and, you know, who supports at the most but can't be heard the female babies. Oh, yes. Go ahead. We've been efforts. Like, though, shut up you at it. I don't even know why the hell I'm playing you. I don't even know why put you on the air. You're a left-wing throwback. That's exactly what you are a Jew hater anti-semites, you break back, cultural, rot into this country, you refuse to assimilate into our culture. That's what I mean, Philip bump over there at the Washington Post. That's what I mean. Anal. Lisa Quinn over there, NPR, and all the rest of you, clowns you like this. I'll be right back. Now, your afternoons are stimulated on AM seven ninety a morning ritual. If you wanna fight for babies, let's counteract lists Milano and have a sex surge. Okay. Weekday morning, six to ten. Protect your vaginas ladies. She writes, men in positions of power are trying to legislate them, which is stupid. She is men have tried this, the beginning of time, the somehow have power over the vagina. And it just doesn't work that way in. T. A M seven ninety Tucson's most stimulating talk. This report is sponsored by Staples. From the casino del sole, the solitu- son traffic.

NYU Milano Israel PHD Facebook professor Steven thrasher Lisa Quinn Tucson supreme court Washington Post Illinois Omar NPR Philip
"nyu" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Well, actually, nearly every culture some psychoactive recycling has been consumed ritualistically, and then we flash for to current day, and you have places like John Hopkins NYU certainly in many others doing research. What are these compounds? Good for what are psychedelic where did they seem to show promise? You know, most of the researchers in this renaissance and it's good. You mentioned Johns Hopkins because that's that really. They really drove a lot of this research, a very good and prominent researcher name rolling Griffith who we both now who had been studying drug abuse for years and years got very interested in psychedelics and drove that agenda there, and it's interesting. He got interested in it because he had had his own mystical experience in his meditation practice that got him very curious about consciousness, and so he began with the study that had no medical benefit or use at all. Which is could you use Silla Sivan, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms to occasion, a mystical experience? And there's a definition of that that Henry J O that William James help develop that would have enduring value for somebody's life. And he proved that in two thirds of cases, you could do that. At and then he went about and other people too. Well, okay. How might that experience? Benefit people who struggling with mental illness. The first and most beautiful study. They did there was with people who had cancer diagnoses. And that's really what got me interested in. And that was really the germ of the book was interviewing people with terminal diagnoses who's who were paralyzed by fear anxiety at the prospect of their death or their recurrence, in some cases. And they had these transformative experiences that in many cases completely removed. Their fear is the most astonishing thing. So that was one important indication picking up again on work that have been done in the sixties. And then there were the scores that were measured in that test included, anxiety and depression. So there was signal there. There's some value in depression..

Griffith John Hopkins NYU Johns Hopkins researcher cancer Henry J O William James
"nyu" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on KCRW

"Today on press play. It's kind of fun to hate on millennials. They're lazy entitled can't figure anything out unless there's an Instagram story telling them what to do or maybe they are rightfully burnt out. I system that denies them the same rewards previous generations enjoyed I'm twenty five. I have a master's from NYU, and I'm an internet burger. The corporate office. No, I'm Madeline brand millennials and the burnout generation today at one on press play on KCRW. Ooh. We never seem as. Thank you. Okay. Thank you. Do..

NYU Instagram
"nyu" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Always trust your feelings. This is the exact opposite of instant wisdom from every culture I've looked at. So here's epoch. Titas. What really frightens in dismays us is not external events themselves, but the way in which we think about them, it is not things that disturb us, but our interpretation of their significance and it's a great truth because you find it in many cultures, here's Buddha, our life is the creation of our minds. With our minds, we make the world, here's Shakespeare in hamlet. Others, nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so so you know, we choose how to interpret things. We have a lot of leeway in how to interpret things. There are a lot of 'em bigamous things in the world and we get to choose, am I going to take this as a personal attack, make gonna brush it off and say, the person probably didn't mean it as a personal attack. And so just give you one example. So I did a panel discussion here at NYU at NYU law school, and. There was a student. There was a law student who eat. It was arguing that NYU is systemically racist, and I asked her to to explain what and she said violence. She said perpetrates violence on its students of color really violence. Like if you explain this to me, what do you mean that NYU is systemically racist? And she said, well, it's undeniable that NYU was not built for people like me because she's Hispanic and really. Wow, okay. I don't deny that it wasn't built for you and they built it in eighteen forty. They weren't thinking of of Hispanic women. That's true. They might have been expecting all white males. But you know here we are in a panel with a gay, a gay black, a philosopher, Anthony, Appier, and Chinese a Chinese woman. He needs Suker Sohn, and I'm Jewish Jewish man. It wasn't Bill for any of us and so, but it's amazingly open as an incredibly open plays. Credibly, welcoming place. And so to take the fact that it was built by white men and to turn that into an obstacle for yourself, you, she's basically self marginalizing. We're giving kids the tools to self marginalize even when they arrive at one of those welcoming institutions they could possibly find themselves in. So again, we are setting. We're setting kids up for failure. If we, if we can teach kids to think this way we can guarantee that no matter what we do, they will feel marginalized and unwelcome. Of course, the I gen retort to what you just said is that you're invalidating this woman's experience. Oh, no. It's gone up since then. It's I'm invalidating her existence. We're still assert that she, poof, she will cease to exist. I wonder she feels unsafe. So I guess this segues neatly into your third untruth, which is this kind of black and white thinking about there being good people in the world and bad people in the world, the us versus them schema. Yeah, this is the most. This is the most pernicious of all. So yeah, the the untruth is life is a battle between good people and evil people, and this is this is social psych one. Oh one. All these experiments Taj fell minimal group experiments. It's very easy to turn people to get people to join groups and then fight or dislike the other group. And this is the bedouin proverb me against my brother me and my brother against our cousin me my brother and cousin against against the world or against the stranger either way. And so what we do in the chapter and this is what we tried to do throughout the, but we don't come in and say, oh daddy, politics is terrible. And social Justice warriors. We don't do any of that..

NYU Suker Sohn NYU law school Justice warriors Taj us Anthony Appier
"nyu" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Of course you know what soundtrack the song was on oh i don't not on the boomerang soundtrack twenty years seen that movie that doesn't mean anything the sutherland twenty years no no no but deep cover what else how real man this is not on decoder you know this is trash soundtrack what does she do now teach he's active he's teaching a class nyu hip hop everybody teaching right no but anybody in them while you talk about i'm going to talk about the the influence that he'll papas hat on or jazz had him on very cool i want our pick pete rock to teach that class but we got to these forty eight years young how today is your birthday q brought to you by jaguar monroe newport beach seventy three tourists to see visit land rover newport beach dot com man rover above and beyond i got a birthday coming up get a land rover no l are two i don't want the big boy i'll take you know i'll take get little discovery action no no no i don't know man i feel like this would be a great way for the sponsors to really activate their promote i mean look hey just take a breath i'm just saying i'll come out asking for too much eight the rope they want to be a cow oh man all right so let's get to a couple of these things real quick by the way just some news broke apparently earlier today did you know that the memphis grizzlies or with one point three billion dollars apparently they are now.

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"nyu" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

"So let me go to something specific to our universe as investors and that's one of the things in the book and that is conference calls for public how because you dig up some research that when public companies have conference calls in the afternoon the tone and tenor of those calls is far more negative than in the morning yeah first of all why is that and second of all what as investors should we do with that information yeah that's a great great question i'm so glad you picked up that research because when i when i look this some research from it from a three scholars at nyu stern when i uncovered at him like wow this is amazing at why and i keep googling thing why hasn't this gotten more press this is extraordinary and i'll answer both your questions but let me give a longwinded prelude one of the exciting things about what's going on in and i think it affects investing to one of the exciting things is going on the world of research in general how do we derive insights about human behave you're in the human condition so a lot of the insights that we have our behavioral science for a long time and this is this is legit came from things like we assembled 71 undergraduate students we put 35 and this condition we put thirty six in this condition than we ran an experiment to see what the difference was and that's that's cool that's scientific method what's happening now is that big data is allowing a is allowing scholars of all kinds to find really really interesting insights using massive massive amounts of information i mean just spectacular and so that's how this so that the study the crisis talking about did this so as you guys know their transcripts of these conference calls for for companies are a public companies there they're transcript transcript are publicly available there is now software out there that that evaluates tax in one of the things that it does even as very primitive stages right now is it can measure the emotional valence of words so we can take a word like somebody writes in a tweet i'm bummed out oh that's kinda negative i'm pumped about.

nyu
"nyu" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"I am i am but i wanna finish up our previous discussion bo by being totally transparent about how i acquired sick bullet belong to the day um so you know might theory about how like if you are dressed well enough glass you walk confidently enough in any lobby of a hotel or restaurant you'd be able to act the the bathroom if you are in need of a bathroom like that that theory was had today because each delay in my neighborhood which i discovered in died of eight kuehne court of an nyu dorrell so i needed to impersonating nyu student to illicitly purchase it hey red chicken sandwich day for lunch today so it's not that i have overlooked my conscience is that i am suppressing my conscience than shaming my cell to acquire that delicious right can be good for you because i promise you i cage as well enough to assure in a by a call and nobody on me if i come up in any dorm anywhere talking to pablo tori of a of a espn magazines zola gas you what did you think about ratchet up here though both here right now the retail covered the that is what you think about him step off the mound to allow the fullthroated bullying ogaryovo right so what it come to the racial lend through which we view scenarios in every day life one of the things that i really appreciate it as an asianamerican dude from retail is that backend guy who were demonstrating very publicly on a huge day that he had listening to our complaint.

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