35 Burst results for "NYU"

Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:55 min | 2 months ago

Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

"I'm continuing my discussion of the misdoings and malfeasance of various social media platforms. And now I want to talk about Google. Now what I'm saying about Google to some degree also applies to IBM. Apparently, Google and IBM and I talked about this on the podcast, think about a week or so week or two ago. Established race based scholarship programs. And established them in coordination with many elite universities. The Google program alone was called the Google fellowship. And Google was carrying out this program with Harvard, Princeton, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, duke, NYU, UNC Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins, I'm Carnegie Mellon. So this is a Google fellowship, and basically under the Google fellowship, if the selection process produced more than two nominees for this for this fellowship, Google required that the next two nominees quote self identify as a woman black African descent, you know, the whole, the whole gamut, trans, LatinX, or person with a disability. But it was essentially a kind of mandatory quota. You have to do this. So these colleges entered into contracts with Google as a requirement. Now, this as it turns out, flatly violates not only the well, gladly vibrate violates a civil rights law that goes all the way back to 1866, which completely bans racial discrimination and contracting. And let's notice that these are contracts between Google and these universities. And then there's also title 6 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bans racial discrimination at federally funded schools, and all these schools, some of them, of course, private, some of them, public, but nevertheless, they all have massive contracts with the federal government and so they fall under the federally funded clause. Now, the free Beacon, the Washington free Beacon, publicized, did an article, which I talked about here on the podcast about this policy on the part of Google. And they also mentioned that IBM has a similar policy IBM had a fellowship program, and it required a mandated that half the nominees of this PhD fellowship program B quote diversity candidates. Now, Google talked, I'm sorry, the Washington free Beacon talked to a bunch of civil rights lawyers when they go, well, these programs are illegal.

Google IBM Unc Chapel Hill Carnegie Mellon NYU University Of Pennsylvania Johns Hopkins MIT Princeton Harvard Duke Federal Government Washington
"nyu" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:12 min | 3 months ago

"nyu" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"And I think they meant it in a way that was supposed to be inviting. But in a lot of but if you really think about it, it's a very, that's a statement that lets you know your friendship is conditional. On whether you act in a way that's a quote unquote appropriate to them. And that's not cool. And as I wrote the book, and even as I've gone older because the book, it took a long time to write. And of course, IE as well. I started to realize that there was a lot of power in embracing one's effeminate behaviors because it's like a big to the standards of society and saying, I'm going to be me no matter what. We always like to provide a little time at the end for our guests to share any additional comments or thoughts. Now is your chance. I am really excited that the book is out in the world. It's coming out right around my birthday, which is just an extra gift and it feels great. For me, what I'm excited for most is that young queer people, when they pick up the book, my hope is that they are able to see their experiences on paper. It really does something for one sense of self and sense of belonging since self esteem. When you read something and you're like, oh, that's my experience. It makes you feel like you're experiences are valid. So I'm really excited about that. And I really hope that regardless of what age people are, whether they're in middle school or their senior citizens, going to find something in the book that is worthwhile to them. I'm really, really excited to that people are interested in wanting to talk openly about sexuality. I spent most of my life in a world where people would want to ignore the topic or to brush it under the rug. And I think that there's just so much beauty and richness within queer communities. So why not share those experiences with the world? And I think what I'll see is I really hope people remember that I just wrote about one small group of gay people like gay sons of immigrants. There's black queer people trans LatinX people. There's non binary folks intersex children of immigrants. And I hope that no one ever sees the book as the end all and be all of all geek experiences. But I want that to just be like the starting point to get folks interested in more because there's a lot of great storytelling out there. You just have to go find it. And the book is available for pre order right now and when does it actually release? Yeah, it's available for pre order right now. If you go directly on the NYU press website, you can get a discount of 30% if you enter a code. It's just a combo 30 FM. I'm sure that can go like the show notes or something, right? Yeah, absolutely. I want people to get the discount review order directly from publisher. But of course, you can get the

NYU
Michael Flynn: From government insider to holy warrior

AP News Radio

01:05 min | 3 months ago

Michael Flynn: From government insider to holy warrior

"Former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn has been criss-crossing the country building a following and a political movement General Michael Flynn ladies and gentlemen retired army general Michael Flynn sat down for a rare interview with what he calls the mainstream media It's so fake and it's so targeted and it's all about we're going to get this guy An AP frontline PBS investigation found Flynn has been building a political movement mixing conspiracy theory He was part of an effort to overthrow the 2020 election with Christian nationalist ideas but says he's not a politician I am fighting for our constitutional rights And you know in a big way to save America I guess But NYU history professor Ruth Ben gyatt says Flynn is a threat to democracy I consider Michael Flynn one of the most dangerous individuals in America today Because he is spearheading the attack on our democracy This is part of an AP frontline investigation that includes the upcoming documentary Michael Flynn's holy war online and on PBS I'm Julie Walker

Michael Flynn Flynn Ruth Ben Gyatt PBS Army NYU America AP Julie Walker
Dinesh Examines Leftist Arguments of the GOP 'Undermining Democracy'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:08 min | 3 months ago

Dinesh Examines Leftist Arguments of the GOP 'Undermining Democracy'

"One of the consistent themes of the left these days. Is to attack conservatives and attack Republicans for somehow undermining democracy. There are passing voter suppression laws that undermine democracy. They're engaged in partisan gerrymandering that undermines democracy. They want to uphold the filibuster, which is a restriction on democracy. And there's an interesting article I want to discuss that is in The New Yorker by Louis menand. Believe in hands of smart guy, I've actually crossed swords with him a few times before. He was one of the early intelligent critics of illiberal education, my very first book out in 1991. And I think at that time Anand was at NYU, he subsequently been at Harvard. He might still be at Harvard, but in any event, he's got this essay in The New Yorker called American democracy was never designed to be democratic. And I was reading the article and kind of laughing through it because he's right. Now, let's see what menand is trying to say because he's trying to give a left wing message to the left. But the message happens to be one that we can heartily endorse even though we're coming from the opposite end of the political spectrum. Basically what men and is saying to the left is listen, you keep complaining that the right is undemocratic. And you're acting as though we have a pure democratic system in this country, America is a kind of democracy across the board and the right is somehow acting in a sort of way that subverts that. And manan goes but America's never been a democracy. The founders weren't believers in pure democracy. America has democratic elements, but it also has Republican elements and quite frankly it has very clearly undemocratic elements by which I mean elements designed explicitly and deliberately to cut against democracy.

Louis Menand The New Yorker Harvard Menand Anand NYU America Manan
"nyu" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"nyu" Discussed on WTOP

"Place You step out onto stage and it pulls the music out of you Jonas born study documentary filmmaking at NYU before shifting to music Sort of accidentally stumbled upon this very vibrant music scene that was going on Her breakthrough hit one of us was nominated for record of the year It's not that it denies that God is this infinite being but he also is the person next to you on the bus And if you can see the sacred in the ordinary that's a really valuable thing Here are our full chat on my podcast beyond the fame Jason fraley WTF he needs Time for traffic to the traffic center in Steve dresner In Maryland on the southbound side of two 70 in the Bethesda area right before he gets to the exit for old Georgetown road Looks like the truck fire has been put out response remains at this scene with minor delays we have at least a lean blocked and staying on two 70 but hitting north in the area of the area southbound two 70 ramp to go to one 21 and clarksburg the ram still is blocked with a reported disabled vehicle Capital bellway traveling incident free throughout Montgomery county and prince George's county traffic moving nicely a 95 between the two beltways but we do have road work set up on the northbound side of the BW Parkway right before you get to one 95 single left lane get you by In Virginia road work set up already inner loop ramp to go to westbound 66 and eastbound 66 currently blocked for the overnight road work that's currently set up and westbound 66 between one 23 and route 50 in the fairfax area That works on his only a single right lane getting you by Southbound 95 in Virginia right after the center port Parkway right lane gets you by the words own that's currently set up And traffic otherwise is moving pretty well in both directions over on three 95 Steve Dresden WTO P.

Jonas born Jason fraley Steve dresner NYU Bethesda clarksburg Maryland prince George Montgomery county Virginia fairfax Steve Dresden
NYU's Arthur Caplan Wants to Unite Americans... By Treating the Unvaxxed as 3rd Class Citizens

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:29 min | 11 months ago

NYU's Arthur Caplan Wants to Unite Americans... By Treating the Unvaxxed as 3rd Class Citizens

"Listen to this guy. Arthur caplan is director of medical ethics at the NYU Grossman school of medicine. He was on CNN this morning. Check this out. Well, look, I want us to act as a community. I want us to act as a team. When you're fighting a war, you need all hands on deck. I don't want to reject those who still haven't done the right thing. I'll condemn them. I'll shame them. I'll blame them. But I don't want to exclude them. They've got to come around. We can't win this war. We're going to be talking about COVID this time next year if we don't get more people to do the right thing. So we can't write them off. We can penalize them more. We can say, we're going to pay more on your hospital bill if you weren't vaccinated. You can't get life insurance or disability insurance at affordable rates if you aren't vaccinated. Those companies should not treat us as equals in terms of what the financial burdens are that that disease imposes. So I can think of a number of ways in which we should say here's the stick, get on board. At the same time, we do need everyone. It's a war. You got to have all your troops unified if we're ever going to win it. Right, because nothing screams unifying the troops more than we're going to financially penalize you and treat you like some third class citizen. Yeah, that's a great, great approach, Arthur caplan. You're really on to something here. These people are nuts.

Arthur Caplan Nyu Grossman School Of Medicin CNN
Best of Mark Levin: NYU's Kay Gabriel Agrees 'Trans-Liberation Calls for Communist Revolution'

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 1 year ago

Best of Mark Levin: NYU's Kay Gabriel Agrees 'Trans-Liberation Calls for Communist Revolution'

"I want you to listen to this Caught one go Trans liberation calls for communist revolution Starting with the big one Okay I'm going to leap on this first but then I promise I will take a vaccine The dominant say liberal bourgeois refraining of translation as trans rights and recognitions kind of say based in the supposedly successful pattern of say gay liberation transformed into rights and recognitions realize of the state in some places not everywhere We make the claim that not only is this insufficient but that pouring our energy into this thing is actually not going to get us what we want or what we need This kind of economic transformation that would be a kind of communist horizon a world in which everyone has what they need So why is this why does this immediately matter to trans people Well what do trans people in our particularity have to say or to offer that expands the universalism of a communist of a communist society Which is to say when there would be achieved in time through processes and events that we could call revolutionary that we would have to call revolutionary because it require the abolition of society as it currently

Colleges go back to drawing board — again — to fight COVID

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Colleges go back to drawing board — again — to fight COVID

"Many many colleges colleges and and universities universities are are telling telling students students to to prepare prepare for for another another term term of of masking masking testing testing and and if if cases cases get get bad bad limits limits around around social social life life going going into into the the Christmas Christmas break break there there are are new new coronavirus coronavirus infections infections and and the the new new variant variant Austin Austin church church check check is is a a student student at at New New York York University University I'm I'm a a senior senior officer officer twenty twenty one one sack sack on on this this past past weekend weekend and and people people getting getting sick sick a a lot lot some some people people had had naked naked photos photos nobody nobody on on directly directly with with so so I I know know that that stops stops going going around around Cornell Cornell University University abruptly abruptly shut shut down down all all campus campus activities activities and and mood mood final final exams exams online online so so did did Princeton Princeton will will Jiang Jiang at at NYU NYU is is studying studying remotely remotely it's it's going going back back and and it's it's better better to to be be safe safe and and hopefully hopefully keep keep score score in in person person in in the the spring spring Syracuse Syracuse University University announced announced all all eligible eligible students students and and employees employees must must get get booster booster shots shots before before the the spring spring term term at at Stanford Stanford no no parties parties or or big big gatherings gatherings for for two two weeks weeks when when classes classes resume resume many many colleges colleges are are planning planning for for potential potential disruption disruption next next semester semester I I bet bet Donahue Donahue

Coronavirus Coronavirus Infect Austin Austin Church Church New New York York University U Cornell Cornell University Uni Princeton Princeton Jiang Jiang Nyu Nyu Syracuse Syracuse University U Stanford Stanford Donahue Donahue
Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey stepping down as CEO

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey stepping down as CEO

"Twitter Twitter co co founder founder Jack Jack Dorsey Dorsey is is stepping stepping down down as as CEO CEO Twitter Twitter share share prices prices rose rose on on the the news news that that CEO CEO Jack Jack Dorsey Dorsey is is leaving leaving his his post post effective effective today today the the social social media media platform platform which which has has over over two two hundred hundred million million active active daily daily users users will will now now be be led led by by Barack Barack Arbor Arbor while while Twitter's Twitter's chief chief technology technology officer officer since since twenty twenty seventeen seventeen in in a a letter letter to to employees employees tweeted tweeted from from his his account account Dorsey Dorsey said said it it was was his his decision decision to to leave leave the the company company where where he he has has had had various various lead lead roles roles for for sixteen sixteen years years and and then then he he was was really really sad sad yet yet really really happy happy he he wrote wrote that that his his trust trust in in the the new new chief chief executive executive runs runs bone bone deep deep and and that that for for all all the the talk talk of of the the importance importance of of a a company company being being founder founder lead lead the the idea idea is is severely severely limiting limiting Dorsey Dorsey says says he'll he'll leave leave the the company's company's board board when when his his term term expires expires in in may may of of next next year year after after helping helping with with the the transition transition Paul Paul Barrett Barrett with with the the NYU NYU stern stern center center for for business business and and human human rights rights says says Dorsey Dorsey leaves leaves behind behind a a mixed mixed legacy legacy a a platform platform that's that's useful useful and and potent potent for for quick quick communication communication but but one one that's that's been been exploited exploited by by a a range range of of bad bad actors actors I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer king king

Jack Jack Dorsey Dorsey Twitter Dorsey Dorsey Barack Barack Arbor CEO Paul Paul Barrett Barrett Stern Center Center For For Bu NYU Jennifer Jennifer King King
"nyu" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"A short term effect which makes sense. You just play Grand Theft Auto or shoot them up game and then you have hyped up when you leave it. But the idea that these violent video games make you more violent has no evidence for it. And there's a big piece of evidence against it, which is over the last 20 years. The games have gotten more and more and more violent. And the streets have become safer and safer and safer. If you took a line of how gory and violent, video games are, and juxtaposed it online of the crime rate of violent crime. It would be like an X, one goes up, one goes down. Now I'm not saying video games make us nicer. That's a bit too much. But the idea that video games makes us worse really is one of the least supported findings you can find in psychology. Is there some evidence that doing this kind of suffering putting yourself through the horror of a video game? Has some sort of benefit. It's like a rehearsal in some way for, I don't know, evolutionarily, is there something to be said for this work? I think with video games, I don't think there's any evidence either way. I don't think there's evidence. It's bad for you. I don't think there's evidence. It's good for you. But there is an evolutionary account, which I think is actually pretty plausible. For why we might like negative aversive games and movies and books and stories, why we like to have them with plenty of violence and suffering, which is we're just naturally drawn to explore the negative. Is even studies a daydreaming. You know, you daydreaming, your mind can go wherever it can go. And people they dream about bad stuff. They tend to think about, oh my God, what will happen if I lose my job or somebody I love dies, my house burns down. And what we find in fiction is imaginative recreations of sort of worst case scenarios. It seems like every movie is either these days either some sort of zombie movie where in the world has collapsed and chaos, or it's an avenger movie where good is fighting evil. And these are sort of natural appetites we have. And we tend not to explore them in a safe prosperous country. We don't go to war. We just watch other people go to war, play war on video games. And evolutionary account is, it's actually really good to think about and practice and worry about bad things. So this negativity bias that's been wired into us through evolution may serve many purposes, but one of them, you're arguing or positing here could be that indulging the negativity bias by watching a zombie film allows some part of your brain to rehearse how you would behave in a zombie apocalypse. That's right. And you know, there's one way of putting it which sounds really dumb, which is, well, there's not going to be a zombie apocalypse. But the cool thing about zombie movies and this is I think your point is that they're not about really zombies. They're about to collapse of society. The real danger in zombie movies are never the zombie cells to people. Right. Yes, in The Walking Dead. The zombies are pretty dangerous, but the most dangerous people are the other living people. Yeah, this show sort of forgot about the zombies. It was let me just background noise to the cruelties. People, and that's what we're what we're drawn to. And you know, you brought up a more general negativity bias. And I think that explains a lot about our psychology and what captures our interests. You know, if there's two people in the room and one's a really nice generous person. Well, it's really nice me to focus and notice, notice him or her. But if one of them is a murderous psychopath, it's really important for me to focus on that person. The negative is much stronger than a positive. And this is for reasons of survival. Yeah, it's reason for survival and prospering and reproduction. The way it's usually put is imagine the best thing that could happen to you today for the rest of the day. And then imagine the worst. And the worst is a lot worse for you than the best is good. I mean, the worst is for instance, you die and everybody you love dies, and that's pretty catastrophic. The best is, I don't know. You win a lottery or something. That's really nice, but not as good as bad as bad. And in fact, there's some evidence coming out from NYU. That people who do a lot of positive fantasizing, thinking a lot about what it would be like when I get a girlfriend. What would it be like when I get that job I won? Actually do worse in the world. And the argument is, they get so much satisfaction from the positive fantasizing that it partially satisfies their appetite. So they don't actually go out and do the things as much as people don't fantasize about. That sounds intuitively correct. However, too much negative fantasizing sounds like a horrible way to live. And I say that from the experiencing it from the inside. Yeah. So there's an optimal amount of anxiety and rumination and worry. And it's more than makes us happy. You know, I think there's an adaptive logic to wiring a lot about your kids about your life about your health because you worry a lot and you prepare. And maybe 99 out of a hundred times your preparation doesn't make a difference. And you shouldn't have worried so much..

NYU
"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"Evolvement <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> lately. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> having <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> strong sense of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> personal interest <Speech_Male> as far as like, <Speech_Male> you know, knowing <Speech_Male> yourself, knowing <Speech_Male> your body type, <Speech_Male> clearly, and <Speech_Male> what fits proportionately <Speech_Male> will work <Speech_Male> for you. That's <Speech_Music_Male> how you start. And <Speech_Music_Male> then I think, <Speech_Male> you know, dressing <Silence> smart is <Speech_Male> always a, <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> safe play. I think, <Speech_Male> you know, not <Silence> exactly like going <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> full tailoring, <Speech_Male> but you know, if you <Speech_Male> look like <Speech_Male> classic 60s <Speech_Music_Male> like almost like <Speech_Music_Male> IV <Speech_Music_Male> IV <Speech_Male> league <Speech_Male> kind of <Speech_Male> like approach, <Speech_Male> mixing that <Speech_Male> with more <Speech_Male> modern sportswear. <Speech_Male> So, you know, if you're <Speech_Male> mixing that with <Speech_Male> an oversized <Speech_Male> button up mix <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> basketball shorts <Speech_Male> in the warmer months <Speech_Male> in LA, like <Speech_Male> that's gonna work. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> think, you know, <Speech_Male> taking your personality, <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Male> thinking that like, <Speech_Male> okay, I'm gonna push it <Speech_Male> through a smarter <Speech_Male> lens. Is <Speech_Male> it a <SpeakerChange> very timeless <Speech_Male> play? So, <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Music_Male> I wouldn't, <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Male> think any trend <Speech_Male> is super <Speech_Male> dangerous unless <Speech_Male> you're an a list <Speech_Male> celebrity and that's <Speech_Male> just what you do and you have <Speech_Music_Male> a stylist that's just <Speech_Music_Male> filtering you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> new stuff on <Speech_Male> a weekly basis. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But if you're, <Speech_Male> you know, just <Speech_Male> a regular guy <Speech_Male> like myself, <Speech_Male> then I think, <Speech_Music_Male> you know, <Speech_Music_Male> trying to play <Speech_Music_Male> it smart, play, <Speech_Music_Male> play it like a little <Speech_Male> classic and timeless. <Speech_Male> That's something <Speech_Male> that, you know, you'll see <Speech_Male> photos of yourself <Speech_Male> in ten years and you're <Silence> not going to <SpeakerChange> you're not <Silence> going to you know, <Speech_Music_Male> trying to play <Speech_Music_Male> it smart, play, <Speech_Music_Male> play it like a little <Speech_Male> classic and timeless. <Speech_Male> That's something <Speech_Male> that, you know, you'll see <Speech_Male> photos of yourself <Speech_Male> in ten years and you're <Silence> not going to <SpeakerChange> you're not <Silence> going to regret. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> John, a good thing <Speech_Male> for this man. <Speech_Male> It was cool to <Speech_Male> kind of have this fast <Speech_Male> forward relationship. <Speech_Male> We hit each other up. You <Speech_Male> got back to me. You <Speech_Male> wanted to come on, you knew <Speech_Male> who Kyle was, so that <Speech_Male> made everybody's day. <Speech_Male> And more <Speech_Male> importantly though, <Speech_Male> for anybody that does their <Speech_Male> own thing. And, you know, <Speech_Male> I said this with a guy <Speech_Female> that I'm involved with and <Speech_Male> athletic gear <Speech_Male> that I'm really <Speech_Male> excited about. <Speech_Male> But to thread <Speech_Male> that needle of <Speech_Male> cool <Speech_Male> is really <Speech_Male> delicate, you know? <Speech_Male> It's like, <Speech_Male> hey, is this cool? <Speech_Male> And then it's like, it just <Speech_Male> sort of has to become <Speech_Male> it. And <Speech_Male> sometimes it's not even up <Speech_Male> to you, you know? <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you did that in a <Speech_Male> very short amount of time. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Really, really well. <Speech_Male> So I'm happy for you, <Speech_Male> even though again, we just <Speech_Male> kind of got to meet each other <Speech_Male> here. So congrats <Silence> to <SpeakerChange> everything, man. <Speech_Male> Well, <Speech_Male> I really appreciate <Speech_Male> you having me on. <Speech_Male> I know we just got to know <Speech_Male> each other. I've been a <Speech_Male> fan of the podcast <Speech_Male> for a long time. So I feel <Speech_Male> like I know all you guys <Speech_Male> well, <Speech_Male> I just, you know, really <Speech_Male> appreciate you guys <Speech_Male> invite me on and <Speech_Male> yeah, <SpeakerChange> hope <Speech_Music_Male> to do it again. <Speech_Music_Male> It's John Elliott. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> I hope you enjoyed <Speech_Male> this today because it was a little <Speech_Male> different. I <Speech_Male> know we're all kind of <Speech_Male> proud of it, but again, the <Speech_Male> way the scheduling worked out, <Speech_Male> this is how we had to have these three <Speech_Male> things in because we still <Speech_Male> have a bunch of tape ones that we <Speech_Male> haven't even used yet. <Speech_Male> So there you go. Please <Speech_Male> subscribe, rate and review, <Speech_Music_Male> thanks <SpeakerChange> to Kyle, thanks, <Speech_Music_Male> Steve, Dilfer <Music> canal

basketball LA Kyle John Elliott
"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"Some knowledge in my background in terms of logo website, et cetera, we may even have a connection who lives down the street from my mother to produce on a larger scale than just her. My question is, the on logo website trying to blast you should on social media bugger your friends to share it. What are good early moves you're getting it off the ground. Advisable sources of funding thoughts on trying to go genderless and environmental environmentally responsible. I want to be a part of a better standard of business, a better business person whose goals extend beyond merely profits, but also into setting an example of how responsible practice can be viable business. Any advice would be appreciated. That's a lot. I would say narrow the scope down a little bit. You know, you know, you don't need to no need to solve every issue all at once. I think, you know, the fact that you have something that makes you feel good that you get compliments on that showcases your creativity when you're when you're out. That's your spark. So I would say make another jacket for yourself. And start to share it. And, you know, chase your curiosities, but don't worry about, you know, I think the sustainability aspect of fashion is like an incredibly important element of where the industry needs to go. But when you're first starting out, you don't even truly have a business plan yet and you kind of been struck with this spark of creativity. Don't give yourself reasons to not get going. Just go. That's what I would say. So there's a lot there that feel like barriers to entry. I would say just continue to create. I think you clearly have some resources between your family and the people around you that would give you kind of a head start, you know, almost over a lot of people, and that's amazing. So chase that continued to create and see what happens. But don't get hung up in like these existential questions I could keep you up at night and take you away from your focus. Good answer. I like that. Narrow the focus at first. But I like that he was thinking about all these different things. I imagine when you're just as a designer, you drive around and you think of things constantly. And then maybe you bring it back to your manufacturers. There's going to be a line where they go, hey, John, somebody's going to wear this man. Somebody's actually going to wear this. You can definitely, you can go crazy. I mean, I'll never forget I was driving down Los in this guy, just like, it was like unreal the way this guy cut me off. It was like he just didn't give a fuck. And he was driving a Bentley and he had like the license plate wrap that said like something yacht club. And I was like, oh my God. This guy fucking has a yacht as well. This guy is a member of a fucking yacht club, and it was like so hysterical to me that this guy just this is the way he lived his life that I just, you know, literally getting cut off in traffic, turned into this idea of like, huh, you know, what is the Pinnacle of luxury? It's like watching water. That is the Pinnacle of what we all strive to do when we're on vacation. Just sit there and watch water. And so I came up with this imaginary yacht club and I, you know, basically did a whole collection with all these like bouncy silks and kind of reflective fabrics and whatnot. And it was a runway smash. It didn't sell very well, but yeah, that was definitely a time where, you know, you can take a real life instance and build a world around it. And that particular case, it wasn't terribly commercial, but, you know, I learned from it. I enjoyed that part of the story as much as any of this just because it's so different. I would hope people that are listening to this appreciate it and be like, wow, that's how that guy got to all these different places. All right, so another email here is from this one says nephew Kyle. And it says how to make an America was fucking awesome. There's no there's no Kyle. Do you want to get in here? That wasn't me, that it was awesome, but that was not me. Was that about you? Is that about you, John? I didn't watch that show. You know, I was showing Kyle. You're going.

yacht club Bentley Los John Kyle America
"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"To have extreme dieting sites suggested to a 15 year old who has 5 foot 7 and a 105 pounds. To let YouTube suggest extreme right wing white supremacist sides to young men. Two thirds of extremo sites are suggested by the algorithms to these young men. So my sense is, yeah, everything we feared is coming to pass and I think of all the regrets we're going to have in 5 years, ten years, 20 years, whether it's okay, we limited job growth by letting monopolies form and they put small companies out of business. Try and raise money as a search engine, a social media company, or a tech company right now or a tech hardware. I mean, the fastest growing parts of our economy are controlled by monopolies or duopolies. We're going to regret not having we're going to regret not having a more competitive environment. We're going to regret having these companies interfere with our elections. But more than anything, we're going to look back on the Sarah and we're going to think, how the hell did we let that happen to our kids? Can you imagine? At the age of 15, seeing your full self 24 by 7. Every stupid thing you said, every outfit that was too revealing your physical abnormalities are awkwardness. Constantly evaluated 24 by 7 in your face and anyone who feels for whatever reason the social need a reward to bully or come after you, and this is especially harmful among young girls, boys bully, physically and verbally girls bully relationally and we put neutron bombs in their hands. I would rather give my kid at 16 a bottle of Jack Daniels and marijuana than a snap in Instagram account. And I think we're going to look back and say, how the hell did we let that happen to our kids? You have spent a lot of time, I know the algebra with wealth is something the videos that pop up too that are like, there's just so many lines in there that are hilarious because I think of my spending habits when I was younger. And I didn't have any kind of income coming in. But you were always kind of spending your income. I'll never forget, too. When I got one of my first decent deals with ESPN, I told my father, I was like, hey, you know, finally, I can start saving some money or whatever. And he's like, you haven't had money now for ten years as an adult. He's like, you're not going to save a dime. He's like, you're going to get a nicer apartment. You're going to get a nicer car. You're going to step up from gap to gap black label or whatever, like he made. He knew he knew exactly what I was going to do. And he was right. I loved one of your lines about being wealthy is not checking your Bitcoin position 7 times a day. When you talk to, imagine there's probably some young students that want to pull you aside to go and I don't know if you have a good will hunting moment at NYU or somebody like pulls you aside and wants to make that impression but also wants to follow you around and wants to figure out the path to wealth. How different is it now for some somebody who's younger going, okay, if I'm graduating and my number one priority is accumulating wealth, how different is that advice to what you went back through? Well, a lot of us do as I say not as I do, because like you, I just raise my standard of living to my salary. I think it's important. That's why I think equity or finding a job where there's sort of four savings either through equity grants or four-o-one-ks. You want to acknowledge you want to come out of the closet and say, I am an alcoholic. And when I say alcoholic, meaning that you're going to spend every current dollar you have. So force yourself to save. So find put yourself in a position, you know, wealth isn't a function of what you earn. It's a function of what you save. And my dad between his social security and Royal Navy pension gets $52,000 a year. And he spends 40. He's rich. Having passive income greater than your burn is the definition of rich. I have a few friends who make two to $5 million a year as masters of the universe and investment banking or big time lawyers between their ex-wife, their house and the Hamptons. They're net jets car. They spend it all. They're poor. So, you know, the algebra wealth is first and foremost is focus. And that is find something you're good at and invest 10,000 hours and becoming great at it. And don't follow your passion, follow your talent, find something you're good at, become great at it because if you're great at something, you can make good money on it. And then live like a stoic for the first until you're 40, try and save ten, 20, 30% of everything through four savings or equity and bust a move to some sort of economic level of economic security. And then diversify, diversification, you don't need to be a hero. I bought Netflix at 12 bucks a share. I said, $540 now. That's the good news. The bad news is I sold it at ten to take a tax loss. But it didn't kill me. I had read envelope stock, go to zero, but it didn't kill me because by the time I was kind of, I'll call it 35 40. I started diversifying. And even though I thought, oh my God, right, I'm all just going to the moon. I'm going to put it all here. I would say no, I'm going to take a little bit of money and put it in Apple. And then let the most powerful force in the universe take over and that is time. And that is the reason I live on the beach and I'm bragging now is because I bought Apple and Amazon in 2008. And I just ignored them. I still ignore them. And occasionally, I look up and I'm like, oh, okay, apple's up 16 X and Amazon's up 12 X, you know? The power of time, anyone over the edge of 40 will tell you times going to go a lot faster than you think. So when you're early try and buy some stocks and good companies and then just put them away. You want to go broke, day trade. Go on Robinhood. 80 to 95% of people who day trade lose money. If you bought any 5 stocks in the S&P 500 since the beginning of the Dow, and you didn't touch them for ten years, no one has ever lost money..

Jack Daniels YouTube Sarah ESPN NYU Royal Navy Hamptons apple Netflix Amazon
"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"It's meant more time with kids, more times with Netflix. And my wealth is doubled. And you think well, okay, isn't that, isn't that a signal of government doing their job? And I'm like, actually, it's dangerous. Because this virus is not seen the full throated capitalist response we're capable of within 7 days of Pearl Harbor, we converted the largest Chrysler factor into a factory punching out M three Baratheon tanks, not one factory punched out more tanks than the entire third rock during the entire war. What's happened here? We have all this bullshit conflating liberty with selfishness if Walmart's stock had gone down 40%. If Amazon's stock had been cut in half at the NASDAQ and gone down 30%, when someone walked into a Walmart without a mask, we would taser their ass and then had a conversation around their liberties. I don't think we've really fought this virus. I understand that people want to get back to work. I think there is a balance between between living your life and some of the mandates I get that. But I don't think we've really really felt a sense of urgency. I think the people who control this nation, the shareholder class, it's kind of been stop stop, it hurts. So good. But back to your original question, I got wealthy from the NASDAQ. I think I'm incredibly talented and I've also was born at exactly the right place at the right time. The analogy highlight is my roommate, my freshman year of the fraternity UCLA. Born a white male in 1964, but God reached into his soul and decided that he was gay, and he died alone of aids at the age of 32. Neither of those, my heterosexuality, his homosexuality, neither of us were our fault, our choice. So it's just impossible to look at where I am and not recognize that, you know, at the end of the day, I'm just really fucking lucky. And I'm not humble. I'm not humble. So I have a mass more wealth than I ever thought possible. I feel very fortunate, but it's been through entrepreneurship. It's been through technology. It's been through working my ass off. It's been through resilience and breaking through failure, but more than anything, it's being in my opinion being born at the right place in the right time. When you look at the founder part of it, and I have made some jokes in the past. I think sometimes when I'll read about something or I'll feel like the guy wanted to be a founder more than he actually wanted to run a company. Was that the case when you felt like out of early tech late 90s, early 2000s and some of the stuff you started up. Was that part of the tech world as prominent as it is now or did guys kind of actually want to start companies to start companies? It was nothing like what it is now. In the graduate class of haz, the business school I graduated from a 92. Two of us were entrepreneurs out of the entire class. It was me and the second was my partner. I mean, no one started companies. I mean, very few people, it was really kind of a niche thing. When I moved to New York in 2000 to start an ecommerce incubator, there were just no one even understood what options were. Employees were like, oh, this is a tech company, isn't this cute? What are options? You want to pay me an option? It was difficult to find a law firm that could set a paperwork for there were no engineers. There were no I mean, so the echo system, people just don't remember what it was like. It's dramatically changed. In addition, we have this massive idolatry of innovators where the best and brightest are supposed to go start tech companies. And if you're really smart, you drop out of school. If you're really smart, you get an amazing job and you leave rich water or a Goldman early to go start a website or a SaaS company. So the emphasis and the hero worship of innovators is striking. I'm an entrepreneur and people think, oh, it's because you're so talented. My entrepreneurship is a function of my deficiencies. I recognized I was self aware enough to realize that Morgan Stanley that I was not successful in big companies. And people say, because you're such a maverick, no, it's not, because I was too fucking insecure. Every time people go into a conference room, I thought they must be talking about me. I couldn't I resented people, senior to me that I didn't think were as smart as me. And you know what? That's called work. Everyone has to put up with that bullshit. I was just not cut out. If you have the skills, people come to my office hours and I say people kids or my students. And they say, I'm thinking about starting a company. I've been off from Google and I'm Amazon. I think my story come in. I'm like, don't be an idiot. Go to work for Amazon. On a risk adjusted basis, these platforms are incredible places to work. And if you can put up with a bullshit if you can navigate the politics, if you can find mentors, if you can play well or nice with others, you know, on a risk adjusted basis, you're going to build a lot of wealth and a lot of credibility. I didn't have those skills. So most entrepreneurs aren't entrepreneurs because of their talents, their entrepreneurs because they just immigrated from South Korea. They don't have any choice but to open a dry cleaner. They're not getting offers from Goldman Sachs. And mine was kind of the same thing. I was self aware enough to big company. I'm not going to be successful. I don't have the emotional. I don't have the EQ to be successful in a big company. I need to be in charge. I need total visibility and transparency. I resent the notion that I'm not in charge of control, but I started with another guy, my stall made a Morgan Stanley. He's now vice chairman. We both ended up in similar places economically. I'm probably a little better off than he is, but he has endured a fraction of the stress I have endured. And a couple times, you know, I kind of lost everything when my, you know, in 2000 with the dot bomb implosion, I went from a 99 looking at jets to literally I remember in 2000 climb my account and saying, what am I worth? And he's like, let me think, no, no. You're worth negative 2 million right now. And then in 2008, building back and then getting crushed again in the recession because I wasn't diversified. By the way, maybe share with us because I was listening to one of the pods recently where you kind of allowed yourself during a monologue to divert into this rage of the 2008 crash. What was the worst moment? Were you running a fund at that point? What was the ultimate how am I going to get out of this moment? The thing that struck me was it was the first time I felt scared. And that is, even from a young age, I was a box boy at samba sante foods. I was a waiter. I used to go to this rich woman's house in a Lillian Helmand and carry her up and down or stare. I could always make money is to park cars with the Beverly Hills. I could always make money and take care of myself and when I moved to New York, worked a Morgan Stanley. I didn't have enough money for a deposit on apartment, and you know, I couldn't borrow from my mom's. I slept on Friends couches, I was social. You know, always could dance between the raindrops and always figure it out. And then in 2008, when I got run over by the recession, and again,.

Walmart Amazon Pearl Harbor Netflix Chrysler haz UCLA Goldman Sachs aids Morgan Stanley New York South Korea Google samba sante jets Lillian Helmand Beverly Hills
"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"Mean, it's just they don't have the capacity to let in unremarkable kids. You have to be this kid who has a patent and is building wells and captain your lacrosse team. You feel like at a 120,000 applications, 60,000 of them were four. So for every kid that gets in, there's three kids that don't get and that had perfect grades. So can you imagine the stress? That's bad. I don't know if you have kids or how old they are but can you imagine the stress that's placing on households around America? Oh, you got to be, you're out. No UC for you. I mean, it's just it's gotten kind of out of control. And I think our priorities are screwed up. There's some second order effects here. I think universities have to be more tolerant of other political viewpoints. We've become we've made huge progress being more tolerant of people who don't look like us or embracing them, I should say, we've become less tolerant of people who don't think like us, one and a half percent of Harvard's faculty identifies as conservative. So you have roughly 50% of state legislatures that are like, I'm just not going to fund this dogma in this viewpoint. They want to embarrass me or humiliate me on Twitter every day, why would I fund that? So universities used to be a place where you could have provocative thought and say offensive things. That was the point. So I think there's a lot of things that we need to change on campus. And I think as a society, we need to reinvest in higher Ed and I think as academics, we need to pull our weight and start teaching more kids and embrace technology. Everything we do has one aim and that is how do we reduce our accountability and increase our compensation compensation for administrators and higher Ed has exploded? There's this image that we're all these wonderful, nice people and cardigans, giving pens to each other and watching PBS. We're capitalists too. We've adopted this luxury brand model where if we let in fewer and fewer people, we create artificial scarcity, massively explode, tuition, and we are endowments grow and we compare ourselves more. And it's got to stop. I couldn't agree more when that last part whenever I've dug into the administrative costs and all the stuff. You're just like and I have another guy on Josh Mitchell, who I've talked with who at the debt trap book that came out recently that I thought was terrific. And in my world of sports, it was like, okay, as soon as the TV money came in for college football, it didn't go to anyone else other than the schools and bigger staffs and bigger facilities and all this stuff. And you're just like, okay, the NCA would constantly just keep saying, well, there's not enough money to change shit and pay the players. And that's a different topic altogether, but it's very similar process and that let's charge more to pay ourselves. And that's pretty much it. And you're in it. And this is why I appreciate your point of view so much is that you're both allowing like, hey, here was my advantage growing up, but also now this is the disadvantage that I'm seeing firsthand. So what are some of the things that you see? I don't know if it's arguments, I don't know if that many people want to argue with you Scott, but your boots on the ground to this as far as the entrance to academia in a place like NYU and someone that is so detachment thinking that they know what the fuck they're talking about. Yeah, but look, I'm guilty of a lot of this. I rail on NYU, but I teach there because I like the prestige and the platform. I have tried to walk the walk I've returned my compensation for the last decade, so I can bite the hand that doesn't feed me. And I recognize a lot of academics aren't in position to do that. But you know, I've been railing against this fetishization of luxury for a while. But you brought up something interesting and you're going to forget more about sports and I'm ever going to know, but I went to UCLA when had o'bannon was there. And again, we find all these reasons we call it purity, you know, oh, the purity of amateur sports. And what ends up happening? You know, the white guy is 50s makes $4 million a year or $7 million a year coaching. The more ethnically diverse, but still older baby boomers at the NC two a and Kansas make really good livings. And the kid who's probably knocked is going to play a ball in Europe for a couple of years, but never make any real money. No, we want to maintain purity and not pay, pay him or her. Everything is just extraordinary bullshit, spread over a lens such that we can keep people in their 40s and 50s rich. And we use this notion to pure the purity of sports. Athletes, I believe college athletes should absolutely get paid. The majority of them aren't going to find a way to make a living. But I mean, it just gets worse and worse as you peel back the onion. Harvard, Harvard's endowment is now over $50 billion. If you stacked Harvard's endowments and a $100 bills, you'd get nearly in if they'd saved the same return this year. You'd have a stack of $100 bills. It's practically to the karman line. In other words, the virgin orbital rocket would run into the stack of $100 bills. And yet they've only they're letting in 1400 freshmen. They could let in 14,000. The head of the admissions department there said we could have tripled our freshmen class without sacrificing inequality and was like, well, Boston, you're sitting on an endowment that's the GDP of Costa Rica. Why wouldn't you? So why do you think they won't? There's back to the prestige, the luxury brand thing that you were talking about. Once you are in America, once you have a Harvard degree, once you have useful a degree, you.

Josh Mitchell Harvard lacrosse NYU PBS NCA America Ed Twitter bannon football Scott UCLA Kansas
"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"And B is technical as you want with it. Because I don't think we ever get that stuff. Yeah, I'd love to. It's 9 37. I got all day. All right, so we can just talk about it. I won't do that to you, but I couldn't invent the West Coast offense, okay? He was at the forty-niners and he learned it from, well, Bill Walsh wasn't there. I used work for George seifert, but the system was in place. He did work for Bill to and every team runs concepts of the West Coast office. In the West Coast offense, isn't just an offense. It's a way of doing things. The West Coast offense, when we learned it, it was this is how you practice. This is how you install this is how you eat. You meet, you have days off. This is the routine that the West Coast offense, Bill Walsh, who really got it from Paul Brown, but he made it win super bowls when he took it his way, right? Paul Brown really, I guess invented the West Coast office. And it's evolved into different things. But yeah, everybody runs concepts of it. It's not as prevalent nowadays, Ryan, anymore because gosh, way back in the day, when you look at film, Jerry Rice was down in a three point stance, the receivers were down. There was two facts in the backfield. Most of the time. And heck they were in split backs around or red. They weren't an eye. They weren't in single back. So there was a fullback, have you heard of before? Some teams don't have half the teams don't even have fullbacks. It's a dinosaur, right? You're not even you get about two fullbacks drafted each year. You know, they're just people don't use fullbacks anymore. And so it's evolving into this shotgun single backswing it kind of thing because rules say we should. And so the West Coast offense is, well, you might name things two and three jet and the numbering system and the flanker drive and the way you call plays may remain the same for Kansas City and everybody else. All these different wrinkles happen. Joe Montana or Steve Young never threw the ball out their horizontally on bubble screens. Didn't happen. You didn't have it in your game. Pat Mahomes last week was 15 for 15 on passes that didn't go past the line of scrimmage. Did you hear what I said? Didn't go past the line of scrimmage. Why? Because you can do that now. When I coach him, I'm far played. You couldn't do that. You couldn't be blocking when the ball was in the air. You couldn't run those screens. Lineman couldn't be downfield at all. Now the RPOs were the line in our block in Iran or you throw the screen out there. Or the slant and they're lenient with how far alignment can be downfield. The rules are much different. That means throw the darn ball more often and throw it horizontally, which means more yards, more points, less interceptions. The rules have changed. The West Coast offense is here, but it's not as prevalent as it used to be because of the rule changes. Yeah, I'm glad you brought up to 15 for 15, 'cause I used to, you know when I was younger, you'd be like, all right, 60% for completion percentage. That's the line. If you're below it. And now you could be last in the link at 60%. I mean, I mean, if you look at the Hall of Famers, a lot of them, lahave quarterbacks, a lot of them had about as many interceptions touchdowns, okay? Now, now if your ratio or TD interception ratio isn't like 5, the one, you're an idiot, okay? Because you just don't go back and throw them all down the field in the coverage is often. You're always throwing it out in space and let's say for passes. Is there a younger quarterback from this group? And I don't want to feel like I'm leaving out everybody. But I think there's certainly whether it's a Josh Allen and Kyler Murray, Lamar, Herbert, maybe even burrow, I know I could probably. Is there anyone that you watch every Sunday that you like better than the rest? No. I like a lot of them. I'd like. I watch my mindset is a league in good shape with quarterbacks because I've been in football all my life. And the health of our league, the health of our sport really depends on having really good quarterbacks to watch and to enjoy, right? And while the NFL is, you know, retiring a lot of its great quarterbacks, we just saw Drew Brees jump into the booth. And, you know, in Philip Rivers has gone soon, it'll be Ben, he'll be gone. And, you know, Aaron Rodgers will play a little bit longer, but the great ones the man eats and all those guys, you know, gone. Brady will be there another three to four 5 decades. I don't know, but it's good to know that our league is in good shape with young superstars. The Patrick Mahomes is a superstar..

West Coast Bill Walsh Paul Brown George seifert Pat Mahomes niners Jerry Rice Steve Young Joe Montana Ryan Bill Kansas City Josh Allen Kyler Murray Hall of Famers Iran Lamar Herbert
Pig-to-human transplants come a step closer with new test

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Pig-to-human transplants come a step closer with new test

"Scientists have come a step closer toward using animal organs for human transplants with the successful experiment using a kidney from a pig surgeons at NYU Langone health attached a pig's kidney to a pair of large blood vessels outside the body of a deceased woman the kidney did what it was supposed to do filter waste and produce urine the woman's family agreed to keep her body on a respirator to allow for this experiment to take place pigs are being studied to address the shortage of human organs since they're already slaughtered for food they can't pay for this experiment came from a gene edited animal to eliminate a sugar that's found in pigs that could have triggered rejection the surgery was led by Dr Robert Montgomery a transplant recipient himself who said he accepted a donor heart from someone with hepatitis C. not knowing if a more suitable organ would be available in time to save his life hi Jackie Quinn

Nyu Langone Health Dr Robert Montgomery Hepatitis Jackie Quinn
"nyu" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Winston ma teaches securities law at NYU and he says Friday's announcement is an escalation The implication will be profound and major As cryptocurrencies get bigger and they become more mainstream in many countries China is going against trend In the world's second largest economy you're no longer able to buy them or sell them banks aren't allowed to process transactions And there's been a crackdown on the infrastructure that supports crypto Masa says this is a government wide effort When you have ten ministers involved right That's very serious Cornell economist ishwa Prasad is the author of a new book called the future of money And he says China's leadership is wary of competition and of losing control I think this speaks to the Chinese government's desire to make sure that payment system does not get entirely managed by the private sector It's targeted big companies that have pioneered digital payments including Alibaba and WeChat and China is developing a digital version of its own currency Prasad's is lawmakers and regulators around the world will pay close attention to the rules China has put in place Because of concerns about domestic financial stability as well as illicit capital flows across the national borders This week the Treasury Department sanctioned a site where cryptocurrency can be bought and sold because of its role in ransomware attacks Crypto appeals to investors to iconoclasts and to international criminal syndicates In the U.S. the chief securities regulator SEC commissioner Gary gensler said in a recent speech there's a need for more safeguards Investors really aren't getting the information that judge the risk and understand the risk And I fear that if we don't address the issues I wear a lot of people will be hurt After China announced its ban the price of Bitcoin fell by more than 5% Now that may sound like a lot but that kind of volatility is very common Some U.S. lawmakers who oppose stricter regulation welcomed China's ban and they're using it to make the case to steer clear of more rules As they see it a huge player has been.

Winston ma China crypto Masa ishwa Prasad Chinese government WeChat NYU Alibaba Prasad Treasury Department Gary gensler SEC U.S.
"nyu" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"So those are my go. To's for back to school. Oh can i tell. I have a favorite story about defectiveness of exercise that that i did for my nyu students I gave them a fifteen minute lecture. On the effects of exercise on the brain and then i had them do a clinically validated anxiety survey and then. We all moved our bodies for ten minutes. I haven't to be exercise instructor. So i meet everybody. Stand up on their assumed. This was august of twenty twenty right before the weirdest semester. Anybody had ever experienced and these were incoming nyu freshman after ten minutes of workout ahead. Them redo the anxiety questionnaire. What i found was before the exercise these students were just shy of clinically anxious. On the scale there were highly highly anxious. The ten minutes of movement that we did together decrease their anxiety score by fifteen points and put them in normal anxiety range. So this is doable. Even if your professor doesn't lead the exercise herself but it's it's it works it's powerful and and trying corporated anytime you can. I totally agree with that. I think exercise has a massive impact on my mood and sleep as well. I think you're right on track. You know at the end of each show. We ask our guests. What is your nobody told me less in. So what is that after all this research and information that unfortunately you had to gather yourself from having anxiety. What's the most valuable thing that you learned that. Nobody told you about anxiety that you wish they had. I love that question so by. Nobody told me moment in writing. This book is happen. Somewhere in the middle and i realized that i was making friends with my own anxiety. I was looking at it differently. It wasn't the enemy that wanted to kick out the door. It was okay. Not soft and cuddly friend. It was a prickly friend. But you we all have those prickly talking about. So it's a it's a prickly friend that's telling you about yourself. It is telling you how it is and i realized that if i made friends with that prickly friend that i could learn more about my anxiety and i could take advantage of it and that. That is the core the book. Can you learn how to bring the at protective aspect out of it. Can you learn to get gifts out of your own anxiety. And that is something nobody ever told me..

nyu
How 9/11 Unfolded at Aviation Week

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

02:23 min | 1 year ago

How 9/11 Unfolded at Aviation Week

"Fran tell us about what you saw that day in new york and how you reacted beautiful tuesday morning and i was at home which was about a mile away from the world trade center. And it's a beautiful day. And i was contemplating playing hooky and conjuring up a medical appointment when i got a call from The new york office. Michael stearns who said turn on your tv a plane has just crashed into the world trade center. Well being a pilot and knowing that that midair alley I assumed it was a small plane that had gone into the world trade center only to discover. Of course it was not. We didn't know what was happening at the time b. then joined forces with the washington bureau on telephone conversation and i was eventually dispatched a downtown but how to get downtown. Because subways have closed down. So i walked about a mile to the world trade center. We're hundreds of people had gathered clear. Jay students from nyu friends and family of those who are in the world trade center trying to find out what had happened but not knowing what had happened. Of course the un no longer a reporter An external force Trying to piece together a story but you. You're a victim as well and i had to battle my own personal fears of terror. We did not know what was happening and The one beautiful thing there with that The clergy with comforting people all types of clergy. It was a beautiful moment where there was a lot of love extended to people who totally panicked so now what started with trying to find out factual information which was few and far between the tv tower had gone down in the tax and We were just piecing together various bits of data that were coming in from all over from local authorities from rescue teams From the military from the faa and from Lower manhattan when there was nothing else to do. We walked back to the office which is about three miles to see the world changing. They were armed. Guards national guardsmen with rifle drawn. Their fighter jets flying overhead. And this was no longer the world we knew. Then we're back to the office. We started scrambling to get The factual

Michael Stearns New York Fran World Trade Center NYU JAY Washington UN Lower Manhattan FAA
"nyu" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"Is made of steel is. A big job. Has to be done in a big way. One reason for the bigness doesn't have the dramatic effects the dramatic elocution. That that commercial audiobooks tend to have you can play them. High-speed many people do change the speed of playback. Mera is one of the foremost scholars on researching the of alternative reading formats particularly tactile formats like braille and audio talking books. These alternative formats have had a huge and also really understated influence on the technologies that we use today. There were a lot of controversies around which kinds of reading really counted is reading and in the early twentieth century. Many of those continue today. Some of those kinds of reading have been highly stigmatized at an early moment. Re braille reading was held in suspicion by cited people who felt that it was too difficult. Cited people often didn't understand what blind people were reading and felt that raised print. Which looked to the i to the cited. I more like ink. Print would be a preferable way to teach blind people to read. Of course that turned out not to be true. So what about the people who use talking books for their method of reading my name is via hashish. M a master student at nyu. I'm lines. so that's why. I've always used talking books. If braille form billable. I think it sort of belittles. It to say that it's just listening to someone is if you're just like listening to music or just in the background because people are very emphatically.

nyu
CEO Joseph Maxwell Shares How Parlance Helped NYU Langone Health Improve Service Levels During the Pandemic

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:26 min | 1 year ago

CEO Joseph Maxwell Shares How Parlance Helped NYU Langone Health Improve Service Levels During the Pandemic

"So I want to share with you now a few examples of how parlance is working with some of the health systems that we've partnered with to deliver some of these great experiences to both callers and agents. And our first one is start with some work that we're doing with NYU langone. At the start of the pandemic, NYU langone was challenged to maintain effective staffing levels. Their operators were unable to consistently report to work, whether it was due to illness or their inability to leverage public transportation due to some of the travel restrictions when New York was in their lockdown. But we partnered with NYU langone to help improve and maintain their service levels to college in the midst of these varying staffing levels. By allowing college to simply just use their voice to naturally engage and get connected, we were able to shift the burden of managing those calls away from the operators and agents over to the modern IVR solution, which is always available. And though NYU langone is a large and complex organization, they have a lot of services and they attend to a broad array of patients. We were able to implement quickly and effectively for them. Today, call us can easily navigate to over 46,000 destinations within the health network. By just using their

Nyu Langone NYU New York
"nyu" Discussed on Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

"The man that i am and then still becoming and i'm grateful for who i'd be who i am and who i am becoming now but it's at the cost of some of the pain or the scars is all supposed to be lovely in pretty. All the time is something that i just can't confirm it's not my experience. The guides said whether a pills for that. If that's what you if you want twenty four seven comfort. But i do think that the things that we encounter. I can't tell you how many people i read for who say well. My marriage is standing the way of my spiritual growth. My husband or my wife doesn't confirm. I pass and i think well that doesn't need to stat away. Your spirit marriages is not working for you by all means you have free. Will you can leave the marriage but to blame somebody else on. Your lack of progress doesn't make great sense to me. It's like people that say. Oh my job needs to be spiritual. I mean you and i are in a position right now. Our our work has to do with our spiritual lives. But when i was teaching college at nyu which i did for twenty five years. That was my spiritual training ground. I loved every minute of it. I learned through that in every faculty meeting that. I had to suffer through. I still learned understand. So your spiritual life is your life. It's your sex life. it's your professional life. It's your emotion alive. It's all part of the same school that we're in and the school thank you. I wanna say like period period period. Thank you thank you. Thank you this concept. It's something that i've been channeling recently. This concept that. I should have this now or i look at my watch. My should have this by now. I'm being told that this concept implies a separateness which is not real in implies than there is a god or divine out there and that we make the van that the commands out to the.

nyu
Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Vaccine Mandates and Dorm Food, the New College Tour

"The quickly approaching fall semester has America's colleges under pressure to decide how far they should go to guard their campuses against the corona virus at New York University Monday marked their first in person college tours in sixteen months and there was lots of talk about mandatory vaccines says assistant VP of admissions Jonathan Williams the universe is crying all students to be vaccinated NYU is one of hundreds of colleges nationwide that have told students they must be fully vaccinated but seventeen year old Jessica Abraham who's considering the school still has not gotten one public school I really wanted many more colleges have held off on vaccine mandates in many Republican led states governments have banned such requirements or school leaders face political pressure to limit their anti virus actions I'm Julie Walker

NYU Jonathan Williams Jessica Abraham America Julie Walker
"nyu" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh virtual reality is here but does it work for everyone. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute boss wrokers associate professor of psychology at nyu. Abu dhabi examines the science behind the tech. What if you could walk into a room full of strangers and see names another elephant details floating above everyone's head. Augmented reality can make such world possible. The technology may soon be built into glasses. For example so does virtual content can be superimposed on our view of the real world. Engineers are close to solving many challenges involved in augmented reality at the same time however our understanding of the conditions on the which our brains can or cannot take advantage of the additional information is relatively limited in a recent study at the university of wisconsin madison and newark university. I would dhabi manipulated. The virtual content displayed. We found it under naturalistic. Viewing conditions the brain exploits. Small involuntary had movements which we call head jitter to improve visual perception for augmented reality devices to work well debt for they should record your head jitter and update the virtual content accordingly as an imported aside. We founded commonly available virtual reality headsets. Do not work well for large fraction of the population. Specifically some popular. Headsets provide a poor fit to women. As a result females tend to report a poor visual experience and greater motion sickness. I work informs the design of new virtual and augmented reality devices and may help us. Better understand deniro. Mechanisms that are disrupted in perceptual disorders. That was best. Route.

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg university of wisconsin madiso newark university nyu Abu dhabi dhabi deniro
Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi Takes Your Brain Through Virtual Reality

The Academic Minute

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi Takes Your Brain Through Virtual Reality

"What if you could walk into a room full of strangers and see names another elephant details floating above everyone's head. Augmented reality can make such world possible. The technology may soon be built into glasses. For example so does virtual content can be superimposed on our view of the real world. Engineers are close to solving many challenges involved in augmented reality at the same time however our understanding of the conditions on the which our brains can or cannot take advantage of the additional information is relatively limited in a recent study at the university of wisconsin madison and newark university. I would dhabi manipulated. The virtual content displayed. We found it under naturalistic. Viewing conditions the brain exploits. Small involuntary had movements which we call head jitter to improve visual perception for augmented reality devices to work well debt for they should record your head jitter and update the virtual content accordingly as an imported aside. We founded commonly available virtual reality headsets. Do not work well for large fraction of the population. Specifically some popular. Headsets provide a poor fit to women. As a result females tend to report a poor visual experience and greater motion sickness. I work informs the design of new virtual and augmented reality devices and may help us. Better understand deniro. Mechanisms that are disrupted in perceptual disorders.

University Of Wisconsin Madiso Newark University Dhabi Deniro
"nyu" Discussed on Startup Stories by Mixergy

Startup Stories by Mixergy

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Startup Stories by Mixergy

"On the internet. And i'm gonna look for the one that outperformed the other nine and that one's going to tell me something about what's working and every time i find a data point of what's working i'm going to double down on it. And that's that's how you ultimately figure out what's what's resonating. That's how i've accumulated one hundred million plus views and by what's working you mean. When are people voting up. What are people reacting to in the comments is am i right about that. Yeah what are people sharing. What's prompting conversations. What makes someone like it or not like it you know. What did you learn. What are some of the things you double down on wall. For example you learn that people have very short attention spans right like no one wants to sit there and read tons of description so a big part of my style became that first sentence of the peace going immediately into the opinion the action whatever Another is like four matting. You know people really. I learned this is it kills me to say but like people skim first and then they decide if they wanna read. Yeah so the way that you format a if you make it easy to skim and you make it easy for the reader to figure out what this whole thing's gonna be about your the likelihood that they're then going to go. You know what this looks promising. I'm gonna. i'm gonna invest my time in reading this so all those things were crucial learning experiences. And i can't imagine that you're going to get that at school. They're not going to tell you know when we did take business writing at nyu. They told us a little bit about the design. The look of your writing and the importance of bullet points not just as a way of communicating tough ideas fast but also making it look better but and more more more readable but that was as far as they went. I just don't think they had enough experience designing text to pull people in to read the writing..

nyu
"nyu" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Got my phd at nyu. And it was very sacred. Politically oriented program developed in certain ways so much so for example that when my patients would say where are you from. Because i haven't been accent. I was told. I'm not supposed to say where i'm from. Introducing extremists material into therapy. Lush explore what fantasies are about where. I'm from which i had trouble with my accent. My place it was pronounced french or german. That would be a question so just because it's a little hard to place. I didn't see why not make my myself. The focus of that session. That wasn't necessarily a transference issues. Truly just a simple question like place. The accent people me all the time. And when i'm told and so at at my schooling we were exposed to a couple of different orientations but they were pretty cycled amick and psychoanalytic and quite devout among nine. Told you must believe in this then. My natural rebellious tendencies to say in fact. I'm gonna go explore those. I can believe in other than that. And so i spent might be really trying to explore other modalities significantly among them were couples and family systems therapy and some and some other kinds of approaches narrative therapy etc. And so. I feel that. I'm eclectic in the sense that that is no one style of therapy. That's good for everyone. People's circumstance.

nyu
Youth of the Pandemic Revisited: Hopeful, Resilient, Nervous

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Youth of the Pandemic Revisited: Hopeful, Resilient, Nervous

"The AP caught up with some young people first contacted at the start of the pandemic makayla CO from Palo alto California isolated in her bedroom in March of last year she was sick staying in my room for long periods of time used to be the dream for me and I used to want that but now that I have it it's less than ideal no one else in the family got sick this year makayla graduated from high school in the fall will begin her freshman year at NYU with the semester in Paris if there's an opportunity for like memory making you have to like go for it because there could be a chance that that opportunity will disappear as a young black man in Chicago seventeen year old Freddie golden not only have the pandemic to think about but the deaths by police of George Floyd and others the pandemic has made me tougher mentally bomb and just be in a different situation than I'm usually in a flight home where I'm comfortable they always makes you stronger I'm at

Palo Alto California AP Makayla NYU George Floyd Paris Chicago
What Cops Are Doing With Your DNA

Slate's If Then

01:57 min | 1 year ago

What Cops Are Doing With Your DNA

"Morning. Everybody for those. That don't know my name. Is anne marie schubert. I'm the district attorney of sacramento county. I remember watching this press conference. Susan was april of two thousand eighteen. The da came out to make our announcement. She's standing in front of a crime lab surrounded by a bunch of cops and he was there to say that finally almost cinematic investigators had found a golden state killer. This man who had terrorized california's throughout the seventies and eighties. There were upwards of fifty rapes twelve murders crimes that spanned ten years across at least ten different counties nor decades had passed law enforcement. Hit dead ends and then regrouped amateur on the internet swap theories and then after more than forty years abroad got him and done it by putting his dna profile on genetic. Teeny apology websites. It is fitting that today is national. Dna we found the needle in the haystack. And it was right here. In sacramento joseph jams. Dangelo was arrested. We'd guilty disturbing twenty six life. Sentences and his case was billed as a triumph for crime solving and genealogy and it marked a seismic shift in how investigators used dna in cold cases. Do you remember what you thought. When you heard that genetic genealogy had been such a big part of that case. I was really intrigued Because i have a biology background before i went to law school and i never thought that you would sort of come together in this way. That's nilo bala. She's a senior attorney the policing project at nyu law school and she studies. How technology and policing come together.

Anne Marie Schubert Sacramento County Dangelo Susan California Sacramento Nilo Bala Nyu Law School
A Buddhist Approach to Patience With Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:11 min | 1 year ago

A Buddhist Approach to Patience With Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche

"How do you define patients generally speaking when we speak a patients it is sort of understood largely as a green in bed with whatever is happening but in the buddhist teachings in the buddhist a practice of course maybe initially you might have to kind of do that. A little bit y. You're being agitated while you're being irritated. Nyu feel few need to react. And you pass beyond that point if you could just be present with what's happening in your in the mental and emotional level then is much. Do actually with the hull. Do you actually constructively respond to the situation. Thou is always close this from this book. If there's something you could do why to worry all why to lose your temper if there's nothing you could do. Then what's the benefit so you come to sort of explore y'all own sort of internal innate wisdom to see whether there is something that you could and if there is something you could remedy then tried to sort of get on with that. Skillful means and then not lose your self to the kind of emotional self destructive any kind of pain fool state of hangul resign mental even if you don lash it out because he should should out. Then it's going to be much more problematic but even if you don lash out if you just kind of stained state sort of eats up a lot of your own peace and a lot of your own sense of well being so in tried to sort of move on with what you do to kind of remedy the situation and then come to the other side so much to do you know applying yourself to kind of find this malaysians rather than sort of be stuck with emotion.

Don Lash NYU
Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Viola Davis, One of the Greatest Actors of Our Time

"Welcome alex i. It's great to have you here to talk about viola. I'm so excited to hear your picks but first a little bit of background viola. When she won her first oscar for best supporting actress for fences and twenty seventeen. She became the first black person to win the so so-called triple crown of acting a competitive advantage emmy and tony award because of this in how omnipresent she's been over the last decade including her turn in the blockbuster period piece the help and as the shady complicated lawyer least keating in the long running series how to get away with murder. It might be easy to forget that. She has more than paid her dues to get where she's at. Now she graduated from juilliard in nineteen ninety-three and bounce between theater and screen throughout the rest of that decade by the early offs. She'd become a reliable supporting actor. Popping up in steven soderbergh movies like solaris and playing rations on the mom rule or the urban professional. She spoken candidly about how being dark skinned. Black woman has impacted her career like in this interview. She did with tina brown in twenty eighteen. I have a career that's probably comparable to meryl streep julianne moore. Let's sigourney weaver. They all came out of jail. They came out of juilliard. They came on nyu. They had the same path as me and yet i am nowhere near them. Not as far as money not as far as job opportunities. Nowhere close to

Emmy And Tony Award Viola Oscar Alex Steven Soderbergh Meryl Streep Julianne Moore Tina Brown Weaver NYU
The Case Of The Pricey Fritos

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:52 min | 1 year ago

The Case Of The Pricey Fritos

"So we are on the case for scott horsely following the fritos clue number. One fritos is owned by pepsi. Pepsi owns frito-lay which makes free does in fact the vending machine scott uses in. The white house is all pepsi products and all of the products and the machine. Not just the fritos got more expensive so we called pepsi. they would not comment. They declined to comment. Okay find out thanks. i know. Luckily there was a second clue. A note left the scene of the crime. There is a note on the vending machine from the the people that stock the machine to are valued patrons effective in the next couple of weeks. The prices in the vending machine may be adjusted to offset increases. We have received in product costs from manufacturers so presumably the wholesale cost of the fritos have gone up and they're passing those along to us but it is kind of curious at a time when corn prices are down. And you know there's only three things in a frito. There's there's corn corn oil and salt. Well how naive to think vaga free does. Caroline dimitri is an applied economist at nyu who specializes food studies and seem kind of offended by the idea that might only have three corn prices at anything to do with the price of corn chips right by the way we tried calling the vending machine company. Sometimes yeah but they would not call us back. Nobody wants to give us a comment so we turn to. The experts and caroline is an expert. She says the price of a processed food like fritos has almost nothing to do with well. food prices. Just break that idea that you have that food actually. The food costs are an important component of any food product. That you buy in the grocery

Pepsi Scott Horsely Frito Caroline Dimitri White House Scott NYU Caroline
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 1 year ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
"nyu" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"A <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Laughter> <Music> letter and <Speech_Music_Female> through <Speech_Music_Female> neural processes <Speech_Female> but kim <Speech_Female> professor and <Speech_Female> so i've done that for <Speech_Female> twenty two years <Speech_Female> and the great thing <Speech_Female> about being a professor <Speech_Female> is you can continue <Speech_Male> to be a journalist and <Speech_Female> you can continue to <Speech_Female> write books <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Male> enjoy of <Speech_Music_Male> teaching <Silence> early young <SpeakerChange> students. <Laughter> Oh <Speech_Female> that's interesting <Speech_Female> so you basically <Speech_Female> just applied <Speech_Female> cold. You didn't know <Speech_Female> anybody <Speech_Female> inside <Speech_Female> an <Speech_Male> chairman department. <Speech_Female> And just thought. I can <Speech_Music_Female> do that <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> said we're not going <Speech_Male> to consider you for jerry. <Silence> You'd never taught <Speech_Female> a. <Speech_Female> But we have a visiting <Speech_Male> position <Speech_Male> that mike you apply <Music> for and