36 Burst results for "NYU"

Fresh update on "nyu" discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:24 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nyu" discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Up. I made myself assign I love it. It was worth every penny a sound investments but first, let's do the numbers. down. Does drills down one hundred and fifty seven points today half percent twenty, six, thousand, five. Oh One, the Nasdaq down two hundred and seventy four points. That is two point four percent, their ten, thousand, nine eleven s and P Five, hundred down forty points about one point two, percent, thirty to sixty nine. So all know how I feel about Pumpkin spice right? Not a fan pumpkins. This time of year is in the real ones though for carving, which is what the good for on average they will cost you about the same as last year according to the US Department of Agriculture Pumpkins this month a running about forty five cents a pound compared to forty four cents a pound last year in store ads pumpkins well, they make up about eight percent of overall vegetable ads compared with potatoes, twelve percent of it. Now, you know you're listening to marketplace. This marketplace podcast is supported by transfer wise. The smart new way to send and receive money internationally transfer wise gives you the real exchange rate every time you send money abroad you can even get an account that holds up to fifty four currencies at once and convert between them anytime join over eight million customers in more than eighty countries who are already saving, try them out for free at transfer. Wise. Dot Com slash marketplace or download the APP. This marketplace podcast is supported by we work as a business you know today news of working it takes new measures toward health and safety flexible terms for where when and how you work spaces designed with your purpose in mind it takes innovation of a we work office to take your business where you want to be visit we dot co slash future to learn more. This is marketplace I'm Kai Ryssdal. We talked about the dollar a little bit yesterday why it matters globally and what happens when it swings in value as it has been doing in this pandemic today why the dollar fluctuates so much first of all, and this might sound obvious but it is backed by the biggest economy in the world which makes it the safe haven safe haven currency serves as a safe haven in. Of global turmoil and there are so much uncertainty in times of uncertainty that was Kasan. At Boston University Susan Pozzo at Western Michigan and Barrel Chara at nyu Stern School of business economists. The pandemic created a huge vive of. Including in the minds of the central banks and other investors of the world, and they all basically wanted to hold dollar assets and as a reserved scramble for dollars became strong Berle Ajaria they're that strong scramble he mentioned sent the dollar to a three year high back in March which gets us to point number to. Trust. It serve as a stable place relative to the rest of the world and when we speak about stable, it's not just at the dollar stable. But that the economy is stable Susan Pozzo on that one, this economy is stable for a lot of reasons, the rule of law sensible regulation and a tradition of understanding its role in the global economy. But as we're all our CIA points out I have no doubt that the status of the United States as a safe haven vile presently still intact is being increasingly question. We are still to be clear a ways from the dollar being replaced as the reserve global currency or it not being what people turn to when they want a safe haven. But the dollar's value. Is a window into how the world thinks the US is doing. We have lots of things to worry about a raging pandemic wildfires, hurricanes election. I'm more worried about the effects of erotic foreign policy, but our policy has been in the last few years to get out of international cords to break up the the trade agreements that we have in general stability of the United States policy as global bellwether. We it's was this has been somewhat shaken over the last few years our thanks to target Assan University Susan Pozzo at Western Michigan also overall. Chara. At nyu Stern School of business, the dollar today by the way down at or near its pandemic lows against the euro. The British Pound and the Japanese yen thing is with virus counts rising here and globally, which is not great economically as they had girl was saying. Maybe people are going to be looking for.

Susan Pozzo Nyu Stern School Of Business United States Michigan Us Department Of Agriculture Kasan Kai Ryssdal Berle Ajaria Barrel Chara Assan University CIA Boston University
One-fourth of New York City Transit workers caught COVID-19, NYU survey says

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last week

One-fourth of New York City Transit workers caught COVID-19, NYU survey says

"Survey of New York City transit workers shows that nearly a quarter of them may have contracted covert 19 and those who became ill likely caught the virus at work. The survey was done by New York University. The results are significantly higher than an assessment from the state last May, at least 131 transit workers have died of the disease. Researchers hope to continue their study with a deeper dive into the mental health impact the pandemic has had on city transit workers.

New York City New York University
How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | Last month

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
UN General Assembly: US-China tensions flare over coronavirus

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:34 min | Last month

UN General Assembly: US-China tensions flare over coronavirus

"Pandemic is a test of international cooperation. One, the U. N secretary general says the world is failing is NPR's Michelle Kellerman reports that failure Was on display at the ongoing General Assembly. The secretary general is trying to use this virtual General Assembly to get countries to work together to fight the pandemic and many other global challenges. But one Security Council debate showed just how hard this will be. You know shame on each of you. I am astonish, and I'm disgusted. That's the U. S ambassador to the U. N. Kelly Craft accusing her colleagues, though not naming, which ones of playing politics with covert 19 members of the council who took this opportunity to focus on political grudges rather than the critical issue at hand. My goodness Craft defended the Trump administration's decision to pull out of the World Health Organization and said China should be held to account for quote, unleashing this plague onto the world. China's Ambassador John Joon, says the US is just trying to blame others for its own failings. The United the States has been spread in political virus on this information. And for 18 confrontation on division. Up to that point, it had been a rather dry Security Council meeting about global governance in the wake of covert 19. There was a lot of talk about multilateralism and a few veiled swipes at the Trump Administration's America first approach, Kraft said. The U. S has given you n agencies $900 million to counter the pandemic and compared that to others on the Security Council. NYU's year 4.6 million South Africa 8.4 million Indonesia five million. The US does give more to the U. N than other, says Richard Gallon of the International Crisis Group. But this is not just about money. Foreign diplomats had grown accustomed to trump attacking. Yuen arrangements like the Paris climate deal on mechanisms like the Human Rights Council. But they were genuinely shocked the Washington would walk away from the W. H O during a global pandemic. Speaking via Skype, he said diplomats are worried about what he calls a nasty fight between the US and China as Beijing tries to increase its influence in the world body on a day to day basis, Chinese diplomats in New York are often Very assertive, increasingly hard line and sometimes bullying colleagues from smaller countries. The reality is that for most members of the U. N, neither the US nor China Is offering an attractive vision of the future of multilateralism and the world needs multilateral solutions on a range of issues beyond the pandemic, says Latisha Courtois, who represents the International Committee of the Red Cross. She's raising the alarms about the forgotten conflicts from Yemen to this, the hell region of Africa has a triple threat of climate conflict and called it mansions. And for that they need to be a collective approach. The U. N Secretary General Antonio Guterres made the same appeal all week, reminding diplomats that the World Sol a previous period of fragmentation a century ago. The result was the first World War. Followed by the seconds. Over. 19 is casting a dark shadow across the world. And he called the band eh Mika warning that must spur US toe action. Michelle Kelemen. NPR news, the State Department

United States Security Council China Trump Administration General Assembly Dry Security Council Secretary General Antonio Gute Richard Gallon World Health Organization Michelle Kellerman NPR Human Rights Council U. N. Kelly Craft Michelle Kelemen Latisha Courtois NYU
Mueller prosecutor says special counsel 'could have done more' to hold Trump accountable

The Daily 202's Big Idea

04:42 min | Last month

Mueller prosecutor says special counsel 'could have done more' to hold Trump accountable

"A former top prosecutor on special counsel Bob Miller's team writes in a new. Tell all book where law ends that the Group failed to fully investigate trump's financial ties and should have stated explicitly in their report that they believed he obstructed justice. Andrew Weissmann claims that Muller's efforts were limited by the ever present threat of trump disbanding their office and by their own reluctance to be aggressive against a sitting president. The team made sure it's work was logged into a computer system in a way so that it would be preserved if trump got rid of Mueller but Weissmann says the pressure caused them to pull punches. He likens it to a sword of Damocles hanging over all of their investigative decisions, leading them at certain times to act much less forcefully and more defensively than they would have if they were investigating anyone but the president. Weisman says it led them to delay and ultimately forego entire lines of inquiry though were quite promising particularly regarding this president financial ties to Russia. This bothered him deeply because in America no one is supposed to be above the law not even the president here is a key paragraph from Weisman's new book which comes out next week, and which we got an early copy of he writes quote. We still do not know if there are other financial ties between the president and either the Russian government or Russian oligarchs. We do not know whether he paid bribes to foreign officials to secure favourable treatment for his business interests a potential violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. That would provide leverage against the president. We do not know if he had other Russian business deals in the works at the time he was running for president how they might have aided or constrained his campaign or. Even if they are continuing to influence his presidency. Weisman was considered one of the top prosecutors at the justice, department had been a senior supervisor before Muller brought him onto his team. Now he teaches it Nyu law school in the book. Whitesman lays particular blame on Muller's number two errands assembly for stopping investigators from taking a broader look at trump's finances and he writes that he wonders whether investigators quote gave it their all Weisman lambasts attorney general bill bar for among other things giving the public a deeply misleading four-page summary of Moore's work before the full report was released publicly. bowlers report was far more damning than the anodyne description that bar put out. It was upon reading bars misleading four-page memo that Weisman decided yet moral obligation to write this book. Weisman is critical of Molar himself for not stating plainly that he concluded trump obstructed justice which Weisman says the evidence clearly shows Weissmann said in an interview on Monday with my colleagues Matt Sabotage and Spencer Sue that he told more, he would have stated that conclusion in the teams final report. More. Critically, Weisman complains how he felt more was wrong not to green light issuing a subpoena for trump's testimony, and he also details how he personally pressed the special counsel repeatedly to do so. The office also declined to compel testimony from the President's son Donald Trump Junior, or even to seek an interview with first daughter Ivanka trump who was involved in a lot of the potential misconduct described in the final report. Weisman's primary task was to lead the team called Team N, which investigated former trump campaign chairman Paul manafort for financial crimes in hopes that he'd flip to become a useful witness another team team are was tasked with exploring whether the trump campaign had coordinated with Russia to influence the election and another team six hundred was tasked with exploring whether trump had obstructed justice. Weisman is critical of that ladder team teams six hundred saying that an FBI agent assigned to it complained to him that it was quote pulling its punches and shooting down her views. And weisman alleges that its leader Mike driven another veteran former prosecutor. Confided in him privately that he would not have been. So mealy mouthed about saying the president had obstructed Justice Weisman's says driven. told him quote if you and I were in charge this is not how it would read. I should say here that Zebedee Moeller Andrew even did not respond to our requests for comment about what said about them in the book.

Justice Weisman President Trump Donald Trump Ivanka Trump Donald Trump Junior Muller Andrew Weissmann Prosecutor Special Counsel Russia Bob Miller Russian Government Zebedee Moeller Team N Paul Manafort NYU Financial Crimes
NYU Freshman Dorm On Lockdown After 4 Positive COVID-19 Cases

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:44 sec | Last month

NYU Freshman Dorm On Lockdown After 4 Positive COVID-19 Cases

"Rubin Hall freshman dorm. Oh as open but is on lock down after four students tested positive for covert, innit? New York University's head of covert prevention team sent out an email saying they're requiring everybody in that dorm to quarantine at least until today. When school officials will let him know if they wanted to keep isolating For longer. It was just a Papa party this past weekend in the middle of venues campus over at Washington Square Park. Hundreds got together for it, and many of whom were not worry mass. But no word of school officials are connecting that party to these four covert cases. Still bears pointing out New York City's Corona virus restrictions bands gatherings of over 50 people, with the point of being to keep the buyers from spreading.

New York University Rubin Hall New York City Washington Square Park Corona
Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

Unladylike

05:10 min | Last month

Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

"So stay we thought we would warm up a little bit because We were delighted to find out that one of your favorite things in the world. Is Felicity. So. What is it about felicity? Well. It's a couple of things I think. For me growing up I I didn't realize it until. Now but I was really obsessed with the WB like. The WB. Children out there will be like, what is she talking about and I think for me? I became obsessed with felicity because she was like I mean obviously Carey is stunning I'm talking about like I know are but I think really affected. Me Was it. It was about this woman who didn't know what she wanted, but she knew she wanted Ben and saying it now it's like such an eye roll but I just thought it was so cool that she. Didn't do anything that her parents or friends wanted her to do and she like just dropped everything and moved to New York for this guy and Mike as a eleven year old a twelve year old I was like yes. Hi. I'm this is I'm going. This is where I'm going I. totally forgot you're going here. So unbelievable. I know this from high school. This is Susan this is. This is. versity felicity while. All right. So I'll see you around. and. Just told myself that I was going to do the same thing felicity did and obviously I mean I there wasn't a boy that I was like in love with and moving to New York for but I researched that like the school that they were modeling it after. Was Nyu, and so I decided that when I was gonNA turn eighteen that that was the school I was GonNa go to. So it's crazy to say now and you know when I did turn eighteen deny auditioned for nyu I didn't get in and so it was heartbreaking and all that stuff and obviously I realized I was not in TV show in not felicity. But then I auditioned my sophomore year and then I did get in and so I moved I dropped everything and moved to New York did you also? Like seek out a job at Dean and Deluca to really out. Absolutely, and they were like no ma'am and I was like please and it's crazy because i. think when I went in there I couldn't afford like not even a Bego I think it was like seven dollars an onion Bagel. But I was like for me like walking Dean and Deluca was like walking into a museum felicity just had an extreme profound effect I. Mean even now I go back and just watch the pilot discussed. Makes me feel good. So getting a little bit into your work to words that we noticed while researching up on, you two words that positively came up a lot to describe your work either by like your own words or other people describing your work. Were dark and weird. So I was wondering what those words, those two words mean to you. I think if I'm honest both of those words like. Growing up had a negative connotation for me I. Think. People often thought I was extremely weird and you know I was a pretty dark kid in terms of the stuff that I was into I mean publicity isn't that dark but I was really into. Buffy obviously but also these. Books where like it's just you know murder and incest, and then I think a lot of my friends were reading goosebumps which I was into but then like my sister was reading just rl Stein. So I was like wait what's that and so I kind of ditched goosebumps because it was like. And got into Rl. Stein. The adult books recalled Rl Stein and so I would read those a lot and those kind of just kept my. I think I was obsessed with a lot of stuff but I didn't WanNa read the Kitty Shit. I really wanted the adult books and I fought really hard. To like, trick my parents into getting me the staff and pretending it was a PG and That's just show you the kind of kid. I was just like I was beyond curious like I wanted the content I wanted I just wanted to grow up really

Felicity Rl Stein New York Deluca Dean NYU Carey PG BEN Susan Murder Mike Buffy
Two Los Angeles County deputies shot in ambush, officials say

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | Last month

Two Los Angeles County deputies shot in ambush, officials say

"In L. A. And the hunt is on for a suspect in the shooting of two county sheriff's deputies who were sitting in a patrol car. Alex Villanueva is the sheriff. They just graduated NYU fact I swore them in office just 14 months ago. These are real people doing a tough job, and it just shows the dangers of the job in the blink of an eye. There is video of the shooting. The two deputies are in critical condition.

Alex Villanueva
Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

Motley Fool Answers

04:39 min | Last month

Whats Up With Mortgages and Real Estate

"Well, it's been a crazy year pandemic thousands of businesses closed millions of Americans, unemployed. The stock market is still up for the year at least so far your portfolio may not be your only acid or even your biggest asset fact according to Edward Wolff nyu economist. For the bottom eighty percent of Americans in terms of assets. Their number one asset is their home about sixty percent of their net worth is in their house. So, how has residential real estate fair during the virus crisis and how might that change in the future here to help us answer those questions is Jeff Strauss, key senior writer and analyst at Bankrate Jeff welcomed the Motley fool answers. Hey, bro thanks for having me. So let's start with the current state of the house in the housing market. Let's get to the numbers. How have prices been holding out during the recession was surprisingly really well, prices are still going up and I. Think I like a lot of people that fill victim to the whole recency bias flaw. That the last time we had a recession home prices just absolutely collapsed. We had fifty percent drops and values in many parts of the country and so back in March when we started going into recession again I think I know a lot weather's thought. Oh, here we go. Again in terms of home prices and that really hasn't happened home prices have held up home sales are down but if you were people have put their houses on the market and so the supply and demand curve has just shifted. So we've got basically more buyers than there are houses for sale. So we're seeing a lot of bidding wars I keep hearing these tales of a nondescript. House getting thirty and forty, and even fifty bids over a weekend. So home prices have held up surprisingly well, they're still going up part of that is because we've got record low mortgage rates and people have more buying power and then part of it also is just that the pandemic has really changed. Qui Bowls thinking about housing I mean if you're going to work earned, your kids are going to school in your house very much. You can make do with less space but now the that were crammed into to one space and people are working from home and taking classes from home it's You suddenly start to think, Hey, I could use a bigger house. You got a couple of interesting points that I. Let's start with mortgage rates. Crazy low. Thirty year mortgage thirty year fixed is around three percent little bit above little bit below dependent where you look. Fifteen year bit below that. One interesting thing I've noticed though is normally the adjustable rate mortgages are the lowest. But from what I've seen there at the same as a thirty year fixed or even a little higher what's going on with fat? Yeah. That is a weird situation and it's funny that you mentioned arms because it seems like nobody really pays much attention to arms anymore with with fixed rate mortgages being so low for. So long at as you said, they're in the the three percent range or even below for thirty year fixed but they've they haven't been much above that the past decade I am I think they briefly spiked up to around five percent but. When fixed rate mortgages are so low it's in they've stayed consistently low. People just sort of You know lose interest in arms. So it's that's part of it. Part of it is a just that there. There aren't as many lenders offering arms, and so there's there's less. Less apply less widely available so that that probably has something to do some of it also is that the without geeking out here too much but the rates were were based on Libor the London interbank offered rate for a long time in libraries going away at a new indexes coming in so that that might have something to do with it. and then in in times of economic uncertainty, we we do see this this pattern where arms suddenly get more expensive than fixed rate mortgages but you know it's intriguing. I talked to a lot of consumers a lot of. Lending officers lot at mortgage brokers. Nobody's talking about arms they're all talking about. The thirty year fixed and they're they're talking about how many points should you pay? Should you do a thirty or fifteen ten? What's? What are the advantages of different types of of fixed rate mortgages and? That just seems like an arms have been sort of forgotten. They were hot thing fifteen years ago but I almost never hear anyone recommending God's

Jeff Strauss Edward Wolff Bankrate Jeff Motley Qui Bowls Writer Analyst
A Love Letter to Short Men

Does This Happen to You

05:21 min | Last month

A Love Letter to Short Men

"DOT COM and at her website Carlin Betcha. Dot Com and here is a love letter to short men. Your height is not an issue unless you make it one. It's one of the most common openers I see on dating apps a man's height. It's usually the first thing men list and sometimes height is the only thing listed. Yep just height nothing else as if those two numbers measured in feet and inches contain multitudes. I understand why it happens. We are a society obsessed with looks we treat beauty and both genders as a currency attractive people make more money are viewed as more agreeable and somehow more valuable. This is part of the halo effect, a psychology term where we assign one single trait beauty to other characteristics kindness. Personally I have never seen a woman who cares about height in fact, I find short men hot, not all of them but many. Let. Me Tell you a not hot short man's story. I recently wanted to date with a five foot five inch guy within fifteen minutes of our meeting. He ass is my height a problem. It was not until he mentioned it. I had not even looked at the height he listed on his profile. I then spent the next twenty minutes assuaging his fragile ego and explaining why many women like short men it was exhausting at one point I think he read the weariness in my slumped shoulders and tried to self correct. I'm only asking because you're right about love and sex. Sure if you went on a date with a dermatologist, would you ask her to examine the fungus between your toes? I didn't say that, but I wanted to my sarcasm is a feral beast. Then, there are the many many short guys who lie about their height. You know who you are. I once went on a date with a guy claiming to be five foot eight inches. He was five foot four inches. That's a four inch lie. If we're keeping track I wore three inch heels for that date that put me at five feet eight inches. Greeted him with a hug. This was pre pandemic days his head landed on my chest. Awkward. For most women height is not a deal breaker but lying is So. Here it is short men the painful truth your height is not the Lady Boehner killer. You think it is it your lack of confidence that makes women's ovaries shrivel up and never want to go on another date again, I have dated a lot of sexy short men and they all had one thing in common nothing to prove when Tom Cruise five foot seven inches was sexiest man alive multiple times. Did anyone add a footnote sexy for a short Guy Hell? No. When Bruno Mars five, foot five inches shakes what his momma gave him are women getting out there measuring. Sticks Adriano. then. There's Napoleon. Napoleon. Never had complex about his height nor was he even really that short you can feel his confidence oozing out of the impatient love letters. He wrote to Josephine one read a kiss on your heart and one much lower down much lower. Nowhere in that letter, will you find a postscript saying unless my height makes you not in the mood? Yet Napoleon somehow got his name attached to the height inferiority complex known as the Napoleon. Complex. The Napoleon Complex states that short men tend to be more aggressive lie more and try to compensate for their short stature by being exceptionally cruel. But researchers found the opposite to be true. One study from Nyu phone short men are thirty two percent less likely to divorce than tolman. The study also found women married to short men reported greater happiness and short men did more housework than tolman. Yes. There is a correlation between happiness and a freshly floor. Clearly short men are doing something, right? I pulled over twenty of my most dateable girlfriends for this article I asked the same question. Are you attracted to short men most had similar answer? It depends on the guy that's a nice way of saying that is not the package. It's the meat inside. So

Napoleon Napoleon Complex Carlin Tolman Bruno Mars Tom Cruise Lady Boehner NYU Adriano. Josephine
Coronavirus Pandemic Hits New York City's Economy Hard

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus Pandemic Hits New York City's Economy Hard

"Dot com slash NPR to learn more. Let's talk about the change happening in New York New York City was hit early. It was hit hard by the pandemic, but the situation is today so much better. The number of virus cases has dropped significantly, but as NPR's Jim Zarroli reports the economy there is still struggling. I'm standing in Hudson yards, which is a huge complex of apartment buildings and office towers and high end retail stores on Manhattan's West Side. There is a lot of excitement when this place opened almost a year and a half ago but today at least by new. York standards there aren't a lot of people here just a few tourists some dog walkers a security guard or crossing this giant windswept plaza. The buzz that you typically feel when you're walking through midtown walking through any parts of Manhattan it's just not there Dustin Jones lives nearby. He's with nyu's Shack Institute of real estate anyone that's been in New York City and spent any time here knows this doesn't feel normal New York is the nation's most densely populated big city and it was hit early and hard by the pandemic Catherine Wild of the partnership. For New York City a business group says half a million people fled many of them were well paid professionals in finance advertising and technology who could work remotely. She says, hotels stores theaters and restaurants had to close. We've got two hundred and thirty thousand small businesses that basically for the most part have been out of business since the middle of March even those that stayed open are struggling two and A. Half years ago. Kasan Davol Mar opened the Likud cafe in Brooklyn she wanted to have a kind of neighborhood hang out serving healthy. Haitian food. It's been a rough year in February I thought we were doing well, and then by March I was like we're doing worse than we've ever done by April we were closed. The cafe is open again and serving mainly takeout food but business has dropped off again lately. The, loss of so many businesses has meant hundreds of thousands of jobs have disappeared unemployment in the city hit nearly twenty percent in July. I ran into Howard begin sitting in a park in Manhattan. He's jazz musician and with all the live music venues shut down, he's living off his savings occasionally if I can find. Production type work. I. Can I can do from home I do that. But my work pretty much ground to a halt on March sixteen having Merck's since then. With so many people not working egan, it's causing real budget problems I'm on the subway the one train I take it all the time and it's often packed at this time of day today there are only about six people in this car all of them sitting very far apart from each other people have been scared to ride the subway ridership is. A quarter of what it normally is and fare revenue is way down I. Mean what you have is a public health crisis that spurred economic crisis that it's Verte fiscal cruzes. Andrew Ryan of the Citizens Budget Commission and Advocacy Group says sales and income tax revenue also down and the city faces a nine billion dollar budget deficit the next year and a half. There is some reason for optimism virus cases have dropped sharply. Museums are reopening. Restaurants are serving customers at outside tables. But tourists have mostly stayed away and Catherine wild of the Partnership for New York City says only about eight percent of office workers are back at their desks. This is a comprehensive, all encompassing problem like we've never had before and wild worries about what will happen when people do return new. York. City where people live

New York City Manhattan Catherine Wild York NPR Howard Jim Zarroli Dustin Jones Citizens Budget Commission Brooklyn Merck West Side Hudson NYU Egan Shack Institute Of Real Andrew Ryan
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | 2 months ago

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

04:30 min | 3 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair DAN Patti Smith Hugh Laura Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

Lost Notes

05:19 min | 3 months ago

Teenagers Surfing on the Wave of the Apocalypse

"I've been approached about the student teacher story before by people who always seem to have this moralistic agenda to tell this cautionary tale of young people who are in over their heads or taken advantage of with too much freedom and sex and drugs, and rock and roll. And I definitely want to be clear with you that I actually believe that artistic exploration and that. Freedom is worth a certain amount of existential risk and I'd rather live next door to junkies than millionaires any day. And I'm endlessly grateful. That we came of age in a place time like that. And welcome to another edition of the shape of things to come. I'm bill floor and I'm Dean Miller and our guest this week artist student teachers. Start off where everything starts off with. Let's introduce ourselves. Then Dan My teachers. Yeah. Go ahead. Base I was more comfortable from the time. I was little kid with what were considered freaks than I like drag Queens I like boys, hugh tweets, their eyebrows I wanted them to put my makeup on J. I Sing I mean going to a dead boys concert with you're sitting in the front row at CBGB's and stiff baiters. Ripping out his pubic hair throwing at you. That's disgusting. But it was amazing. On wore I play drums as teenagers. We were filming gigs for the mumps we were helping the erasers build up their sets for their shows and we've been very involved and so there was kind of this organic thing that came together. You know maybe we should maybe we can do that. You know I mean maybe we can do that. By Play Guitar. Let's say you had. School. In one hand and. Being in a band and hanging out with blondie. David Bowie and the other hand and it was impossible to do both things. Boy Do you think would happen. There'd be less school-going. Joe I buy another talk. I wanted to be a rock and roller I play guitar, and I just wanted to make wild noise. Or. Unveil. muschamp coffee you would see warhol walking around with his polaroid and handing out copies into you magazine. So this is what I thought. Every teenager did it didn't occur to me that. What an unusual environment this what? We're here sort of to talk a little bit about the band place music and give people a chance to find out what the student teachers are really because I think a lot of people in New York even though I know most of the people in the band from the New York area don't know that much about student teachers. Any. Seems to be a mystery to herself and everyone. While sometimes, that's effective. I don't know. Imagine this group of teenagers in the late seventies in new. York. City. Most of them are still in high school, a couple of recently graduated. They're obsessed with bands like television and Patti Smith the Ramones Roxy Music. Most of them come from fractured family lives and find community in the club scene. But get this in the span of six months they go from not knowing how to play instruments to headlining their favorite clubs. Then opening IGGY pop getting interviewed I'm GonNa have their favorite radio stations eighty nine point one W Nyu. How do they make that happen? This Ragtag Group of best friends lived and breathed the scene. They spent all their time together by records running fan clubs. Reading. Rock magazines. They'd go to shows together and off often get mistaken for being in a band so. One day in bills living room they decide. Why not? Let's form one. Just. kind of said that everybody everybody's all play drums and I'll play guitar. Okay. You play Bass and I said, okay. Then lawyer said well, I don't know if my voice will be good enough because she was gonNA sing. So maybe you should be from female rhythm section and then we We all hated. Wouldn't bands felt like sports teams. And with David I both being gay and Philip, and then later Joe being straight boys and then, Lauren? Laurean. Laura being the female rhythm section we really love what we did visually. I think it's more important than we have a concept an idea. I A music. Actual technical ability because we knew our instruments well enough to be able to contain the idea to an extent. But you guys can make it. I mean you think you're gonNA make it after the All of us into. Your knew we weren't musicians and none of us cared but we cared about is that we were gonNA have a blast. We were going to be cool. We were GONNA be the coolest kids and we weren't going to imitate anyway.

New York David Bowie Joe I Mumps Dean Miller Pubic Hair Laura Patti Smith DAN Hugh Warhol Iggy J. NYU Philip Lauren
Naya Rivera honored by Netflix in 'Sugar Rush' episode

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

Naya Rivera honored by Netflix in 'Sugar Rush' episode

"Netflix is baking competition. Sugar Rush begins streaming today. This is sugar rush extra sweet baking competition where time is the most important ingredient. The episode is dedicated to NYU Rivera with a tribute to her before the opening credits. The lately actress was a guest judge on an episode filmed in February. She drowned early this month while voting with her four year old son on a lake in Southern California

Nyu Rivera Southern California Netflix
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 3 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

Pivot

05:03 min | 3 months ago

Big Tech Funds a Think Tank Pushing for Fewer Rules. For Big Tech.

"Dig. Tech firms are schmoozing regulators into to not doing their jobs. Thirty four anti-trust officials were wined and nine last year by the global anti-trust into the suit, a part of the Antonin Scalia Law School at George. Mason University in Fairfax Virginia basically don't regulate us. Please enjoy this delicious meal. Global Antitrust Institute is funded mostly entirely by big companies affiliated foundations including Amazon Google qualcomm George Mason I covered it when I was at the Washington, Post they were always doing this kind of thing like putting up, you know. Being very friendly to corporate corporate citizens as I recall during this time when they were just getting started. Trying to attract a bigger level of professor there and so talk about this Mr Academics in terms of these things that get funded at universities, you institute Scott. Galloway Institute of Jabal Thank for example. That's right. like it's it's were. Universities are not immune from the lure of capitalism and a big component of. Your ability to get tenure is to get research funded, and it's difficult if you WANNA know. If. You WanNa. Know the outcome and a conclusion of research. Just find who's paid for it. Yeah, and in the case of most academic research. It's a lot of times it's funded. By nonpartisan sources are the university itself, and so if there is a a lease bad version of peer reviewed research, you're GONNA. Find it typically universities, but these think tanks if they're funded by. Certain And we have him on the left care we fund. We found groups to do research to basically support our know our narrative so i. don't think this is anything unusual. The question is abound power in that is. In addition to this think tank Sarah now more fulltime Amazon. Lobbyists making I would bet somewhere between four hundred eight hundred thousand dollars a year. Then there are sitting US senators now one hundred full time lobbyist from Amazon living in DC, taking all of these nice women and men to to golf into dinner and saying hey, we just a big fan of your leadership. We fight to get involved in your campaign by the way when this whole antitrust off comes up. We assume that you're you're for capitalism. Your four consumer lower consumer prices. And this is the danger, but I don't think these think tanks. We have on both sides nervous now whenever I time talking to one today and I was like Oh, where did you get your money? Like I never thought this like in terms of. The university and I was like I'm going to have to check in case, I'm. Saying something that sounded reasonable, but it was sort of like who's paying your bills and you know there was some controversy around some of this Kobe testing of where these these researchers have, it just feels like a lot of steph feels. Bogus like. It feels bogus when they're doing this and they're trying to influence, but I think many some universities are doing real research. Others are much more pay for play and I think that's that's really when I was a does. You've inspired her synapse farmer talking about this when I was? Five years into my Nyu Kerr invited me to a meeting where they were talking about doing some research about around financial markets and the impact on IPO's and They admitted meeting. And there was someone from the Nasdaq, and they were willing to fund it Funds Research and fund even fund center, and as one of the guys in the meeting Professor Bruce Buchanan who I think's one of the clear blue flame thinking economists in the world you know at the end of the meeting, said a not comfortable with the Nasdaq taking money. Money from the Nasdaq for research around the financial markets, because ultimately we're. GonNa end up saying that that the Nasdaq has the right you know. He just wasn't comfortable with private enterprise being injected into academic research, and then the meeting ended and I was like what the hell are you thinking? We have an opportunity to go great research here. Don't so pedantic. And as I've thought about it I'm wrong and he was right. Yeah, you can't help it. You can't help, but if they're paying for like all the smoking ones so much damage in terms of like smoking wants. We're like cigarettes aren't bad. That went on for a long time and Whatever the whatever the research is, it just seems like if it's cooked, it's cooked then. How do you pay for like the university should presumably just pay. Pay For right and live and die on the quality of the research, but that's sort of naive. I suspect you in the majority of about any sort of fifteen year overdue apology to a Professor Buchanan Vice. Chancellor Ingo Walter felt the same way that this was just. This creates too much opportunity for bias research so anyways. Net Net in it's a sample size of one, but Nyu takes that got role being a neutral arbiter very seriously. and. You have these funding you know. I'm thinking of all the different organizations are they seem like the like their criminal justice stuff Very Friedman! It feels like it's really good research right now, and that's the thing it's like who you have. They should at least be very clear about who's paying for it, so you know and and what they might turf. What what the what reports they might put in the drawer like the government is doing right now,

Amazon Global Antitrust Institute Galloway Institute Of Jabal Antonin Scalia Law School George Mason Mason University NYU Washington Fairfax Virginia United States Funds Research Chancellor Ingo Walter Professor Buchanan Vice Professor Professor Bruce Buchanan Friedman Sarah Kobe
Toxic Masculinity

Thank God I'm Atheist

05:44 min | 3 months ago

Toxic Masculinity

"Hey every. Tag is well from gorgeous, a little still too hot SALT LAKE CITY UTAH. It's thank God I mean kissed the podcast I'm Frank Feldman and I'm Dan Beecher and coming up. On the show today day on. Trump about trump and we're. GonNa talk about White Evangelical. An article that we both read About, maybe why? Why Evangelical did vote for trump? And it's not for the reasons that liberals like to think so I think it's actually It's an interesting take and one worth talking about if even just if it's. Just sort of as a as a discussion about what America is Nyu. We're that way and. Don't expect it to sound good. Don't don't expect us to come out. Rosie on this one. Oh, Americans America. Yeah America has a concept. People. Artistic. Ship has sailed trae yeah, I think I think we all know Diane got problems. We're not in shining city on the hill or whatever and. smolder smoldering. Shit pile and the devil. We're the tire fire that stinking up the place. Off. Had to be American. Oh, it's fine. It's fine. The other ones who are ruining America right now we're. We're the good ones. It's nice to assure oneself. All right Dan yeah. What are you? Win Covid nineteen I hit. Twelve years ago twelve. Going on thirteen. Did you have any thought about what it might mean for relative Religiosity in America like. Did you think that maybe people might kind of the fence sitters might. Find Faith. Again was thought that that maybe you had I had this thought. I'm just one to two. I know I didn't think that I have given up predicting in the universe because. I'd starting with the with the twenty sixteen elections I have now realised. I have no handle on what human beings do yeah, and it'll just go left every time I think it's GonNa go right well I think a lot of people probably did think like I did where your? Sort of this impulse right that people who who weren't really. They just didn't go to church right, but they still maybe Kinda. SORTA believed in God and so maybe those people would would return right, and we may be an up an uptick. In America in sort of religious observance and whatnot. Well it turns out. that it is the exact opposite. Wrong or at least according? To the state of the Bible survey. That was just released this last week by the American. Bible Society. It was the tenth such survey that they've done. They started in two thousand eleven right. Okay, and they look to see. How many America what percentage of American adults are consider themselves to be? Sort of scripture engaged right? Metric but the they look at how frequently people read. The Bible. And Sort of how? Nobody's ever read the Bible. And what what they consider its impact on their relationships and choices are right sure in the six months span. Between January and the end of June. Yeah. The number of scripturally engaged Americans dropped from twenty eight percent to twenty two point seven percent. Wow, that's thirteen million people who previously. Went to scripture? To seek solace or or a? For better living or whatever. Who stopped doing that just basically were like Oh. This thing doesn't do anything. I mean it's hard to read into exactly what it is i. mean the article kind of speculates Lake. Is this just because they don't have time? Because these are people who got kids at home and a job that? You know telecommuting on. You know like like it. Just people being really busy, or is it potentially? What's? More likely in my mind, which is what you're saying at least to a certain extent, right and no matter what these are people who had a habit. These are thirteen million people who had the habit of going to scripture. Have broken that habit and her going, maybe because they've lived this long, not. You know without the impulse? Maybe

America NYU Donald Trump Dan Beecher Utah Frank Feldman Rosie Bible Society Diane Bible Lake
Tanya Zuckerbrot: The F-Factor Diet

The Here for Her Podcast

05:32 min | 4 months ago

Tanya Zuckerbrot: The F-Factor Diet

"Okay, so let's talk about a factor for people that are listening. Who may have never heard of this before? What is give us a little post? It note introduction short so f factor. The company is a health and wellness brand that was based on the factor diet, which was a book I wrote back in two, thousand six, and the factor diet is a disruptive liberating ineffective approach to weight loss and. Your health and it's based on the premise of fiber. Eat carbs day one, but unlike traditional carbs fiber as zero grams of CARBS, though it's found in carb's. I'll get into that a little bit five reds up metabolism feeling full, so that's the beauty of f factor is that you're eating carbs from day one, but you're able to lose weight without compromising your lifestyle, so it's a very lifestyle brand. Where your dining out from day one you're enjoying carves from day one. You're enjoying cocktails from day one and we even talked about the role that exercise should play, and that is probably. Probably one of the most liberating pillars of factor because we teach people that it's not how long you're working out. It's actually what you're doing, and we teach people how to probably work out. Let's look a greater return, so it's just very liberating approach, but if it wasn't producing results, it would all be smoke and mirrors, and probably had a business after a year, and the company's been around for twenty years and only growing. So Amazing? Okay, so I WANNA, go back a little because you are a registered Dietitian and I love your story. Can you share? How you found such a passionate nutritional wellness, and how you developed a factor, sure so I've always loved food and I think that. Really reveals itself when you see me doing all. My AG TV's an all the cooking videos because. At the core of F factor is my desire to. Deliver yummy food at still allows people to look and feel their best the space of weight loss I think. has you believing that it's like healthy food is tasteless food and. Through that taste, good is always fattening and F- factors. Theory is that if you give people yummy food that's healthy. That produces certain results. This can become a lifestyle so because I've always loved food and cooking I. think that's where F factors popularity drives from because people see like the passion, and when I say that always love food, I optical going to become a chef rather than a registered dietitian cooking, my whole life, not professionally, but more through passion like when I was five years old six years old from Julia. Child's like you know cookbooks. And when I was applying for my master's degree, I knew I want to be in the wellness space by thought. I really wanted a healthy gourmet shop that was gonna be my career path. The I was choosing between new universities, food and nutrition program. That was the masters, course there or the Culinary Institute of America. and. because. I had attended the University of Michigan Undergrad. I really wanted to be back like in an urban setting because. University of Michigan is in Ann. Arbor, which is like a small town, but compared to your that is and the culinary. Institute of America is like an upstate New, York, so I was like no I want to be in the big city, but I miss understood the curriculum like the food and nutrition studies may be studying food and I get to Nyu on the first day and I get handed a list of prerequisites. And the classes included. Inorganic Chemistry Organic Chemistry Biochemistry Anatomy Physiology I'm like. Wait I'm here for the courses on apple like. Pretty Mad. Because twenty years ago, the idea becoming a nutritionist. Commonplace like yeah, you became a doctor lawyer, but what? What was a registered Dietitian, so I had no idea that my interest in nutrition was really tracking me to be more pre MED. And because I was ready to Nyu and my parents had paid my tuition also I got stick this out. There was no backyard at this point so I put my head down and I got through the science classes and to my surprise I love them I'd never taken science courses before. I was a psych major Undergrad so the science to me was new. I learned that I really appreciated the science that. Explains the value of food and food in the form of nutrition, and then you really learn that nutrition is a discipline of medicine, and in order to become a registered dieticians be board certified. You have to complete a residency. And I did mine near University Hospital where your rotations include oncology audio vascular rotations gastroenterology. You're even in the ICU so you are working as part of the medical team. Prescribing is to enhance patient care to either manage a clinical condition, or hopefully in some cases, reverse it or at least decrease the amount of medication to patients taking so my background is super clinical and when I went into. Into private practice weight loss was not even on my radar like frankly after doing two feeds in the ICU, weight loss felt beneath my skill set. I'm not minimizing it, and certainly that's where I've landed, but at the time I really wanted a clinical private practice i. have this mother Theresa Complex I wanNA. Make the world a better place. People healthy and I thought I could do it. The reversing disease states through nutrition,

NYU Private Practice Chemistry Organic Chemistry Bi University Of Michigan Undergr University Of Michigan Culinary Institute Of America. F Julia Apple University Hospital Theresa Complex Arbor Institute Of America ANN York
"nyu" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And sleep medicine here at the department of NYU Winthrop, and she's going to discuss this morning with us signs and symptoms. That probably affect many of us, and I hear this time and time again for my own patients that getting up at night. And a lot of times, I think, you know, as Iran, while it's probably the bladder the prostate, but it may not be. And so we're going to talk to her, and she's also going to discuss new approaches to treating sleep apnea and particularly something that's fascinating to me, a new implantable device and other things that we're going to get into this morning. She is wonderful person. She had outstanding credentials. I could be on the on the phone here for you know, the whole show talking about all of the work and credentials, that she's done, but she is a physician and fellow of the American Academy of sleep medicine. She won numerous awards in this area and also very involved in media on the news quite a bit, and has also written some very interesting novels so welcome to the show once again documents. So glad. That you could be with us this morning. Good morning. He can't pleasure. Good morning. How are how have you been? It's been a long time since we had you on the show, I think it has. But we were together discussing sleep at you'll mend health conference here in garden city. So it's wonderful to be back and on Sunday morning. Most of your listeners may be listening to you while they are still getting ready to get out of bed, one of the communist sate disorders. Hey, we are in the city that doesn't sleep is sleep deprivation..

American Academy of sleep medi garden city NYU Iran
"nyu" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Well, actually, nearly every culture some psychoactive recycling has been consumed ritualistically, and then we flash for to current day, and you have places like John Hopkins NYU certainly in many others doing research. What are these compounds? Good for what are psychedelic where did they seem to show promise? You know, most of the researchers in this renaissance and it's good. You mentioned Johns Hopkins because that's that really. They really drove a lot of this research, a very good and prominent researcher name rolling Griffith who we both now who had been studying drug abuse for years and years got very interested in psychedelics and drove that agenda there, and it's interesting. He got interested in it because he had had his own mystical experience in his meditation practice that got him very curious about consciousness, and so he began with the study that had no medical benefit or use at all. Which is could you use Silla Sivan, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms to occasion, a mystical experience? And there's a definition of that that Henry J O that William James help develop that would have enduring value for somebody's life. And he proved that in two thirds of cases, you could do that. At and then he went about and other people too. Well, okay. How might that experience? Benefit people who struggling with mental illness. The first and most beautiful study. They did there was with people who had cancer diagnoses. And that's really what got me interested in. And that was really the germ of the book was interviewing people with terminal diagnoses who's who were paralyzed by fear anxiety at the prospect of their death or their recurrence, in some cases. And they had these transformative experiences that in many cases completely removed. Their fear is the most astonishing thing. So that was one important indication picking up again on work that have been done in the sixties. And then there were the scores that were measured in that test included, anxiety and depression. So there was signal there. There's some value in depression..

Griffith John Hopkins NYU Johns Hopkins researcher cancer Henry J O William James
"nyu" Discussed on Pick the Brain

Pick the Brain

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"nyu" Discussed on Pick the Brain

"I was walking downtown in Manhattan the day, and I was approached by group of very sweet young ladies. But it came out that they were NYU freshman, and they were majoring in musical theater. Of course, come on. Science majors running after me. What musicals are you doing? I enquired. Well, one of them said looking down at her shoes. We aren't allowed to be in plays are yet. Our freshman year. Now, they were paying very high tuition. Tuning not do what they love doing. I think I said. Well, hang in there. What I should've said was. Don't wait until they tell you. You are ready. Get in there. Sing. Now tell the story. Because. The world might say you are not allowed to yet. I waited a long time out in the world. Before I gave myself permission to fail. Please. Don't even bother asking. Don't bother telling the world, you are ready. Show it. Do it. What did Beckett say? Ever tried ever failed? No matter try again fail again, fail better. The world is yours. Treat everyone kindly. And light up the night. We all bought into this lie that you've got to feel ready in order to change. We bought into this this complete falsehood that at some point you're going to have the courage at some point you're going to have the confidence, and it's total bullshit, frankly. I don't realize swear out, so okay, it's complete garbage. And so there are so many people in the world, and you may be watching this right now, and you have these incredible ideas, and what you think is missing his motivation. And that's not true. Because the way that our minds are wired, and the fact about human beings is that we are not designed to do things that are uncomfortable or scary or difficult. Our brains are designed to protect us from those things because our brains are trying to keep us alive and in order to change in order to build a business in order to be the best. The spouse to do all those things that you know, you wanna do with your life with your work with your dreams. You're gonna have to do things that are difficult uncertain or scary which sets up this problem for all of us. You're never gonna feel like it motivations carved. You only feel motivated to do the things that are easy, right? Because I studied this so much because for me one of the hardest things to figure out was why is it so hard to do the little things that would improve my life. And what I've come to realize what we'll talk a lot about today is that the way that our minds are designed is our minds are designed to stop you at all costs from doing anything that might hurt you and the way that that that that this all happens is it all starts with something super subtle that none of us ever catch. Ch and that is with this habit. That all of us have that nobody's talking about. We all have a habit of hesitating. We have an idea you're sitting in a meeting this incredible idea. And instead of just, you know. Saying it you stop and you have to take. Now, what none of us realize is that when you hesitate us that moment that micro moment that small hesitation it sends a stress signal to your brain it wakes your brain. And your brain all of a sudden goes, oh, wait a minute. Why is he has attained? He didn't hesitate when he put on his killer spiky sneakers. He didn't hesitate with the really cool track pants. He didn't hesitate with an acetate. Now, he says it tasting talks up must be up. So then your brain goes to work to protect you. It has a million different ways to protect you one of them's called the spotlight effect. It's a known phenomenon where your brain magnifies risk. Why deplete away from something that perceives to be a problem? And so you can truly trace every single problem or complaint in your life to silence and hesitation those are decisions. And what I do. And what's changed? My life is waking up and realizing that motivations garbage a never gonna feel like doing the things that are tougher difficulty. And certain or scarier new. So I need to stop waiting until I feel like it. And number two. I am one decision away from a totally different marriage..

Beckett NYU Manhattan
"nyu" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Revision Path

"To be out in the world a bit more and for my particular role that was hard to do. I was at a small liberal arts college where things were very socalist on physical presence on the campus and providing mentorship and support in that capacity. So I kind of did a parallel move where I, I done some administrative work and thought, oh, this is so interesting that I actually like working on behalf of creative people as much as I like teaching and. In some ways. I started to find that that kind of leadership administrative kind of work enabled me to have more creative energy for my own studio work. And that was really the sort of clincher though I love that I left academia to get an a second degree in design and technology just so I could really kind of focus and think about like, is this what I think it is? And that sort of gave you the opportunity to dive in and sort of think more and have some more hands on experience with what kind of stuff I actually liked to do. You know, sounds like an all come and feeds into each other. You know the educational experience of teaching experience feeds into the strategy work as into the studio art, which I guess is a good thing. You're always pulling from like this constant well of inspiration when you talk about it always sounds like it I planted and it just falls into place. It always sounds so neat. When when I'm talking to people who are just starting out their careers, I'm like, does not what it feels like is just what it looks like. You. So I think the, you know, the fact is that like everyone right now, it may be studying something as like studying something that won't even exist. By the time you hit the professional, the professional sphere, most likely now does your current studio work still have that same technology focus? You know, it's interesting. The last thing that I did was a game design project and it was it was a commission for NYU game center, and I was the only artist in that group who had something that was completely analog. Like I did a like role playing game that was face to face real time. No technology. It was about technology. It was all about imagining how technology might work, but there was actually no tech in the experience. So I don't know the more I helped pe- other people think about what they should be doing. Sometimes when I have time on my own, I and obviously still engaging with technology, but I've. Not creating digital solutions are create projects right now. This real time RPG. Can you tell me a little bit about that? Like what was that? Sure, sure. Yeah, it was a lot of fun. It was called lesbian and it was all about because I was running. I was commissioned to run a game that would basically run in one evening. It's an interesting exhibition that NYU game center does every year called no quarter, and it's sort of a game expo there about four of us who were commissioned to do games, and I was really interested in thinking about queer spaces and specifically thinking about the kinds of spaces that we create intentionally and what you tohp, how utopia can often become dystopia. So I basically I set my game on a lesbian separatists commune and made the every game table. Basically the minute you sat down to participate in the game, you become. A member of this lesbian separatists commun-. Then there's a game runner who is a call to game dyke and the game dyke runs the game, explains it to you helps you understand it, and then you're basically faced with historical, some fantastical, mostly historical issues that have faced these kinds of separatists communities over time. So you take your, you know, your given tools and strategies are sort of cards you're given, and you have to use your tools in strategies to come up with solutions to whatever problem has been placed on the board.

NYU
"nyu" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Always trust your feelings. This is the exact opposite of instant wisdom from every culture I've looked at. So here's epoch. Titas. What really frightens in dismays us is not external events themselves, but the way in which we think about them, it is not things that disturb us, but our interpretation of their significance and it's a great truth because you find it in many cultures, here's Buddha, our life is the creation of our minds. With our minds, we make the world, here's Shakespeare in hamlet. Others, nothing good or bad, but thinking makes it so so you know, we choose how to interpret things. We have a lot of leeway in how to interpret things. There are a lot of 'em bigamous things in the world and we get to choose, am I going to take this as a personal attack, make gonna brush it off and say, the person probably didn't mean it as a personal attack. And so just give you one example. So I did a panel discussion here at NYU at NYU law school, and. There was a student. There was a law student who eat. It was arguing that NYU is systemically racist, and I asked her to to explain what and she said violence. She said perpetrates violence on its students of color really violence. Like if you explain this to me, what do you mean that NYU is systemically racist? And she said, well, it's undeniable that NYU was not built for people like me because she's Hispanic and really. Wow, okay. I don't deny that it wasn't built for you and they built it in eighteen forty. They weren't thinking of of Hispanic women. That's true. They might have been expecting all white males. But you know here we are in a panel with a gay, a gay black, a philosopher, Anthony, Appier, and Chinese a Chinese woman. He needs Suker Sohn, and I'm Jewish Jewish man. It wasn't Bill for any of us and so, but it's amazingly open as an incredibly open plays. Credibly, welcoming place. And so to take the fact that it was built by white men and to turn that into an obstacle for yourself, you, she's basically self marginalizing. We're giving kids the tools to self marginalize even when they arrive at one of those welcoming institutions they could possibly find themselves in. So again, we are setting. We're setting kids up for failure. If we, if we can teach kids to think this way we can guarantee that no matter what we do, they will feel marginalized and unwelcome. Of course, the I gen retort to what you just said is that you're invalidating this woman's experience. Oh, no. It's gone up since then. It's I'm invalidating her existence. We're still assert that she, poof, she will cease to exist. I wonder she feels unsafe. So I guess this segues neatly into your third untruth, which is this kind of black and white thinking about there being good people in the world and bad people in the world, the us versus them schema. Yeah, this is the most. This is the most pernicious of all. So yeah, the the untruth is life is a battle between good people and evil people, and this is this is social psych one. Oh one. All these experiments Taj fell minimal group experiments. It's very easy to turn people to get people to join groups and then fight or dislike the other group. And this is the bedouin proverb me against my brother me and my brother against our cousin me my brother and cousin against against the world or against the stranger either way. And so what we do in the chapter and this is what we tried to do throughout the, but we don't come in and say, oh daddy, politics is terrible. And social Justice warriors. We don't do any of that..

NYU Suker Sohn NYU law school Justice warriors Taj us Anthony Appier
"nyu" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Bad Science

"Yes. Where were you read his resume? What was it? But you just read his resume. That's correct. But I don't know still, this happens to me all the time. We've only done like fourteen fifteen episodes and I all the time science will come in. I'll have a description of their job for what they study. No clue what their day to day like critical thinking to the yes to the okay. Do you want me to read it? I can read it, but if not, you know, take a ticket guess. Swing, yeah. Okay. Go either one. Wait, we have to. We have to digital. Right? I want you to guess what his life is like, what is he studying? What is he? What is he doing? Context clues tells me that he is part of NYU so far what I was going to say so far masterful. Studying? I think I heard philosophy and computer science. Yup. Okay. This is true. He has a PHD in both secrets. Yeah, it's like only one PHD it's only one PHD berry. Sorry. I hope I do. You taught. Wow. That's incredibly disappointing Kristoff. I thought I had a double PHD here now just the one now, just the one we could do on our own. Well, I thought I was doing the comedy parts. I guess they are doing the science. Feel bio means wanted him to carry this carry it now. That's true. Okay. So you guys don't want to even try to. But I. Not the Greg, it is the correct answer. I guess what is east scientists? They studied different things different research being out in the field. Some of them are digging. Some of them are on a roll day. I don't know broad. You study like the Allah g. No. All right. You're not listening. Right now. Criticize what plus for guessing. Do you teach? Do you teach.

NYU
"nyu" Discussed on First Mondays

First Mondays

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on First Mondays

"We feel very good about our arguments in opposition, but we feel even better after the confirmation of or after the domination of of judge Cavanaugh because he wrote the majority in our favor in that decision. So as much as we like to have pre report merits cases where we're hopeful that that wouldn't we'll get to wh-what briefly, just for a health law listeners, what's the five second version of the issue case? Sure. It's a Medicare act about whether the Medicare act requires notice and comment rulemaking different and apart from the as requirements. Yes, it's a, it's a page Turner. Yeah, I'm impressed. You actually were able to summarize that quickly because I Mike spirits most most health laws user kind of complicated, right? Well, this one is fortunately it is a, it's more of a not in the weeds of the substance of the health law, but really it's a, it's a administrative law case. And so we have that going on. We've been involved in. We have some other Mikus and other things, but we've been involved in these Indian child welfare act cases equa as we. At NYU. It is the traditional one l. problem set for like the thing that you right. So if you ever meet at NYU kid talking about equa, they'll know what you mean. Yeah. So those challenges have gained a bit of traction in the years in the in recent years, I think become somewhat of a conservative cause to attack the child welfare act and and we do represent Indian tribes as I mentioned earlier. And so we've been involved in the defense of the constitutionality of the Indian child welfare act. I argued a case in the ninth circuit a couple months back defending along with the United States defending the constitutionality of challenge out by the Goldwater institute essentially making it sounds like it is..

NYU judge Cavanaugh Goldwater institute United States Turner Mike five second one l
"nyu" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Yeah undoing oh my son is on his way to college in august if you believe it and listen malls berg talk is my well you know what go to my facebook or twitter and i'll get in touch with you okay send me your i love you guys they take care of all right you take care all right folks maybe i save this for tomorrow at this point yeah i think we'll save this for tomorrow to show the insanity but i will mention this again here this great organization called campus performed dot org and they go they do a lot of great things so they went to nyu in new york city probably right not far from jewels and they asked these students of the great nyu right you got to be a brainiac and pretty wealthy or you get a lot of aid to go to nyu and they asked these students to weigh in on the pick that donald trump made for supreme court justice of course he had made the pick he still hasn't made the pick didn't stop them from weighing in on a nonexistent pick so please this is our future these are these are the people who are future leaders people who think they know what they're talking about it's sad we'll do we'll we'll let you hear from the house this for a tease we'll come back tomorrow and let you hear that after we'll talk about the pick tomorrow we'll have a lot to talk about we'll get another few calls in at eight eight eight.

facebook new york city twitter nyu donald trump
"nyu" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"The diplomatic answer and that was enough from a mom to be like okay and then getting into a school at that time when it might still be as prestigious as nyu was a big deal in building their confidence i would imagine that would allow them to feel like sort of xl little bit like nyu grade school for whatever happens with this acting you went to stint furred did did yeah coup but then i went after i finish stanford i went and lived in new york city and dated a girl who who isn't nyu student in the acting program there and i had i met a bunch of those missing not not remembering nobody would know but i got i got like a sense of that program and kind of what goes on there it's so impressive yeah it was it was fun man i don't know how you are in academic environment but as a creative person and when you're trying to express something that is so intrinsically a part of who you are especially when what you do is so tied into the rhythm of humor and comedy and it's not about diving into the mind of a character it's about finding the music in the moment and finding and mining the laughter and that's an instinct jewel thing you can learn it to some degree but the language of laughter is so you can see on contorted my body it's so in the back of my neck and in the base of my spine and in my stomach and it's in my ear lobes it's like i can it's an energy and so when you go to school and you have that's the language that i spoke at the time and people are like you should be playing prince's and you should be this don't be a funny man be a serious man did do you want people to take you seriously don't you this is acting and i'm like oh i want that experience that i had when that woman came in with a frowning face and then left beaming i do it for them don't wanna do it for critical peers i don't wanna do it for anyone who has an understanding of how the magic works i'm not doing magic for other magicians i'm doing it for the people that want to be transported somewhere so that was.

nyu grade school prince nyu new york
"nyu" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"And did a three semesters at the journalism graduate school nyu will good for you good for nyu lucky us you got into nyu so where did it go from there how did you so you hadn't had internships you hadn't really followed the kind of traditional how do i get a media job path exactly my first semester was so rough because it was like learning a new language and i was like doing right thing do nothing but my second semester i when everyone starting internships i actually didn't get one but because i just couldn't i don't think i have the experience and it was really hard and other people who had done a lot of like journals rang but on their schools newspapers and the like and i hadn't but actually turn out to be a blessing in disguise because i was only doing class and i actually took a class cone eating new york which who would have thought would end up being titled the radio i think i called this episode new york bites maybe it's not too late yeah i think nyu in mind if he's that class and and why is taking over new york i'm gonna steal their class exact people don't know what i'm talking about nyu has bought up like half the real estate and city that's what i'm referring to and this class we it was the our program head merrill like this was her class and she brought in like adam plot to talk to us who's the was your teacher meryl.

nyu york new york adam
"nyu" Discussed on Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on Working Interferences Dental Podcast for Dentists

"It's like four times mine well wilder yeah what was the difference in years seven okay seven years i think could account for well what do you think has debt would have been if he would have gone to oregon hundred fifty and what is it at nyu four hundred fifty yeah clinton went to nyu he did super cool yeah yeah he he had i mean is for culture shock went from nyu manhattan his wife going into med school you went to demoines iowa nice i even still ochoa mfs like i don't want to generalize in characterize but own fasd really good like they really do they i mean they worked their asses off i'm not saying that like oh they're popping out a couple of paradigm only evolve teeth in and make an eighty grand a month for it like no no no they work their ass off but like there are plenty of opportunities for all of us to do really well and it and the ton of different types of practices of you and you do thirds all day on teens there's there's ethics stuff does oral path stuff there's the hadn't hadn't had cancer sorta stuff there's trauma like there's just all kinds of places that you can go when you're s and all of it seems to to typically reimburse pretty well so tyler i think you're going to be good he'll be fine so the big question is is is he a big enough of a pain in the ass to be a process honest that's been only what he's asking right to comes down to that right is so processed on us are generally and i think they would pretty much agree process can kinda be pains in the asses right at least academically.

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"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This she sought this experience at nyu where it's this research was going on and she went in her experience she traveled into her body and she saw under her ribcage this black mass and she realized it wasn't her cancer it was her fear and she said to this and i don't want to use this obscenity but she said get the f out and when she screamed at it it vanished and she said after that experience it hasn't come back she said i learned i can't control my cancer but i can control my fear and that changed her life and so how widespread is this research i mean is it just a couple of places where is this happening so the big centers of research so far have been right here in new york at nyu at johns hopkins university there's been very important research at ucla as well and and imperial college in london so far these are the big centers of research however now that we're moving into phase three trials which is the last step before a approval by the fda which is that step where you try it on humans well no we've been trying it on humans but small groups we've done phase one which is polly pilot study phase two is know groups of about forty say and now face three is going to be groups of hundreds and this is where you really prove out is this for real because in a small group you have a little more control over selecting volunteers and and your guides are extremely well trained and committed to the work so face three which should get started later this year that will be three hundred patients probably and it will be the at maybe a dozen sites so there will be universities and medical centers all across the country doing this research and it will be available to more people which is very exciting and do does it didn't require fda approval who approves this how at some point the fda will say yes this has a medical use we approve this and then doctors can prescribe it well there's one other step the da the drug enforcement administration has to reschedule it right now at schedule one they have to move it to schedule two or schedule three which are which are potentially dangerous drugs that doctors can prescribe and at that point.

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"nyu" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"I wanna use the word deep i mean that in a good way because it's got so much information in it so here's here's the next question if you will you used a format you interview dozens maybe hundreds i don't know how many people the format of the book explain how you did at like who you interviewed why you interviewed them why were the right person why were the right peop why were they the right people for your book shift ahead well first of all we went on did fairmont of research which also was another benefit of connecting with nyu and we spoke to as you said lots of organizations more than one hundred some large them small some startups some establish some growing rapidly some almost gone and some totally gone and and we were looking for you know why why was so many companies struggling to stay relevant to try to avoid becoming their father's oldsmobile and in terms of the structure most most organizations failed we there were no magic follows the three steps drink coffee have your orange juice and you'll be successful but so a lot of the book is focused on what are the some of the obvious warning signs said if you're doing this it's not a good sign of your prognosis for being successful tomorrow interesting use the phrase not your father's oldsmobile at the end of the interview i want people to say say answer they really delivered when they ask where's the beef.

nyu
"nyu" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"The united states so you could use your skills in this particular company country and then start moving over but i think in effect john you sort of don't get the sort of the the geology or the ecology of the system exactly right if you assume that the only thing we have to worry about is making sure that people can go to citizenship let me give you another example the university of chicago nyu we all take in very large numbers of students and what happens is many of them including nuns at i know what they do is they want to take the new york bar for example and they want to stay in practice here for two or three years and then they want to go back to their home country so for people with that kind of plan a temporary visas extremely efficient way in which to do this thing so i think what happens is rather than take the political risk to some extent the social and economic risk of a huge expansion in permanent invitations by sales right at the bunny what you do is you head you bet you split the thing both ways if it turns out that somebody's here for five years and it's all working out well i would assume that renewability would become a against something you could do either on the basis that they're close to a permanent alien maybe not quite maybe ten years or in some cases they'll be on a road to citizenship and others are not i mean i think you could run all of these programs but the key feature doing all of this is when you let them in the government does not engage in industrial policy and seek to determine either the wages of the occupations but which these folks are fit so as you mentioned that the top of the hour in immigration is a very imperfect science the political sentiments on this and as you move out from the employment context into other context it's clear that they're really deep passions on the subject so it's not the kind of thing for what you can have categorical clean solutions it's sort of more like national security and economic liberties they're always gonna be trade off and so what i'm trying to suggest this we don't have to go to the end of the road the first step down and you.

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"nyu" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Happen i recognize that some crackpot judge from nyu was say that's unconstitutional shuttle unconstitutional well i tell you that judges unconstitutional when it when the constitution was written it was never ridden what the attempt to have crazy drugaddicted judges in filthy robes overturn laws that makes sense that's what's unconstitutional but we're in the grips of an insanity in this country like you can't believe like an absolute power of a filthy dumb judge in a black robe he has the absolute power more than a president who gave this judge the power to do the things he's doing to overturn a president that overturn electrical gave them the power who gave him that power who gave the aclu this power nobody they took it they stole the power suspected shooter in custody seven people dead fourteen injured we will not hear about the drugs this idiot was on will not hear about the drugs earlier about the weapons and we can talk about the weapons and what needs to be done but i i'm sorry we need to talk about the drugs s s r i selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors they're very helpful for some and very dangerous for others numerous school violence acts of violence suicides associate with ssris because there's only so much serotonin that your body can preserve until eventually it the levels disappear the purcell goes into hyper mania or hype it depression at goes insane hold.

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"nyu" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WDRC

"T r hoffman dot com welcome back to tell his medicine dutch welled up in here and we're talking about the relationship between the microbiome what resides in your intestinal tract and heart health that i recently delivered a lecture of this uh at nyu here in new york city in conjunction with uh a great uh young gastroenterologist uh lien chan who has pleased to make the acquaintance of because she's involved in research on the microbiome over there at nyu sowa my alma mater uh one of the places that i steadied at has really really made some fantastic advances in the thirty or more years since i was there um in addition to potentially making you fat yeah literally the veteran your gastrointestinal truck can make you fat how do we know that will through technical fecal transfer in experiments if you transfer the bacteria from the intestine of a fat rat to within rat the thin rent will get fat and part of its due to the effect on the table a and part of its due to the effect on appetite the bugs in or intestinal tract actually commandeer our appetite centers and may cause us to eat more really quite fascinating what's going on there but of course obesity is a prerequisite to cardiovascular disease so that's one of the ways that i talk about it by article would you can fight d r kaufman dot com but in addition there's something made in the gut called tma o uh trimethyl amine oxide and trimester be oxide he is potentially as much of a risk factor for cardiovascular disease as cholesterol or ldl cholesterol or c reactive protein her whole desisti it's uh really among the major risk factors associated getting a heart attack or stroke and is said that people who consume a lot of choline or carnitine choline cubs from fish eggs dairy uh and uh uh eggs and carnitine of course cavs were meat uh that those people make more tma oh but many studies suggest that mediators and even people consume highfat dairy lots of eggs don't have were cardiovascular disease what's up with that is it about their dieters about the bacteria their gut that convert these foods into dangerous tma o it's something very interesting came up will they were studying tma there's a natural substance that can inhibit tia mayo very nicely and that is reserved troll and it may be the the.

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"nyu" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"nyu" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To say on for him health care guncontrol y'all ears what you're going to get matters 60 wcbm shall you know this of your normal person you went about your business but if you are a sicko goes to nyu colombia harvard ghost state or the other denizens of lower living uh illiberal more how to the wider anniversary of trump's election by getting in public space in howling howling yesterday and they were shouting shrieking screeching yowling this is what they have become from the savage nation to the medicated nation of one generation is the country permanently broken have meds and ads finally destroyed america this is what they consider to be protest thous screaming at the sky and they called themselves anti fascists well let me tell you something screaming at the guy if that's the best the anti fascist i don't think the fascists are afraid of them the left wing refuse fascism group which has so she'd with the revolutionary communist party sharp with signs drums and a host a chance who's gonna end this fresh nightmare shedding medicated children children you want to know what real fascism is you wouldn't be screaming in the streets you'd be in a concentration camp morons iverson kgb fascism organiz another refuse fascism or of refuse refuse said we are screaming enrage we are screaming in pain but were screaming in unity and solidarity because we have a plan in a way word your way forward is the way of death you stupid you stupid creature you do you know what you led to the you know what people like you led to an other countries the ash can of history ask all of those who fled fascism if you're really anti fascist you are the hysterical fascists of today now that the other big story you wanna hit a scream again anyone even need to hear the scream again of the the opposition in america a robert let's hear the screams against the people understand how sick the opposition rarely as how mentally deranged thoroughly well gene gene gene the lead rose terrific with the colleges look with the colleges a produced they can't debate they can argue that care reasons they scream this is.

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