35 Burst results for "NYE"

Why You Should Stop "Trusting the Science"

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:17 min | 8 months ago

Why You Should Stop "Trusting the Science"

"How many times have you heard we have to trust the science? That the science is settled, you have to wear two masks, you have to get vaccines plus boosters, you must stay at home, you must shower with a mask. The science is settled. How many times have you seen the signs on the side of highways, sponsored by pharmaceutical companies? We trust the science around here. Nancy Pelosi to Joe Biden, Chuck Schumer. We are the pro science party. Now, we've done a fair amount of work in the fields of where this word science came from. And why the cult of science has dominated American life over the last two years. The idea of being able to master the natural world and the human condition through scientific inquiry is nothing new. Science absent of morality is how you get some of the most horrific totalitarian dictatorships like the national socialist Workers Party in Germany or the USSR. Much of it was derived from the industrial revolution where the Germans themselves with Hegel and then marks, they looked at science as a means to the end. All we need is groups of experts in Walt off rooms that had a lot of power and they were able to organize society the way they saw fit. They know better than you. Now, if you look at kind of the push towards the acceptance of the term science over the last 20 or 30 years, there's been some primary actors that have been behind this. One of which is Bill Nye, the science guy. If you grew up in public schools like I did starting in 6th grade, I went to public school in the suburbs of Chicago, almost once a week I would say there was almost an infomercial that was shown with Bill Nye, the science guy. Talking about how cool science was. He would do chemistry experiments he would do physics, demonstrations. He would talk about all sorts of different kind of wrinkles in the natural world that we have discovered. And science was platformed in the eyes of young people in some ways rightfully in some ways dangerously as an irrefutable Pinnacle of human existence.

National Socialist Workers Par Chuck Schumer Joe Biden Nancy Pelosi Bill Nye Hegel Ussr Walt Germany Chicago
"nye" Discussed on The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

01:31 min | 9 months ago

"nye" Discussed on The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

"Rob your offense shoots through the roof. Al defensively still extremely sturdy at this point. They're running some of their best defensive lineups with him out there. It's probably the best defender right now right up there with smart. But you can't you saw it on Wednesday, like all those horror stories with moralizing and when the second half with double big again and you were running those as you were missing all those shots. You want more spacious lineups you want to create some room for grant in a game like that for how is there to get some opportunity there outside of just that short stint in the first in the fourth quarter? You got to think of offense, right, John. Enough to tell me. It's almost like completely I've been getting. We've argued this nonstop. I mean, the game has changed. It is about scoring the basketball. I mean, I mean, more so than ever before. You've got to have guys who can fill it, man. You know, like, it's too fast. It doesn't matter if you're and not only that. Play Gritty defense and lock it down. Teams are so good and they have so much skill in so many good shooters. They can erase 1215 point leads in a heartbeat. You have to be able to go basket for basket in these games. And you can't just go and rely on grind it out slow it down, isolation when they get into their least efficient basketball. How many leads have been erased in 90 seconds? Double digits. That's 16 full run the suns put together with that three minutes. You know, like, so what.

"nye" Discussed on The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

03:17 min | 9 months ago

"nye" Discussed on The Garden Report | Boston Celtics Post Game Show from TD Garden

"And so the idea of him coming off the bench playing Morgan's second unit, guys, I like that I did, but more I'm watching him play. And the more I'm watching rob evolve and grow into a guy that is probably gonna be a little bit more reliable going forward with this team. Well, you look at the two man pairing, just them alone in 20 games, 230 minutes. Alan Robert now a net negative with that 98 offensive because the offensive offenses fall enough so badly. And that's true. That's also hurt a lot Bobby because you've been without Tatum or brown for so many of the last 15 games. But that's the whole season. No, I know, but it started okay with where they had a positive net rating, but that lineup has been without another scorer for so long that they're still starting those two guys together, but you've had a lot of Schroeder smart lineups and just lineups that offensively have been more challenging because, you know, because you have an at jail and in Tatum. So when it's different, when you have Jalen and Jason, that lineup can hold a little bit better without them in there for sure. It's definitely creator. You've seen it a lot. In December, it's -22. Yeah, and that's cratered when Jalen went out there and now they've been without Tatum for a couple. It's been really bad. It was much better. It was like plus 5 or plus 6 for I thought the first month with that pairing, but I can't remember exactly. But yeah, we'll see. I think it's the matrix dependent. There's no reason you have to be married to anything. If you play the sixers, you need Horford in there to be honest. It's weird to me. That's a good point. Brad, we do the line of the matchup thing sometimes, right? Like he'd switch the starting line up around quite a bit just based on who they were playing. They're completely married to this double bake thing. It doesn't matter who they're playing. It didn't make sense match otherwise to start three bigs in this one. Did it? He said he wanted size in this game, which is weird because Phoenix was without their typical big players, you know? Like, he wanted grant in there 'cause he mentioned guys like being bigger to Booker. You'd figure Romeo is in there to check guys, you know, other guys are playing so I'm not really sure what they were super concerned with. You know, in this game to go with that bigger lineup, but it was a matchup based decision rather than being married to a thing. At least in certain grant over Romeo was. Maybe there was more to that and really it was Romeo really sucked last game so I think I'm gonna try something different, but you don't wanna say that. But yeah, I'd be playing matchups all the time. There's no reason not to. All right guys, quick pause we want to tell you about one of our sponsors and that is insa. We're welcome welcoming back incest. Yeah, exactly. It's one of Massachusetts premiere cannabis dispensaries inside. Their founders, patent Pete. They re-engineered the cannabis model from what they sell to how they sell it. Into dispensaries are inviting their modern, the staff or authorities on the science that go in there, they can answer any question, difference between flowers, concentrates, what you want to take for insomnia anxiety, edibles. Hanging out with friends, whatever you want, they're telling you exactly what you need to fill your needs..

Alan Robert Jalen Tatum Romeo Schroeder Morgan rob Bobby Horford sixers brown Jason Brad Booker insa Phoenix Massachusetts Pete insomnia anxiety
NYC celebrates a smaller NYE in Times Square

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

NYC celebrates a smaller NYE in Times Square

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker New New York York City City is is ready ready to to throw throw its its annual annual new new year's year's eve eve celebration celebration in in Times Times Square Square and and while while the the crowd crowd maybe maybe smaller smaller organizers organizers promised promised the the party party will will be be big big the the new new year's year's eve eve ball ball which which is is lived lived and and raised raised at at six six PM PM is is the the star star of of the the show show since since the the countdown countdown entertainment entertainment president president Jeffrey Jeffrey Strauss Strauss this this is is the the largest largest crystal crystal ball ball the the world world has has two two thousand thousand six six hundred hundred eighty eighty eight eight Waterford Waterford crystal crystal triangles triangles it's it's nearly nearly twelve twelve thousand thousand pounds pounds twelve twelve feet feet in in diameter diameter there's there's nothing nothing like like it it there's there's a a live live performances performances from from KT KT Tunstall Tunstall Chloe Chloe journey journey Carol Carol G. G. plus plus others others but but with with fewer fewer revelers revelers fifteen fifteen thousand thousand in in designated designated viewing viewing areas areas instead instead of of fifty fifty eight eight thousand thousand and and tight tight rules rules as as Times Times Square Square alliance alliance president president Tom Tom Harris Harris is is going going to to be be a a fully fully vaccinated vaccinated event event with with mandatory mandatory masks masks the the city city made made the the changes changes because because of of increased increased code code cases cases Julie Julie Walker Walker New New York York

Julie Julie Walker Walker New New York York City City Times Times Square Square Jeffrey Jeffrey Strauss Straus Tunstall Tunstall Chloe Chloe Carol Carol G. G. Times Times Square Square Alliance Allianc Tom Tom Harris Harris New New York York
Sean Feucht Is Planning a Massive NYE Worship Event in Miami

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:13 min | 9 months ago

Sean Feucht Is Planning a Massive NYE Worship Event in Miami

"Border. Hey, folks I'm talking to my friend, Sean Foyt. Don't try to spell it, you'll get hurt. FE. It's German. Sean foy, listen, if you want to find you, they need to go to let us worship dot U.S.. We were just talking about Miami. Okay, where in Miami, December 31st, you're doing a bunch of stuff if they go to let us worship dot U.S.. But where in Miami is the New Year's Eve event, the worship event, three hours of it's actually in a parking lot, the exact address is at let us worship U.S. but we're setting up kind of like we've been doing for the last year, a giant stage, a huge setup in this church parking lot. And the weather is going to be beautiful and from 9 p.m. to midnight. We are going after it. It's going to be amazing. Kim walker, my good friend, Kim walker, Smith is with me. We have we're going to be doing part of this set in Spanish, of course, because we're in Miami. So that's going to be really fun. And you guys do not want to miss it. We have a surprise guest, a really big surprise guest, which I can't tell you who it is yet, but you don't want to miss it. Is it me? Because that would be a huge surprise because I haven't booked any

Sean Foyt Miami Sean Foy Kim Walker U.S. FE Smith
There's No Legislative Purpose in Congress Reviewing President Trump's Tax Returns

Mark Levin

01:40 min | 10 months ago

There's No Legislative Purpose in Congress Reviewing President Trump's Tax Returns

"So we have this piece in the hill by Naomi Jagoda In Harper Nye dig beats me Anyway federal judge yesterday dismissed an effort from former president Trump to prevent the Treasury Department at IRS from providing House Democrats with his tax returns Look how it's Trump They dismissed his effort to protect his tax returns from Congress Now folks Donald Trump is a private citizen There is absolutely no reason for Congress to have his tax returns None Do you have no of any ex-president that has been treated this way In this latest attack I mean do you know any president that's been treated this way Ex-president They don't want to know about George HW Excuse me George W. Bush's taxes They don't want to know anything about Obama and the hundreds of millions that he's pulled in Why not Now I'm telling you right now when the Republicans if the Republicans take the house and I want to talk about that in a minute if the Republicans take the house they damn well better get on their bikes here They should target Obama or Clinton and somebody and demand their taxes And if the judges think it's no big deal that Congress has a legitimate effort and trying to make tax policy based on what public officials are doing then they should subpoena these This judge is taxes and Supreme Court Justices taxes Why suggest the president our former president in this case There's no legislative purpose

Naomi Jagoda Harper Nye House Democrats Congress George Hw Treasury Department Donald Trump IRS George W. Bush Barack Obama Clinton Supreme Court
"nye" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Maybe he's gonna win points on that but for the most part. You're not impressed with this guy hockey moral for a if we again we really. It's much too early to know. But i think he got china's attention and He a in. We'll have to see how that plays out the so called. Phase one trade agreement is is not much is. We don't know whether it's going to get to the heart of the of the issues of so. I'd given that i also we give him on. I think i rated reasonably on the use of force which is that there has been a degree of proportion discrimination and his limited attacks on syrian chemical causes. Was i think what about the level of obama should have done but you can plead the chapter before this omanis. Somali strike came afterwards. And i think that's a case where for reasons. I mentioned earlier. He lost his sense portion. Right so my last question is about donald trump administration. There was a giant spurt of writing about the roles based international order. There were people who said it's over with that. Trump represents the end of the rules-based international order. There are people who defended it. You gave a qualified defense. I think it's fair to say the rules based interactive order wondering. I have no idea of out how much of this book was. A response to trump. Who and a response to this this conception that were this idea that the rules based international order is either defunct or not worth defending. It was this while he brought high impart but the book actually has roots. Go back much deeper. i'd never heard with donald trump but not in the political sent When i was thinking about this. I think there is a lot of talk about the end of the liberal international order. What i say. The book was dropped. The word liberal difference between liberal international order which is will sewn in which tries democracy and we ought to realize it when you have a great power like china they don't wanna be liberal and there's not much you about that in the short run at least but rules-based there still is a a role and going back to that point bad axe rodney's to shins and the long shadow future chinese have an interesting certain rules based dimensions and climate is probably the most dramatic was so i think we don't wanna as we get rid of the losers about the liberal international order. That's not the same rules-based international order which you begin to get cooperation in the production of public goods. That i is whatever is trying to make a distinction. That's great joe. Thank you very much. This book is an excellent book on many levels. It's like a lot of great books. It is both accessible to the general reader. But it's also theoretically very sophisticated. Both i think it's fair to say that both novices and experts Thank you. I tried to write for real people. The law fair. Podcast is produced in cooperation with the brookings institution. Thanks this week to joseph nye for coming on the show. If you have a second please. Share the l'affaire podcast on social media. And give us a five star rating and review. Wherever you found us you can also purchase fair swag at our online store. Www dot the law. Fair store dot com..

donald trump administration china hockey Trump donald trump obama rodney joseph nye joe brookings institution
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"Oh grants and learn more but the deadline is july twenty eighth of twenty twenty one. And if you've got an observatory and doing serious work involving near and looking for some help upgrade your equipment. Thank about so many rosal. I don't know if there's anything else we need to say up front We probably ought to hear from these. Two guys who have Seen such benefits in their search also characterization of of near earth objects but bruce's. I said we'll be back with you in a few minutes after we've heard from them. Thanks for joining me upfront. most excellent. they're doing great work. The first of the shoemaker neo recipients will talk with today received his third grand in late two thousand nineteen called on russell durkee a few days ago for this report on his work and about the opportunities it has provided for some of his high school students in minnesota russ welcome back to planetary radio a year and a half after our first conversation when you adjust been awarded That neo grant your third so You are a multiple recipient. Welcome back to the show. thank you matt. Great to be back shed of science. I love it but how did get that name. Well i have to thank bill. Nye actually really. Yeah because i remember in college. I was in college when bill nye was doing his show on television. And we'd watch it every saturday morning. I remember he had a bucket of science at some point in one of his life shows. And i thought that was awesome and so when i was looking for observatory names it was just a shed in my backyard and so i said well this this will now be the shed of science and had i actually thought about it and knew that i would be still using it and trying to get grants and things like that using the name. I probably would have picked something a little. More distinguished but shadow sciences is worked out just fine and that's that's where game from to be honest. I love it. I know that the second of these three grants was also to allow you to buy camera. We talked about that last time. And then something like ten years past and you picked up the camera that That this current grant was able to To get for you. How's it working out is. Is it proven to be as valuable as you hoped. Yeah so far so good. It started off a little rough. you know. These cameras aren't things you can buy off the shelf. You them from specialty manufacturers and they make them to order and it arrived about six months. After i made the purchase. Wow and Yeah it's amazing the lead time then. I installed it a month or two later. Since my observatory is across the country for me then it proceeded to fail right after i drove across the country and and it took a month or so that the manufacturer was wonderful to work with. They fixed the camera. Sent it back. And i had a colleague. Install it for me and it was off to the races so it took. I made the order probably in november or december. I received it in march went back for repairs and i didn't have it operational until september. I think so it. It was a little rough start but since then it's worked beautifully. And in fact i ran last night and i'm looking at data as we speak so nine or ten months now where it's been working pretty reliably. What kind of improvement has it made for you. I mean how. Dim and object. Could you really observe in the past. And what's the level now. The magnitude i typically observe around fifteenth magnitude. Or so sometimes. They're brighter fourteenth. Magnitude is a little unusual. Before this. I was may be observing objects. Down to sixteenth magnitude reliably with sufficient signal. But now i'm routinely going at least a magnitude and a half deeper. I've observed objects seventeen and a half magnitude and it allows.

december minnesota november bill bill nye seventeen and a half magnitude july twenty eighth matt fourteenth sixteenth magnitude third march september nine today Two guys last night ten months a month rosal
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"The long the newseum drought is over. Here's planetary society editor. Ray pauleta ray. Welcome back and thank you for this. June ninth article double venus missions all the burning questions nasa hopes to answer no pun intended. I'm sure double it's now triple right. Tell us about this new announcement from the european space agency. Yes so we're actually getting not one not two but three missions to venus which is to be super exciting. The third mission is actually called envision. Yes say just announced. Recently that they're going to be sending their own spacecraft to venus which is just incredible. I mean it's been thirty years since nasa has sent spacecraft venus. The last one. I believe was magellan. So it's kind of wild that everything is just turning up venus. It's about time thirty one years since that. Lots of magellan. It's just absolutely crazy that we had to wait this long. We hope to have the principal. Investigators for both of the nasa missions. On pretty soon maybe we can get the vision <hes>. Equivalent of a pi as well. There are a lot of questions that we hope. These missions are going to help us to answer. Even if they don't provide full answers you cover a lot of them in this article. One of them we go back to that drought. I mentioned at the top of this segment. Water there's all the speculation about did venus. Was it a much wetter place. Billions of years ago like mars. Is this going to help us with that. Yeah it's really incredible. I mean when you think of something like venus. It's hard to imagine that there is anything ever even just resembling an ocean on the planet right but was actually a good chance that hey there might have been a watery past so i think that with davinci plus the spacecraft is actually going to drop a sphere through venus's atmosphere and measure some of those noble gases that could be there and that seems to be a big clue in finding out whether or not venus ever had an ocean. And

Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Venus Missions: All the Burning Questions NASA Hopes to Answer

"The long the newseum drought is over. Here's planetary society editor. Ray pauleta ray. Welcome back and thank you for this. June ninth article double venus missions all the burning questions nasa hopes to answer no pun intended. I'm sure double it's now triple right. Tell us about this new announcement from the european space agency. Yes so we're actually getting not one not two but three missions to venus which is to be super exciting. The third mission is actually called envision. Yes say just announced. Recently that they're going to be sending their own spacecraft to venus which is just incredible. I mean it's been thirty years since nasa has sent spacecraft venus. The last one. I believe was magellan. So it's kind of wild that everything is just turning up venus. It's about time thirty one years since that. Lots of magellan. It's just absolutely crazy that we had to wait this long. We hope to have the principal. Investigators for both of the nasa missions. On pretty soon maybe we can get the vision Equivalent of a pi as well. There are a lot of questions that we hope. These missions are going to help us to answer. Even if they don't provide full answers you cover a lot of them in this article. One of them we go back to that drought. I mentioned at the top of this segment. Water there's all the speculation about did venus. Was it a much wetter place. Billions of years ago like mars. Is this going to help us with that. Yeah it's really incredible. I mean when you think of something like venus. It's hard to imagine that there is anything ever even just resembling an ocean on the planet right but was actually a good chance that hey there might have been a watery past so i think that with davinci plus the spacecraft is actually going to drop a sphere through venus's atmosphere and measure some of those noble gases that could be there and that seems to be a big clue in finding out whether or not venus ever had an ocean. And

Ray Pauleta Ray Nasa European Space Agency Magellan
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"And we would like you to talk to them about what you do. Because you're the expert so if your king of the forest if you're running the show over there based on this book based on what you've learned and the people you've met people interview. What would you change what we have done differently in. Twenty twenty twenty thousand nine hundred twenty. I wouldn't so much rewind the tape and say what we could have done a different. I mean it's kind of obvious and things we would have done differently. We would have. We wouldn't have had for example a single point of failure in testing where we were completely dependent on the cdc for attest and they're just not only doesn't work but they've slows down for weeks while trying to figure out how to make it work and lead. Everybody think it's coming when it's it's not coming. It's that absence of testing was catastrophic from january to late march. But i would do. Is i'd back away from it and say how do we create an institution that could take the risks. It needs to pick but this means somebody in charge the president or somebody in charge is going to have to be able to tell people wear a mask This a rule. You gotta get vaccinated. That's a rule. You can't go hang out together. That's a rule. Is that possible. The cdc director should have had the same demeanor the same sets seeming detachment from the president as anthony. Fauci did anthony. Fauci is a permanent civil servant. So the first thing you do. Is you rewind the tape and you say this job along. It's a job that they've president can't fire onto him maybe points the first one. We recreate what we had before. How was the person picked in the good old days. As a practical matter they bubbled up from within the institution and and presented themselves to their colleagues. If someone who was quite capable department of health and human services would appoint the person but want to pointed. It was not contemporaneous with the presidential term. The person could just stayed across across administrations. I think this isn't just the cdc. I think we've queered our ability to govern ourselves by allowing a lot of these those kind of jobs that are really expert jobs and then really not ideological to drift into the hands of the president to appoint and it makes us very inefficient. I mean crates. Discontinuity in the organizations right makes us foldable. Look what happened my look what happened. I know it makes us vulnerable one of the other things. It was just because my characters hair to fire. Charity not charity to carter measure who was and the wolverines the guys who designed this the pandemic strategy in the bush white house and who had become kind of gifted as they call it redneck epidemiologists. They understood that the beginning of an outbreak. It's muddy. it's the picture is very money. You've got to be very resourceful. And figuring out the things you need to figure out like transmissibility and leaf -ality and they had done that by january the twentieth of twenty twenty so in order and a half ago and a month before the cdc stands up acknowledges. It's a threat. So they were. There was a month. That was just wasted an a month when people are all shaking hands and kissing and carrying on as all exponential enormity a month when nobody is paying too much attention to the fact that the didn't have a test that worked there was a month that should have been a month of urgency. And these weren't chicken littles. I mean these are people who really knew the material and who had actually lines of communication with people in the administration with people in the cdc and they couldn't get anybody listen to him except they could get governors to listen to them once. The governor's realized that the federal government is not gonna come save me. They were able to like persuade some governors. They needed to take action. But the point is people did know and it wasn't. They could show you why they knew and how they knew from the death. Statistics that the dug out of chinese websites in in wuhan there were different from the officially reported statistics. Oh wow they were doing. They were doing that kind of thing. That's what you're saying it's muddy you just gotta try to figure out as much as you can from all the different sources you can. He s and because the big point is that you're always looking in the rear view mirror with disease. If what you're responding to is the first american death you responding to an infection that occurred a month earlier and it's an infection from a virus that is replicating ex financially. So by the time you get the death it's too light so here you are. You're in charge now. What are you going to change. You're going to change. How the head of the cdc has picked. You're going to change that culture. Somehow i'm going to immediately do two things. The cdc is now permanent career servant. The cdc's communication team is not white house appointed. It's not political people. It's a permanent communication arm of that agency independently. Able to kind of get out and talk to the american people this is somehow how it is at the national institutes of health. It's better at the national. Yes i i don't know. The communication operation is but anthony fauci the reason he was able to kind of maintain. Some independence was his status. Trump couldn't fire him on a whim. I then say. I look at the whole apparatus. I say at acknowledge that there's always going to be bureaucratic inefficiency protectiveness about their space. I anchor disease response inside the white house at the top. There's like a person who is the the pandemic czar who is coordinating the agencies because it isn't just the cdc response. I mean the fda had horrible problems. We have horrible problems. Getting rapid tests approved. The fda is partly responsible for restricting people from other people from creating tests in the beginning of the pandemic. So i would anchor in the white house. I'd have like someone who is always front of mind. Pandemic disease person who's in charge of coordinating intimate the administration's but kind of back and i'd say look where were the vulnerabilities that we saw in the system. And what were you saw. It was at the local level that essentially disease at a local level. It is naturally a local. It's it's war. It's like where it's happening. I would empower these local health officers in a new way. The we got three thousand five hundred of them. It sounds like you're valuing civil service. Y'all my god. Yes valuing civil service. But i'm also i gotta give them the tools that they need to give them the weapons. They need to fight the war part of the problem and all this is the status structure in public health. The cdc sits at the top in those guys are like the gods win in fact the really important characters are these local health officers who referred to starts and fight it on the ground who have to tell the local population. You gotta wear masks and you'll have to be trusted. They've gotta be trusted. Gotta be trusted so invest enormous energy into making that an elite corps with high status like if possible higher status and the people in washington. You're not gonna pay them. Are you gonna tax dollars. That's crazy. no i'm not gonna just pay them a makita an oscars for them where the best civil servants are on national television. And they're getting awards for stuff they did and the thing about this space. It's not like i don't know restaurant inspection. It is an inherently dramatic job disease control. It is amazing. What goes on everyday in america even before cove it. It's a netflix. Series is not hard to interest people in the person. If you pay attention it could be a new york times best sour michael possible now. Here's the sentence that really struck me in your book. This particular story is about the curious talents of a society and how those talents are wasted if not lead. That's what you're talking about right. These local officials are really skilled People not all of them. We refrained nothing but excrement on them for the last thirty years but the best ones are unbelievable. I mean the action heroes. I had a pick of half a dozen characters. I could've set as.

Trump america january washington Fauci anthony new york netflix anthony fauci three thousand late march wuhan first Twenty twenty twenty thousand half a dozen characters twentieth nine hundred twenty a month earlier oscars a month
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

10:10 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"People got infected who were researchers who worked on this. It was sort of like a right of passage. I mean it is very infectious. Like one single spore and you can get infected so you're not that surprising. It's not that surprising. And so dixon was like i've solved the puzzle and he presented this hypothesis at a meeting of the california medical association and he never wants acknowledged that it was actually gifford who had come up with the idea. Yeah which is really frustrating. His infuriating eventually in the nineteen fifties her contribution would be recognized but like still really annoying. Yeah so now that. Researchers had a picture of the disease caused by toxic waiting. They could start digging into questions like where does this happen. What animals does this happen to. How often does it happen. And so on and these massive questions would almost all be taken up by another of dixon students. So gifford was one of dixon students. A guy named charles smith also herald tropes frat brother this like. This is just perfectly illustrates. How either incestuous or connected the world is a small world if you have a very specific study organism everyone knows everyone and smith spent the late nineteen thirties. Wandering all over kerr and to layer counties in a truck named the flying cleanliness for nope Yep don't call it that. A clinton spore his a thick walled. Heisel sell that functions as a spore. So i haven't parentheses. I love it and he was just like looking for people who had developed erythematosus him. Okay he was like okay. Like i want to know. And so what he found what he was looking for because over eighteen months he saw over four hundred people who reacted to a skin. Test with cox And this is in two counties in california. Like i feel like that's kind of substantial aaron. I can't wait to tell you about the current events in so i have a little bit of a taste of it. I'm sure yup. And he found that a good chunk of the people who seem to have an infected at one point we're just a symptomatically infected and that the disease was much more prevalent than previously thought. And that people who were new to the area or this in a lot of the early studies weren't white Seemed to be more likely to develop severe disease. And i know that like these studies were back from the nineteen early nineteen hundreds and so i don't know right in what their reasons were yet. That sounds like a very common thing that you see even in literature from today. Yeah all of the literature from today. Still says the same thing and i agree. I don't know exactly what they're basing that on right right so charles. Smith was also infamous for hating to wash glassware in the lab. He was like a hate. He hated doing it. And so that is how through a series of serendipitous accidents. I don't know involving dirty wasserman tubes. He developed a complement fixation. Test for the disease like accidentally figure deadly he like left them on the counter like washing later on washington later and then they formed these little like buttons. He was like oh that can be anyway. This was a huge forward though this this complement fixation test because it became a standardized way to test for exposure to the disease and it allowed for these large scale prevalence studies without the need for growing the fungus and lab animals. Why was so much. Focus placed on cox city auriemma coast because it kind of seems like it was. I mean like yes. It could absolutely be deadly and debilitating but there were also so many other diseases that were in constant circulation. Yeah this is still pre antibiotic in pre most vaccines but cukor. Mycosis did pose a big threat to california's rapidly growing population. Why was it growing the dust bowl. The dust bowl throughout the nineteen thirties tens of thousands of families picked up from their eroded and parched farms in the prairies and headed to california and this enormous influx of people meant a whole new bunch of susceptible for cock city oi dis and so the disease became much more visible that makes sense and so aaron. I really like side note really still want to do an episode on the dust bowl. I know if you listeners. Can't wait until that episode comes out. Go read the worst hard time. Because that's an amazing book. Okay so if the dust bowl was indirectly responsible for cox's mycosis becoming more visible and fuelling more research in the nineteen thirties than in the nineteen forties. That role would go to world war two as the. Us got ready to enter the war. A bunch of airfields were established for training purposes and what better place than the southwestern u. Us smith so like charles smith from before took this opportunity to set up perspective epidemiological. Study where he begins. Skin testing all of the newly arrived personnel to these airfields. He made notes of how living conditions impacted disease risk like tents and even though on smith's recommendation the airfields implemented dust control strategies. There is still plenty of city audio mycosis cases for smith to make detailed study on all the ways the disease could manifest incubation period. The timeline of disease and so on and with this and other research conducted during this time ended up showing was that this disease was essentially endemic in a good chunk of the southwestern united states. And the other thing that the nineteen forties would do was to firmly establish cock city oi dis as a pathogen of incarcerated populations. Oh yeah oh yeah during world war. Two specifically between the years of nineteen forty two and nineteen forty-five the united states set up concentration camps previously known as internment camps in the western states. And other places as well for the forceful relocation and incarceration of around one hundred and twenty thousand people of japanese ancestry. Sixty two percent of whom were us citizens actually at least one of these camps which had a population of thirteen thousand was located on the healer river in southern arizona which was a hot spot for custody. Auto mycosis and the high prevalence of this disease was known before the camp was established of course and so no one was to surprise when cases began popping up at the camp or nearby at the prisoner of war camp where german prisoners were being held. And i didn't see any solid numbers for infection rates or like total number of cases at these concentration camps. But i did see that at the prisoner of war camp where charles smith visited. I think at least once. He estimated that between two thirds to three quarters of new arrivals would become infected within one year of arriving god based on living conditions. And just the super high and domna city of the pathogen and there do seem to have been some deaths at the camp and aaron. I'm sure you're going to talk a whole lot. More about how to mycosis is still super prevalent prisons and maybe about some of the ethics of intentionally building or maintaining prison facilities where infection is a certainty. There's so much there but yeah but at the time that these concentration camps and other prisons were first being built. There weren't any effective treatments for the disease. And no vaccines. And i know that treatment is still more art than science even today but but the big increase in cases during world war two in endemic areas allowed smith and other researchers to notice that infection with the fungus did seem to protect you from getting it again which then spurred on some vaccine work Alongside this vaccine research which ultimately did seem to produce a vaccine. I read a paper word that was like oh and then they all injected themselves with this vaccine and it seemed to work. Oh i don't know. I nineteen fifties. Yeah but it seems like it seems like this vaccine research was being done at the same time that the us was looking into this as a potential bioweapon Not to weaponize it but to see how feasible it was for other people to weaponize and also like how we be about the should we make a vaccine just in case etc and then finally treatment emerged in the nineteen sixties in the form of amphotericin b like. We talked about nor organ transplant episode. And since that one can be a bit toxic later development of antifungal as levels was kind of a relief. And i say because yeah all problems you talked about And then the next time we really saw like a huge increase in interest in mexico mycosis was of course during the aids pandemic in the nineteen eighties.

charles smith today Smith Sixty two percent thirteen thousand washington nineteen early nineteen hundre world war two nineteen forties smith one year late nineteen thirties charles southern arizona nineteen sixties world war over four hundred people california over eighteen months southwestern united states
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"Pain tends to be very severe and with this type of pneumonia. The fatigue can last for months and months So the known resolves that fatigue can persist. Okay if you were to take a chest x ray or a chest. Cat scan which would be very likely to happen. If you went to the or the doctor's office it would look like pretty much most other causes of pneumonia which means it would look like. There's fluid in some portion of your loan either in just one lobe or maybe in like the middle region which is called the high lar region around the trachea like where the trachea divides you might have. Some swollen lymph nodes along that region. That's a little bit more common with a cock city. Pneumonia than other types of pneumonia. One other thing you might have. That's not as common with other forms of pneumonia. Is you might have some skin. Changes like some red painful swollen bumps along your shins that are called era thema no some or another red splotch rash that can occur kind of a cross. Your body that's called arizona multiform question okay. What else causes those two things. So a number of different. These are not specific to custody ladies infection. These are both caused by an immune response to this infection not right a disseminated fungus. So there's actually a number of different infections that can cause similar findings viruses and bacteria. Okay but i mean like guess. What's the mechanism like. Why does that happen in these different infections. That's a really good question. That i i don't know the specifics of it. Aside from the fact that whatever specific immune response is being generated. That's what then causes this okay. And this is only like an occasional It's not always sign of disease. Okay yeah yeah so. It's also kind of person. Specific like some people might be more likely to have this immune response than others But most of these people with this presentation will recover and be pretty much fine with or without any treatment and keep that in mind. Ding ding ding with or without treatment. Because it'll become really important later on okay. But some people won't so there's a few other forms that this disease can take. Some people will go on to have a chronic form of pneumonia. That's called chronic progressive pneumonia. And i had a hard time. Finding the exact percentage of people that go on to have like a chronic pneumonia which basically would be all the same things that you had with this pneumonia so cough potentially coughing up blood because you have so much inflammation and infection. You'd go onto have weight loss because you've essentially been sick for so long that you're just not eating you feel really really bad. The fatigue is extreme and on x. Ray you still see those same pneumonia changes but what based on everything that i. It seems like it's likely less than five percent of the time. But i didn't get a hard number on chronic pneumonia okay. But even if ammonia resolves or is treated and goes away sometimes all of the fluid and gunk. that's left behind from the infection can persist and what it does is contract in two like a cavity that our body kind of walls off and it just stays there and this can happen like five to ten percent of the time so you'd still see like inaugural cavity if you look at an x ray of a person with this is this is in their lung in their lung now most of the time. That's all and nothing ever happens beyond that but in thirty to sixty percent of people with these naturals they actually still have an active infection. It's just not spreading or doing anything. So if you tested them for cox city authorities you would find it. And so this could potentially reactivate or have like waxing and waning symptoms. Wait a second so the fungus is still there in that knowledgeable but it's been walled off. It's been walled off. So it's like that. Edgar allan poe story the cask of a monte auto jerry out. I probably have read it but i don't specifically remember if the one where they wall the guy up inside. Oh yeah they wall him up. Leave him yeah. I was going to say. It's kind of like tb. Also that. I feel like that says a lot about our personnel. This is not uncommon in other fungal infections as well fungal infections are are very difficult. to kind of treat in and deal with our immune system doesn't always do a great job of responding to them now. There's something else that can happen. That gets a lot worse. So in somewhere between one and five percent of cases the infection can spread beyond the lungs and result in what's called disseminated disease so overall if you look at everyone who gets infected with city authorities. The percentages are like somewhere between one and five percent. But if you look just at people who are in some way immuno-compromised whether that's from hiv infection. That has low cd four. Count or some kind congenital. Immunodeficiency someone who's on immunosuppressants because of an organ transplant. Or whatever in this group it's like thirty to fifty percent of people could go on to develop disseminated disease. Okay so it's like so it's disproportionate. Who is right to get a disseminated infection rate right but even in people who are otherwise immuno competent somewhere between like one to three percent of people will go on to develop this systemic infection. Okay so once. This fungus spreads from beyond your lungs to it. Like makes its way from your alveoli out into your bloodstream. It can go literally anywhere and in fact in theory any oregon or any system but there are a few places that it goes most commonly the skin is one of them and this results in kind of ulcerations or or big kind of like blisters. That that burst. Open that you see on the skin It can go to the lymph nodes which would cause a lot of swelling. It can go to the joints which would cause a lot of joint pain but the most severe and terrifying manifestation is if it goes to the meninges which is the lining of our central nervous system So this means it's managed to cross the blood brain barrier and result in meningitis which if untreated is over ninety percent of the time in this also tends to happen months or even years after an initial respiratory pneumonia type infection months or years. So it's a long of this fungus making its way through our body and wreaking havoc. So is it possible that somebody becomes infected and then doesn't know for years and years that this is what they have. I don't think for years and years but potentially yes because for example if they form like inaugural and there otherwise immuno competent than their immune system can keep that at bay if they then become immunosuppressed for some reason later on this could be reactivated. Okay yeah gotcha. Yeah so yeah. So that's kind of like the general overall. Biology of cox cdo mycosis. Well said thank you..

thirty ten percent five percent five one less than five percent Edgar allan poe three percent both two things One over ninety percent sixty percent fifty percent two one lobe years them time cox
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"Cuck city later mycosis aka valley fever aka. Our first human fungal pathogen. It's actually two different species of fungi cox. Ladies images in custody pos odyssey which are both and democ to desert areas in mostly the southwestern u. s. so custody ladies impetus tends to be more prevalent in california and cox's ladies passat ac- mostly in arizona. But these fungi are also found throughout new mexico. Utah into texas. We'll talk a little bit later about how. Maybe it's all the way up in washington as well as down into parts of mexico and central and south america. So let's get into the disease that's actually caused by this fungus. This is the pathogen that is not contagious. So it has not been shown to be spread from person to person or from animal to person because this is also a fungus that can infect other animals aside from humans especially dogs. But i am not really going to talk anymore. About infection. Animals like at all but this is a fungus. That's called diamorphine. So it has to entirely different forms that it exists in. And i i have to confess that i know so little about fungus that i i still have so many questions. About how the heck this is possible like. It's so fascinating okay. Let's get into it in the environment. This fungus exists as a mold. It's called a my celia liam so if you were to grow a whole bunch of it like very concentrated in like a jar or something and pick it up it would look like a little cotton puff like a little ball of white little wispy like pot and candy yum if you look at these. Little wispy is in more detail. They look. they're called branching Heidi what does that mean. they're kind of like. This is the way. I'm gonna describe it erin. It's like a tree made out of toilet paper so it's a long stringy. Bits that have branches like a tree would but then they're separated at certain points like the way that toilet paper is so low separations. Okay and so what happens. Is that during times of drought or low precipitation those like toilet paper squares which in the fungus are called arthri canadia or arthur spores. They dry out and then they break off super easily like if your house got toilet paper and then the wind picked up in broke off a bunch of little squares of toilet paper and then toilet. Paper flew all under neighborhood. And then what happens. Is that you as a human breathe. Those spores in so that is kind of the life cycle in the environment. So you have these my celia these little long branchy stringy bits that break off when they dry out and then can become born on the wind in the soil excellent now you breed them in and now we have to talk about what happens in us because it's totally completely different than what happens in the environment. So when you breathe in a spore literally potentially just one it only has to be one spore could potentially infect you what happens is you breathe it in and it goes down into the bottom of your respiratory tract and lodges in your terminal ally terminal bronchials right where gas exchange is supposed to be happening and once it gets there. It begins to enlarge and it forms. What's called a sphere. You'll like a big sphere. Okay that like a beach ball in your own your line and in this spiritual it begins to replicate informs thousands of endo spores ooh within the sphere the spiritual and then eventually. That's ferial will rupture and release those thousands of endo sports that can go on to travel forum new sphere urals which make more spores etc etc. That's cool So it brings its own little like reproductive machinery. Yeah it just it. Does it all on its own. It's asexually reproducing just boop boop boop boop making a bunch of little endo spores but that's completely different than how. It lives in replicates in the environment in the soil and it gets even weirder. Because if for example you take a sample of someone's sputum like like gunk. They coughed up when they were infected with cox city. And that's a whole bunch of indo sports inside a spiritual. If you left that on the counter it would grow mice. Helium it would grow into the environmental form which by the way would be highly infectious if it dried out. So there's some kind of cues that its using yes. Some kind of cues to know that it's in a host versus in the external environment. I wonder what those cues are me too erin too but we're gonna focus on what happens when it's inside of your body. If somebody is a fungus research true it would be awesome to know more details about that fungus because who boy but in general once this happens inside of our lungs are body reacts to this fungus. It's going to induce an immune response. It's going to recruit a lot of inflammatory cells and that's going to kind of result in the symptoms that we see so. Let's talk about this. Yeah if you have any symptoms at all which about forty percent of people who get infected with cox. Cd's will sixty percent of people won't have any symptoms at all if you have these symptoms most commonly it presents as an acute pneumonia. And i think we've talked very peripherally about pneumonia in the past. I'm actually gonna talk a lot about pneumonia in this episode. Which is exciting. Yeah but pneumonia is basically just the way that we say. There's an infectious cause of inflammation and fluid filling up the air sacs of the lungs. Okay so it's inflammation of the lungs but pneumonia is used specifically to mean an infectious cause of that inflammation So with cox video mycosis take it right. I think so. Honestly it's it's like we've said it. And i've thought it so many times. It's starting to sound weird. I know when to three weeks after inhalation of the spores you have basically pretty typical pneumonia symptoms. Fever cough that's quite productive of gunk. Very profound fatigue. Like just feeling very exhausted and probably chest pain especially when you take really deep breaths with cox infection. It's also really common to have headache and the chest..

sixty percent arizona california Utah texas washington mexico new mexico south america southwestern u. s. thousands of endo spores both first erin central thousands of endo sports one spore Heidi cox city forty percent
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"My whole life. And i was always very healthy at age. Nineteen i create a plan to serve a religious mission. And then come home and spend the rest of my life. Doing iron man's in one day making it to the kona ironman championship however those plans would quickly change in march of two thousand fourteen. I left on a religious mission to arizona for eighteen months doing service outdoors in teaching iran nearly every day of this mission and did quite a lot of bike riding his well initially going out to arizona. We were warned about valley fever. We were told to stay inside if there was a store or if his extra dusty outside because valley fever was in the spores the spoiler the dust while we tried to stay inside from dust. Storms being outside with evitable on being around the desk was inevitable. Hello it's sorta and we spent so much time outside saas forward. It was august. Twenty ninth two thousand and fifteen. I was seventeen days away from going home and seeing my family again and finishing the service and that day my life would change forever. I woke up with a bit of chest tightness but shrugged it off. I still went on our morning run but could barely make it more than a quarter of mile. When the chest pain became so intense. I ended up going to an urgent care and sitting in the waiting room for three hours gasping for breast because their computer was down. I was in so much pain. I can barely breathe. When the computers found the came up. I was able to get an x ray by the urgent care doctor. After analyzing the x ray. Nothing of concern showed up so the presumed that the only explanation was something similar to shingles. Because i didn't have a fever. I didn't have a cough. Have a rash or anything else. I was given steroid shots and pain. Medications then sent on my way. After a few days. I began to have a low grade. Fever and somebody aches progressively the fever scott worse than the aches more extreme to which prey i felt unable to move my joints. Exactly one week from initial trip to the urgent care. I was back again with fevers. Nausea a developing costs consistent chest pain with absolutely no relief and convinced this was more than shingles. I wanted to die with. The pain is experiencing. Luckily the computers didn't have issues. And i was able to get right into the doctor and he immediately ordered an additional chest x ray again just to see i will never forget that x ray as his assistant helped me stand up because i screamed in agony trying to expand my joints and my chest all of which were screaming back at me tenfold. What i was screaming out loud. The extra came up on the screen. Starting from the bottom up. As i watched it i saw spiderweb clouds occurring my entire right lung. Even i knew something was wrong in a week's time my chest. X ray had dramatically changed. The doctor spent what seems like years just looking at the x. ray and deemed it appropriate for me to go to the er get a staff c. T. scan and be admitted. When i got there my o. Two sats were in the eighties at best and the c. T. scan that they quickly did showed fluid remain entire right lung and beginning around my lower left lobe. It was clear. Whatever i was experiencing with spreading quickly. I was quickly treated. By teams of infectious disease doctors pulmonologist and respiratory therapists. Let samples were taken. Sent off to labs in the meantime i was treated for anything and everything one of the first things they tested for was valley fever. The blood antigen tests that they did ended up coming back negative for valley fever oddly enough but they wanted to test part of my lung tissue to be sure i was then presumed to to maybe have to bricusse and or staph infection and was primarily treated for that along with anti uncles for the possible valley fever in the coming days. I got sicker and weaker. Might cost persisted and became more violent. So much water was in my lungs. That each time i coughed. I felt like i was drowning because so much water came up every bone hurt and my fever couldn't get under control. I remember multiple mornings being visited by the infectious disease. Doctor and her sitting by the side of my bed holding my hand and telling me she didn't sleep worried. I wouldn't make it through the night on september twelfth three days before i was supposed to return home to utah the concoction of medication. That they had me on. Seem to be stabilizing me and my resting ero two stats looked as could be stable for a short flight home by this day. The atrophy may station of my once. Very strong. healthy body was shocking. I no longer even sit up in my hospital bed without being winded or gasping for air standing up a special task of its own. That i could no longer fathom doing on my own. I was willed wheelchair through the airport to greet my family. Active volcanoes Wants new returned home bruised and beaten by unknown. 'cause we later received a call from arizona. That tissue biopsy did end up going valley fever and that valley fever was indeed the culprit the year following infection would be very trying to say the least. I continue to be sick returning to the hospital. A few additional times. I lived on the couch barely even able to get myself up for months still coughing. Up water continuously taking quick shallow frightening breasts and too weak to do much of anything on my own. Everything caused me to be out of breath very different from what i grew up knowing as it stands today. I still get a cat scan about once a year sometimes every six months depending on what my infectious disease doctor says. My lower two lobes of my right lung are dead as well as the lower lobe of my left leg. I have the equivalent of one lung in my body. The remaining tissue eventually took up the task of providing my body with enough oxygen to live a normal life. When i was able to start moving again. After many years exercise became a daunting feat getting my heart rate up was very difficult and typically resulted in a coughing attack. It took years for me to work up the stamina to ride a bike to this day. I cannot run and emma mediocre. At best i can enjoy movement for the most part and do what my lungs will allow. Walking hills and stares tend to be most difficult. i'm on forever antifungal. 's because for whatever reason my body being an anomaly doesn't like to fight valley fever however today i'm grateful for a body that did fight though. My goals and ambitions changed drastically. I survived at walk. Stay with the equivalent of one month. Old Thank you so much tori for sharing your story with us. Yeah wow thank you. Thank you hi. I'm erin welsh. I'm aaron almond updike. And this is this. Podcast will kill you and today..

arizona eighteen months Nineteen erin welsh seventeen days august one month three hours one week more than a quarter of mile two stats today two thousand tori one lung Two sats Twenty ninth two aaron almond updike about once a year
"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"Giving them sixty to seventy ad buell's anti-venom over three to four hour period. Which is an insane amount of anti-venom and he might as well be running water in for it. Did one thing that you may have heard that. I actually thought was true. Until i talk to brian. Is this idea that baby. Snakes are more dangerous than adult snakes. I had always learned that adult. Snakes will do sort of dummy strikes where they don't waste your precious venom if they can scare you away without it then takes a lot of energy and resources for an animal to make. They don't wanna waste it but baby snakes. The story goes haven't figured that out yet so they are more to actually investigate you. It turns out that that is not true. Total myth and doors their venom necessarily more potent venom. however it can be completely different like in australia. We have a problem with the brown snakes. The adults are specialists on bamboo poles so their venom is specific for causing blood clots. They turned the blood system on and so they immobilize prey by causing stroke. The baby's however are specialists on lizards out so their venom is narrow toxic so the event anti-venom for the made using the venom of the adults doesn't work against the venom of babies because of that radical difference in batam biochemistry. And this is where we get to kind of the big conundrum of my idea to vaccinate people against snake bites the even if we are just talking about snakes the different compounds and toxins in each snake. Venom can be really different even today. Certain anti-venom developed in one place or on one population. Don't work in other places where the snakes are different. They're also in. India boasting flashy currently all the venom big us. Frankie venom comes from the madras crocodile. madrid or tonigh- is a city on the southeastern coast of india which means that the anti-venom being made there is made you think snakes from that area fails go north india. They've got a big problem. As of two thousand twelve there was only one company producing anti-venom in all of africa and it was located in south africa particularly for this type of snake called assault scale viper. That's arguably the most medically important snake in the world but anti-venom is expensive and again often the folks who need it most are the ones who can least afford it. So the indian about a manufacturers allow any testing have been bay started selling their anti venoms in africa. Anti-venom said were already shown have issues regional issues within india saying salts go by we saw scaled by burs. Let's make a deal will once. They started doing that rates in kenya example skyrocketed even though the anti-venom is from the same species of snake it doesn't work as well and yet these way less effective anti venoms are still sold today. Even though studies have shown that they don't really work. But besides all of the different specialties in regional variations between snakes. There's also this big question of can humans even develop an immunity to stuff like this and the answer is it's complicated in theory. Maybe it's really a question of amount. So snake venoms in-principle aren't all that different from say virus or a bacterium at least in the way that your body responds to them. It sees these toxins as foreign material. It tries to develop antibodies to attack them. Theoretically if you were being introduced to small amounts of snake venom all the time. Could you build up enough circulating. Antibodies to withstand a larger dose of venom theoretically. Yes it's the same ideas as a vaccine in that. In that way the injured chrissy of course is very very much more complex and nuanced than that and it is very very difficult because these these venoms they aren't just one or two toxins like a vaccine against one virus or two viruses right. These are dozens hundreds sometimes thousands of different toxins. So you're talking about needing to have a lot of antibodies. being produced against a wide variety of toxins. There are people out there who intentionally inject themselves with vietnam with this idea that they could develop some kind of resistance but there is a ton of good evidence that this works reliably. There is one guy who i've read about and who. Brian mentioned who. Maybe did successfully do this. Absolute legend called bill host. Who was the owner of the miami. Serpentine he was bilking and supplying snakes for lunch in the fifties through seventies and eighties. I remember going there and seeing him. He was amazing. He injected himself with that too because he had a dramatic occupational hazard where he built up a resistance to battle but he was working with snakes for which there was no wendy then so he had a legitimate res. Bill lived to be one hundred years old and he is the guy that a lot of people point to as proof that this works but in general especially when it comes to hobbyists snake keepers. Who are doing this. It is just like not a good idea. I know he lived a long time despite the invitations. But people point and say look you live long time because he was injecting but if you look at like the horses that are used for anti-venom production they have shorter life spans than a horse that has not been regularly injected with them now. Venom is very hard on the body. Funny that and again even if this did work it would probably only work on a very specific species or population that you used as your source venom. So you might be immune to rattlesnakes in the desert but if you climb up the hill no guarantees. Now i had this other weird idea that i threw it kristie like what if biochemists and biologists got together and figured out how to give humans or even that could detect snake venom and generate anti-venom in response. Like if don't need gallbladder what if we replaced it with an anti venom or even my instinctual answer is that it would be an issue of volume because to have anti-venom against all the possible snakes that that could bite you or.

australia Brian africa sixty Bill India north india one two thousand twelve south africa two viruses kenya one virus brian tonigh madrid seventy seventies today bill
How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

08:10 min | 1 year ago

How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

"Hi it's bryce dallas howard guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from an incredible ted fellow and the stem educator brittany young a community leader tackling national issues by turning passions into opportunities for stem education and career development. Hey ted talks daily listeners. I'm adam grant. I hosted another podcast. From the ted audio collective called work life and it's about the science of making work not suck next time the number of protests targeting firms. Today it's on the order of sixty times. The numbers that you would see and early tens employees activism is on the rise. But how can we use our voices effectively. And how can leaders manage all those voices find. Work life on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen. I show people all around. Dc antiquites my guests engaged. I liked sprinkle in a fun factor to net. Stop dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet then just have to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has been you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial. That's od co dot com slash. Ted i want you to take this journey with me. Let's set the stage. Is a sunday in baltimore in a park. We endure a hill watching dirt bike. Riders go pash do tricks. Willies do stunts zipping. He hit the engines revving. Smell the gasoline. You could see the join excitement. Netface someone's probably learning how to fix the dirt bike way too expensive to buy. Then they can go to school. They can get a pop quiz or a test teacher. You'll account we all heard. And we've all hated train as leaving new york to cleveland. But they're here in baltimore. How does this relate. They don't get it. They fail the test and now they can hate then now. World can turned upside down. They can get on facebook instagram. Get a call or text. They can watch as their friend can become a hashtag. A kid in the wrong place wrong time lost to the streets loss of the system lost a gun violence or kick that could be arrested for dirt bike. Because of my city it can be a misdemeanor. Possession of dirk like this can be elected story for black kids across the country. And he's like miami. Cleveland atlanta philly. Whatever please had the dirt bike task force now. Acts yourself if the thing you used to relieve your stress if it was demonized would you still do it if it was criminal us. The answer is yes. That's the reality black people across the us right now. They've watched as we made room in. Cities escape borders bicycles in any other sport. They can watch tv in seattle games olympics on. Espn the style and stain ad campaigns and films but in baltimore would they have looked forward to would do. Right is get from all of it. No space no outlet just typical narrative. Like i said this is a communist story. I was a kid in the park. I wanted to be just like the big crowd is but i hate the fall. Instead i became like bill nye the science guy i was doing all kinds of experiments blown out burrows off glowing people to the chair and i may or may not have made stink bombs at school. They would describe me as a bad kid. Where they didn't see was all my jeans. My talent my voice was not hurt. Then i became that black girl from west baltimore working stem my first position. I was confused for the secretary was pissed but liquefying soon get more people in industry and it's one eight hundred. That's what i start doing. Working small groups for kids students teach them some activities then and twenty fourteen. I lost my little brother to the prison system. In twenty fifteen. I lost all faith. In system period. The world watched following a freddie gray uprising as possible burn. I wondered people go and listen. Where would it solutions. And where was investment into my community and twenty sixteen. I broke the system and became the founder and ceo of beat through sixty carbonell. I went back to my experience in park. I thought about the kids bikes those scales. People use to pay the bills just like mechanics mechanical news. We lane in system s sights the sign's behind popping best willie playing in dirt bike. It's home o'clock is busy quesion technology. The technology needed to get the best radio tires. So you don't have the channel asphalt engineering. The engineers needed to fix peg dirt bike. But the also get the best mac mac. 'em mathematics the math needed for the guests to oriole ratio. So you dirt. Bike does not explode then also gonna step further. I thought about the rights new only way to have programming solutions was ahead of them at because the people closest to the problem onto solution i thought about. Mike says he was six. He's rendered by geez when he seventeen graduating high school. He didn't know what you wanted to do but he knew he loved everything about their bikes and started working with us and beat through sixty. He's helped us. Educate kids trained by gratis and x twenty one. He's our lead instructor. He's created mates showed them across the country and he really represents the best to be three sixty at the corvallis. Work is constantly thinking about what people like. Like one for mike. He was a space. Basically work of students on our curriculum space. Keep training more. Riders and growing a skill sets a space where he no longer has skating but he has something his own city for him with your support and it's of more cities we can make this reality since two thousand seventeen. We've saved the city of baltimore about two hundred thirty three million dollars by dorm programming over seven thousand students. We saved the city of baltimore. One million dollars by growing workforce opportunities for people. Just like mike. That's less people that could possibly go to jail. Less money spent on dollars and cents of incarceration and more money going and saw black communities our leaders our culture and our voices. We don't need to black squares. We don't need your campaigns but will we do need as your dollars and cents behind us to make roach. We need more people like you and cities to believe in invest in our model of growing the people. What will you choose to be an ally being impact be the revolution be three sixty. Thank you hello there. I'm chris anderson. The guy lucky enough to run. Ted now has a podcast called the ted interview and this week on the show. I took someone really special name me. The woman married to jacqueline nova 'grats. She's been that he is learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the ted interview. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

TED Apple Brittany Young Adam Grant Baltimore Pash Netface Bryce Dallas Howard Bill Nye West Baltimore Cleveland Carbonell Espn Olympics Miami Atlanta Seattle Facebook
T.C. Williams High School renamed Alexandria City High School

Chris Plante

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

T.C. Williams High School renamed Alexandria City High School

"The Titans but forget their old school name. The school board in Alexandria also voted last night to change the name of T. C. Williams to simply Alexandria City High School, scrubbing the name of a longtime segregationist superintendent from the school that was best known for its true story of a desegregated football team winning the State Championship. An elementary school, named after a Confederate naval officer was also renamed this time after a beloved teacher, Nye Omi, Brooks. She died last year. Just his

T. C. Williams Alexandria City High School Titans Alexandria Football Nye Omi Brooks
Coronavirus: Long-Haul Covid

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: Long-Haul Covid

"Just last week is that. He came out looking at the plight of kobe. Lung haulers people experiencing something called brain fog. Could this be the beginning of a whole new phase of copa nineteen drawn out error of persistent symptoms. Adhered help us understand. This phenomenon is dr eager corral mc he's neurologist at northwestern university and head of northwestern's clinic for kobe related neurological symptoms. Dr gore corral. Nick welcome to science rules drawn virus edition. May i call you e gor. Yes bill you may an thank you very much for inviting me. I'm delighted to be distancing socially with you and to all your listener what are the symptoms of long-haul what what goes on with you if you're a long haul corona virus person. This is excellent question and the long kohler is a term that has been chosen by patients themselves and Those patients mostly had a mild covid nineteen disease at onset with the you know transients respiratory symptoms including some cough sore throat ogi. The fever may be muscle that when away and thereafter despite the fact that they did not never give develop pneumonia or were never hospitalized. They developed those lingering persistent and beating symptoms that mean volve the nervous system cardiac and the respiratory system as well as

Northwestern's Clinic For Kobe Neurological Symptoms Dr Gore Corral Northwestern University Nick Cough Sore Throat Ogi Fever Pneumonia
Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:57 min | 1 year ago

Naomi Shihab Nye Shares Why Kindness Is The Deepest Thing Inside You

"Naomi. shehab nice. Childhood unfolded between ferguson missouri. Near where her mother grew up and her father's palestinian homeland. Our conversation in two thousand sixteen spoke to so much that he's even more alive in the world. Now i always start my interviews by inquiring about the religious or spiritual background of someone's tighted and i just wonder where you'd start reflecting on what that was in your life all. I felt very lucky as a child to have open minded parents. And i knew they were open minded because they were unlike any other parents. I met my friends parents I also knew that they didn't practice the religions of their upbringings. Either one of them so this fascinated me as even a little child. And i would ask a lot of questions. There was no sense of a taboo subject on. My father had not really had a difficult time telling his family that he didn't want to practice islam. He said i will respect it. But i don't want to practice it and they had accepted that my mother's family on the other hand had been more hard hearted about her rejection of their german lutheran missouri. Synod background but this was something. Both of my parents. Talk about with each other and with their children. You know that people are raised in all kinds of different ways. And if it doesn't feel a meaningful to you maybe you have to search more. You have to keep searching. And i was a religion major in college. Of course you work. Because of my appetite for this topic and i was fascinated to study more about zen buddhism which appealed to me very much from the beginning and it seems like hugh became a writer at a very young inch. You're like seven six. I was six. When i started writing my own poems and seven when i started sending them out and And just today Some students i was talking to a skype class in kuwait. How much. I love the modern world that we can do these things. I was with these students for two hours. And i feel like i'm going to think about them for the rest of my life but one young man asked me. How were you brave enough to do that. What gave you the confidence. he said. i've been trying to run a publication here at our university campus. And i can't get my friends to give me their writing. They're not brave enough. What gave you confidence. And i think just having you know that sense of voice while other people have done it. That's what we do if you know words if you compose wanna share them. Because they'll have a bigger life if you do that so you know. I certainly wasn't thinking about a career. Just thought of myself as having a practice you know if you have a practice of writing then you have a lot of pieces of paper on your desk and you can share the if you chose to. And it seemed more exciting or illuminating. Share them and see what happened next than just keep for myself. So i'm very interested in general in this question of you know what poetry works in us but i think even that question itself hasn't holds the implication that poetry is something separate something distinct but it seems that in your sensibility. You see it. As very organic i mean there's i think it was in in some of your writing for poems by children. He said i do think that all of us think in poems i do i do think that and i think that is very important enough feeling separate from text feeling sort of your thoughts as text or the world as it passes through you as a kind of text the story that you would be telling to yourself about the street even as you walk down or as you drive down as you look out the window the story you would be telling a. It always seemed very much to me as a child that i was living in a poem. The my life was the poem. In fact at this late date i have started putting that on the board of any room. I walk into. That has a board Came back from japan a month ago and every classroom. I would just write on the board. You are living in a poem. And then i would write other things just relating to whatever. We were doing that class. But i found the students very intrigued by discussing that you know. What do you mean. we're living in a poem or win all the time or just when someone talks about poetry and i'd say no when you think when you're in a very quiet place when you're remembering when you're savoring an image when you're allowing your mind calmly to leap from one thought to another. That's a poem. That's what a poem does and they liked that and grow in. Fact wrote me a note In yokohama on the day that i was leaving her school that has come to be like the most significant note. Any student has written me in years. She said well here. In japan we have a concept called you todi and it is spaciousness. It's a kind of living with spaciousness for example like it's leaving early enough to get somewhere so you know you're going to arrive early so when you get there you have time to look around. Or whether she gave all these different definitions of what you tori was to her but one of them was an after you read a poem just knowing you can hold it you could be in that space of the poem and it can hold you in its space and you don't have to explain it you don't have to paraphrase it. You just hold it and it allows you to see differently. And i just love that i mean. I think that's what i've been trying to say all these years.

Shehab Missouri Naomi Ferguson Hugh Kuwait Skype Japan Yokohama Tori
Meet the Woman Tasked With Keeping Joe Biden's Climate Promises

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Meet the Woman Tasked With Keeping Joe Biden's Climate Promises

"Our guest today is gina mccarthy. She was the head of the environmental protection agency. Under president obama and until recently was in charge of the national resources. Defense council but now she is america's first national climate adviser gina mccarthy. Welcome to science rules. May i call you gina. You may may. I call you bill please. You're an anthropologist. Is that right and is actually true. Yes that was my first love. I got a degree in social anthropology. I find people fascinating was approaching social and insofar as well. I was interested in the cultural part. What makes people tick. Well you know how they adapt to where they live. And and what makes people think differently about things in this richness about that. That really appealed to minute. Made me understand. And i think better at working in bureaucracies because it unbound you. It makes you think about whole human beings and really relish differences of opinions and in ways of looking at life. And it's one of the most fascinating things it's part of what you realize is so difficult about people is everybody loves change because they want to be better but people also are terrified of change because they might get worse it's the complexity of human beings that makes it really fun. I think there's a slight twinge in the way you speak. Which makes me think that maybe you spent some time massachusetts in fact. I'm pretty sure that you did. In fact spend a lotta time kind of working in the massachusetts government. What was that experience like. And how did that prepare you for the bigger things that you're doing now. Well i if. I say the word cobb and does that really totally give it away to everybody. Yeah because it's it's spelled. C. h. b. o. n. In case anyone wants to look it up. Yeah i worked in massachusetts for about twenty years before. I actually moved to connecticut and now and then i went to a and and honestly it gave me a great foundation because i worked at the local level and then i worked at the state level in massachusetts ended up working between massachusetts connecticut for governors five of them were republicans now arguably republicans in new england different animal than than elsewhere. But it gave me a wonderful opportunity to figure out how i could really make connections with people about the pollution. We were trying to address including carbon pollution so that we can sort of get some shared values. She had interest ways of making progress. And and i find. I just found it fascinating particularly the local level work. 'cause everything's personal at the local level absolutely everything.

Gina Mccarthy Defense Council Environmental Protection Agenc Massachusetts Massachusetts Government Gina Barack Obama America Connecticut Cobb New England
"nye" Discussed on Liberaleren Podcast

Liberaleren Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"nye" Discussed on Liberaleren Podcast

"Be tall tear. Someone cerium at the arkansas. Seek day manga the You bought a decent year when i go out to liberty digital nitty did all to promote the at late medieval do off work Excellent that's a. That's an ramona pool store on e. economically but all also wanting also but she learn poor old all stem military listeners so via mata older at the lowest voter of chat among actual intact of the england isam battled leukemia panga. The handelman healthy deep. Three nevarez do sano yet. If you could tall stone asylum afraid woeful in. The report was not. Give them simple but at lunch. Or let's to get satellite the fray at history early some spooked unmanning spoiling. Those beautiful adeyemi. Neal saunders pergamum nip government. So three thousand years the scorn of obsolete some other dot we norling it and not oscar minister his women men. Do these modest dr. The some scenery southern represented video. Your folks some old fatma. Practice politics unfor- declawed. Befeore key stops ends. The morton other fought to their power to start. A coke is sorta to an exterior fox do said africa toshio for his own doodo. Now let's based camille get air sampling mendez mendez not use it to compete while liberals now all the socialist youth and many swollen i e blunt listener run investigator that will spend the roadmap. Fresh dude cost number of allah. We'll be due to the new colonists. Do all the adult batata league will calm enough water. Kosinski thank thing are politic fit. Dennis norfork on supply all over to a list personal steelers some fans on sold them find out how many there's alexander spur over to snow. This pandemic for a four and traffic snits for before coming on stomach would discolored elephant bumped in the glimmering or deb come haircut for about a that donald by them and the komo suburbia of issac snow them to pursue the longest over or sold. The w don't smell. Do you spend this. We take the dog on the top issue or something else. Sock inmate threat dog lynn. From newly but not the koto institute. The highest onto three hits index the newly compute or nikolai bizarre. To all in house covid known would then that comment from a blunt defeatist e in new orleans. We'll see from the attempt. The most of the pope in new zealand switz- switzerland this league. Balk at least two endorsements Hongkong don mark overall apple boone saudi iran yemen venezuela sudan or syria though marcos for on north ohio also well that lit dorkiest ultimate alderson. Stay up new scare three hits runoff forty-two lan met three and in order to get men said sculptor. Auguste off slit man. Morality in that among scepter salema of this on to institute adler manhattan would have yet with free log on to debrief you on for them. So that it's only encounter vittles attending to talk about some Bus apple woodfold calixto ultimate follows possess along that awesome coma who top all than that indicates index data community nudist columbia heitmann zelda mocatta all over taylor day. I walked the lonesome sites. Come all the on the across the also we saw common pursuit. Plus sooner not all my interest or this maneuver neidl also economical medic. simple What you honesty..

new orleans north ohio arkansas new zealand syria venezuela Dennis norfork forty-two oscar issac three thousand years koto institute three hits Neal saunders sudan Kosinski Auguste switz- switzerland camille mendez mendez
Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles photographed holding hands amid reports they're dating

Comments By Celebs

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles photographed holding hands amid reports they're dating

"This episode ready to go ready to publish and then about thirty minutes ago this news about olivia wilde and harry styles dating broke and we had to kind of. Just come on and talk about it. So we're going to go through a full detailed breakdown of everything we know. And then get into a discussion. But julie do wanna just give it immediate reaction. Yeah i mean whole he should know the skeptic in me isn't one hundred percent convinced yet but let's go through it okay so first off age wise just because everybody's wondering olivia is thirty six in harry's twenty six let's also keep in mind that olivia wilde. Jason seditious announced their split in november. They were never technically married. They were engaged for seven years. I remember at the time we did a pretty lengthy discussion on that. And when you go through their history you find out you know. She a pretty interesting dating history. Previously they have two kids and according to sources they had broken up at the beginning of the pandemic. It's been really amicable. They had great co-parenting and kind of the general consensus was like. There's really no drama here. I also think just as a total side note. I remember when it came out of the time. Everybody was shocked that they weren't married. Because i guess we just forgotten that you know he yeah. I also think the time line here are so important that they split the beginning of the urine. We only found out in november. Yes that is crucial. Also keep in mind olivia's currently directing and also starring the film. Don't worry darling. Harry's in florence was in it so we can kind of that. That is where they've gotten close if this is true but the reason that all this is circulating today is because they were seen holding hands at jeffrey as offs wedding. Jeffrey as off is harry's manager and he's also the son of irving shelley's off that is kim kardashian. Best friend's parents stadler kris jenner. Best friends and jeffries marrying glenn christianson. She is the global head of music partnerships at apple. Are you initiating this wedding and it was super small. There were sixteen people because of covid. And harry brought olivia as his plus one so they were seen holding hands. I'm sure you saw. He looked so handsome. She looked so beautiful she was in this kind of floral maxi dress gown type of thing. They were then seen after the wedding arriving at his house a source told people quote. They weren't montecito california this weekend for wedding. They were affectionate around their friends held hands and look very happy. They've dated for a few weeks. I've so more things to read. But i like. Can we just freak out about this for a second. Yes we can. We can freak out about it really. I have to tell you. This is the last thing i ever saw coming. And i actually remember when we had kind of just hypothesize about what we thought was going to happen. I remember for some reason. We had thought that zach braff and florence few broke up and i think it was said. Yeah you know. I could totally see florence and harry dating not in my wildest dreams. Did i envision a libyan harry. Well at the time the she was still adjacent stake as we had no reason to And even with the knowledge of them breaking up. I don't think i necessarily saw this coming. Although harry's track record liking older women does make sense here not that olivia's old by any means. I just mean older than him But the reason that. I really do believe this. I mean the skeptic in me is obviously like i said before. It's still a little bit hesitant to say. It's fully true because i think holding hands isn't the most incriminating evidence but when you think about a small wedding only sixteen people harry's officiating the wedding to bring a plus one it kind of feels like a big deal may first of all i agree. Second of all it makes sense. You know what. I mean. When i i wasn't i wouldn't have necessarily seen it coming but as i'm looking at him i'm like okay. I could see that she everything we've ever heard about her is that she's so great. He's very mature for his age. Also another reason that points me to believe that this is true is because you can't forget her break up with. Jason apparently was at the beginning of the year. So it's not like this has been one month since this big break up and also it's. He was officiating. The wedding and this was his manager. It's not like he's going to some you know random wedding where he didn't know anyone that's very in my opinion kind of like sacred thing to bring someone do so i i may be wrong and i'm totally fine if i'm wrong but i'm going to put my cards in here. In my official vote on the record is going to say this is actually happening.

Harry Olivia Wilde Olivia Jason Seditious Irving Shelley Glenn Christianson Kris Jenner Julie Jeffries Kim Kardashian Florence Jeffrey Zach Braff Apple California Jason
Times Square closed to NYE revelers as New Yorkers ring in 2021 amid second wave of COVID-19 infections

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Times Square closed to NYE revelers as New Yorkers ring in 2021 amid second wave of COVID-19 infections

"Has been horrible for everything in Times Square, a surreal sight for the first time in over a century, the iconic ball drop taking place without the usual crowds. Instead, officials closing off several blocks around the area, the only crowd in attendance a small group of frontline workers, but tradition still stood as the clock counted us down. Into 2021 if you gathered outside, donned in masks and socially distance, while the party continued for many at home performances from some of the biggest artist Jennifer Lopez, if you lend means, saying, Meghan, the stallion. I can't go with him and now you

Times Square Jennifer Lopez Meghan
Boston residents celebrate NYE online

WBZ Morning News

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Boston residents celebrate NYE online

"And many others asking all of us to stay home on New Year's Eve. The final day of 2020 was quiet and Nothing like we've seen in years past the city of Boston, celebrating online with streamed performances, encouraging people to stay home people. Shall we celebrate with the people? They know people they live with. Asking people not to travel travel increases the chance of spreading the virus on the docket for many take out in a night on the couch and at La Mora and Brookline. Creativity is on the menu. Restaurant seated guests for a special New year's dinner ringing in 2021 at 2020 or 8:20 P.m.. Since the restaurant has to close at 9 30. It's been a trying year for so many, regardless of age. Let's just Local crazy love. Go on, even know we're just out of this town leg. Just go back 2019. We can't go back, but we will go forward. WBZ TV is Christina Rex reporting. One tradition that Woz upheld this year was ice sculptures, which were on display along the waterfront in Boston by a group known as Boston Harbor Now

La Mora Boston Brookline Wbz Tv Christina Rex WOZ Boston Harbor
Virtual NYE Times Square Celebration To Honor New York City's Frontline Workers

Buck Sexton

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Virtual NYE Times Square Celebration To Honor New York City's Frontline Workers

"Meantime, New York City officials will be honoring frontline workers tomorrow night. Well every year. There are special guests. And this year Jeff Strauss with Countdown Entertainment, says dozens of New York City coronavirus heroes and their families will be on hand and honored in Times Square. So whether it's the doctor who had to be away from her family. On strike in the basement to avoid potentially giving them and the infection or whether it's the teacher of the postal worker, the grocery store worker. They couldn't make a birthday because some have to do extra shifts of all those people were celebrating now because of Coronavirus. Times Square will not be open to the public for the New Year's Eve celebration, those watching on TV will see a number of performers, including Jennifer

Jeff Strauss Countdown Entertainment New York City Times Square Jennifer
La Scala in Los Angeles County's Beverly Hills caught planning 'secret' NYE party

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

La Scala in Los Angeles County's Beverly Hills caught planning 'secret' NYE party

"Beverly Hills restaurant accused of planning to blow off covert restrictions for New Year's Eve party lose. Scala is known for its chopped salad and its famous customers. But the Beverly Hills Institution now in trouble for allegedly planning a secret indoor in person, New Year's Eve party to go customers say they were slipped an invitation telling them to keep it under wraps. Beverly Hills, probably saying code enforcement will deal with it. Marcel lives in Beverly Hills and says it just doesn't seem right. I present think is a good idea, both of my parents that Cove it would have got the hospital. The theme was reportedly to be a 19 twenties era speakeasy

Beverly Hills Beverly Hills Institution Scala Marcel
Beverly Hills Restaurant Urged To Scrap Alleged Plans For ‘Secret’ NYE Party, Los Angeles

Morning Edition

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Beverly Hills Restaurant Urged To Scrap Alleged Plans For ‘Secret’ NYE Party, Los Angeles

"Trying to put a stop to plans for a speakeasy style New Year's Eve party being promoted by while the city's well known restaurants Kcrw's Larry Parole reports It could be another challenge by a restaurant. Pandemic related restrictions. Gourmet Italian restaurant LES column on Cannon Drive, reportedly placed invitations and carry out bags, the gauges customers interests in the Speakeasy style party. The invitation says. We are currently taking reservations for New Year's Eve dinner. And if you're interested, let us know. Tell your friends but keep it discreet. Well, evidently it wasn't discreet enough. Beverly Hills officials got word and stepped in on Friday to remind management about L, a county's dining band. The party would violate those orders. But even if they were lifted, the state's ban on indoor dining would kick in any way. This may not be the latest, but it is certainly one of the most high profile conflict between public health officials and local restaurants. Earlier this month, the Beverly Hills City Council adopted resolution against L. A county's ban on indoor dining. Decided, among other things, a lack of scientific evidence. There's no word yet if the Scala will move ahead or cancel for KCRW, I'm Larry Peral. Who do you

Larry Parole Kcrw Beverly Hills Beverly Hills City Council Larry Peral
Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

podnews

03:06 min | 2 years ago

Acast integrates with Patreon patron-only shows

"A constant patron of just announced a collaboration enabling creators to publish subscriber only content across different podcast platforms and make it easier for fans to financially support patriot creators. who works on almost all podcast. Players is profitable. Fuck i heart media. Podcasting revenue grew seventy four percent year on year for the company. Downloads are up. Seventy one percent new advertiser also spending with the company and other places to bob pittman. Ceo committed in a revenue colder fifty percent of the new. Podcasts launched on the podcast network be from female and verse creators and we now know that iheart paid fifty million dollars to buy. Vox nurse last month. I heart media has also signed sales and production partnership with pushkin industries. It'll make iheartmedia. The company's exclusive sales partner. And pushkin will also co produce new original. Podcasts iheartmedia over the next few years quite enough iheartmedia. It's focused on somebody else. Stitcher has rolled out a new website in the process. The url for podcast has changed old addresses. Though will read rx by you might as well update you website. It's probably a good idea. A are ends iheart podcast network trailer that they are again. They've signed up with pod sites to enable podcast attribution for every campaign triton. Digital's omni studio has partnered with ghana india's largest music streaming app to bring omni studio podcasts into the garner platform. Keep listening for how well garner is working for. Us and podcasts was a category in. Us quiz show jeopardy on monday. Podcasts highlighted stitches. Science rules with bill. Nye luminaries fiasco wonder is we crashed an audible. Original weirdly called it burns us neither and it will conan. O'brien needs a friend taped earlier. It was the first podcast since the death of the host. Alex trebek surprise. It's time for some more tech stuff. Garner the indian podcast app appears really high impart news podcast downloads. Statistics which are linked to today are numbers are produced using both rss us agent and player user agents but the garner app itself doesn't set any obvious user agents so this traffic might not be visible in your own podcast host anyway willing to all of our workings today in our show notes nine newsletter phase one is about to close editions and suggestions for the new podcast. Namespace willing to that today. Buzz sprout now supports visual. Soundbites away to mark sharable portions of podcasting apps and social media attack from podcast index. New podcast namespace willing to a bite from the podcasting two point. Oh show on pont verse and we all sending a little more about the lightning network and podcast monetization and another piece of news that to just in case you understand it more than we do.

Bob Pittman Pushkin Industries Omni Studio Pushkin Omni Ghana Alex Trebek Brien Garner United States Conan India Mark Sharable
"nye" Discussed on Still Buffering

Still Buffering

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"nye" Discussed on Still Buffering

"I am still suffering. And I? Love. Don't die is like. Policy will. That's a lot. To town. Turn back to twilight. By Is Bill Nine eternal scientists that we. I hope so that what you would do if you a vampire Yes I hope Bill Nye vampire just so he can be around forever..

Bill Nye
'False alarm' between T-Mobile and Verizon shows how competitive 5G battle is

Business Wars Daily

04:22 min | 2 years ago

'False alarm' between T-Mobile and Verizon shows how competitive 5G battle is

"Hour always on culture now depends on a working grid not just of electricity but of telecommunications and an Internet that not only never goes down but constantly speeds up efficiency is our subconscious mantra and that may be a big reason behind the hot water. All three major wireless carriers are in Verizon at and T. and T. mobile have all been promoting their new five G. wireless services heard about that each wants you to believe that their service is the fastest the most reliable hands down the best. Here's one of Reisen ads from last year at Verizon building the most powerful five G. Experience for America. That's why the NFL. Chose Verizon because they need their massive capacity of five G. With Ultra wideband, we're streaming streaming posting fans inexperienced five. Thirteen trouble in most cases, those claims can't be proved, and so the courts have banned each of these rivals from boasting about their prowess and from implying that the others are the lightweights of the wireless world witness verizon the ad I just shared with you was set in Gillette Stadium, home of the new Patriots, the company stopped running that ad last November. But that didn't stop at and T. from challenging verizon's use of the phrase most powerful to the division, the Better Business Bureau that rules on deceptive advertising cases. Why did not call the phrase into question essentially because the carriers have hardly rolled five g. out anywhere yet so it's impossible to prove one carriers mostly non existent five G. implementation is better than others. There were also questions about whether the ad was implying that the rollout was far more widespread and available to the average consumer than it was in May. The Review Board called the national advertising. Division were in a D agreed with a t and t and told verizon to using the term verizon appealed early this month they lost the said essentially consumers have no idea what most powerful means in this context the claim could not be substantiated. One it comes to making false claims don't assume that verizon is the worst offender. nope. The Empty Braggadocio is a game played by the entire industry. Go back through years in you'll see that at and T. got trouble claiming that its current four G. Network was by virtue of being fast virtually identical to five G. It even used the phrase five G. EVOLUTION TO DESCRIBE ITS FOUR G service a consumer looking for the fastest cell service could hardly be blamed for assuming that meant, they'd be using a five G. Network. Three years later, most of US still use four g networks the told at and T. to stop using the deceptive evolution phrase. At and Later agreed, and then there's t mobile, which isn't exactly honest either in late August, the NASD toll, t mobile to stop claiming that it's five G. services more reliable than the others verizon had challenged that claim t mobile said, it will appeal that decision but the Advertising Review Board also recommended that t mobile needed to stop running ads in which science guy bill nye claim that verizon's five G. coverage was barely broader than the average bus stop bench that according to industry publication fierce wireless. With a widespread deployment of five G. still some time off in the future. Why would every major wireless carrier use such inflated claims in a Word Mindshare? They want to attract and retain you as a customer. Are you more likely to stay with your current mobile carrier? If you feel pretty sure that the company will soon offer blazing fast five g service. Well maybe it's all about perception perception of what's here today and better yet perception about a speedy powerful future. That's almost hear these kinds of empty claims have a long long history in the advertising world from Telco Tonics beauty items to baby products. Advertisers repeatedly tried to stake out the territory of a- best. And rivals almost always challenge those fluffy bordering on dishonest claims. So next time you see a company claiming to be the strongest most powerful fastest or the best ask yourself. Where's the evidence chances are? There isn't any.

Verizon T Mobile G. Network G. Wireless T. Better Business Bureau Gillette Stadium NFL America Patriots Telco Tonics Review Board Bill Nye Nasd
"nye" Discussed on On The Table Gaming

On The Table Gaming

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nye" Discussed on On The Table Gaming

"Yeah. I mean just the ability to build a pick off their units and you know never underestimate how how tough cavalry units are. It's still twelve wounds, but they've only got you know six wounds per rank instead of four. Exactly. Yeah Man. And then it's a super mobile army. Ranger trackers can I mean when they're almost dead? They can. They can boogie across the field, I? mean. Yeah. If you get watcher on the wall on them, you've effectively added three inches to the total movement they can make so they can maneuver seven march fourteen. So there's a lot of you can use the vows with this list to make it even Nastier than what it looks like on paper because like I watch on the wall again. Being able to control the maneuvers zone and make a free retreat to start your action. Unit of ranger trackers that you've charged into penny unit down now, they can retreat d six plus seven, and then scoot across the board and go do it to somebody else. So it's going to be tricky. I thank play. It looks also fun though right and if you look at your testing through more like. You're definitely going to have some amazing moments in Games for sure. It's GonNa be fun because it's GonNa be challenging because they. The NYE. The ranger trackers can explode so quickly no, I'm. Not I don't think I have the mental capacity to run. This is going to vary like running like five games that'd be I'd be just completely mentally sped. It's hard enough as it is for me to get used to cavalry always fun. Yeah it looks amazing. I'm looking forward to to mortar exploits and and future successes and thank you so much for coming on the podcast. Thank you for having me. It is always a pleasure to come here and talk to you. So stay safe, and in the meantime we get your miniatures on the table..

NYE
"nye" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"nye" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"The curious podcast that is devoted to all things about what used to be in professional sports. Yes, we love to About two. No, longer with us defunct or otherwise, you can consider me by the way, the doctor of defunct. It's one of my many nicknames. And things teams that are previously domiciled for sure leagues. No longer with us. So yeah. But also events in sports spectacle, shall we say that Similarly, came and went, we've expanded our purview to include such things and this week as you could tell by our little intro there. We're. GonNa, mix it up with something uniquely crazy Maybe just perfect for the Times in which we find ourselves. And that is cycling and in particular this little thing. Called the tour to trump. Yeah tour to trump donald trump right in the eighties right we. We remember him as more benign if you could even think of that. As somebody who was. You know taking the New York City real estate world by storm. Stir certainly trying to transform his name into a product and services brand. The trump airline You had the various trump hotels and casinos especially, Atlantic City. This is the This is the high time I guess in Mr, trump's life that preceded. The. First of a whole number of financial difficulties including a bankruptcy for said, Atlantic city properties and then some. But we're still now talking around the late eighties. When he was still pretty much kind of at Zenith. I guess in terms of his Ego and his branding and his prowess and his Shall we say self-confidence? Enough to lend his name. How charitably? To. A very compelling idea that is a world-class toward Franz like stage race in the United States for cycling. Why not call it the tour to trump? Well. Okay. But as we'll find out in our conversation this week, a very interesting one with our guest. Peter Nye he basically the. The kind of the poet laureate, if you will of cycling history in the United States and the author of the Second Edition version of. Would argue probably the most seminal and comprehensive history of cycling in the US called hearts of lions we're going to get into. The? Genesis of. Not. Only this tour. And it's ambitious plans. And it's naming. But also a little bit of pretext to it. Right. The the history of cycling is is very long and very colorful in this country and a bunch of things. It's sort of lead up to this interesting moment of time with this tour to trump later to be known by the way, of course, as the tour Dupont in the nineties, and we'll get the reasons why for that too, you can probably guess kind of hinted at it. bankruptcy has something to do with it. The the the idea of sports and bicycling. We're very intertwined especially at the turn of the nineteenth century, the earliest part of the Twentieth Century Frankly until the nineteen thirties. Was a major if not the most major competitive sport professionally in this country. This is back at a time when Madison Square Garden was regularly used for. A cycling events races a number of racetracks. Horse race tracks were used. For not only a cycling racist, but endurance competitions were six day marathon like competitions were. not only commonplace, but heavily added upon and big time cash prizes for the winners. Whereas you'll also here in our conversation with Peter in a few moments. Some of the more traditional, shall we say sports in this country actually leveraged the popularity of bicycling to help promote these other sports and by those other sports I'm talking about baseball actually at the time. and soccer and fledgling some fledgling pro football. Games and such. So, this is very interesting and the juxtaposition of of what was in the earlier part of. Of the modern history of the United States. Cycling was the panic. If you will a and quite the exciting thing, clearly it, it changed morphed over the decades after that. But in the seventies and early eighties, you had a number of different entities. We'll get into specifically with Peter. That were trying to kind of bring road racing competition. Back. In professionally oriented sir. Amateur. was was around certainly. The Olympic certainly helped. Goose up some interesting stuff but. This is sort of where we leave the doorstep of Nineteen eighty-nine nine that clip that you heard from NBC sports. Was the young and Brash and you know perhaps hallucinating. In some way shape or form donald trump talking about just how great this event was going to be well. You know like a lot of things that all came to a crashing halt About seven or eight years later after a name change or to some. But this is a fascinating story, not just about. The guy named Donald, trump, and not just sort of the history of cycling. But the various characters that are involved this story that the more you dig into it, the more work, just insane and hard to believe it is and we'll get into it, but I'll give you two names just to kind of wet, the whistle. John, Tash. Is Part of this discussion and this story. And even more curiously former CBS sports, Basketball College basketball analyst Billy. Packer is a central part of the story to. Trust, me all this comes together in our conversation with Peter. nye He the author of hearts of Lions, which is a fascinating read. I learned a whole bunch about cycling where I thought. I wouldn't really necessarily care all that much. But actually do because the history is very long and very curious and very surprising, but it certainly a tremendous subtext and background to. This event that we're going to focus on conversation this week around this tour to trump a little known as the Tour de Pont Stay tuned fun interesting and unexpectedly. So I suggest you stick around for that and before we get there, we want to say hello to one of our great sponsors, one of our longest lasting, and that is five Oh three sports..

donald trump United States Peter Nye Atlantic City New York City Atlantic city Pont Stay NBC Madison Square Garden CBS Zenith Packer Dupont John Olympic analyst Peter. Brash
"nye" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"nye" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Of all let me remind you I don't want to miss this the pro bowl is Sunday good god Super Bowl of course is a week from Sunday and you know we're already I miss the days when you had actually wait until Super Bowl Sunday to know the commercials but now they're everywhere they purposely put him online and they're on the internet and everyone share and I'm so why should I be any different right what I'm gonna do we'll talk more about this next week but I'm going to give you a couple of Super Bowl commercials that we know are coming and then you tell me if you want to see them or not okay I say a Mustafa the ripped old spice guy on the horse he's back in another one but this time he's an embarrassing dad to his son I know it sounds funny I the the bill Nye the science guy doing an ad for sodastream now now can not a big fan of bill Nye now he's crazy pop tarts with Jonathan van ness some guy from clear I don't know him must be the new guys that'll be the first time I've seen a pop tarts commercial while the long time Hon die is doing one with Saturday night live's Rachel Dratch and big papi David or big poppy I see that yeah okay yeah well I you're gonna see a way out so you're not I'll watch that one yes okay MC hammer doing even have to go.

Mustafa bill Nye sodastream Jonathan van ness Rachel Dratch David MC hammer
"nye" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"nye" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Thank you so much for your great support this past year one of the best years we've had a lot of fun doing these parodies the good news is it sounds like you guys enjoy them as well so bill Nye the so called science guy is a guy that I've never had a problem with and he's been doing it for a long time and then suddenly came out he's cursing the F. word over the place climate change this that the other I've had enough I had to go after lion bill Nye we are you I why she said because there.

bill Nye