31 Burst results for "NSF"

"nsf" Discussed on John Bartolo Show

John Bartolo Show

04:11 min | Last month

"nsf" Discussed on John Bartolo Show

"Nsf or any of those organizations uscc pick them could get their head out of their ass to figure out guys like you're impart my french but Could get get their act together. A little bit to see that guys like you could add value to the conversation within the industry and i'm talking about at a thousand feet right now. Getting to the greater issue of course is a whole separate thing but you would think you could rely on your own industry to amplify your thing and you can't unfortunately and this is you know as much as i try to keep it away from being a political issue it is partly political and then when you start talking about mandates and political Some people get hesitant to to be involved with it. Well the problem is right now. Brennan in the and and again i. I'm coming off a little bit of a bad mood the other day. So i'm gonna. I'm gonna i'm gonna pray you have so many loppers coming into even the republican side of the party right now. There's people running and district's they ain't gonna win. There's people running just for for social media. Clout there's people jumping on the maga- trained jumping on this and i think that that's great but the problem is who can you trust. That's going to support you. Help you move your message forward like you said you get calls from political people. Are they trying to capitalize on. Just your clout. You see where i'm going with this. There's a lot of that and you're right. I definitely you know people seeing how large the moving is grown and people of course want to be a part of that will give their name attention. But i'll be. I'm paying very close attention to that personally and who is actually reaching out to me and like listen. This is the cause. I'm going after here. You know it's more black and white no more gains straight. No more republican democrat americans and americans to have the freedom to choose so you need to be in line with you know my message here..

Nsf Brennan
How America Spent Trillions and Trained the Taliban To Grow Stronger

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:24 min | 2 months ago

How America Spent Trillions and Trained the Taliban To Grow Stronger

"Was on it to visit afghanistan. Just five years after nine eleven i traveled to four different provinces to see what was going on and at the end of my tour of the provinces i ended up back in kabul at the isaf headquarters then i was taken from the isaf. The international security force to the military academy america built in afghanistan and i was very impressed by the young officer. Who was my chaperone. Who was my briefer straight out of central casting. Six foot one blonde fit and his name taps had strong. Yeah major strong belief it on may strong briefed me gave me the command group briefing on the success of the afghan miniature academy america built along with her nato partners and it was really very impressive. I mean you know. I'm used to death by pipe. Powerpoint having spent six and a half seven years as a dod civilian and then on the faculty of the marine corps universities. Five seen a lot of powerpoint presentations in the military mode. But this was a good one. How much was invested each year. How many nco's how. Many offices were passed out from our training academy to become members of the afghan national security forces. But then i decided to dig a little deeper. Not just to take the word of the official power points. I sniffed around in a little bit to find out. What is the true impact of what we had done. In that nation a nation that the british couldn't conquer the soviets couldn't come come from the blue eyed redhead. White skinned afghans. Find find today. not alexander could conquer. Yeah they do exist. It's really quite something to say in the middle of herat in the middle of water that province. A caucasian redhead with colleagues. You would see in dublin as much as you'd see anywhere else. What did we think we're going to achieve just one metric for you. I found out of every passing out plus every intake of offices junior. Nco's senior nco's that had gone through some form of training small unit tactics leadership. What have you that we had graduated off. They received their last per d. m. Pay in cash of course nice crisp green american dollars more than forty percent of them up. They passed out from our kademi disappeared from the ranks of the nsf from the ranks of the afghan machosky forces and went back to that tribal regions to join their local militias and their local offshoots of the taliban

Isaf International Security Force Afghanistan Afghan National Security Force Kabul America Nato Marine Corps Herat Alexander NCO Dublin NSF Taliban
"nsf" Discussed on Optimal Finance Daily

Optimal Finance Daily

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"nsf" Discussed on Optimal Finance Daily

"If your annual spend is forty thousand dollars and you plan to live by the four percent rule if you have a million dollars saved up. Don't by helicopter after you accumulate. More money is okay to let loose a little. I did this when i bought a fancy car. But you have to be careful here too. I thought the ns x. Would bring me happiness. And it didn't at least not the car itself. I did find that it was fun to hang out with other owners and i can hang out with fellow car people. Even if i don't happen to be driving a fancy car so that's my outlet. I get the fun of talking to like minded humans without the hassle of the car. The nsf x. Went to a new owner after basic needs are taken care of no matter how much money you have. It still a valid exercise to practice mindful spending and restraint. A recent trip reminded me of the importance of the latter point being in a hotel. We ate at restaurants every day. This quickly gets old and the appreciation for the experience goes out the window the first time it feels pretty great by the fifth meal. You feel bad. So what should mr couch do. My thought is that he should do whatever the heck wants. If i was in the situation. I probably keep the duct tape monstrosity to as long as the thing is comfortable. Who cares if people judge him. Based on the state of the furniture. Those people can go find friends with nicer couches. But i wouldn't judge someone with nice furniture either if you're houses in order and a five thousand dollar couch gives you joy go by it perhaps my main takeaway from this exercise is to not be judgmental. I've been guilty of this in the past and my thought now is this. Who am i to judge. Another humans choices. Their choices are accumulation of decades of experience. That i have no knowledge of you. Just listen to the post. Titled how i hired the best people in the world to make me rich in the couch cacophony. Both by mr fifteen hundred of fifteen hundred days dot com. Thank you to mr fifteen hundred. The.

nsf
Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger: Taking the High Road

Squawk Pod

01:42 min | 4 months ago

Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger: Taking the High Road

"Warren buffett. And charlie munger have been business partners more than five decades. We were sort of made for each other. We've never had an argument in this whole time. We are strong minded in that time. The pair have built berkshires. Unique portfolio companies brands like the nsf. Railway geico duracell see's candies and basically left them alone. The way to get a good partner was to be a good partner and these are very effective ideas and they just work so fabulously well and they worked so well at berkshire. I caught up with squawk box. Anchor becky quick. Hi how are you. I'm good how are you over. Zoom about the buffett. Munger magic neither one of them ever really wanted to work for bosses or have a boss or work in corporate culture. They both said that they wouldn't survive it. They'd get fired. And i think that's why berkshire is the way that it is. They like to let people have their autonomy. They like to let the. They've got more than sixty businesses that they own outright and they let the managers run those businesses for a company that is now one of the ten biggest companies in the world by market capitalization. It's an incredibly decentralized organization. I mean there's twenty five people at the headquarters in omaha which by the way they don't even have a building that they run their corporate headquarters out of they. They lease a couple of floors from somebody else. And that's where the whole thing's run run from. If i were to tell you the details of this you'd think it was a scam. You know that. I'm going to tell you about one of the ten largest companies in the world. That's run out of these. Two floors in our mohammed. Twenty five people Okay yeah where. Where's the bridge that you want to sell me on top of that right.

Railway Geico Duracell Becky Quick Charlie Munger Warren Buffett NSF Munger Berkshire Omaha Mohammed
"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"So that's sort of a little bit about in. And i'll just say that in terms of i Nsf funded research has really enabled much of the ai. Revolution that we talk about today so nsf. Investments in reinforcement learning for example. Many decades ago led to algorithms in netflix and amazon. That today recommend movies and products based on your past viewing or purchasing history. So we really take seriously our role in enabling the research that can have transformative impact on society years in decades to come in. We also care at the same time about workforce development. How do we train the next generation of ai. Researchers and practitioners who can innovate and use these tools and capabilities. Go yes. i think it's really cool. I don't think people realize the the amount of research that the nsf has supported just across all domains. Obviously we're gonna talk about machine learning and and advanced data analytics that good stuff but i know that the domains that nsf involved on a really all the primary researchers and research is the core of competitive advantage you know for a society for country for organizations as a whole so because his fantastic and one of the things that you spoke about at our recent machine learning life cycle conference where you joined a panel talking about enhancing skills is skills in the government workforce. Is you were talking about some of these ways that we can sort of bring in some of this new insight this new research. These new skills. Both to the federal workforce as well as to the general workforce and for our listeners. You can still actually view this panel online. That's the benefit of all these online sessions is that they're available for recording and for replay. If you just go to life cycle con dot com Three to attend all of our events are always free to attend. Can join and see the panel. Were irwin and others on the panel shared insights on how. Ai skills were being enhanced. In the government workforce before listeners. Here maybe as a way of Teasing them a bit and giving them a little bit of insight to to watch that panel. Maybe you could share some of the of what you shared there at the panel about ways in which the federal government is helping to kill and reskill. The workforce sure absolutely. I mean. I think this is such an important topic brunch an end. I was glad to be a part of that panel as well. As you've noted the federal government has indeed i think Place to premium unruly trying to upskill and reskill..

amazon netflix today one Both Many decades ago Three things life cycle learning con dot com irwin
Interview With Erwin Gianchandani, Deputy Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:19 min | 6 months ago

Interview With Erwin Gianchandani, Deputy Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

"And we're fortunate to have with us today. Irwin gancheng donny. Deputy assistant director computer and information science and engineering at the national science foundation. So high irwin and thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me a pleasure to be here. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background your current role at national science foundation. I know you've recently taken on an additional one as well and maybe just explain what. The national science foundation is for some of our listeners. That may not be familiar with it. Sure happy to do that again. For having me kathleen in ron. It's a pleasure to be on this podcast today. So as you said Money and for the last five and a half years or so. I have served as the deputy for the computer and information science and engineering director at the national science foundation. So you might hear me over the course of this podcast Accidentally say size ci se. That's short for the acronym of art director the computing and information science engineering director. And as you sort of alluded to kathleen in the last few months. I've actually gone on detail to the office of the director of the national science foundation. Serving as an acting senior adviser there specifically focused on translation innovation in partnership. So i'm coming to you really Perspective in this podcast today. But i've taken on sedition role in a package sale of more about bad if the opportunity presents itself to So as you may know as some of your listeners may know the national science foundation is really a research funding agency within the federal government so in particular we support research and education in all areas of science and engineering from astronomy to biology chemistry to mathematics. Physics social won't be april sciences as well really any discipline of science and engineering and technology and mathematics and is a funder of that in the federal government. Now we have a vast. We have a budget of about eight point. Five billion dollars in the current fiscal year fiscal year twenty twenty one and the vast vast majority of about ninety three percent goes out the door in the form of grants cooperative agreements primarily to colleges and universities throughout the us but some also small businesses. That are just starting up as well

National Science Foundation Irwin Gancheng Donny Computer And Information Scien Kathleen Irwin RON Federal Government United States
Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:56 min | 8 months ago

Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

"The managing director equity initiatives for koya partners melissa is responsible for ensuring that quiz commitment to diversity equity and inclusion is infused into every aspect of the firms work with clients candidates staff in leading this work. Melissa applies experience as search leader for numerous organizations as well as for background in social work in staff development prior to this role melissa served as managing director equity executive search with partners primarily focusing on identifying senior leaders for social justice organizations melissa lead or co-lead executive searches for organizations including innocence project diaz community changed foundation for justice society move on southern poverty law center and hentrich martin institute though her earlier nonprofit through her earlier nonprofit work melissa developed a deep understanding of variety of nonprofit roles and organization cultures prior to joining coy in twenty fifteen. She held positions with unicef. Usa safe horizon and cities of service. She also served as a founding core member and program manager with city year. New york melissa serves on the advisory council of equity in the center a national initiative dedicated to creating a more diverse equitable social sector talent pipeline. She actively volunteers time to provide coaching and mentorship to leaders of color and members of the lgbtq plus community. Melissa holds a masters of social work from the school social policy and practice at the university of pennsylvania and she earned her b a human services and theater performance from northeastern university. Well listen thank you very much for joining us and sharing your insights today. Thanks so much for having me john. It's great to be with you. So folks are drew bio and is one of the things. I just love about people in search. There doesn't seem to be. Maybe there's a degree in it but i very infrequently talked to someone who has such a thing my friend. Derek clarke failed. Who from dri who also been a podcast. Guest runs another search firm. She's an ordained. Rabbi every search leader seems to have this kind of wacky wildly diverse backgrounds. So how did your professional path leader to search. Please don't leave out. How cedar performance visit scrape up. Dick place for the start and especially i love. Dr and i agree similar to her and said lord is so many people in search we. You know it's it's things that line us up for this work even though we have no idea and then all of the sudden one day it's the only thing that we can do and so funny thing. It's actually a funny thing. Because i don't i mean maybe there are lots of other professional You know sort of professional career paths. That are like that. But this one seems uniquely wacky in that way definitely definitely and i think it's people think about what their superpowers might superpower. I rarely the smartest person in room. Sometimes the most interesting but what. My superpower is figuring out who the smartest in who are the most interesting people aren't any room and then introducing them to each other and just so you just shared my bio. I've had the chance to be in so many different types of organizations then community based work and national work in global work and in different parts of the organizations mostly in development but also on the program side in operations i. I'm social worker by training as you said i've got this theater background. Which is an interesting and so when it gets down to it. I love talking to people. I loved networking. I love having genuine and authentic relationships and seeing how i can be a resource folks and i was extremely extremely lucky and fortunate when i was at you at nsf usa to have Onondaga as my leader. When i was there and he was a believer. Not you know him. Joan of stu. He believed in creating ten percent of everyone on his team's time to carve out for them to do other work something. That benefited the organization. In some other. Way wow yeah. And and that's unusual. Especially considering he was leading development team and so what we found was that i love recruiting. And i liked going out and talking to people and letting them get to know unicef usa and in so. I was having a great time doing that. But it wasn't. My core job is really a fundraiser. And it was just threw a perfect stroke of fate that i was introduced to katy baton. Who's the founder of partners and she talked to me about what her vision was the work that clay was doing. She talked to me about her values and just as she talked to me about. I had no idea what an enormous sector the search field is and how many variations exist of nonprofit search professionals. But i i just decided that this is what i needed to do

Melissa Koya Partners Melissa Lead Or Co Diaz Community Changed Foundat Hentrich Martin Institute Council Of Equity Derek Clarke Southern Poverty Law Center Unicef Northeastern University USA University Of Pennsylvania DRI Rabbi New York Dick John Onondaga NSF
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 9 months ago

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
"nsf" Discussed on Pool Pro Podcast

Pool Pro Podcast

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"nsf" Discussed on Pool Pro Podcast

"Alternatives non-alternative. It's not a replacement and it is a supplemental sanitizer. It can be useful in some situations the other thing about living organisms. Uv doesn't technically kill them dead the answer. It's it's it's a fun thing. Wrap your head around. So we use the term inactivate. Uv inactivates bacteria. So if we think about how we kill bugs as really two ways to kill bugs one is to blow him up and the other is to lead them out so loading them up is basically what high concentrations of ozone do that oxidative reaction just causes that that outer outer shell of the bacteria whether it's assisted whether it's a normal gram negative bacterial organism. It just basically bursts it. There's such an oxidative reaction occurring. Think about when you pour peroxide onto a cotton see that fizzing bacteria dying. That's the peroxide reacting with the proteins in your blood. But the same thing happens when ozone reacts with bacteria basically blows it and then if you use chemicals like courts you know backwards so things like that. That's a license action. So there's a particular brand of disinfectant. We've all used at some point now. Lives it's cold. Lysol that name comes from licensing and licensing is basically the concept of chemicals swords puncturing the outer layer of the bacterial organism and it bleeds out in a dis. So blow him up. Bleed them out. But then ultraviolet comes along and it's a little different it disrupts the dna of the bacteria and so it actually think that like you've got a a ribbon of dna that this helix dna and you've got your various codes in the dna and it actually destroys some of the pieces in that demand and destroy so many that the bacteria essentially stops being able to do anything it cannot reproduce and that this works with lg works with a host of other things and facts just about anything that you expose long enough to ultraviolet light will eventually be inactivated so think about hanging laundry out in the sun those of assault. That are old enough before we fires all the time a hanging laundry out in the sun. It smells good. And that's because that bacteria got killed by the ultraviolet radiation from the sun. And so we're inactivating bacteria with you the but we can't use it as you very well put. We can't use it as an alternative to corinne it's secondary it's an augmentation to chlorine residual 'cause you you've only good while it can see stuff so for that half a second that that water water flowing one hundred gallons of minutes or pool you've got maybe maybe half a second contact time on a good day. I don't think. I trust my health and safety to that half a second contact time and that's why. Nsf doesn't trust you and so even an innocent fifty certified uv system does not give you a free. Pass to use that as a primary disinfectant and especially win. It's beyond you and your family and your in a public environment or hospitality environment if if other people who depend on you too good job and you don't people.

lg Nsf
"nsf" Discussed on EGO NetCast

EGO NetCast

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on EGO NetCast

"Market are really cool eighty. I featured her a little bit on my website. She's a you know market. And she was talking about how the old days of like you know people would send out newsletters in the mail or like newsletter would be almost like a newspaper and people put tons tons of content in there which you know made sense and logic when you're going from paper to digital but that's not what's going to work the whole idea of the purpose of an email is to remind people that you're there the same way that i said my linked inner minds people on their your email remind people that you're there too and when you think about how many long long long emails you get with like tons of articles an thanks. That's actually not serving business. If you're trying to remind people that you have something one short email or that one long enough broken into four emails over hondas actually way more valuable because people if you give people one solid hip or insight or something related to your business. That's worth so much more it's light it's easy and it is. Overwhelming is probably the emails you're talking about so that's why i actually just lodged my email marketing. After like over a year of prepping. I finally launched it in june and i'd had a bunch of emails. Go out and they're all short and sweet and they all have a very clear call to action guides people the book concert with me so they can figure out if they want to hire me for a one on one social media session and it's always a social media ship that's related to what i think my audience wants so it's been really cool so far and and that's where i spend the fifty dollars a month on the software that doesn't active campaign. I love them But it's been really useful. I can see who clicks interested in all this nsf. But i know that over time..

nsf
"nsf" Discussed on The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

"Well, I think there's always going to be people who should just get another job. Yeah, you know, I mean if you've got abusive bosses, if you have you know a situation where they just don't listen to anything you said they don't respect you they don't care about you. You should get out but I think if you're same mid-level, yeah and you're in a company you have to really just look at what it is that you love about it and there is always something that you love about your job and make that your focus. So for instance when I went to work at the kitchen see, yeah, you know, I saw that they were they weren't anti-science but they just represented sometimes the wrong people and so I started a practice doing wrong thing was they're going to destroy the world and I'm I'm helping the scientists to save it. Yeah, and so I started working with Scientists about better communicating the science that they do and making wage. More accessible to the public and how do we in an NSF in particular? It was trying to explain the role that basic research has in science and that's very hard because you can't point to a specific thing and then say, you know like NSF there was a period where they just took credit for these grants and funded right and you know one thing they actually did fund the beginning of the internet but how do you draw a line from? You know, we gave somebody money to look at the possibilities of doing this for Science and now look right, you know, it's hard. So I think you know you find something that you really believe in and I do believe in science and you Figure out a way to work in that piece of it and bring the skills that you have because as a former journalist, I was very good at explaining things to people and people would go on and on and on off and especially in Academia, you know, they just go on and on and I used to think..

NSF
"nsf" Discussed on The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

"It wasn't in her head. She's got some some things that she's working through and by the way to my audience she's doing a lot better now than what she wrote in the essay was. I I have different passions now and because of what happened to me, I see I see that can get through anything. And I have to tell you, you know, as a parent you get through these things and you're like it's my kid going to be okay, my kids going to be okay. She chief. I'll call bravery. She said you know what I've been through this thing. It really sucked. But I'm going to find another way. And right now I think she's headed towards a career in science. She loves operation. Oh, that's wonderful. And she's working really hard by the way, no social life. I'm like, her old man college is Dad. I'm sorry. I'd love to talk you about need to study. My daughter is like that too. I'm so proud of her but I you know, my wife and I are like, I wish you would have a little more fun on the weekends, but you know, she's she's busy but the brave it's so amazing to me how these kids now because of all that they're going through and I think they realize that it's really up to them clean up the messes that their parents and grandparents made them if they can if they can well, you know, let's hope that they can't I did want to say something about meaningful work sure because I'm a very strong believer that you can find meaning in the job that you have often people, you know, they're in a career. They've reached a certain Plateau to just blow it all up. Especially if you're raising a family is not always possible indeed, but there are things in what you do that you can learn to love so take us through that. What would be your advice to somebody who cannot blow up their careers because they have to have a cash-flow. How long do they find meaning either carve-outs in the work? They're currently doing or things additionally that they could be doing. I'm not saying you're going to point them anything specific. But how would they get through The Bravery process to get to that point of saying I'm going to open up my eyes and my heart says something different that will make my day beautiful. Well, I think there's always going to be people who should just get another job. Yeah, you know, I mean if you've got abusive bosses, if you have you know a situation where they just don't listen to anything you said they don't respect you they don't care about you. You should get out but I think if you're same mid-level, yeah and you're in a company you have to really just look at what it is that you love about it and there is always something that you love about your job and make that your focus. So for instance when I went to work at the kitchen see, yeah, you know, I saw that they were they weren't anti-science but they just represented sometimes the wrong people and so I started a practice doing wrong thing was they're going to destroy the world and I'm helping the scientists to save it. Yeah, and so I started working with Scientists about better communicating the science that they do and making wage. More accessible to the public and how do we in an NSF in particular? It was trying to explain the role that basic research has in science and that's very hard because you can't point to a specific thing and then say, you know like NSF there was a period where they just took credit for these grants and funded right and you know one thing they actually did fund the beginning of the internet but how do you draw a line from? You know, we gave somebody money to look at the possibilities of doing this for Science and now look right, you know, it's hard..

NSF
Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

Moving2Live

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar. Set of journeys But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go not quite as little as where I heard you up. But? Yes. So I grew up on Lake Ontario My Dad was a doctor in I. Always always wanted to be a doctor specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, and my dad always told me no, you do not He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, no, No, no dad engineers are big nerds. And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and I. Really suggest you become an engineer. So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. throughout my Undergrad I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next I started getting really interested in robotics and in two that feel that was emerging back. Then decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. So I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of ski. Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well?

Lisa Mcfadden South Dakota Pittsburgh New York Engineer Alabama Grad School Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Robotics Institute Lake Ontario Carnegie Mellon University Of Rochester Meyer York United States
"nsf" Discussed on Pool Pro Podcast

Pool Pro Podcast

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Pool Pro Podcast

"So there is good cartridge filter technology, but that's not what you're gonNA. See in swimming pool. We're going to have you know. Thirty Micron Pours, and we're going to have particles that are one to five microns, and that's GonNa that's GonNa make them work. Okay for clarity and do nothing for the for the. Pathogens. And that can cause disease outbreaks the filters D. is kind of hard to dispose of so I'm GonNa. Talk about the filters Pearland filters because you can use Perla a in a filter and just say that you know it's probably the. The the easiest one to get to work properly of the three because you can, you can change the that you put in. You can change the amount of the, and you can change the way you operate it design it, so it's probably the most amenable to doing good pathogen removal and pools, but if you follow NSF guidelines it probably won't work worth a damn. and. You also need to operate improperly or the or the media fall off and leave. kinda holes in the filter, so there's a lot of problems with pool filters and and I'm sure we'll circle back to these more detail, but just just trying to get everybody's attention. Would like to do as maybe we could take each one of these filters individually, but the one thing I'll say that that I agree with you is. In our education. filtration is exactly. That what you described. It's used for water clarity with US chlorine supplemental sanitizers now like ozone UvA okay. those are the the main tools for killing in removing pathogens for the from the water, and and the the filtration is really just about clarity in in the water, and so what I'm hearing you saying is that we could be doing a lot more with full filtration. Yeah absolutely we can. We can filter pools correctly I mean we can do a much better job of of removing pathogens, because the simple truth is, every pool has a filter. Every pool doesn't have an ozone system. You know every doesn't have you the system. You know until they do we should probably try to make filters work and that's. That's my my thinking anyway. So the cartridge filters that we have available to and the other thing that I will say I. Haven't been around fifty years, but I read on thirty years and the filtration technology. Really even the filters themselves haven't changed much the pretty much. The same models that were available when I started in the business are what we're using now. There hasn't been much in the way of advancements. Yeah. Filtration has come a long way You know it's just that the pool industry hasn't embraced it. I mean if you look at the NSF standards which these filters are kind of tested and and regulated by I mean twenty twenty seven percent performance is all thereafter, so if the filter can get you know twenty two percent removal of large particles five times, you know passes NSF..

NSF Micron Pours Perla US
AI in the US Federal Government  Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:51 min | 1 year ago

AI in the US Federal Government Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh. I'm your host Ronald Schmoozer. Our guest today is who's that. Who's the federal chief information officer of the United States? Hi thank you so much for joining us on today. Well thank you Kathleen. Nice to join you. Yeah welcome Suzanne and thanks for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as Federal Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan through that Canon. The federal chief information officer and that role. I have the our pleasure of working with all the agencies of the Federal Government Executive Branch. And how we use technology. That's both the policies as well as a looking at how agencies actually perform against those policies and intense. So it's an exciting face because the most important thing is how we use technology to serve mission and I came to the federal government after almost thirty in industry most of that in financial services show when we think about many concepts particularly around. Hey I for use of delivering services to citizens the importance of privacy and transparency and ethics. Many of those things were part of my career in the private sector so happy to join you today really excited about this topic. Because it's one of the things that as I look across. All the technology areas that are part of the role of the Federal Cio. The opportunities here and the come in across the agencies is really important in this area. You know that's really great because you know. Artificial intelligence is a transformative. Technology is transforming industry and society and governments across the board. It's part of what we've been really thrilled to cover as part of our now hundred forty or so episodes of today plus all of our research. So it's really exciting to see that the federal government United States has made a priority. So where do you see federal agencies today in their adoption? That's a great question Ron and I actually think it's across the board and I'll share some examples of what I mean by that but I'm GonNa Start with emphasizing the way you open the question investment in a I both in private sector and in use inside. The federal government is a priority of this administration and there have been multiple statements and commitments about that and most of the examples and things that I'm going to share. Obviously were about what we're doing inside the federal government and what agencies are doing but but your question I see it across the board and what I mean by that is some agencies like Department of Energy and Dod Nath. Nsf COMMERCE HHS. They're more than and they range from. Having formal focus business units and teen data curation expanded infrastructure in a multitude of projects and investments. And their own you know high performance computing capabilities and other agencies like va PSA labor transportation and interior. They may be in a little different place. And maybe in some cases not as mature across that entire spectrum of investments but they have targeted mission project. They've pilot initiatives they're driving maturity of data capabilities their computer capabilities and workforce skills development and of course every single agency has opportunity to use a AI as it's embedded in many of the products that we're getting from our commercial vendor partners so they're bringing in elements of Automation Analytical Advancement. Hey I and some of those mature data use capabilities as we leveraged commercially available product. So that kind of a broad spectrum across all the agencies yeah that's a really good overview and I know that for our listeners who have been following us for quite some time we've interviewed various leaders from government and I think that every agency does have their own adoption and maturity but it's really nice and refreshing to see that everybody is working towards that. I know that the United States also wants to train an AI. Ready Workforce as we continue to bring ai into every aspect of our lives. It's important that we have a workforce that's able to feel comfortable and work with and Bill. So can you share with us what that means to have an AI? Ready Workforce how the US government plans to get a already workforce. And maybe what? Some of the long term projections are for this type of training. This is one of your questions that I was most excited about and so I will do bear with me kind of for a longer answer on this because an angry ready workforce is really a big statement. It's an important commitment as well because the goal extends beyond the technical workforce to our entire workforce the missions face and how we interact with the American people. What makes a difference technology versus? Some of the things that we've seen in history is that this is really driving a paradigm shift and what I mean. By that is many of her legacy technologies. They captured aided they move data. They store it. They present it but largely the State Action John Interpretations for she'll done by people and as we look at a I the human land and people at interpretation. Does it change but the capacity and the capabilities that we have changed significantly. And I'll give you an example of shared in the past one of the things I was very excited about. It was one of my favorite simulations that combine weather data transportation data power grid data labor and Commerce data to answer really complex question or a simple question with a lot of complex factors as. Where's the optimal placement response teams during the hurricane? So you had to look at kind of. Where is the weather impact can be made? And what the impact of water and wind on road power. Where would people be they somewhere? They worked in where they live. And that makes us think differently about all the people who have to be involved in building that capability beyond technicians deep mission expert individuals who understand implications of the mission. And so with that kind of long answer. I'll take it a second step and then talk about actual training. I was recently visiting one of our university chains who are recipients from some federal grant. Ai and they were taking that scenario that I just mentioned to even further step by saying if we know what's going to happen. How can we recover faster? Where will there be treason degree that needs to be removed? And what is the workforce that we need to repair flood damage not only use the capabilities to minimize impact to speed up recovery? When you think about this type of scenario that fundamentally changes are end to end workforce those designing and developing from a technical stage. Those are part of the mission. The subject matter expertise in multiple kind of rings of impact that scenario so to train our workforce to leverage the powerful capabilities. We need not only but commitment from the technical side but mission operations in the business teams who understand and have the insight to help us identify e contract and reconstruct some of those complex interactions and in all of that for the citizens that were serving. We have to invest in the transparency in plain ability. Of how both that data and technology are being used so it is a very different approach to technical operational and service delivery and the way that we are looking at. The training is kind of end. Those different components hands on skill but literacy in. How a an information is used and heard the term Dev ops in development but how we empower our in the workforce through the business processes changes how we design and deliver the capabilities because we have to expand it throughout the entire business process from the genesis of the data to the experience of the end user. So that is somewhat of a long winded answer. That part of the transformational capability when you actually address the entire flow from end to end.

Federal Government United States AI Chief Information Officer Federal Government Executive B Kathleen Walsh Federal Cio Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan Ronald Schmoozer Suzanne Canon RON Dod Nath Department Of Energy John Interpretations
The Third Wave of Robotic Learning with Ken Goldberg

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:37 min | 1 year ago

The Third Wave of Robotic Learning with Ken Goldberg

"All right everyone. I am on the line with Ken. Goldberg can is a professor of engineering at UC Berkeley. Ken Welcome to the TWAT podcast. Thank you pleasure to be here. It is great to finally get you on this show. We've been talking about this for a bit. You know I meant to ask you before we started last time you were. You mentioned you. Were working on a book. Maybe we'll get remembering that right. Well I think I'M I. I've been thinking about that for a while but I'm also thinking about an more right now an article. Okay okay. Well we'll We'll get to the article. I think I I came across you and some of your work in the context of decks net. I saw that at a Siemens Innovation Fair last year. I think we exchanged tweets and stuff like that. But you know I would really love for you to introduce yourself to the audience and share a little bit about your background and how you came into working in robotics and okay great. I well first since you mentioned twitter I should mention my twitter handle which is at Ken. Underscore Goldberg. And I've been trained very well. My daughter to post there at least one today so I've got the actually. I found it very interesting channel so so I am posting technical things as well as updates about things that are that are finding out which is the learning about which I find very useful. So my background is that I was. I went to University of Pennsylvania and then went to Carnegie Mellon for I was at USC for four years and then to Berkeley where I've been for now twenty five years for here. I RUN A lab. The we we call it the auto lab for Automation Science and Engineering and we have approximately thirty students doing research in there. And we're doing work. There's there's there's post graduate students and a good number of undergrads and we're also associated with other labs like the Berkeley Research Lab and the rise lab and citrus and other programs at Berkeley our particular labs interested in in in doing research on on robotics basically on algorithm ick approaches to robotics and specifically in last year's been focusing on learning methods for for imitation learning deep learning and reinforcement learning for control of robots in applications from grasping as you mentioned which is a primary want working on for for thirty five years to surgery surgical assistance Hugh assisting human surgeons for for robotics and home robots to especially for seniors and in who are who are who prefer to live at home and the last year is very new and we can talk about later is is agriculture and we have a new approach to poly culture farming that were exploring using deep learning so one thing that I thought was really interesting in looking at your bio is in spite of the fact that you are a highly accomplished robot assists you start your your body starts with Ken. Goldberg is an artist so art clearly must be very important to. You actually saw some sketches behind. You am curious. I'm curious about Ken as an artist. And you know how if all ties into your work. It's not the usual fare of this podcast but then I saw somewhere else. You are filmmaker as well Is that your art? Tell US okay. Well actually I wanted to be an artist when I was a kid and I I basically my mother said listen. You can be an artist after you become an engineer. So She she. She was very wise and I think it was. It was it was a good choice for me because actually love both art. Something that I take very seriously. I think it's often underrated by many people especially Engineers who think of it as as lightweight. It's actually just opposite trying to produce something that's meaningful in the art. World is extremely difficult and demanding. So I've spent a lot of time studying I have made a series of installations and projects. That almost always involve technology in some way. But they're also commenting on the role of technology in society. So probably best known pieces of project is a project called Tele Garden that my students and I set up in the very early very early years of the Internet. So it's nineteen ninety five that we we connected a industrial robot arm to the web interface at the time which was mosaic Browser and we built an interface. That would allow you from your screen from anywhere from your laptop There were no cellphones at the time. But you could. You could log in this thing I think. Yeah it was very fun project. We thought well. It's kind of curious. who would use it if anyone and we got thousands of people coming in and and moving the robot but the part of what was made. An artwork was the context because it was sitting inside a garden. A real physical gardens. We could plant in water seeds remotely and then we got tens of thousands and we estimate that over the time that product was was that robot was available online which is approximately nine years. It was visited over. Hundred thousand people participated in the in the project. That's awesome that's awesome again kind of the technology and are coming together rate. So that was the thing Sam because one of the ideas were said I. I don't think I would have pursued that if I just stuck with my research plans at the time but because this came out and offered a way to reach a at the time when I saw as potentially very broad audience I started putting effort into this then there was a fantastic team of students who worked on it. And then we are thrilled with the the idea that you could take a robot and you could put it into the hands essentially of potentially millions of people and then there were. There was a proof of concept the interface questions there it turned out that there were lots of interesting theoretical questions that came out of that so after that project we did a series of subsequent projects and then had an NSF grant to develop versions of this. We have a patent related to the south. Yeah it really grew into a whole new direction of research that that really started with our awesome awesome into tell us a little bit about your research interests nowadays more broadly. So we're still doing art and I can come back to that. There's a new contract. But the the the lab right now is been been very very focused on robot learning and especially as as I know your. Your listeners are very aware there's been huge revolution in the past decade. And so we've been. We're interested in this before the the advanced in deep learning started but now it really has become a huge focus for us so in particular. We have this been working robot grasping for many years and then went deep. Learning came out. We saw an opportunity to apply it. I can tell you that story if you if you like how we do it. Maybe start from the perspective of the grounding on the challenges associated with grasping like we see these pictures of whether they're rohbock robot hands or more industrial types of robots or prostheses. And you know a can grasp like we've seen we've all seen pictures of that but maybe it's harder than it looks or you know maybe the opportunities that have not figured out. Oh good okay so I can. I can answer that partly. I've realized only last few years that part of the reason I believe I went into this field was at myself as a kid was was incredibly clumsy. I still I still am. Anyone would throw me a ball I would drop it and so You know the last kid getting picked for any sports Games or anything like that and it was just Ed. I think that may unconsciously made me interested in in trying to figure this thing out like how. How do you grasp things and many years? Later when I was in Undergraduate I joined a laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania and they were studying various aspects of tactile sensing and I built a very simple hand with another student and we started really exploring this question. Of How do you grasp things? And it is fundamentally difficult for robots like to say that robots remain incredibly clumsy today. They're much better than they were but industrial arms. If you give them novel objects there will drop them with a fairly high frequency and this is a problem because we really want is want You WANNA be able to pick up anything that's put in front of you and the application the big application that's growing enormous right now is e commerce so you wanna be able to take objects every orders different so you wanna take things from bins and pack them. Lift them out of the band. Grasp and put them into boxes or bags for shipment and that turns out to be a bottleneck right now for robotics

Ken Welcome Goldberg Berkeley Automation Science And Enginee Berkeley Research Lab Uc Berkeley University Of Pennsylvania Professor Of Engineering Siemens Innovation Fair Carnegie Mellon Tele Garden Engineer NSF SAM USC Hugh
Fooling Computer Vision

Data Skeptic

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Fooling Computer Vision

"By now I have to assume. Most listeners are aware of deep fakes. Not just because we've covered deep fakes on this show before but if you show an interest for anything anything related to data and or skepticism you must know about the advances in technology that have been pretty impressive in creating videos that were not actual captures. There's a reality. Most people's first introduction to this idea was the video with comedian Jordan peele effectively puppeteer in the then president Barack Obama talking about out the dangers of deep fake technology. Maybe for some of you your first introduction was a bit more. NSF W and with the advent of any technology like doc deep fakes which just to be totally clear as the ability to kind of mask a different face onto a body. That doesn't belong to that face. Or just otherwise edit the content of identity a photo will these technologies are very much coming of age. Interestingly you never hear too much about the let's say positive or anonymity angle of this. You know someone who wants to release something to the world but not have their face identified could look like a real person person but obscure it in some way or let's go directly to the princess lay appearance in the recent star wars films deep fakes or not all bad even though they can like anything certainly be used maliciously so with any malicious tool the first questions. Really well can. We detect usage of that tool. Is there a categorical way. We can identify video. US fake or not fake and like all good questions. The answer is maybe I read good deal research on ways of detecting this one of the ways is it was sort of interesting to me. Initially was a researcher that in the case of very high fidelity cameras was able to detect blood pressure in the images by really amplifying amplifying certain parts of the signal you could notice subtle changes related to I guess the temperature of the human body. You're just things were we radiate as beings and and the deep fake systems you know these things developed based on generative adversarial networks things that have a discriminator in generator that our adversary competing competing to see who can make the best forgeries and who can spot the forgeries will these systems. They sometimes take a bit of a shortcut. They don't notice things like the subtle presence of blood pressure or as we covered on the show last year. That something interesting like the blinking of a face was not something Ganz out of box did and that on the surface surface that seems like a great detection technology as my guest in that episode will remind. You only took a little bit of time until the forgers were able to incorporate that into their systems and start producing deep fakes. which in fact did blink ultimately the detection of deep fake seems to be sort of maybe a bit of an asymptotically failed strategy? Gee if I went outside right now and I don't know set fire to my neighbor's house. If you filmed me doing that you would have a video of me setting fire into my neighbor's house which I'm sure why me jail Wednesday. That video was just a collection of bits of information in computers are getting quite good at generating very specialized sequences of bits of information. Seeing is no longer believing at least when you're seeing is delivered on Youtube or an MP before file or the equivalent and that's why video and images have always been a little bit curious to me. There is such a wide potential space of possible images in videos. That could be shown. We're going to talk a lot this season about gant's and fooling images and all these sorts of topics especially as they relate to our general theme. You of model interpret ability but I thought the best way to kick this off might be to talk about what fighting chances we have. If I'm right in fighting faces an asymptotically Alex's losing battle well we might not yet be at the point of inflection. So while they're still chance in the spirit of Sarah Connor maybe we can fight back a little bit against. It's the machines. Welcome to Davis skeptic interpret ability podcast asked about machine learning fooling images and the right to be ignored at least by an algorithm my guest today is vp Van rance today in our main segment sygmunt. We discussed the ways in which US mere mortals the non algorithms might develop techniques which we can subvert or fool image recognition systems. He's not just in an academic paper but actually in the real world

United States Sarah Connor Jordan Peele Barack Obama Youtube Ganz Researcher Van Rance Gant Davis President Trump VP Alex
"nsf" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Germs that national safety federation NSF conducted a study to find the gym is diatoms in a typical home it's gonna be your bathroom it in sync area. in this house how would you say that I don't know I was just so random just kids were so wrong Meyer is don't have any let's do a swab test let's see how that goes down. is that we cannot get a single figure out today without going all over the houses all around the neighborhood oh my goodness anyway I'm sure that the study was not cold how to find the Germiston items but I really like that word anyway Shelly you'll not be surprised that dog toys made top ten list and in this particular study twenty two families swap thirty household items to measure the various types of bacteria and other organisms pet toys were found to contain the ZTE mold and staff bacteria bad news really bad news and there's a survey by pepco that found that one third of pet owners were not aware that the dog toys collector T. data by Terry used to mold what have they don't have kids. and that they do have some guidelines by NSF and see what they recommend that everyone in the house will wash their hands of the plane with pets in handling the toys I never wash my hands of the play with the pets I was going to be on the stand for and nasty stinky. what is the main national safety federal oh my gosh IBM is it it don't wash my hands after played at my pets but having that toys especially before eating yeah I get that the kiss your dog on the nose after they put their face in some of the dog's poop I have done that a clearly have done it you've done it now. washy dog toys monthly asik that's too long in between toys personally all more often if needed especially the treat releasing toys in the once a stuff with food in the stick in the freezer these types of these steps help prevent disease causing organisms from being transferred to you potentially making your toxic by handling dirty dog toys you have to think about the bacteria viruses that may cause respiratory illness parasites fecal contaminants may end they may all be transferred by handling dirty dog toys this led raised her head on that did she say don't worry about it so she is not a complete go she is not bothered she loves the bone and something she can chew on their own walking slowly nodding mother about toys in the slightest and trick trick see parents well. anything is a talk to him a shoe a sock he steals gym socks the minute you try to take a mafia cheese you know snatches Emmons often to job but he does love a tidy lives a soft toy and it's good read was anyway here it here are some tips on how you can watch certain types of toys hot toys bought toys gonna wash with hot soapy water and rinse and rinse and rinse and rinse and rinse use a tooth brush to scrub the surface and get into all those crevices with those gems like to look around you can use a solution of one part vinegar to two parts water for toys that extra day say and you can soak them and then you again rinsing thoroughly and let them add dry do not put them back in the toy basket when they're not so relate to rye otherwise going to set itself up formal problems in the future Robert Tories often toys labeled as dishwasher safe and you're instructed to place the toys on the top shelf of the dishwasher the best level of disinfection you do not need to add detergent just running through this hot water cycle and if they're not dishwasher safe don't put him in that because your wrist the plastic breaking down soft toys I to me I think these are once again the dirtiest that most at testamenti washing machine use the sanitize cycle and if the toys more delicate you can wash on cold use natural fragrance retention I do not use detergents I do not use detergent I would say use soap nuts the natural they look like little. dates shriveled updates they look like Hazelett slid it they have a sudden and them but it's not soap there's no soap isn't touching the snow fragrances none of that you don't want your pets puts in the toys in the mouth after that yeah anyway so that's what that's the direction I would go in and you can also add some baking soda and vinegar to rinse cycle throw in the dryer and you can actually put them in the sun to add dry because that really does kill off and jumps rope toys. not a huge fan of these but Sam have you ever had Jim of microwaving your cleaning sponges the one that used to wash the dishes all clean the bathrooms with usually just buy a new one yeah that's always a good tip to basic concept for killing bacteria they found that if you. throw your old cleaning sponges in the microwave for two minutes it will kill ninety nine percent of the germs so with that being established rope toys can be clean exactly the same way let them down stick in the microwave a couple minutes and of course make sure there's no plastic or metal or a kind of rings a with things on the actual rope tight now caring for your dog's toys will keep them in good shape and I think this is overlooked lots and how many times have you had all my dog chewed off a big piece of this toy is choked on the outskirts of surgeries that double scope for you know so in previous shows of of talked about cleaning your pet toys once a week and that's the time when you would also inspect your pet toys the broken piece says all shop edges of the just to fill the just thought our rate the shoot off faces and yeah and inside stuffing coming out of the whole yeah that really bothers me that really freaks me out always bring your pet toys inside because the elements can cause mold and it can cause plastic to break down especially in the heats and you don't want anything leaching out of those and then you know you docks put them in the mouth for months with the squirrel has to go I know we have to constantly replace that squirrel because Trixie druggies toys outside and we do have extremely hot weather so the risk of of the breaking down is quite high but I do love the idea of vinegar and baking soda as a cleaning agent and I personally am a I would rather do them every week in all honesty lizard with everything we do out with a patch of got to have the health and safety in mind and always buy toys that made in your country of origin N. N. as in the U. S. in the U. K. Canada Australia and make sure that the maid of a hundred percent natural FIBA's organic cotton natural rubber of the eco friendly and contaminant free the mid tier rials and as many of you have experience in buying toys strong strong chemical smell is a big no no avoid it like the Leydig another gush about pet toys. I was just next time that you do buy toys that you by ones that can be easily cleaned and made a safe material and will last so there you go do we have a commercial we can try a commercial that just disappeared this money but when I tried on a commercial for Pepsi magazine and if it doesn't I'll do a read of a commercial. the Gattaca you could just go with the flow go with the flow so you'll listen to Vegas rocked up radio with me semi host the queen of a couple dunks and we will be right back. radio. people pop culture..

national safety federation NSF Pepsi magazine Gattaca Vegas ninety nine percent hundred percent two minutes
"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The world is dramatic. Cliffs of more. Let's go to Ireland together. Find out more call toll free triple eight, seven three three ninety four ninety four or go to conservative tours dot com. And I'll see you on the cliffs of more that badly. I'm Bob Carson with the discovery files from the National Science Foundation scientists at Carnegie Mellon, University of Pittsburgh in the Salk institute for biological studies. The bunch a whole new sporting event care. Welcome to bacterial ninja warrior carriers. Certainly we'll condition for the challenge. You're very give a buildup stick. Of course, do reach the poo by swimming tumbling in dancing their way over the weekend. Micrometer micro Lewis chambers complete with obstacles inside the gay masters, have not made this, an easy course, tiny obstacle course. Proved no match for the plucky bacteria. There used to navigating places like complex to rain, the gas. Grow intestinal tract with fact except as the well known swimming, tumble or circular games that slows them down a bid, but helps reorient them on the right path add to that their ability to swim more and tumble less until they're in the clear all the while secreting chemicals, the signal the others about the obstacles bottom line, their actions, enabled them to get the food almost as fast as if it were a clear path. New insights on bacterial behavior that helped the researchers understand so movement, and that could even be applied to larger applications such as reducing search time for rescue box looking for victims in emergencies of met six things bacteria one that season for me. Brother. Discover more at NSF dot gov. News ninety three point one f local news. Breaking news, traffic, and weather became Sacramento, Katie.

Carnegie Mellon Sacramento University of Pittsburgh Bob Carson Salk institute National Science Foundation Ireland NSF Katie
"nsf" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"So standby Bill Sardi, welcome. Welcome and pet our, our big story today is magnesium and special highly absorbable form of magnesium. We're gonna be telling the audience about it, and purity products, new product, it's called MEK vantage, and the Meg vantage product is going to be available to the audience free. You're going to be telling them about that soon. But I believe you have a list of questions you wanna fire me. Absolutely bill. You're on a mission to help people correct this issue. We're facing with an inadequate intake of magnesium. Seems like about half of our population just doesn't get enough. That means millions of us are affected. So let me read the list, here, the Bank museum does about ten things in the body that will simply amaze, you as final for energy, an ATP production. Healthy bones joints, healthy heart rhythm and cardio health, healthy blood pressure blood. Sugar managing inflammation promoting circulation sleep mood Bill. How can one mineral do so much it does? Well every cell of the body has made him in it. And there's lots of things that rob us have made easy him anything from NSF diorite IX, even lots of calcium, which competes with magnesium. So the more calcium, you intake, the more net magnesium you it, it's kind of missing from our diets. It was there one hundred years ago before we use Ross fate fertilizers, and so we're deficient, and we're paying the price for it. We can get it back. But the problem is dietary supplements loaded with magnesium, aren't very absorbable. And so now we have a little breakthrough in MAG vantage from purity products, make knees. Eum bisque lice, and what it means is the wonderful Meg knees, Eum, ions combined with glysophate and amino acid. So it's key lated, and it's buffered in it's easy to. Take, and it's highly absorbable and we're going to be telling the audience more about it. And of course, we need it. We have to have it for life. We're not getting it. If fortified foods out of what's missing, but they can't do mcneese e-emits very bulky infected can't get it in multivitamins insufficient amounts. So that's why purity products with their twenty fifth anniversary Meg vantage their new product. You'll get the try it for free. We'll tell you about that in just a moment. The media loves magnesium. I mean, the New York Post declares magnesium is one of the four vitamins or minerals that everybody should be taking. And we, we saw the famous framingham study to January of two thousand fourteen a big meta analysis. And here's here's the gist of it. Magnesium intake is associated with a healthy cardio vascular system, in healthy arteries, to, so we love this, a big deal. But Bill, most magnesium people buying the stores. It's the cheap stuff. Now you've teamed up with purity products. And today, you're debuting, a free bottle of MAG. Vantage advantage gets it. Right. And just to. Yeah. Just to simple tablets. It's so easy. You're packing. These super potent magnesium, bisque, liken, eight and also a little bit of zinc, vitamin d so talk about this breakthrough formula MAG vantage from purity planks. Why do you like it so much? I like it because it's highly observable. That's the problem I like it because it has the right dose, three hundred fifty. Full milligrams when they say this on labels, it needs to be the elemental form. The key later, the misclass- in this case, you'll see make knees Eum glue khanate, magnesium sulfate, make Newseum oxide, the last part of that is the key later. Well, here we have bisque lies in the issue is, is that they frequently give the total amount, not just the ele- mental magnesium. And so this is full three hundred and fifty milligrams of elemental magnesium. And it's combined with vitamin d that helps you utilize it better. And of course, boron boron is a little mineral, you just give about three milligrams of, and it tends to maintain I levels of minerals, particularly make museum. And so we, we normalize IRS. So we want to have it in their, this wonderful cofactors to go along with a course, this wonderful highly absorbable bioavailable form of magnesium. And I can just tell you today if you're. Showing any of the symptoms and signs, all of these things that, they're just a long list of issues that go on with us. Probably every day. The list is long and I'm reading from journal, highly regrettable, that the deficiency of such an inexpensive low toxicity nutrient, you know, they're even talking about vitamin B one. It was the first vitamin that was discovered. You don't you can't use bite them and be one. If you don't have some magnesium low-caste guests at you need magnesium to make the stomach as until you can digest better. So there's just the list is on and on and on. We tend to accumulate iron and we tend to lose magnesium as we age in our brain that causes all kinds of other issues. Let me let me jump in on that one too. Because you know, as if that wasn't enough as men and women age guys love magnesium. Because societas with healthy testosterone in women love the role of plays in bone health to that. Right. You've got that, right. And. We need make museum to make our bones. So the calcium makes the calcium crystallizes and so it makes it kind of hard, brittle bone. You need to make museum to lace in-between, the calcium so that your bone has flexibility. And that's really important. We lean on our hip joint we lean. And so we need flexibility in our bones. You, you get that from magnesium. Highly important Bill. The Washington Post reported on June tenth that magnesium is essential to your health, most people just don't get enough. In fact, the Washington Post points out that magnesium is involved in regulating blood pressure blood sugar heart rate in your new Meg vantage formula, you get more for less, meaning you get you get the new technology this magnesium bisque like an eight key. Lated buffered technology. I mean it's the good stuff. More magnesium fewer pills is eighteen percent. Bioavailability versus just four percent for the cheaper magnesium. So more magnesium. Fewer pills, more efficiency built, you joke around that this new vantage formula. It kind of makes the, the old-fashioned magnesium formulas Jonas. And we got a free bottle today to explain all that. Well, I can hear the skeptics. They're wondering about it. Listen. I know you can get magnesium out of your diet. You're asking can you do it that way? Well, if you eat a lot of green leafy vegetables, like a whole head of lettuce, and that won't get you there either and nuts and whole grains, but it's impossible to get you there, without a supplement 'cause you need this, bulky magnesium and that you need a lot of it a lot more in the dairy rich diets have a lot of calcium. And so, you need more magnesium more than you can get out of your diet, which is why we're having our our show today. And of course, you may think, well, just go to the doctor, and he'll do a blood test. And no. Because there's one percent of the magnesium is in your blood, and you really need a special kind of magnesium. It's a red blood. Cell test in order to see if you have enough magnesium. So the best way to do it is just take it, and feel the difference, because most of us are made knees Eum deficient. Now this wonderful new MAG vantage from purity products. It's their flagship injury. Is there twenty fifth anniversary and they want every listener to get a free bottle and of course, purity products, you kick in a little bit of shipping. They send it to you for free. You get to try it. You tell them, whether it's working for you, but you can feel the difference. Once you get this magnesium in a highly Zorba before we have these depleter, and we need to replace it back. And I find it's best for me to take it in the morning. That's when I really like it, my brain needs it in a really gets me going, and we need it for cell energy, the sill energy, little compartments in your cells, called might Okon drill will as you age. Guess what your might Conrail aren't as officiant? You need to make a Dino triphosphate the.

Bill Sardi Washington Post Bank museum New York Post Meg Conrail Lated NSF mcneese Ross testosterone IRS twenty fifth one hundred years eighteen percent
A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

Astronomy Cast

05:39 min | 2 years ago

A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

"This sort of strong Makassar is sponsored by Magellan TV dot com. Check out this new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast now, this isn't a normal part of the ad, but I have to say the landing paid. They made for strong me. Cast is amazing. Once you get to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast, you can dive into a collection of documentary movies series and exclusive playlists designed by documentary filmmakers, this growing platform is adding new content weekly, and is already home to a who's who of the best productions from the overview of fact to the NSF funded seeing the beginning of time. There is an amazing selection of space astronomy related content watching four K from Roucou or on your computer or stream on. Any I o s or Android device? I lost track of a bunch of hours on Saturday afternoon diving through history, and you can explore the solar system traveled to distant stars and experienced the universe. Like never before. Once again, you can check out. This new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast. Hi, everyone producer Susie here. We apologize for the lower quality audio this week, Pamela, experienced power outage that affected the saved audio files. So this show is being created from the audio from our YouTube street. Trying to cast episode five twenty five one hundred years international astronomically. Caster weekly facts based journey the cosmos help you understand not only what we know how we know what we know I presume came publisher of university with me as always Dr Pamela, gays senior scientists for the planetary scientists end the director Cozma quest penalty doing I'm doing. Well. How are you? I am doing. Well, also, did you survive all the excitement yesterday? It was a great day for people who are not don't know. We're talking about literally everything happened yesterday. Rockets. Relaunched lunar orbits were arrived at. Asteroid was hit tank weapon, which was great. What a great use for anti tank weaponry. Take more of that plea. Yeah. Exactly. So. Solar system more of that coming. So you just stay in line. So yeah, no. It was a great day. And and now other stuff too. I just saw that the put down a date for the Knicks falcon heavy launched. It's going to be soon like within the week. So it's gonna be it's gonna be a crazy week. Actually. I'm utterly overwhelmed. Right now, people may have noticed haven't got simply newsletter out yet because I just have so busy. But it's it's it's almost ready. It'll go another like couple of hours. I was at my keyboard for sixteen hours yesterday as annuals that I took turns live streaming all of the events line on twins Catholic. Absolutely amazing, and I I have to brag a little bit. So I love so much working once again, a like rock solid. We do science organization. I I haven't done that since I worked at Harvard. I've been at places that focused and communications education and undergraduate education, and I'm back. And so there was a quiet little does anyone know how to do this thing and stuff at the command line to fix the formatting of a whole bunch of files. And I was like, yeah. You just need to write software to footy foodie FU and the person who was working on high a booster, and they needed to convert a whole bunch of files was like help. And so last night in real time while everything was happening. I got to help by just reading a stupid little snippet of of code, but people at high. Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. To make a science people. I got to make us lions. So so you saying like, thanks to the planetary sciences toot for giving you a home that you get to do science on on an occasional basis. Yeah. That's amazing. And more to the point. I get to science with a whole bunch of other people instead of being like the person over here making science while everyone else is doing other things it was it's awesome. Here we go even though they might be scattered around our planet. Astronomers have a way to come together to work the issues that face their entire field of study, it's called the international astronomical union. And they're the ones who work out the new names for stars. And sometimes depleted beloved Kuyper built objects. Oh, man, people have that love hate blade ship with the I eight you which is the international stra nominal union.

Magellan Dr Pamela Makassar International Astronomical Uni Roucou Rockets NSF Knicks Harvard Kuyper Producer Susie Publisher Director Five Twenty Five One Hundred Y Sixteen Hours
"nsf" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on WTRH

"We're we're we're the industry. We're the guys that we represent all the retailers. The range is the manufacturers the guys that are making the products, and the places that you're going to purchase the products, and the places that you're going to utilize the product. So those are all of our members where this business businesses behind the industry. It's always interesting to me how the media, of course, almost always gets it wrong. The NRA represents gun makers. No, actually, there's another group that represents a gun makers and the gun sellers. That's the NSF. But you know, what I like the way you put it. It's who's behind the counter and who's in front of the counter NRA's guys are in front of counter, an NSF folks are behind the counter, it's the industry. Yes. Exactly. Well, and you know, I have to learn all this stuff now because I haven't actually our quickly said anything about it on the air. I was just appointed to the board of governors of the NSF. Yeah. Congratulations. It's good to have that was happening here. Thank you. I don't know what I'm doing. But I'm going to find out by golly. Well, we're talking about the great program that plus one movement, and it's you know, it's not like this is a new idea. A lot of us have been doing this for years. Jim our our producer here. He took on a challenge a few years ago, and he actually introduced fifty new people to shooting in a year, which I thought was phenomenal. Wow. And that's the kind of thing we're talking about doing is taking this on as a. A personal challenge request. If you will I have people ask me all the time. What can I do for gun rights? What can I do for the second amendment? I always tell them. Honestly is this sounds so simple. But if you would just take somebody to the range, take them hunting introduced somebody to this bring in somebody. That's about the best you can do because I call it Bill. I call it vaccinating somebody because somebody goes out to the range, and shoots has a great time and says it comes back and says, you know, those folks out there having fun, you know, they're safe, and it's great fun. And they're just a great bunch of people changed that person. And no amount of propaganda could convince that person that gun owners are bad. All the time. Like,.

NSF NRA Jim producer
"nsf" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on KTOK

"To utilize the product. So those are all of our members where this businesses behind the industry, and it's always interesting to me how the media, of course, almost always gets it wrong represents gun makers. I'm thinking, no, actually, there's another group that represents gun makers and the gun sellers. That's the NSF. But you know, what I like the way you put it. It's who's behind the counter and who's in front of the counter guys are inferno counter. An NSF folks are behind the counter, it's the industry. Yes. Exactly. Well, you're and you know, I have to learn all this stuff now because haven't actually said anything about it on the air. I was just appointed to the board of governors of the NSF. Yeah. Congratulations. It's good to have you on that was happening here. I don't know what I'm doing. But I'm going to find out by golly. We're talking about the great program the plus one movement, and it's. You know, it's not like this is a new idea. A lot of us have been doing this for years. Jim our our producer here. He took on a challenge a few years ago, and he actually introduced fifty new people to shooting in a year, which I thought was phenomenal. Oh, wow. And that's the kind of thing we're talking about doing his taking this on as a. A personal challenge request. If you will I have people ask me all the time. What can I do for gun rights? Can I do for the second amendment? And I always tell them honestly is the sound so simple. But if he would just take somebody to the range, take them hunting introduce somebody to this bring in somebody. That's about the best you can do because I call it Bill vaccinating somebody because when somebody goes out to the reins and shoots. It has a great time and says comes back and says, you know, those folks out there having fun, you know, they're safe, and it's great fun. And they're just a great bunch of people change that person. And no amount of propaganda could convince that person that gun owners are bad. You see it all the time. Like, I love taking new people in and like you said you see that smile on their face. And you things change they understand what.

NSF Bill Jim producer
"nsf" Discussed on The Brit and Yankee Craft Beer Pubcast

The Brit and Yankee Craft Beer Pubcast

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on The Brit and Yankee Craft Beer Pubcast

"Among the I guess we should say some liberties the brewing celebrities down here. Depend the community. Here on my my right? You'll live, of course, they can't see that Dan scally wag growing. Now. Tell us a little bit about scally way because you're about to we are talking enrolling. We are. We're about to open next probably four to six weeks. We are at the assembly face in a lot of pieces laying around and got a lot of people coming in footing things together. One of these guys this so Matt match one of our partners Molitor partners over skyway came in more recently, one of the more recent partners. He's been helping us out a lot with the construction. Get a lot of good ideas. Get a lot of he else we when I when I don't need to yell at people, and I need to talk to them as if they don't work for me. That's where Matt comes in. And sometimes I help them even more. So when he does need yell it still that we can all walk away and go home to our family. We have fun together. Folks, did yes, it was a good price. Off breaking things when they get rid of the leftovers all that. Crime against man in nature, just wait till next year because we're gonna win at all. So tell us a little bit about where you located. So we are downtown Westmont about a block north of the NSF stop. Okay, which makes it easy walking distance. You can go that line. You can get on that line. You can hit like you can hit flap deck and Berlin you can hit us in Westmont, and then you can go to altered and then stop it to brothers and do all the opposite direction on the way back. Are you going to do any real ales push your hit drinking drinking a cost condition? I am actually I believe this one was the Mrkonic. Oh, miss raven. Yes. Which is the the craving areas down, which is an Irish doubt on IRA stone. I've had it had it multiple times on tap atmos- Kettani, but also and the one of the major differences between their standard fare there for the craven and this one is this one. It does not have any lemon in it. So thing iris-out Iraq. Yes. And the chocolate come through a lot more as a result because it's not being muted by the lemon. So when you get going what's going to be your flagship biz allow release that yet. Things. I mean what I'm thinking behind the wall. Right. All right. Let me ask another question. Then when are you going to have when we have here? Necessarily for the public. We expect to be brewing within the next two weeks. As soon as we have beer that can go out to distribution it will distribution. So they will be out in the wild Ronald vigor straw within by the end of the month. Hopefully, why did you call it? Stally wack. Silly thing wasn't take it. Now. Everything search of the idea, right attitude. We are we're pranksters were rogues where pirates starts with your Han solo. Obviously you can't use that. And so you run down the list, and you find something that works with your apart. Where's your body? Parents. She's at home.

Westmont Matt Dan scally Iraq Molitor NSF Mrkonic Berlin six weeks two weeks
"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"More at NSF dot gov. This is a Bloomberg market minute. Netflix may need to play against type this here. Twenty nine thousand nine is going to be a year where it's very challenging for net flicks to kind of maintain market dominance, Andre Swanson CEO of true optic, Disney, AT and T potentially NBC universal. There's also a lot of free streaming solutions that are gaining rapid market share disease. Also, pulling some content off net flex, but Paul Verna analyst emarketer says looks has its new A-List ready, including a production deal with the Obamas. And with Grey's, anatomy writer and producer shonda rhimes bad. Kind of celebrity driven strategy is gonna pay off for them and Netflix also allowing viewers to pick their own outcomes in black mirror episodes like bender snatch. But even if you choose your own plot, you may still get the same ending John Klein president dealing says winter is coming for net. Flicks. Look over the next several years. It's just gonna be much stiffer headwind that they're selling into Denise Pellegrini. Bloomberg radio. Did you know there are other signs of Asia? Besides facial redness, bumps and pimples, visible blood. Vessels other signs include burning stinging or swelling of the face even enlargement of the nose. Rosie. She can also affect the is causing a bloodshot appearance and irritation that could lead division loss. If you have any sign of rosacea see apologist and ask about advances in treatment or visit the national rosacea society at rosacea dot org. Join us Monday for the case Piquet afternoon news, the latest on the inauguration of Gavin Newsom the afternoon news starts at four on News Radio cave.

Bloomberg Netflix Gavin Newsom shonda rhimes NSF Denise Pellegrini Andre Swanson John Klein Paul Verna facial redness emarketer Piquet Disney CEO analyst Asia NBC AT president Grey
"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Discover more at NSF dot gov. Now, a look back at this week in history this week in seventeen eighty eight Georgia votes to ratify the US constitution becoming the four state in the modern United States named after King George the second Georgia was first settled by Europeans in seventeen. Thirty three Georgia became the first southern state to ratify, the US constitution this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty two sergeant Joe Friday's famous catchphrase just the facts, ma'am. Enters American homes on NBC via new entertainment device. The television a popular radio series since nineteen forty nine to police drama dragnet became one of the first TV series filmed in Hollywood instead of New York. It also began a long nearly unbroken line of popular crime and police TV dramas this week in nineteen seventy four president Nixon signs, the emergency highway energy conservation act setting a new national maximum speed. Limit prior to nineteen seventy four individual states set speed limits within their boundaries and highway speed limits across the country range from forty miles per hour too. Eighty miles per hour. President Nixon signed a federal law lowering all national highway speeds to fifty five miles per hour. The acquis intended to force Americans to drive it speeds, Demore fuel-efficient and this week in one thousand nine hundred Panama's general Manuel Noriega after holding up for ten days at the Vatican embassy in Panama City surrenders to US military troops to face charges of drug trafficking. Noriega was flown to Miami the following day and crowds of citizens on the streets of Panama City rejoiced on July tenth nineteen Ninety-two. The former dictator was convicted of drug trafficking, money laundering, and racketeering and sentenced to forty years in prison. That's your look back at this week in history extremist live at camp, K dot com and on your iheartradio app. Follow us on our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter at KABC K extends beyond classic latest. Breaking news as it happens. Traffic. Speeds are expected to slow the traffic and weather together every ten minutes as we hit through the night tonight. All of this will diminish in tomorrow's going to be a dry day. Sacramento's news, traffic and weather at the top and bottom of every hour. News Radio KFB K. Out of Washington. And we're also getting a big question. Mark. There is the White House. Press corps has been called. And there was nothing on the calendar.

President Nixon Georgia Manuel Noriega United States Panama City Vatican embassy NBC NSF president Joe Friday King George Facebook White House racketeering Sacramento New York Mark Washington Hollywood
"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Guys will stay clear winds will slowly diminish as we head through the night. We'll still have some breeze around tomorrow tomorrow is gonna be a sunny day with highs in the mid fifties. And we will stay dry through the end of the week. We'll just a few clouds, I'm k- CRA three meteorologist Mark finding on NewsRadio. Toasty. Eventually we may be able to save energy by turning down our thermostats and turning up or sweaters socks. Jammies. Gloves and coats, and for my grandma who always seems to be chilled. Maybe an entire body suit. Discover more at NSF dot gov. Franson what's in a word, evidently, allot love hate. And a slew of other emotions that helped land certain words on two thousand eighteen.

NSF Mark
Is It Okay to Say I Miss You to a Teacher?

All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

11:13 min | 3 years ago

Is It Okay to Say I Miss You to a Teacher?

"Yeah. So guys, we're using this word, miss right, miss very common word to talk about your feelings, and we actually have a listener question about this word and a listener with his experience using this word. Lindsey, do wanna read the question. Yeah, let's hear from Pablo. So here we go. So Pablo says, hi, Lindsay. How have you been? My name is Pablo. It's my first Email to all ears, English. I'm the winner of the app contest and we have. We had a Skype, hang out. It was amazing to know you better and the stories about all ears, English development? Yes. I met with Pablo way back in February or January. He won the app contest that we held that month and I got a chance to meet him. We talked for thirty minutes on Skype. Very cool. Yeah. So guys, listen out for any contest that we have in the future around the app. Okay. So now the question I studied English here in my city and it was a wonderful experience. A few months after I finished the course, I went back to the. School and I met my teacher and I said, I missed you. It sounded a bit weird. I thought, and I noticed that she wasn't so comfortable with. However, she was polite as she was play as well as we expect from a British person. Oh, jeez. Okay. L. o. l. he says, all right, just a little joke there. Okay, Pablo nice. Moreover, everything went well in the conversation, took a good way how not to fail this miserably. When I use I miss you how to tell someone you miss them without being weird. I love the show in the way you guys teach. I've listened to the show as much as I like. Furthermore, it's always amazing. I hear from all English. You're my favorite English content on the web. I miss you kidding l. o. l. by. I like the Hubble sense of humor. Spotty. He's funny. I really enjoyed meeting Pablo's. We had a good time. Yeah. Oh, I bet that was fun. Yeah, thanks for that question. Yeah. Good topic today. Yeah, and I love on our listeners. Ask us about experience. They have had experiences they've had in real life. What do you think? Yeah, I love it. That is the best question guys. You know, if you go out into the world and you use your English and then the question comes up Email us immediately with that question because those are the stories we like to tell them the show hersher for sure. I love it. I mean, Lindsay, what do you think of students said that to you would. Wow. Yeah, I think there's a lot that we don't know here about kind of the tone of voice the context true? Were they alone in the room where they like, I, I mean, I'm guessing obviously like Pablo's not trying to act weird or to try to imply anything obviously. But like maybe the scenario was strained. I'm not sure, but in general, I, I would. I don't think it should be a problem saying, I missed, I missed you are so much. There's so much here that we don't know. Right, right. But, yeah, in general, it shouldn't be a major problem. It's okay to say that you miss someone, right, right, right. I mean, yeah, I, I don't think I would find it weird if someone said that to me Luga student, I'd probably be happy. It'd be like I missed you, but but yeah, like we said, I mean, who who? Who knows like how what the situation was or maybe the, I don't know. Yeah, Lindsey, one hundred percent. What you said. Yeah. I mean, yeah, maybe a teacher could find it a little too informal or intimate in a classroom potentially coming from a student. That's probably what happened. Right. I mean, I missed you. I guess could be like, you know, more. Yeah. I mean, it is kind of intimate in a way, but I never thought about it in a like that. Some student couldn't say to me. Yeah, this is interesting because it's kind of complex this question. If you really dig below the surface. Because if I think about like who I would say, I missed you too. Like I wouldn't say at to like a friend of a friend that I don't know that. Well, you know what I mean? But I would certainly say to like a good friend who went away, right? I might say it even if I even if I were teacher liked to a student, I might say, all I missed you like you've been going on. Glad you're back in the class. That is true because I think also like a teacher is like a more personal religion. I mean, like you know, a friend of a friend, you might not know that well, but teacher like, you know, that's kind of like a big deal relationship actually. Yeah, it's just it's, I think it's really about what goes around the phrase. I miss you. Like, what are you saying before? What are you saying after what's the whole context of the conversation? Right. That's true. That's true. Very interesting lot. Lots to

Michelle Pablo Lindsey Susan Partner NSF Linda Brazil
How to Discover the Joy of Being with Marina Pearson

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

13:51 min | 3 years ago

How to Discover the Joy of Being with Marina Pearson

"Hey, hey, if you haven't already head over to pod, simply dot com slash joined. That's where you can learn more information about the podcasting membership program that I'm watching that is all about how to launch grow, monetize intern, turn your podcast into a real thing. I'm giving away every single piece of information. I have everything that I've learned over the last four and a half years over the last forty plus podcasts that I've worked on and the last seven in a row top one hundred launches that I've done so everything I typically reserved for my clients. I am giving away to you in this membership program. So you definitely if you're interested in podcasting at all, if you want to launch your own show, if you have a show and want to learn how to grow it, then this is the place to be head over to pod simply dot com. Slash joined to learn more, and I will see you right there. In this episode, I sit down with marina Pearson to talk about the joy of fees get. Get excited because this is tiny lease big, Jake. Another episode, tiny leaves baked changes, whereas share simple strategies you can use to get more out of your life. My name is Greg clueless in in this episode, I'm sitting down with marina Pearson marina is the host of a podcast called the joy of being and from every single interaction I've had with her over roughly the last two or three months. It's been made very clear to me that the number one thing hers zone of genius is learning how to bring joy back into your life, learning how to navigate whether it's motherhood or business, or whatever it is a way that brings joy into your life. And she is just such a bundle of joy in a bundle of energy and excitement to speak with. So I'm excited to bring her on the show talk about that process because I think that for many of us, joy is the missing piece. It's that thing that we get. So. Bogged down in the day to day life in the process of pursuing progress. We get bogged down in that day today, tiny leap activity, and we forget to just look up and smile and be grateful and happy and and live the life that we actually have. So marina. I am super excited to have you on the show. How are you doing today on Ralph front Klag such a pleasure such on to be. Absolutely. I mean, the pleasure is mine. So let's let's start here. Tell me a little bit about the joy of being podcast. How did that concept come to be. Gosh, it was back in February were I was little bit stuck. I had actually been attempting to make my coaching practice worked for many many years and had done well. But I was at a point where been so many changes in my life last year I go to. First, and then I was a bit like lost as opposed to gonna gun which direction I was going to go in. So I actually decided to go in, go inside in January, stoke attempting attempting trying so hard and just enjoy just enjoy whatever cuts may soil. I did not. She do any work. I didn't get online. I did. The things would just fill me with joy, which was on my started. I decided to go in a join us singing group. I then was cooking. 'cause I actually love cooking. I was watching notes of movies on TV shows, which I absolutely love to. And then I decided to join an acting group as well in the town that I'm in. And I realized that I just been putting off everything like things that really were calling me because I felt that didn't have enough time.

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Baltimore cop indicted after video shows him punching man

KSTE Programming

00:24 sec | 3 years ago

Baltimore cop indicted after video shows him punching man

"Happened but when the scientists weaken. The outer membrane, cells die, quickly strong outer. Membrane life week outer membrane this gives researchers a new path to follow one that was right in front of them yet hidden in plain, sight the new drugs the destabilize the, deceptively. Thin outer layer could help destroy infectious bacteria useful, because about half. Of the

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Seven cars removed after train derailment, oil spill; cleanup and railroad repair to follow

Van and Bonnie in the Morning

01:21 min | 3 years ago

Seven cars removed after train derailment, oil spill; cleanup and railroad repair to follow

"A seventeen year old west des moines girl died in a crash in creston monday afternoon iowa state patrol says after stayton turned in front of a pickup truck on highway thirty four and died from her injuries passenger was also hurt and taken the creston hospital the driver of the pickup was uninjured the crash follows several others in the past few days in which at least four others were killed and several others injured on i was roads clean up efforts continue in north west iowa after a train derailment spilled a lot of oil i'll be nsf said yesterday the cars that derailed have all been moved off the track near dune meanwhile the company said the track where the cars derailed could be repaired as soon as today about two hundred thirty thousand gallons of oil were spilled last friday into the little rock river the low unemployment rate is prompting a new effort to expand the local labor pool the focus is on students the downtown des moines chamber says it's an idea to address a labor and skill shortage taking that step and then getting the students and the employers together so that they can't figure out what's going to work best for each of them becky greenwald of the des moines downtown chamber of commerce says it's called student to employer s to e and involves several local organizations a nonprofit groups that serve low income students in those at risk of dropping out of school we have more on that story at whol radio.

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