29 Burst results for "NSF"

"nsf" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"nsf" Discussed on WTOP

"Morning, we're discovering how the environment reacts to plastic. Though smaller than a sesame seed, microplastics pose an increasing threat to the environment, they have been found in human lungs, blood and placentas. New research explores how environmental weathering could cause microplastics to absorb pollutants, potentially making them even more harmful. But what does studying microplastics and environmental weathering reveal about the spread of pollutants? From the U.S. national science foundation, this is the discovery funds. Microplastics can be found everywhere in the environment, scientists estimate that between 15 and 51 trillion populate surface water around the globe. Previously, little was known about the impact of environmental weathering on these micron sized plastics, with support from NSF. Researchers at Louisiana state university are taking a deep dive and have made a significant discovery. Their experiments with weather conditions revealed the role of sunlight in altering the properties of microplastics, while at first only found on the surface of water. After only ten days, the micro particulates were discovered suspended in water. The study showed that photo oxidation, the combination of light and oxygen, caused this dispersion. The research demonstrated that the environment induced chemical changes caused the microplastics to absorb pollutants, such as lead. Further research could help the team assess if and when these toxic chemicals are released from microplastics and could initiate development of a process to intervene. To hear more science and engineering news, including from the researchers making it, subscribe to NSF's discovery files podcast. You are listening to 103.5 FM at WTO P dot com. We know you're listening to WTO for

NSF Louisiana state university micron WTO
"nsf" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"nsf" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"And going into this next data play, I think there has been hope thrown away thrown around that will maybe see Final Fantasy 16. I firmly been on the side of, no, we are not seeing Final Fantasy 16. That said, I think I have a lot of myself to open up to the idea of seeing Final Fantasy 16. I think part of that comes from talking to you guys on the kind of funny games cast, talking about like, yeah, sure, maybe a 16 level announcement isn't like revealed at a state of play, but we could get an update. We could get a gameplay trailer. We could get maybe a release date, something along those lines. And we'll see. I've opened myself up to that, 'cause they've talked about seeing third party stuff. My last question for you, before we get into the proper show, because we're going to talk a lot about safe place, summer games, that's all that. We're going to LA in about a week in like a day. Crazy, man. Yeah. Me and your first games trip, dude. Yeah, yeah. And I'm very excited about it, right? Like going, being able to go and do a preview I think when I first joined kind of funny, there was maybe one or two previous in person. I did one for a persona 5 royal. In LA and then I did another one for doom eternal. That was NSF. But now I'm going with you and Greg. This is quote unquote judges week adjacent. And this is my first time at a thing like this. I think that I've heard about on podcasts over the years that have gotten excited about. What is your hype level for next week? Going to LA? Oh, ten out of ten. Honestly, just being able to hang out with you and Greg and treat this treat like a real E three. I'm so excited about and also seeing everybody and just kind of seeing what Jeff and them have in store for us. I think that this is, again, going back to what I was just saying. Like, we're still not at the point where summer game fest existed. People understand exactly what it is. I think that this days of play, I think they're calling it play days, something like that is a step towards that. Is Jeff really kind of owning the week and owning the organization of it all. So I'm super excited about all of that. I do want to put a poll up in the chat. I don't know how to do that, so if somebody that's watching live can, will blessing get a treat today. Will he get treated? Yes or no. I know you think I'm gonna get it. That's gonna get his treats or not. I feel like I already got a treat. Barry came in here and called me daddy and that was I don't know if that was a trick or treat. But enough about that too. I want to talk more about some specific very specific summer game fast news with today's stories, which include obsidian, having something to show next week, ubisoft, having nothing to show next week and more because this is kind of funny games daily, each and every weekday at 10 a.m. live right here on twitch.tv slash kind of funny games. We run you through the nerdy news needs to know about. If you're watching live and.

LA Greg NSF Jeff Barry ubisoft
"nsf" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:54 min | 9 months ago

"nsf" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"You can just launch in a space. You basically have your own little mini space station for a few days. It's not that big, right? But I think that's what we probably see him do first, because they're going to see a lot more tests of those in the next three, two, three years. But they're already been demonstrated to be safe. And then you're not trying to go for ten to 20 days or months or years at a time. It just up in space for a few days, but you're in proper space. It's an orbital flight. It's not just a suborbital flight. You can do the podcast from there. And I think 2026, I wonder how the audio works. See, also, can you comment on 2026? I'll start getting ready. I'll start pushing him on this. I'm quite serious. It's a fascinating kind of axiom two still has room. You could go on that mission if you wanted. So I'll ask you about axiom. How stricter are these? So this seems surreal that civilians are traveling up. So how much bureaucracies they're still in your experience for the scientific and I know it's a difficult question to ask a scientist. Because you get to, you know, you don't want to complain too much. But how much, you know, there's sometimes bureaucracy with NSF and your D in the funding and all those kinds of things. That kind of prevent you from being as free as you might sometimes like to do all kinds of wild experiments and crazy experiments. Now, the benefit of that is that you don't do any wild and crazy experiments that hurt people. And so it's very important to put safety first. But it's like a dance, a little too much restrictions of bureaucracy can hamper the flourishing of science, a little too little of that can get some crazy scientists to start doing unethical experiments. Okay. That said, NASA and just space flight in general is sort of famously very, very risk averse..

NSF NASA
"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"But looking back at 2021, some of the podcasts that we were able to share with our research was we did one we covered ethical AI frameworks and we did a podcast on the state of ethical AI frameworks. So what we did was we analyzed about 60 plus different frameworks and long story short, I'm sure you're not surprised these came from multinational organizations, different countries, different companies, different agencies within different companies. Different countries as well. So not just the country specifically, but Jake, for example, did one, the joint AI center, the NSF did one as well. So we looked at all of these. And no surprise. It's not apples to apples in the language that they use. And it can be quite difficult to look at one and interpret that and compare it to another. So we broke it down. We normalized the language and we were really able to give a good comparison as to what they are actually trying to say and areas that they excelled in areas where they lacked and we thought that they needed to focus on a little bit more. Yeah. So we're definitely going to spend a lot more time on this in 2022, mainly because the market research and the insights into the market are very relevant to where AI is and where AI is heading. And I think, honestly, it provides a lot of realism into what we're doing. We're going to be much more specific in terms of looking at specific corners. Yeah, we talked about data lab. And we'll talk about that again, mainly because we have a report coming a research snapshot actually coming out on that very shortly. But we're also looking at things like AI and sales and marketing and AI and content production and AI even in legal and real estate and also the AI enabling technologies conversational where are we with NLP systems? We're already with computer vision systems, where are we with all that sort of stuff? One of the things that we've been tracking more in our research as mentioned Kathleen mentioned were well over 20,000 vendors covered. We're also tracking what's happening in open-source. Analysts have traditionally not covered open-source because they're not vendors. They don't have marketing teams and things like that. But we do because they are credible alternatives. And credible solutions for folks looking for a solution, right? And so we talk a little bit about what's happening there. We'll spend some time on that as well. So that's a little forecast we will do more of that in the next podcast episode so I don't want to get into too much into that. But I would say in terms of 2021, the biggest thing we realized is that people still need those fundamentals. Whether it's tracking what's happening on the legal front, in terms of laws and regulations, we did that. And one of the podcasts in 2021, we also did in our research, although we didn't really spend too much time on the podcast as we took a look at a country by a country where our countries with their AI strategies..

AI center NSF Jake Kathleen
"nsf" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Now. A couple of questions. I have here for you one. Is you guys are operating this business. And i would say that it is. It is disruptive what you're doing from what i can tell. The brand seems to be disruptive. What do you accredit the the rapid growth to do. What do you attribute the rapid growth to why is it. Being such a disruptive success. I would say there's more people coming to the category now right so there's certain people that would never try an energy drink right that more health conscious consumer really was not interested in putting in other bodies some of these beverages that had you know some you know ingredients that you can't even pronounce so as more people. Are you know looking for energy solutions. Whether it's a coffee drinker. That wants something. A little bit cleaner lighter Or you know somebody that might be drinking other energy drinks but is trying to live a healthier lifestyle. You know. i think that's really where the disruption comes in also. There's never really been a brand that you know was built in the locker room in this energy category right so you know. We're really fortunate that Death net recently featured us as a sports drink. Innovator we're not really a sports drink. We're not a hydration drink or something that you might take Before you want to do some exercise or if you wanna just have a little bit more energy and focus throughout the workday but you wanna have it with clean healthy ingredients and you know the other reason why people might consider us to be somewhat. Disruptors is just because of you know this athlete a model. there really haven't been athletes like saquon. Barkley labonte david kawhi leonard and now kendall tool who's one of the top peleton athletes That are joining a company like ours as shareholders and partners in the business. I think it's just you know shedding some light that there is renovation innovation in the energy category and that's where we could probably be looked at as being somewhat

Catterson quan barkley beijing Leonard nsf Nsf nba nfl baseball Gnc leonard Cbs california
"nsf" Discussed on Around the House with Eric G®

Around the House with Eric G®

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Around the House with Eric G®

"Been going on the show even in some of our funny posts during the week including our boot giveaway which you can find over at around the house. Online dot com. You guys boots are awesome awesome. They are hip and cool. It's slip on boot especially for the ladies the ladies can win men it's men and women's all unisex and it's a slip-on really great work boot. It's it looks almost like a cowboy. Boot i would say but not like you know. Doesn't the cowboy design but that's from our friends over inside from last week's show and also what you forgot to mention. We have an older white. Remember around the house. So it's not my instagram page. It's the whose instagram page. Which are building out. So it's just not the eric g posts. It's the eric g and caroline be posts. So we've got that over there and we're getting a lot of people are going to all these new people joining us and the a lot of Corporate corporate products. And then of course fan. So please join us. Look for us on instagram. Our little cartoon characters are are are summonsing. You in that's awesome. Well we've been talking a whole appliances because there's a lot of maintenance you need to do to these things to keep them working on top order and you know. This is the debate. I think out of anything in the house. Well the next segment. We'll have here as well but this is a big one here. One of the big top ones front-load machine versus top load washing machine and caroline. I are on different camps on this one hundred percent. I think we agree though when you need to get a unit and a motor is only good if it's got a stainless steel toe on the inside and a stainless steel outta and that's the same with the front loader. Would you agree. We're both in cahoots on that one. Yeah we're in that same. Yeah we're on the same thing so remember everyone to drums. There's two drums and they're not just drum. You look into when you look into. Put your laundry in the basket. That's one drum but then underneath. There's another basket underneath that. You can't see that can get off funky especially especially if it's plastic. Now i will make a prediction here. I would bet and a year from now. We will see an announcement from energy star that will eliminate the sale of top load washing machines. I think that is our next our next hurdle that you're gonna see out. There is that they were gonna do it here. And we don't get into politics on this show but the previous administration had stopped that from starting to happen. They were getting ready to do that. You know like three. And a half years ago. And i think with the current administration we will see those energy star. Things come back. They've already backed off the one that was on the the. Why the dishwasher. And we'll debate that one here in a little bit but that is the That one got backed off. So i think in the next year we will see a formal announcement from energy star that they are going to make the standards where you can't sell a brand new top load washing machine so if you're a fan of top loads make sure you go out and get the good one you're gonna have because they'll still sell parts but there's gonna be begin to a point there where you probably won't be able to do that. They did that in europe twenty years ago. That's why the us is one of the only places that you can get a toppling the issue right so when we talk zero energy and we talk energy efficiency we lose things we know we lose it in building and we lose things and appliances and one of the biggest factors is from an allergy standpoint. If that washer is not getting up over one hundred forty degrees in temperature you will not kill dust mites. You will not kill mold. You will knock. You'll get rid of proteins and your clothing becomes less sanitized. So that is a huge issue. That temperature in your washer. And how you do this as you take a meet. The monitor and when that water is coming out now. I don't know how you do this on a front loader. So i'd be interested to know but a top leader. You can run. Take your meat thermometer underneath the water coming out. If it's not reaching one hundred forty degrees you either have to go over to the water heater and increase the tap. Because what they did is they. Kind of put a i guess. It's an energy efficient system on the top loader. Eric where they don't let it get that hot and so that's not you're reaching that point so but then you've got gotta worry about if you have kids and stuff with the water coming out of the tax so we get that but you need to have that water up in a washer at one hundred forty. So what would you say. How can you test it on a front loader. Can you test that. Water is our way to do it. I would test on the drain cycle. I'd go back and at pull the machine out. Run it through and when it goes to drain i would put a thermometer and test the water coming out of the unit to see how colder hottest and that way you kind of have an idea what it is now. I've got a washing machine. That has a heating element on the inside. So that also takes care of that that if it has cool to cool water for michael it will actually heat the water up to that. So it's safer for the kids and it will actually heat the water up to To get to that warmer temperature. She don't have to set your your water heater to that one hundred and forty degrees if you've got kids in the house so it's kind of heating at though because of energy efficiency they may not be getting it up to one forty. One forty is the sanitizing temp that you need to clean your bedding dust mites all that stuff right. That doesn't mean that the washing machine companies or energy star is agreeing with that right. That's what we know as a microbiologist. What the what the temp needs to be. I believe mine is because it's an nsf cycle online. So i'm gonna assume since it's got that nsf rating on it that it's going to get you up to that thing. Dishwashers what it is. Yes so that's the national sanitation foundation. You i saw that on. Dishwashers where you'd see that. Nsf cycle so when you went through the dishwasher in the the final rinse it would get up above hundred forty degrees. It would heat the water in the unit and run it for a certain period of time to sanitize everything inside of that. This has that function as well lot of the new washing machines that are frontloaded to have that because they've actually put a heating element inside is efficient. Well you know you're using one hundred ten to heat. You know lecture city heated so it's not the most efficient heat but you're trying to change that water ten or fifteen or twenty degrees so it's not a a huge difference kind of like your coffee maker. You're not trying to eat a ton of water but it does do it. And so that's one way to look at so we've got to have the temp up high enough in these units to sanitize. Because that's important you also want to make sure stainless steel no plastics because the plastics will hold onto mold debris growth bacteria. All that starts to grow on that inner tub not stainless steel Examine so agitator verse. Non agitators so tell them you know. I'm from that old school where i feel like the agitator allows things to kind of it. Beats up your clothes right. That's what we're were saying. If you put a shirt and you'll get four years out of it in a front loader versus a top loader with an agitator but i feel like agitator kind of stimulates the.

eric g caroline allergy nsf national sanitation foundation europe Eric us michael
"nsf" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Switch4Good

"I don't know if any of you guys people who compete. But i think he's the best human on the planet He is just an extraordinary person. We fell in love like immediately and within a month of us starting dating. He was already talking about marriage. And i hadn't really told him alka lupus and it wasn't because i was hiding it swear it was just you know you meet a really hot guy. You don't leave with the lupus story. Hey guess would you know we talked about music and dancing and our favorite you know hobbies and movies and we had the same movie at the time it was fireman and the matrix ultimate handout right. I'm showing how old i am. Here of knows occurred movies. I and so will when he talked about marriage though. I had to tell him you know. Listen i have this disease. i'm not gonna live a long life. I am going to become disabled before i died. Young age you're gonna end up having to take care of me up to get the tissues out already. I get tell you. I'm not you're gonna have to take care of me would become disabled and at twenty years old. This is not exactly the romantic answer. To a puzzle that most are looking for and he he didn't even hesitate. He says that he felt like minutes went by while he was panicking in his head. There was it was barely a heartbeat. And he just said rather live a short life with you than a lifetime with anybody else and it'll just be the best damn life you could ever have nsf. We'll get married a so. That's really where things are gonna change for me because really it was all bandy. My husband is known as one of the top atlas experts in the world. He says celebrity trainer and at the time she was working with. Mtv he would train people from mtv who you know. They've been drinking too much and they need a six pack in three weeks. They call him..

nsf mtv
"nsf" Discussed on John Bartolo Show

John Bartolo Show

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on John Bartolo Show

"Nsf or any of those organizations uscc pick them could get their head out of their ass to figure out guys like you're impart my french but Could get get their act together. A little bit to see that guys like you could add value to the conversation within the industry and i'm talking about at a thousand feet right now. Getting to the greater issue of course is a whole separate thing but you would think you could rely on your own industry to amplify your thing and you can't unfortunately and this is you know as much as i try to keep it away from being a political issue it is partly political and then when you start talking about mandates and political Some people get hesitant to to be involved with it. Well the problem is right now. Brennan in the and and again i. I'm coming off a little bit of a bad mood the other day. So i'm gonna. I'm gonna i'm gonna pray you have so many loppers coming into even the republican side of the party right now. There's people running and district's they ain't gonna win. There's people running just for for social media. Clout there's people jumping on the maga- trained jumping on this and i think that that's great but the problem is who can you trust. That's going to support you. Help you move your message forward like you said you get calls from political people. Are they trying to capitalize on. Just your clout. You see where i'm going with this. There's a lot of that and you're right. I definitely you know people seeing how large the moving is grown and people of course want to be a part of that will give their name attention. But i'll be. I'm paying very close attention to that personally and who is actually reaching out to me and like listen. This is the cause. I'm going after here. You know it's more black and white no more gains straight. No more republican democrat americans and americans to have the freedom to choose so you need to be in line with you know my message here..

Nsf Brennan
"nsf" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

Motor1.com Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Motor1.com Podcast

"Debuts that i've been waiting for i kinda wish nissan would have made it a little bit different from their prototype from the z. Proto because i'm fine. It's it's i mean it's pretty much z. Proto channels though in a way like okay. Let's look at subaru. What they do they make a concept that looks drop dead sexy you look at your say make that and then they come out with something completely different. And you're like why didn't you make it look like the concept. I prefer the opposite. Show me show me something. Looks close and then you know massage it to be roadworthy and give it to me. That's just me it's stolen opinion. Yeah yeah i. I guess it depends on the car itself. And maybe i'm saying that this time around because when the z pro came out was like okay. That's a concept. There are lots of things i like about other things. I don't hopefully. They'll fix things that i don't like and they didn't change anything named them that that front. That's still kind of bugged. I am told by quite a few people that have seen it in person that it does look better in person so i will reserve further judgment on that until they get a chance to see it in person and oh yes i will see it in person about that one. Yeah i look forward to seeing it to how. 'bout the how the accurate ns because that's the best debuted yep I mean the the nissan debuted here just yesterday i days ago. Whatever a few days ago as you're listening to the podcast. It debuted on on tuesday august seventeenth. So that's going to be a few days after this podcast comes out but accurate antics type. S was a few days before that. And we're going to talk about that. Right now bruce is you wrote this up. I can pull up some photos. If you wanna talk about this for listening to this one off the dome more or less you wanna you wanna go for it because yeah yeah so. We talked about this with clint. Because we knew it was coming. Obviously we knew this was a thing that was going to happen. We didn't really know that much about it And for anyone watching on youtube you'll see kind of the the hero shot of here and i think it looks. It looks great by the way that some people don't like the the new knows the the updated knows they gave it and if people are thank you we agree. I mean if anything. It's a little if anything. It's a little too edgy. I think that's fantastic. I would prefer a little more symmetry with some of those angles. But it's a minor. Gripe yeah i think it looks. I think it looks very mean. I think it looks very aggressive. I think it's a fitting is the fitting way to send the ns x. Into the sunset so this is a one year only model. They're going to make three hundred fifty of them. Three hundred of those are going to be for the united states which kinda suggests to me that maybe the new nsf never kinda got traction outside of the us or maybe it's because it's built here. I don't know but it's interesting to me that the vast majority are going to be for the united states rather than outside of the united states. The big kind of the headline feature is that it does have a power upgrade. It's going to be making six hundred horsepower. Four hundred ninety two pound feet of torque. That's up over five seventy three horsepower and four hundred seventy six thousand feet or the standard Also you're going to be able to get an optional lightweight package that's going to reduce weight by just about fifty pounds which is not a lot but you know it's it's you on diet after eight months. You know it's something it's not. It's not nothing And that is going to add what so. The standard version is going to be one hundred and sixty nine thousand one hundred sixty nine five hundred dollars and with the lightweight package.

nissan clint united states bruce youtube nsf
How America Spent Trillions and Trained the Taliban To Grow Stronger

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:24 min | 1 year ago

How America Spent Trillions and Trained the Taliban To Grow Stronger

"Was on it to visit afghanistan. Just five years after nine eleven i traveled to four different provinces to see what was going on and at the end of my tour of the provinces i ended up back in kabul at the isaf headquarters then i was taken from the isaf. The international security force to the military academy america built in afghanistan and i was very impressed by the young officer. Who was my chaperone. Who was my briefer straight out of central casting. Six foot one blonde fit and his name taps had strong. Yeah major strong belief it on may strong briefed me gave me the command group briefing on the success of the afghan miniature academy america built along with her nato partners and it was really very impressive. I mean you know. I'm used to death by pipe. Powerpoint having spent six and a half seven years as a dod civilian and then on the faculty of the marine corps universities. Five seen a lot of powerpoint presentations in the military mode. But this was a good one. How much was invested each year. How many nco's how. Many offices were passed out from our training academy to become members of the afghan national security forces. But then i decided to dig a little deeper. Not just to take the word of the official power points. I sniffed around in a little bit to find out. What is the true impact of what we had done. In that nation a nation that the british couldn't conquer the soviets couldn't come come from the blue eyed redhead. White skinned afghans. Find find today. not alexander could conquer. Yeah they do exist. It's really quite something to say in the middle of herat in the middle of water that province. A caucasian redhead with colleagues. You would see in dublin as much as you'd see anywhere else. What did we think we're going to achieve just one metric for you. I found out of every passing out plus every intake of offices junior. Nco's senior nco's that had gone through some form of training small unit tactics leadership. What have you that we had graduated off. They received their last per d. m. Pay in cash of course nice crisp green american dollars more than forty percent of them up. They passed out from our kademi disappeared from the ranks of the nsf from the ranks of the afghan machosky forces and went back to that tribal regions to join their local militias and their local offshoots of the taliban

Isaf International Security Force Afghanistan Afghan National Security Force Kabul America Nato Marine Corps Herat Alexander NCO Dublin NSF Taliban
"nsf" Discussed on Optimal Finance Daily

Optimal Finance Daily

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Optimal Finance Daily

"If your annual spend is forty thousand dollars and you plan to live by the four percent rule if you have a million dollars saved up. Don't by helicopter after you accumulate. More money is okay to let loose a little. I did this when i bought a fancy car. But you have to be careful here too. I thought the ns x. Would bring me happiness. And it didn't at least not the car itself. I did find that it was fun to hang out with other owners and i can hang out with fellow car people. Even if i don't happen to be driving a fancy car so that's my outlet. I get the fun of talking to like minded humans without the hassle of the car. The nsf x. Went to a new owner after basic needs are taken care of no matter how much money you have. It still a valid exercise to practice mindful spending and restraint. A recent trip reminded me of the importance of the latter point being in a hotel. We ate at restaurants every day. This quickly gets old and the appreciation for the experience goes out the window the first time it feels pretty great by the fifth meal. You feel bad. So what should mr couch do. My thought is that he should do whatever the heck wants. If i was in the situation. I probably keep the duct tape monstrosity to as long as the thing is comfortable. Who cares if people judge him. Based on the state of the furniture. Those people can go find friends with nicer couches. But i wouldn't judge someone with nice furniture either if you're houses in order and a five thousand dollar couch gives you joy go by it perhaps my main takeaway from this exercise is to not be judgmental. I've been guilty of this in the past and my thought now is this. Who am i to judge. Another humans choices. Their choices are accumulation of decades of experience. That i have no knowledge of you. Just listen to the post. Titled how i hired the best people in the world to make me rich in the couch cacophony. Both by mr fifteen hundred of fifteen hundred days dot com. Thank you to mr fifteen hundred. The.

nsf
"nsf" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"This is the green and I'm the publisher of Telecom reseller and today, I'm with Alan person at Elk. Overages, thank you for joining me, as always a happy to be here and so glad to be invited. As I also should add that. Alan not only works for Telco Bridges, but he's a very fine, bloggers of Telecom resellers for many years and people watch and read your articles on a monthly basis. But today, we're going to be talking about a special announcement that just occurred Telco. Bridges has announced that x two ends that has selected Telco Bridges Pro SBC for its satellite Gateway sites. So this is very interesting to us and we're going to be finding out a little bit more about it. But for folks who don't know about Telco Bridges, what is talc overages? Sure. What's all coverage is, is a technology company based in Montreal, is that about forty people who are focused on the media, Gateway and session border controller psychology that are used to interconnect telecommunications software or applications to to the public network. And companies going around since around, 2002 is privately-held and of great place to work. Now who is X2, NSF sure is a pistol, a Communications technology company that that offers Network integration and remote connectivity for businesses through their satellite Network page of a network integrator for satellite technology and they're based out in California, they were founded in nineteen ninety seven and they're headquartered. Yep. In Petaluma California. So why did they pick you guys? Yeah, it's great. So interesting. Yeah, a little bit of background about the challenges that they were facing and why do they pick us? And one of their lead Engineers was really challenged with trying to manage all the network truck. I can. Basically the architecture that they were aiming for was they have a pair of ground stations that consolidate all the, all the satellite Network traffic and then they have remote base stations that they put, for example, at a hospital. So, if a hospital wants to have a business continuity, they put a small antenna up on top of the satellite or I'm sorry on top of the hospital off the points up to the satellites. And then that connectivity is then both it's IP connectivity, so we can do their phone system. It can do their IP PBX, it could be maybe they're, you know, there email ma'am. These kinds of things can travel across the satellite, link. The other end of the link, of course, is this ground station. So they have, you know, many dozens of customers out of the remote site and all this traffic comes in to these ground stations and much of that traffic is voice traffic, and they.

Telco Bridges Alan Telco SBC Bridges Montreal NSF California Gateway Petaluma
"nsf" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"To be a better mom. She just was the woman that she knew she could be In her daily life and it just felt so so good and she knew that other out there could feel better so she is on a mission to improve sleep stress and sex in women's everyday lives as well as wealth. Yeah that's right. We'll get to that in a moment but their products are just top of the line. They are working with leading chemists and colorado based farm for all of their growing extraction and purification needs. And then all of the cd products from house of weiser organic there. Nsf certified cg mp which is good manufacturing practice And they are tested tested so much so they're tested for quality through a super robust third party procedure so really. They're holding their products to the same high standards that we hold ourselves so i want to recommend some products because they have to tell you and i league literally laugh for like so i'm out of the sex is do. Do you have any that. I could curl. The sex. dummies are absolutely not only delicious. But a truly work. They'd just enhance the experience. Whether you're by yourself or with a partner ingredients include horny goat weed. Extract maka root extract ashwell gonda And that all spectrum hand derive. Cbd in every single. Gummy bear yummy. Yummy keep them at your bedside. You will not be disappointed You know we take care of you guys I would also highly recommend their fleet. Drop so i put these under my tongue before bad. Keep running my tongue for like. I don't know thirty seconds. They're made of melatonin five milligrams of melatonin to promote that better sleep and twenty five milligrams of full spectrum hemp ride. Cbd in every single. Drop lastly. I just adore this brand. Because they are not only on a mission to help. Women feel their best but they have a give back components of they're partnering with the last prisoner project. said they are committed to an ongoing partnership with l. p. Dedicated to cannabis criminal justice reform..

ashwell gonda Nsf colorado
Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger: Taking the High Road

Squawk Pod

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Warren Buffett & Charlie Munger: Taking the High Road

"Warren buffett. And charlie munger have been business partners more than five decades. We were sort of made for each other. We've never had an argument in this whole time. We are strong minded in that time. The pair have built berkshires. Unique portfolio companies brands like the nsf. Railway geico duracell see's candies and basically left them alone. The way to get a good partner was to be a good partner and these are very effective ideas and they just work so fabulously well and they worked so well at berkshire. I caught up with squawk box. Anchor becky quick. Hi how are you. I'm good how are you over. Zoom about the buffett. Munger magic neither one of them ever really wanted to work for bosses or have a boss or work in corporate culture. They both said that they wouldn't survive it. They'd get fired. And i think that's why berkshire is the way that it is. They like to let people have their autonomy. They like to let the. They've got more than sixty businesses that they own outright and they let the managers run those businesses for a company that is now one of the ten biggest companies in the world by market capitalization. It's an incredibly decentralized organization. I mean there's twenty five people at the headquarters in omaha which by the way they don't even have a building that they run their corporate headquarters out of they. They lease a couple of floors from somebody else. And that's where the whole thing's run run from. If i were to tell you the details of this you'd think it was a scam. You know that. I'm going to tell you about one of the ten largest companies in the world. That's run out of these. Two floors in our mohammed. Twenty five people Okay yeah where. Where's the bridge that you want to sell me on top of that right.

Railway Geico Duracell Becky Quick Charlie Munger Warren Buffett NSF Munger Berkshire Omaha Mohammed
"nsf" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Not gooey ulysses memorial way. That i like i said it'd be look at the nsf valiant and also recited re so that i believe god donovan dc or lateran jeter. Audibly him you martinez had a bustle. Overly will hit bubba in your new you. Under rita mother ada came out of a machine. Dibaba deland dependence by at sea. Empress assault victim has seen other kamamba ultra ultra-secret forever ago republican roy moore that they'll your title. I'll go look for l. Mini turn into your host server. Okay.

ulysses memorial donovan dc lateran jeter Dibaba deland nsf martinez rita ada roy moore
"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"That those resources can be can be made available to the to the community and to the public at large Broadly written as well so so there. Is you know there are. There was an administration transition absolutely. But i think that it's fair to say that i End in sort of these emerging technology areas continue to be pervasive areas of interest irrespective of Democrat republican irrespective of party in these areas. That we're all seeing as ones that are going to help shape. Us competitiveness and competitiveness on a global stage for years and years to come in so we continue to be focused on those all right. Well that's great to hear. I know that some people are keeping an eye on that and it's nice to hear that it's a it continues to be driver in the government and that you know people are paying attention to it and focusing on it so you know this. Podcast has been incredible. It's provided some great insights. I always love when you bring in Use cases and you brought in a lot of them on various ways that national science foundation is funding different initiatives. And helping the youth. So thank you for that. But i'd like to end this podcast with the final question that we ask all of our guests because i always love to hear the varied answers that we get as a final note. What do you believe the future of. Ai is in general and its application to governments organizations and beyond while it's a great question kathleen so i'll say an perhaps it's not surprising given my role at nsf. ics as having a clear pressing need to invest in fundamental research to ensure that our ai systems are to ensure the us leadership in artificial intelligence and data science and automated systems. Going forward and and i guess one of the things. I briefly touched on in an earlier question that you pose to come back to ensuring that we design these systems fairly and we're cognizant of any bias these that are introduced into these systems that affect the outputs of these systems. I think increasingly that is.

kathleen Democrat one science years republican
"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"nsf" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"Of fair. Where we still as a society reconciling with what that definition of fairness like we have some investments in basic research by the way out of nsf. That are that are looking at at this very issue as speak so. I think that there are a whole stream of opportunities in the public sector a where we have the ability to predicting flight delays for example. That's another one that Has been talked about a bid particularly in the context of of weather events or other kinds of situations that might present themselves. So i think there's a tremendous opportunity with respect to how we can really leverage based approaches to be able to Advanced whole range of sectors are supported by the federal government from agriculture to healthcare. And beyond. I'll give you one example of something that we're doing internally within the national science foundation because i think it's it's germane to this notion of judge. How do we develop approaches. That can save save time and make us more efficient and effective really focusing on higher order tasks and so for the last year so We have Actually deployed a capability. That allows us to leverage the treasure trove of data that we have within our organization about awards that we've made research awards that we made over the years to try to automate. What is one of the most time. Intensive processes for our workforce which is trying to identify qualified reviewers for the many research proposals that we received so just as a little bit of detail on this every year. nsf receives about fifty thousand proposals for the research. Community in our job is to bring in outside experts. Who are not conflicted with those puzzles folks. Who wrote proposals reviewing their own proposals. So they can't be conflicted with those proposals but we want them to lend their subject matter expertise and provide us with reviews so that they can form which projects we ought to be funding once the best science. That's gonna have the most transformative in going forward that we should be funding will finding those reviewers particularly folks who have the right expertise for given set of proposals at are not conflicted with them is very difficult. Is sometimes trying to find a needle in a haystack. Because you might have thousand proposals in an area and you're trying to figure out who's not conflicted and yet who has the expertise of and yet at the same time will have within our enterprise systems within the foundation. All the awards all the grants in agreement that we've issued over the years and so what we've done over the last couple of years is deploy a tool on a pilot basis that does some natural language processing it allows us to be able to match new proposal with past awards as well as with journal articles in public databases and other resources. That are out there so that we can potentially surface reviewers for our staff were leading the review process and so that that that innovation right can free up a significant amount of time for the staff that can allow them to think about higher order task. What are the higher order. Research areas that we should be investing in as agency. What are the gaps in the research spaces that were funding that we should be potentially exploring. Those are the types of questions that we'd love to have our phd trained scientists and engineers focused on within the foundation in this tool allows us to be able to relieve some of the time intensive pressures that they face on a day-to-day basis. Just executing their job. So that's an illustration to think of how we're seeing opportunity and potential but we also..

last year one example about fifty thousand one thousand last couple
Interview With Erwin Gianchandani, Deputy Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Erwin Gianchandani, Deputy Assistant Director, National Science Foundation

"And we're fortunate to have with us today. Irwin gancheng donny. Deputy assistant director computer and information science and engineering at the national science foundation. So high irwin and thanks so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for having me a pleasure to be here. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background your current role at national science foundation. I know you've recently taken on an additional one as well and maybe just explain what. The national science foundation is for some of our listeners. That may not be familiar with it. Sure happy to do that again. For having me kathleen in ron. It's a pleasure to be on this podcast today. So as you said Money and for the last five and a half years or so. I have served as the deputy for the computer and information science and engineering director at the national science foundation. So you might hear me over the course of this podcast Accidentally say size ci se. That's short for the acronym of art director the computing and information science engineering director. And as you sort of alluded to kathleen in the last few months. I've actually gone on detail to the office of the director of the national science foundation. Serving as an acting senior adviser there specifically focused on translation innovation in partnership. So i'm coming to you really Perspective in this podcast today. But i've taken on sedition role in a package sale of more about bad if the opportunity presents itself to So as you may know as some of your listeners may know the national science foundation is really a research funding agency within the federal government so in particular we support research and education in all areas of science and engineering from astronomy to biology chemistry to mathematics. Physics social won't be april sciences as well really any discipline of science and engineering and technology and mathematics and is a funder of that in the federal government. Now we have a vast. We have a budget of about eight point. Five billion dollars in the current fiscal year fiscal year twenty twenty one and the vast vast majority of about ninety three percent goes out the door in the form of grants cooperative agreements primarily to colleges and universities throughout the us but some also small businesses. That are just starting up as well

National Science Foundation Irwin Gancheng Donny Computer And Information Scien Kathleen Irwin RON Federal Government United States
Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:56 min | 2 years ago

Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

"The managing director equity initiatives for koya partners melissa is responsible for ensuring that quiz commitment to diversity equity and inclusion is infused into every aspect of the firms work with clients candidates staff in leading this work. Melissa applies experience as search leader for numerous organizations as well as for background in social work in staff development prior to this role melissa served as managing director equity executive search with partners primarily focusing on identifying senior leaders for social justice organizations melissa lead or co-lead executive searches for organizations including innocence project diaz community changed foundation for justice society move on southern poverty law center and hentrich martin institute though her earlier nonprofit through her earlier nonprofit work melissa developed a deep understanding of variety of nonprofit roles and organization cultures prior to joining coy in twenty fifteen. She held positions with unicef. Usa safe horizon and cities of service. She also served as a founding core member and program manager with city year. New york melissa serves on the advisory council of equity in the center a national initiative dedicated to creating a more diverse equitable social sector talent pipeline. She actively volunteers time to provide coaching and mentorship to leaders of color and members of the lgbtq plus community. Melissa holds a masters of social work from the school social policy and practice at the university of pennsylvania and she earned her b a human services and theater performance from northeastern university. Well listen thank you very much for joining us and sharing your insights today. Thanks so much for having me john. It's great to be with you. So folks are drew bio and is one of the things. I just love about people in search. There doesn't seem to be. Maybe there's a degree in it but i very infrequently talked to someone who has such a thing my friend. Derek clarke failed. Who from dri who also been a podcast. Guest runs another search firm. She's an ordained. Rabbi every search leader seems to have this kind of wacky wildly diverse backgrounds. So how did your professional path leader to search. Please don't leave out. How cedar performance visit scrape up. Dick place for the start and especially i love. Dr and i agree similar to her and said lord is so many people in search we. You know it's it's things that line us up for this work even though we have no idea and then all of the sudden one day it's the only thing that we can do and so funny thing. It's actually a funny thing. Because i don't i mean maybe there are lots of other professional You know sort of professional career paths. That are like that. But this one seems uniquely wacky in that way definitely definitely and i think it's people think about what their superpowers might superpower. I rarely the smartest person in room. Sometimes the most interesting but what. My superpower is figuring out who the smartest in who are the most interesting people aren't any room and then introducing them to each other and just so you just shared my bio. I've had the chance to be in so many different types of organizations then community based work and national work in global work and in different parts of the organizations mostly in development but also on the program side in operations i. I'm social worker by training as you said i've got this theater background. Which is an interesting and so when it gets down to it. I love talking to people. I loved networking. I love having genuine and authentic relationships and seeing how i can be a resource folks and i was extremely extremely lucky and fortunate when i was at you at nsf usa to have Onondaga as my leader. When i was there and he was a believer. Not you know him. Joan of stu. He believed in creating ten percent of everyone on his team's time to carve out for them to do other work something. That benefited the organization. In some other. Way wow yeah. And and that's unusual. Especially considering he was leading development team and so what we found was that i love recruiting. And i liked going out and talking to people and letting them get to know unicef usa and in so. I was having a great time doing that. But it wasn't. My core job is really a fundraiser. And it was just threw a perfect stroke of fate that i was introduced to katy baton. Who's the founder of partners and she talked to me about what her vision was the work that clay was doing. She talked to me about her values and just as she talked to me about. I had no idea what an enormous sector the search field is and how many variations exist of nonprofit search professionals. But i i just decided that this is what i needed to do

Melissa Koya Partners Melissa Lead Or Co Diaz Community Changed Foundat Hentrich Martin Institute Council Of Equity Derek Clarke Southern Poverty Law Center Unicef Northeastern University USA University Of Pennsylvania DRI Rabbi New York Dick John Onondaga NSF
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
"nsf" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"What's something right now that you're really excited about what is e t c. Labs doing to You know add new additions to the theory. Am classic blockchain protocol. Sure we're actually doing odd up both on the technical so we have a team working on the protocol. Were building different. Features like trace. Ap i so that it's easier for exchanges and others to assert Batches of transactions We've just implemented a new network security feature that will prevent fifty-one percent attacks We have a touring team. That's working on a signatory tools and a wallets and other more user oriented features that will make it easier to use the bob jane. Anne have complete control over your assets and then we have our accelerated where we give grant funding. We provide investment and support early stage chain projects that will looking to bill Either on top of their class. Berthier or addressed large universal problems in blockchain. One example is a prescription which is an organ projects that using boxing to increase access to health care Another ping needed providing microloans are merrily in east africa These these early projects. They're promising projects and they're using the technology in a way that we've been innovative and sustainable. Can you say a little bit more about this application for healthcare like what is it that These people who are building the application are sort of doing for healthcare and who does it benefit short. It's called prescriptive. They're primarily based in latin america. And what they do is make it easier for people to access and Keep a record of their medical prescriptions. Which you know is is difficult in any environment And in some ways it's a good use for the blockchain because of the supply chain characteristics and also because of the recordkeeping that that it allows and this is something that we think will solve the fundamental problem and is solving a fundamental problem. It's a it's an interesting project. They were recently given an award by newsweek. As a as a promising startup. we're introduced to them through our partnership with unicef innovation where they went through the nsf innovation incubator and we provided follow on funding We think it's a good project and have you and then Yeah that's i mean like it's great to hear that people are actually Building real live products for things that have you know at least within the space of always been a buzzword for you know a killer use case right you know medical records or in this case Records of one's prescriptions and said so. It's great to hear that people You know whatever chain. They're sort of building on. But especially in this case of for during classics right. It's great to hear the people are actually Trying to you know get this idea of Supply chain and Identity records on an immutable. ledger You had also mentioned that people in east africa were making use of lending and borrowing Applications right This this this sort of gets me thinking about defy right where sort of blockchain's in the integration of smart contracts on blockchain's are being used to Allow a more inclusive group of people to take part in the You know the traditional aspects of banking like lending and borrowing but maybe before we get into philosophical discussion about sort of right making that open to a certain people who may not have before been In a position to access it maybe you can say for now what. Atc blockchain is Do for defy. is there any thing going on..

bob jane Berthier blockchain east africa Anne boxing latin america newsweek unicef nsf
"nsf" Discussed on Pool Pro Podcast

Pool Pro Podcast

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"nsf" Discussed on Pool Pro Podcast

"Alternatives non-alternative. It's not a replacement and it is a supplemental sanitizer. It can be useful in some situations the other thing about living organisms. Uv doesn't technically kill them dead the answer. It's it's it's a fun thing. Wrap your head around. So we use the term inactivate. Uv inactivates bacteria. So if we think about how we kill bugs as really two ways to kill bugs one is to blow him up and the other is to lead them out so loading them up is basically what high concentrations of ozone do that oxidative reaction just causes that that outer outer shell of the bacteria whether it's assisted whether it's a normal gram negative bacterial organism. It just basically bursts it. There's such an oxidative reaction occurring. Think about when you pour peroxide onto a cotton see that fizzing bacteria dying. That's the peroxide reacting with the proteins in your blood. But the same thing happens when ozone reacts with bacteria basically blows it and then if you use chemicals like courts you know backwards so things like that. That's a license action. So there's a particular brand of disinfectant. We've all used at some point now. Lives it's cold. Lysol that name comes from licensing and licensing is basically the concept of chemicals swords puncturing the outer layer of the bacterial organism and it bleeds out in a dis. So blow him up. Bleed them out. But then ultraviolet comes along and it's a little different it disrupts the dna of the bacteria and so it actually think that like you've got a a ribbon of dna that this helix dna and you've got your various codes in the dna and it actually destroys some of the pieces in that demand and destroy so many that the bacteria essentially stops being able to do anything it cannot reproduce and that this works with lg works with a host of other things and facts just about anything that you expose long enough to ultraviolet light will eventually be inactivated so think about hanging laundry out in the sun those of assault. That are old enough before we fires all the time a hanging laundry out in the sun. It smells good. And that's because that bacteria got killed by the ultraviolet radiation from the sun. And so we're inactivating bacteria with you the but we can't use it as you very well put. We can't use it as an alternative to corinne it's secondary it's an augmentation to chlorine residual 'cause you you've only good while it can see stuff so for that half a second that that water water flowing one hundred gallons of minutes or pool you've got maybe maybe half a second contact time on a good day. I don't think. I trust my health and safety to that half a second contact time and that's why. Nsf doesn't trust you and so even an innocent fifty certified uv system does not give you a free. Pass to use that as a primary disinfectant and especially win. It's beyond you and your family and your in a public environment or hospitality environment if if other people who depend on you too good job and you don't people.

lg Nsf
AI in the US Federal Government  Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:51 min | 2 years ago

AI in the US Federal Government Interview with Suzette Kent, US Federal CIO

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh. I'm your host Ronald Schmoozer. Our guest today is who's that. Who's the federal chief information officer of the United States? Hi thank you so much for joining us on today. Well thank you Kathleen. Nice to join you. Yeah welcome Suzanne and thanks for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role as Federal Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan through that Canon. The federal chief information officer and that role. I have the our pleasure of working with all the agencies of the Federal Government Executive Branch. And how we use technology. That's both the policies as well as a looking at how agencies actually perform against those policies and intense. So it's an exciting face because the most important thing is how we use technology to serve mission and I came to the federal government after almost thirty in industry most of that in financial services show when we think about many concepts particularly around. Hey I for use of delivering services to citizens the importance of privacy and transparency and ethics. Many of those things were part of my career in the private sector so happy to join you today really excited about this topic. Because it's one of the things that as I look across. All the technology areas that are part of the role of the Federal Cio. The opportunities here and the come in across the agencies is really important in this area. You know that's really great because you know. Artificial intelligence is a transformative. Technology is transforming industry and society and governments across the board. It's part of what we've been really thrilled to cover as part of our now hundred forty or so episodes of today plus all of our research. So it's really exciting to see that the federal government United States has made a priority. So where do you see federal agencies today in their adoption? That's a great question Ron and I actually think it's across the board and I'll share some examples of what I mean by that but I'm GonNa Start with emphasizing the way you open the question investment in a I both in private sector and in use inside. The federal government is a priority of this administration and there have been multiple statements and commitments about that and most of the examples and things that I'm going to share. Obviously were about what we're doing inside the federal government and what agencies are doing but but your question I see it across the board and what I mean by that is some agencies like Department of Energy and Dod Nath. Nsf COMMERCE HHS. They're more than and they range from. Having formal focus business units and teen data curation expanded infrastructure in a multitude of projects and investments. And their own you know high performance computing capabilities and other agencies like va PSA labor transportation and interior. They may be in a little different place. And maybe in some cases not as mature across that entire spectrum of investments but they have targeted mission project. They've pilot initiatives they're driving maturity of data capabilities their computer capabilities and workforce skills development and of course every single agency has opportunity to use a AI as it's embedded in many of the products that we're getting from our commercial vendor partners so they're bringing in elements of Automation Analytical Advancement. Hey I and some of those mature data use capabilities as we leveraged commercially available product. So that kind of a broad spectrum across all the agencies yeah that's a really good overview and I know that for our listeners who have been following us for quite some time we've interviewed various leaders from government and I think that every agency does have their own adoption and maturity but it's really nice and refreshing to see that everybody is working towards that. I know that the United States also wants to train an AI. Ready Workforce as we continue to bring ai into every aspect of our lives. It's important that we have a workforce that's able to feel comfortable and work with and Bill. So can you share with us what that means to have an AI? Ready Workforce how the US government plans to get a already workforce. And maybe what? Some of the long term projections are for this type of training. This is one of your questions that I was most excited about and so I will do bear with me kind of for a longer answer on this because an angry ready workforce is really a big statement. It's an important commitment as well because the goal extends beyond the technical workforce to our entire workforce the missions face and how we interact with the American people. What makes a difference technology versus? Some of the things that we've seen in history is that this is really driving a paradigm shift and what I mean. By that is many of her legacy technologies. They captured aided they move data. They store it. They present it but largely the State Action John Interpretations for she'll done by people and as we look at a I the human land and people at interpretation. Does it change but the capacity and the capabilities that we have changed significantly. And I'll give you an example of shared in the past one of the things I was very excited about. It was one of my favorite simulations that combine weather data transportation data power grid data labor and Commerce data to answer really complex question or a simple question with a lot of complex factors as. Where's the optimal placement response teams during the hurricane? So you had to look at kind of. Where is the weather impact can be made? And what the impact of water and wind on road power. Where would people be they somewhere? They worked in where they live. And that makes us think differently about all the people who have to be involved in building that capability beyond technicians deep mission expert individuals who understand implications of the mission. And so with that kind of long answer. I'll take it a second step and then talk about actual training. I was recently visiting one of our university chains who are recipients from some federal grant. Ai and they were taking that scenario that I just mentioned to even further step by saying if we know what's going to happen. How can we recover faster? Where will there be treason degree that needs to be removed? And what is the workforce that we need to repair flood damage not only use the capabilities to minimize impact to speed up recovery? When you think about this type of scenario that fundamentally changes are end to end workforce those designing and developing from a technical stage. Those are part of the mission. The subject matter expertise in multiple kind of rings of impact that scenario so to train our workforce to leverage the powerful capabilities. We need not only but commitment from the technical side but mission operations in the business teams who understand and have the insight to help us identify e contract and reconstruct some of those complex interactions and in all of that for the citizens that were serving. We have to invest in the transparency in plain ability. Of how both that data and technology are being used so it is a very different approach to technical operational and service delivery and the way that we are looking at. The training is kind of end. Those different components hands on skill but literacy in. How a an information is used and heard the term Dev ops in development but how we empower our in the workforce through the business processes changes how we design and deliver the capabilities because we have to expand it throughout the entire business process from the genesis of the data to the experience of the end user. So that is somewhat of a long winded answer. That part of the transformational capability when you actually address the entire flow from end to end.

Federal Government United States AI Chief Information Officer Federal Government Executive B Kathleen Walsh Federal Cio Cio Berlin Kathleen Ryan Ronald Schmoozer Suzanne Canon RON Dod Nath Department Of Energy John Interpretations
The Third Wave of Robotic Learning with Ken Goldberg

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:37 min | 3 years ago

The Third Wave of Robotic Learning with Ken Goldberg

"All right everyone. I am on the line with Ken. Goldberg can is a professor of engineering at UC Berkeley. Ken Welcome to the TWAT podcast. Thank you pleasure to be here. It is great to finally get you on this show. We've been talking about this for a bit. You know I meant to ask you before we started last time you were. You mentioned you. Were working on a book. Maybe we'll get remembering that right. Well I think I'M I. I've been thinking about that for a while but I'm also thinking about an more right now an article. Okay okay. Well we'll We'll get to the article. I think I I came across you and some of your work in the context of decks net. I saw that at a Siemens Innovation Fair last year. I think we exchanged tweets and stuff like that. But you know I would really love for you to introduce yourself to the audience and share a little bit about your background and how you came into working in robotics and okay great. I well first since you mentioned twitter I should mention my twitter handle which is at Ken. Underscore Goldberg. And I've been trained very well. My daughter to post there at least one today so I've got the actually. I found it very interesting channel so so I am posting technical things as well as updates about things that are that are finding out which is the learning about which I find very useful. So my background is that I was. I went to University of Pennsylvania and then went to Carnegie Mellon for I was at USC for four years and then to Berkeley where I've been for now twenty five years for here. I RUN A lab. The we we call it the auto lab for Automation Science and Engineering and we have approximately thirty students doing research in there. And we're doing work. There's there's there's post graduate students and a good number of undergrads and we're also associated with other labs like the Berkeley Research Lab and the rise lab and citrus and other programs at Berkeley our particular labs interested in in in doing research on on robotics basically on algorithm ick approaches to robotics and specifically in last year's been focusing on learning methods for for imitation learning deep learning and reinforcement learning for control of robots in applications from grasping as you mentioned which is a primary want working on for for thirty five years to surgery surgical assistance Hugh assisting human surgeons for for robotics and home robots to especially for seniors and in who are who are who prefer to live at home and the last year is very new and we can talk about later is is agriculture and we have a new approach to poly culture farming that were exploring using deep learning so one thing that I thought was really interesting in looking at your bio is in spite of the fact that you are a highly accomplished robot assists you start your your body starts with Ken. Goldberg is an artist so art clearly must be very important to. You actually saw some sketches behind. You am curious. I'm curious about Ken as an artist. And you know how if all ties into your work. It's not the usual fare of this podcast but then I saw somewhere else. You are filmmaker as well Is that your art? Tell US okay. Well actually I wanted to be an artist when I was a kid and I I basically my mother said listen. You can be an artist after you become an engineer. So She she. She was very wise and I think it was. It was it was a good choice for me because actually love both art. Something that I take very seriously. I think it's often underrated by many people especially Engineers who think of it as as lightweight. It's actually just opposite trying to produce something that's meaningful in the art. World is extremely difficult and demanding. So I've spent a lot of time studying I have made a series of installations and projects. That almost always involve technology in some way. But they're also commenting on the role of technology in society. So probably best known pieces of project is a project called Tele Garden that my students and I set up in the very early very early years of the Internet. So it's nineteen ninety five that we we connected a industrial robot arm to the web interface at the time which was mosaic Browser and we built an interface. That would allow you from your screen from anywhere from your laptop There were no cellphones at the time. But you could. You could log in this thing I think. Yeah it was very fun project. We thought well. It's kind of curious. who would use it if anyone and we got thousands of people coming in and and moving the robot but the part of what was made. An artwork was the context because it was sitting inside a garden. A real physical gardens. We could plant in water seeds remotely and then we got tens of thousands and we estimate that over the time that product was was that robot was available online which is approximately nine years. It was visited over. Hundred thousand people participated in the in the project. That's awesome that's awesome again kind of the technology and are coming together rate. So that was the thing Sam because one of the ideas were said I. I don't think I would have pursued that if I just stuck with my research plans at the time but because this came out and offered a way to reach a at the time when I saw as potentially very broad audience I started putting effort into this then there was a fantastic team of students who worked on it. And then we are thrilled with the the idea that you could take a robot and you could put it into the hands essentially of potentially millions of people and then there were. There was a proof of concept the interface questions there it turned out that there were lots of interesting theoretical questions that came out of that so after that project we did a series of subsequent projects and then had an NSF grant to develop versions of this. We have a patent related to the south. Yeah it really grew into a whole new direction of research that that really started with our awesome awesome into tell us a little bit about your research interests nowadays more broadly. So we're still doing art and I can come back to that. There's a new contract. But the the the lab right now is been been very very focused on robot learning and especially as as I know your. Your listeners are very aware there's been huge revolution in the past decade. And so we've been. We're interested in this before the the advanced in deep learning started but now it really has become a huge focus for us so in particular. We have this been working robot grasping for many years and then went deep. Learning came out. We saw an opportunity to apply it. I can tell you that story if you if you like how we do it. Maybe start from the perspective of the grounding on the challenges associated with grasping like we see these pictures of whether they're rohbock robot hands or more industrial types of robots or prostheses. And you know a can grasp like we've seen we've all seen pictures of that but maybe it's harder than it looks or you know maybe the opportunities that have not figured out. Oh good okay so I can. I can answer that partly. I've realized only last few years that part of the reason I believe I went into this field was at myself as a kid was was incredibly clumsy. I still I still am. Anyone would throw me a ball I would drop it and so You know the last kid getting picked for any sports Games or anything like that and it was just Ed. I think that may unconsciously made me interested in in trying to figure this thing out like how. How do you grasp things and many years? Later when I was in Undergraduate I joined a laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania and they were studying various aspects of tactile sensing and I built a very simple hand with another student and we started really exploring this question. Of How do you grasp things? And it is fundamentally difficult for robots like to say that robots remain incredibly clumsy today. They're much better than they were but industrial arms. If you give them novel objects there will drop them with a fairly high frequency and this is a problem because we really want is want You WANNA be able to pick up anything that's put in front of you and the application the big application that's growing enormous right now is e commerce so you wanna be able to take objects every orders different so you wanna take things from bins and pack them. Lift them out of the band. Grasp and put them into boxes or bags for shipment and that turns out to be a bottleneck right now for robotics

Ken Welcome Goldberg Berkeley Automation Science And Enginee Berkeley Research Lab Uc Berkeley University Of Pennsylvania Professor Of Engineering Siemens Innovation Fair Carnegie Mellon Tele Garden Engineer NSF SAM USC Hugh
Fooling Computer Vision

Data Skeptic

04:33 min | 3 years ago

Fooling Computer Vision

"By now I have to assume. Most listeners are aware of deep fakes. Not just because we've covered deep fakes on this show before but if you show an interest for anything anything related to data and or skepticism you must know about the advances in technology that have been pretty impressive in creating videos that were not actual captures. There's a reality. Most people's first introduction to this idea was the video with comedian Jordan peele effectively puppeteer in the then president Barack Obama talking about out the dangers of deep fake technology. Maybe for some of you your first introduction was a bit more. NSF W and with the advent of any technology like doc deep fakes which just to be totally clear as the ability to kind of mask a different face onto a body. That doesn't belong to that face. Or just otherwise edit the content of identity a photo will these technologies are very much coming of age. Interestingly you never hear too much about the let's say positive or anonymity angle of this. You know someone who wants to release something to the world but not have their face identified could look like a real person person but obscure it in some way or let's go directly to the princess lay appearance in the recent star wars films deep fakes or not all bad even though they can like anything certainly be used maliciously so with any malicious tool the first questions. Really well can. We detect usage of that tool. Is there a categorical way. We can identify video. US fake or not fake and like all good questions. The answer is maybe I read good deal research on ways of detecting this one of the ways is it was sort of interesting to me. Initially was a researcher that in the case of very high fidelity cameras was able to detect blood pressure in the images by really amplifying amplifying certain parts of the signal you could notice subtle changes related to I guess the temperature of the human body. You're just things were we radiate as beings and and the deep fake systems you know these things developed based on generative adversarial networks things that have a discriminator in generator that our adversary competing competing to see who can make the best forgeries and who can spot the forgeries will these systems. They sometimes take a bit of a shortcut. They don't notice things like the subtle presence of blood pressure or as we covered on the show last year. That something interesting like the blinking of a face was not something Ganz out of box did and that on the surface surface that seems like a great detection technology as my guest in that episode will remind. You only took a little bit of time until the forgers were able to incorporate that into their systems and start producing deep fakes. which in fact did blink ultimately the detection of deep fake seems to be sort of maybe a bit of an asymptotically failed strategy? Gee if I went outside right now and I don't know set fire to my neighbor's house. If you filmed me doing that you would have a video of me setting fire into my neighbor's house which I'm sure why me jail Wednesday. That video was just a collection of bits of information in computers are getting quite good at generating very specialized sequences of bits of information. Seeing is no longer believing at least when you're seeing is delivered on Youtube or an MP before file or the equivalent and that's why video and images have always been a little bit curious to me. There is such a wide potential space of possible images in videos. That could be shown. We're going to talk a lot this season about gant's and fooling images and all these sorts of topics especially as they relate to our general theme. You of model interpret ability but I thought the best way to kick this off might be to talk about what fighting chances we have. If I'm right in fighting faces an asymptotically Alex's losing battle well we might not yet be at the point of inflection. So while they're still chance in the spirit of Sarah Connor maybe we can fight back a little bit against. It's the machines. Welcome to Davis skeptic interpret ability podcast asked about machine learning fooling images and the right to be ignored at least by an algorithm my guest today is vp Van rance today in our main segment sygmunt. We discussed the ways in which US mere mortals the non algorithms might develop techniques which we can subvert or fool image recognition systems. He's not just in an academic paper but actually in the real world

United States Sarah Connor Jordan Peele Barack Obama Youtube Ganz Researcher Van Rance Gant Davis President Trump VP Alex
A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

Astronomy Cast

05:39 min | 4 years ago

A deadly fungus outbreak is spreading in Chicago-area health facilities

"This sort of strong Makassar is sponsored by Magellan TV dot com. Check out this new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast now, this isn't a normal part of the ad, but I have to say the landing paid. They made for strong me. Cast is amazing. Once you get to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast, you can dive into a collection of documentary movies series and exclusive playlists designed by documentary filmmakers, this growing platform is adding new content weekly, and is already home to a who's who of the best productions from the overview of fact to the NSF funded seeing the beginning of time. There is an amazing selection of space astronomy related content watching four K from Roucou or on your computer or stream on. Any I o s or Android device? I lost track of a bunch of hours on Saturday afternoon diving through history, and you can explore the solar system traveled to distant stars and experienced the universe. Like never before. Once again, you can check out. This new streaming service with your exclusive to month free trial by clicking over to Magellan, TV dot com slash astronomy cast. Hi, everyone producer Susie here. We apologize for the lower quality audio this week, Pamela, experienced power outage that affected the saved audio files. So this show is being created from the audio from our YouTube street. Trying to cast episode five twenty five one hundred years international astronomically. Caster weekly facts based journey the cosmos help you understand not only what we know how we know what we know I presume came publisher of university with me as always Dr Pamela, gays senior scientists for the planetary scientists end the director Cozma quest penalty doing I'm doing. Well. How are you? I am doing. Well, also, did you survive all the excitement yesterday? It was a great day for people who are not don't know. We're talking about literally everything happened yesterday. Rockets. Relaunched lunar orbits were arrived at. Asteroid was hit tank weapon, which was great. What a great use for anti tank weaponry. Take more of that plea. Yeah. Exactly. So. Solar system more of that coming. So you just stay in line. So yeah, no. It was a great day. And and now other stuff too. I just saw that the put down a date for the Knicks falcon heavy launched. It's going to be soon like within the week. So it's gonna be it's gonna be a crazy week. Actually. I'm utterly overwhelmed. Right now, people may have noticed haven't got simply newsletter out yet because I just have so busy. But it's it's it's almost ready. It'll go another like couple of hours. I was at my keyboard for sixteen hours yesterday as annuals that I took turns live streaming all of the events line on twins Catholic. Absolutely amazing, and I I have to brag a little bit. So I love so much working once again, a like rock solid. We do science organization. I I haven't done that since I worked at Harvard. I've been at places that focused and communications education and undergraduate education, and I'm back. And so there was a quiet little does anyone know how to do this thing and stuff at the command line to fix the formatting of a whole bunch of files. And I was like, yeah. You just need to write software to footy foodie FU and the person who was working on high a booster, and they needed to convert a whole bunch of files was like help. And so last night in real time while everything was happening. I got to help by just reading a stupid little snippet of of code, but people at high. Yeah, that's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. To make a science people. I got to make us lions. So so you saying like, thanks to the planetary sciences toot for giving you a home that you get to do science on on an occasional basis. Yeah. That's amazing. And more to the point. I get to science with a whole bunch of other people instead of being like the person over here making science while everyone else is doing other things it was it's awesome. Here we go even though they might be scattered around our planet. Astronomers have a way to come together to work the issues that face their entire field of study, it's called the international astronomical union. And they're the ones who work out the new names for stars. And sometimes depleted beloved Kuyper built objects. Oh, man, people have that love hate blade ship with the I eight you which is the international stra nominal union.

Magellan Dr Pamela Makassar International Astronomical Uni Roucou Rockets NSF Knicks Harvard Kuyper Producer Susie Publisher Director Five Twenty Five One Hundred Y Sixteen Hours
Is It Okay to Say I Miss You to a Teacher?

All Ears English Podcast | Real English Vocabulary | Conversation | American Culture

11:13 min | 4 years ago

Is It Okay to Say I Miss You to a Teacher?

"Yeah. So guys, we're using this word, miss right, miss very common word to talk about your feelings, and we actually have a listener question about this word and a listener with his experience using this word. Lindsey, do wanna read the question. Yeah, let's hear from Pablo. So here we go. So Pablo says, hi, Lindsay. How have you been? My name is Pablo. It's my first Email to all ears, English. I'm the winner of the app contest and we have. We had a Skype, hang out. It was amazing to know you better and the stories about all ears, English development? Yes. I met with Pablo way back in February or January. He won the app contest that we held that month and I got a chance to meet him. We talked for thirty minutes on Skype. Very cool. Yeah. So guys, listen out for any contest that we have in the future around the app. Okay. So now the question I studied English here in my city and it was a wonderful experience. A few months after I finished the course, I went back to the. School and I met my teacher and I said, I missed you. It sounded a bit weird. I thought, and I noticed that she wasn't so comfortable with. However, she was polite as she was play as well as we expect from a British person. Oh, jeez. Okay. L. o. l. he says, all right, just a little joke there. Okay, Pablo nice. Moreover, everything went well in the conversation, took a good way how not to fail this miserably. When I use I miss you how to tell someone you miss them without being weird. I love the show in the way you guys teach. I've listened to the show as much as I like. Furthermore, it's always amazing. I hear from all English. You're my favorite English content on the web. I miss you kidding l. o. l. by. I like the Hubble sense of humor. Spotty. He's funny. I really enjoyed meeting Pablo's. We had a good time. Yeah. Oh, I bet that was fun. Yeah, thanks for that question. Yeah. Good topic today. Yeah, and I love on our listeners. Ask us about experience. They have had experiences they've had in real life. What do you think? Yeah, I love it. That is the best question guys. You know, if you go out into the world and you use your English and then the question comes up Email us immediately with that question because those are the stories we like to tell them the show hersher for sure. I love it. I mean, Lindsay, what do you think of students said that to you would. Wow. Yeah, I think there's a lot that we don't know here about kind of the tone of voice the context true? Were they alone in the room where they like, I, I mean, I'm guessing obviously like Pablo's not trying to act weird or to try to imply anything obviously. But like maybe the scenario was strained. I'm not sure, but in general, I, I would. I don't think it should be a problem saying, I missed, I missed you are so much. There's so much here that we don't know. Right, right. But, yeah, in general, it shouldn't be a major problem. It's okay to say that you miss someone, right, right, right. I mean, yeah, I, I don't think I would find it weird if someone said that to me Luga student, I'd probably be happy. It'd be like I missed you, but but yeah, like we said, I mean, who who? Who knows like how what the situation was or maybe the, I don't know. Yeah, Lindsey, one hundred percent. What you said. Yeah. I mean, yeah, maybe a teacher could find it a little too informal or intimate in a classroom potentially coming from a student. That's probably what happened. Right. I mean, I missed you. I guess could be like, you know, more. Yeah. I mean, it is kind of intimate in a way, but I never thought about it in a like that. Some student couldn't say to me. Yeah, this is interesting because it's kind of complex this question. If you really dig below the surface. Because if I think about like who I would say, I missed you too. Like I wouldn't say at to like a friend of a friend that I don't know that. Well, you know what I mean? But I would certainly say to like a good friend who went away, right? I might say it even if I even if I were teacher liked to a student, I might say, all I missed you like you've been going on. Glad you're back in the class. That is true because I think also like a teacher is like a more personal religion. I mean, like you know, a friend of a friend, you might not know that well, but teacher like, you know, that's kind of like a big deal relationship actually. Yeah, it's just it's, I think it's really about what goes around the phrase. I miss you. Like, what are you saying before? What are you saying after what's the whole context of the conversation? Right. That's true. That's true. Very interesting lot. Lots to

Michelle Pablo Lindsey Susan Partner NSF Linda Brazil
Baltimore cop indicted after video shows him punching man

KSTE Programming

00:24 sec | 4 years ago

Baltimore cop indicted after video shows him punching man

"Happened but when the scientists weaken. The outer membrane, cells die, quickly strong outer. Membrane life week outer membrane this gives researchers a new path to follow one that was right in front of them yet hidden in plain, sight the new drugs the destabilize the, deceptively. Thin outer layer could help destroy infectious bacteria useful, because about half. Of the

Turkey Tom Roberts Arthur Williams Andrew Branson Officer Turkish Court Donald Trump Sanders Baltimore Lisa Carter Amazon Moesby NSF Nbc News Marilyn Attorney Three Weeks
Seven cars removed after train derailment, oil spill; cleanup and railroad repair to follow

Van and Bonnie in the Morning

01:21 min | 4 years ago

Seven cars removed after train derailment, oil spill; cleanup and railroad repair to follow

"A seventeen year old west des moines girl died in a crash in creston monday afternoon iowa state patrol says after stayton turned in front of a pickup truck on highway thirty four and died from her injuries passenger was also hurt and taken the creston hospital the driver of the pickup was uninjured the crash follows several others in the past few days in which at least four others were killed and several others injured on i was roads clean up efforts continue in north west iowa after a train derailment spilled a lot of oil i'll be nsf said yesterday the cars that derailed have all been moved off the track near dune meanwhile the company said the track where the cars derailed could be repaired as soon as today about two hundred thirty thousand gallons of oil were spilled last friday into the little rock river the low unemployment rate is prompting a new effort to expand the local labor pool the focus is on students the downtown des moines chamber says it's an idea to address a labor and skill shortage taking that step and then getting the students and the employers together so that they can't figure out what's going to work best for each of them becky greenwald of the des moines downtown chamber of commerce says it's called student to employer s to e and involves several local organizations a nonprofit groups that serve low income students in those at risk of dropping out of school we have more on that story at whol radio.

Creston Stayton Creston Hospital NSF Little Rock River Becky Greenwald Des Moines Whol Radio Iowa North West Iowa Chamber Of Commerce Two Hundred Thirty Thousand Ga Seventeen Year