20 Burst results for "NRDC"

"nrdc" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"nrdc" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that <hes>. As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point <hes>. As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article <hes>. To your credit in health affairs <hes>. Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject <hes>. So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change <hes>. But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

david congress twenty eighteen twenty twenty seven sixteen lemay Five billion dollars four million acres twenty seventeen forty one year twenty two one billion dollar last year forty five billion seventy eve today Twenty twenty more than three million one point Two degrees celsius two thousand sixteen five hundred
NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 3 months ago

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article To your credit in health affairs Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

Vj Lemay David Intra Defense Council Center Dr Lemay Dr Maze Natural Resources Defense Coun Gresham Commissions Given Broa Congress Arctic United States Lance RDC Medicare Drew
Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 6 months ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 6 months ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
"nrdc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Forum to discuss your plans for the NRDC which is leading dozens of legal battles against the trump administration's environmental rollbacks that's all next after this news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Lakshmi Singh Wally Ron asserts it is still committed to salvaging the twenty fifteen nuclear pact with world powers the Islamic Republic is condemning steps taken by three European countries who accused Iran of violating the accord the U. K. Germany and France have moved to trigger a dispute mechanism in the nuclear agreement and peers Peter Kenyon reports to run is threatening a strong and serious response to European sanctions leaders of Britain France and Germany saying they feel they have no choice but to respond to a run several violations of its commitments under the agreement move to trigger the deals dispute resolution mechanism and he you official said he accepts the move as an effort to save the agreement which has been on shaky ground after president trump withdrew the US from the deal and resume sanctioning Iran Iran's foreign ministry declares complete readiness to support any constructive effort to save the nuclear deal but Tehran ones they would be a strong reaction to any new sanctions from the Europeans Peter Kenyon NPR news is ten Iran's announced the arrests of those it centers are behind the accidental downing of Ukrainian airliner that killed all one hundred seventy six people on board many of them around instead of running Canadians but the government claims some individuals were arrested after extensive investigations however still no detail on how many people have been rounded up or who they are after days of denying that its people had shot down the plane he run conceded it was to blame outraged by attempted cover up large crowd stage street protests against the government the US house is now expected to vote tomorrow on sending the articles of impeachment of president trump to the U. S. Senate for trial here's to be ten minutes of debate house speaker Nancy Pelosi will also name the impeachment managers once the resolutions passed to go through the formality of being placed in a box and carried from the house to the Senate to be presented to the secretary of the Senate president trump stands accused of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress for allegedly leveraging military aid to pressure you crane into investigating rival Joe Biden trump denies wrongdoing the seventh democratic primary debate takes place tonight in Iowa beginning at nine eastern and Pierce Jessica tale report the stage at the CNN hosted event will be the smallest and least diverse yet just six cameras are set to debate tonight former vice president Joe Biden former mayor PPV judge billionaire Tom's tire and cinders any club char Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren the Democratic National Committee has impose stricter criteria to qualify with every debate and those dole polling and fundraising requirements mean that non profit executive Andrew Yang who made the December debate won't be on stage in Iowa tonight without Yang this means the debate is without any racial diversity that's problematic given the Democratic Party strong minority basis but the smaller field could allow for a longer and more complex exchanges and the stakes couldn't be higher with less than three weeks now before the Iowa caucuses Jessica Taylor NPR news Washington this is NPR live from KQED news on Brian white that's protesters chanting sheriff's deputies this morning as they came to evict the housing activists who took over a west Oakland home about two months ago the deputies were enforcing any fiction order they arrested for activist including two moms who occupied the vacant house the kids of the moms removed from the house he spent the night elsewhere the home is owned by Wedgwood properties which went to court to evict the activist the group of moms for housing appealed arguing that housing is a human right this morning Wedgewood issued a statement that said it's please the illegal occupation ended peacefully there's more on this coming up on four San Francisco supervisors are expected to vote today on a proposal to ban natural gas in new and renovated city buildings Cindy Comerford with the department of the environment told the committee earlier this month that moving toward all electric energy sources is essential in order to meet the city's climate goals and to protect public health forty four percent of our overall.

NRDC
"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"To be that big and why aren't these people coming to these meetings and connecting with folks and if you look at other industries like the EU civil engineers conference in it's huge those people should be showing up to this adaptation form an enlarged Hansen who the organized she knows this and she's done a great job reaching out but it's always just you know another conference but I think when you start getting the big money attending the event we've made it as opposed to policy people are educational people these are the conferences that I've attended all my life and all right where where's the big money kind of thing and that's that's what I that happens that's when you know you've made it big well we should make a push to get somebody Goldman Sachs there if you recall just last month Goldman Sachs but a very interesting report out about climate adaptation in cities around the world old and highlighted this is one of an area where there will be he huge amounts of capital invested in future years too cope with the impacts of climate change so this is definitely something that Goldman Sachs is well aware of and I would say the time is right let's let's extend the invitation now let's get them they're Goldman show up in your jet and attend the next form and I don't think they've announced the next location yet I think they do that soon it's every two years so that'll be a little wild but we'll be we'll do our part I mentioned the form all the time on the podcast obviously it's a chance for me to recruit people to come on the podcast so it's good stuff well sign me up how extend an invitation to I think we should do that well you know what just between you and me I was looking at your board of trustees and lead approach on it so I just put a good word to get him to the national adaptation form and that creates buds for sure so get on that one okay yeah I promise the next time he calls me up all right all right I got a few more questions and I wanna come back to this notion of communicating climate change and I don't know if you remember your thought but I thought maybe what might spur your your memories that you recently did an event with Amy Brady in New York City about storytelling and climate change and you share the transcripts with me got out of it it was a really incredible event I'm a fan of Amy Brady the work she does at Guernica magazine as well as her monthly climate fiction column burning worlds on the Chicago review books and everybody that that amy arranged to be part of that panel was just we're all just amazing people to be around and the whole focus that event was to talk about the role storytelling and communicating climate change so we had caroline Norman is a a journalist New Yorker we add the author of Bangkok Wakes Rain Amazing Book that the contemplates a climate future in in helping people understand the challenges we face because of climate change and what the future potentially looks like what we want it to look like so it was just a you know it was one of these hour long panel discussions that's.

EU two years
"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

14:12 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Few things but I wanted to to make sure I get this and you're at energy and we had little chance to talk about this but there's it's not just an RTC you know this is happening with so many groups Asian virus mental groups and it's something that we're aware of and are consciously addressing luckily could a personal twist Anez I've spent my career in can at lowering emissions and averting these problems that the scientific community is telling us are going to occur as the climate warms and I was you know the fact of the matter is this is born out in any number the the series of reports the Internet the all too real impacts climate change that we already see that are still to come we'll how does that work at NCA especially I think the the adaptation side of things or even one point five degrees Celsius agreed upon the Paris accords the impacts of Climate Change Dump diminish with that increase in temperature they escalate others a considerable amount of work that groups like entity seat need to be doing to cope with those impacts the reality of of our work at entities see is that there are many people in different programs in different teams have over the years have recognized the importance of incorporating climate adaptation into their at work and there's a number of us that kind of of our own volition it started evolving her work in that direction and now the organization I think there's a growing awareness that we need to have a much more deliberate strategy on climate adaptation and that it's going to need to be rated very closely with our overall strategy climate change it's just fascinating to see larger groups grapple with how focus on this and you've you listened to the podcast I brought it up reputations is that Oh if you focus on adaptation that means you're ignoring mitigation and oh my goodness God no and I've tried to make that point over and over again they're just two separate areas yes and I remember and I don't know if I was being unfair to them I was at a conference a couple years ago and I was having conversation with a state nature conservancy person and they were telling me that and I don't even know this is the case I haven't followed them much at all but she was saying that they're getting into the mitigation side of things in a big way at the state and federal level and I just looked at her and I'm like why 'cause I just I I was being flippant but it's just the nature conservancy your giant land trust your seems to me your focus should be on adaptation because that's what you've just had this decade long reputation for why would you get into space that I felt like an RDC and EDF and to some of the other groups have been doing for a while oh end she wasn't too happy with my critique but it's just you know I know your skill set I don't know I just I don't know in our DC L. enough like it you guys are putting out a lot of good material just I but I'm sure you Kinda went through that sort of strategic planning thinking process like all right should we be doing this yeah we we have been going through that type of of deliberate thinking about these problems I think a lot of people's assumptions and what it means to work on climate change have been frankly challenged by some of the new information that has been coming out from the international panel on climate change starting with the report that the IPC put out in October of last year on what it's going to take to limit global warming one point five degrees Celsius I think that really underscored just how daunting challenge it's going to be to reduce nations to that extent but also highlighted just how steep challenges to adapt to even that level of work the the science on the adaptation side I think is evolving very fast and very little of it provides goods the impacts of climate change in many instances are outpacing our past projections of what the pace of impact would be and that's certainly true in the arena of sea level rise but I think it entered e c two we we are increasingly realizing that you cannot pretend to be addressing climate change change in a way that's fair and equitable to all members of our society if you are not addressing climate resilience and adaptation the fact that the matter is that these hurricanes these flood events he's wildfires he's droughts that that the US has been expelled dancing often hit disadvantaged in lower income communities the hardest we have to be able to offer them solutions beyond sorry about your flood drought wildfire but here's some great ways to reduce your emissions because such an approach is addressing their problems that we think it's very important that we be able to come up with solutions that address that that very real action balance that the hundreds of thousands of millions of people even just here in the US are already being affected by there's also a growing body of knowledge out there that shows is that the way the United States delivers disaster assistance actually contributes to making poor people horror these disasters that are now driven by climate change are actually contributing to the existing equity gap here in United States so we have to be very conscious of that as we uh develop our solutions on climate change including eric strategies for lowering emissions and on the adaptations I certainly feel that focusing on adaptation resilience is sort of pathway into like real effective climate change policy so even though if you're focusing on mitigation it's like people can get their heads around like what can we do that sort of help right now and adaptation lends itself to that narrative a lot better than well if we just reduce our and again you have to do these things but I'm just saying it's a it's a nice interface it's a nicer interface to deal with the public today then I think the mitigation side people do they they have a tough job it's it's I don't envy their side things people aren't used to thinking long term and climate change it poses a very difficult problem in risk indication talking about risk that people perceive as being very far off and and part of that I think is a problem of how we communicate risks if you look at graphs of climate data impacts of climate change there all these very smooth charts and graphs right kind of gives the perception that climate change is this kind of smooth predictable upward curve ah we've got time to deal with it except you know the planet doesn't operate such a smooth linear fashion these things happen in fits and starts see that weather patterns that we're dealing with now here in the US and abroad you get these very dramatic events that cause catastrophic levels of damage and localized areas the next year could be someplace else that suffer staffing it's not smooth by any means it's a very bumpy road we are on whether we like it or not okay I'm going to another pivot here and I want to talk about adaptation community in general so first off even though I saw you at the national adaptation form you kind of consider yourself an adaptation professional yeah most definitely the work that my team does here inner DC he is is done holy through climate adaptation Lens fat is why we've decided to engage these issues because we we see that you see the need to help smooth path for people who are going to be struggling with the impacts of climate change we need to provide more options to p okay so they have the agency to do what's best for them in the face of the risks that are coming attended the national adaptation for him was that your first or have you been just ones you know I'm I'm embarrassed to admit Doug to you and your listeners that it was the first adaptation forum I have personally attended and I will not will not be making a mistake of missing missing them in the future because it was a wonderful experience anybody who's out there listening national adaptation forum happens every two years it's an amazing convenience of people who are working on these issues and I found it to be just a just a great experience to be among people who think about these things as much as as people I work with I in the colleagues that I work with day in day out yeah it's a great great convenient you hear that Laura Hanson were the organizers you that's nice okay unsolicited from the art but kissing on this podcast so that was my third I really enjoy it a lot of times it's just it's so great just because it's coming up in my previous lives of doing policy I just get to see a lot of people that I know so that's great and so I've I was Gonna ask you what you think but you obviously got a lot especially being your first one I did a podcast episode out of it I've done it twice now that was an incredibly popular episode and people the feedback was like they just loved because I interviewed a bunch like maybe ten fifteen different participants for like five minutes and they just loved hearing the diversity of People's backgrounds that would attend the event but one of the questions that I ask people that attended it's just like what's missing you know what were the blind spots this is an anew emerging field and this is like the premiere adaptation form but what did you feel was missing did you notice anything oh you're asking me that question tell me what people other people's pigeon I listened to that I was so so what do you thank who who is missing if you could even notice those things if it is your first but did you kind of feel like you know what this is great I'm making connections but this is missing did anything like that cross your mind man there are so many people there and there are there such a huge number of topics being covered I I I really for me personally I didn't feel like there was a lot missing I think if there was there's one area that would be great to see explored other events like the National Adaptation Forum is this the issue of housing a lot of communities in us are already struggling with the housing crisis in availability of liberal housing and the impacts of climate change are not going to make that an easier problem to solve a lot of house he groups out there better starting to get into this arena and I think it'd be great to have to see more of those organizations and stakeholders involved with things like the adaptation for them you know that would be great too and thing that kind of came up just for your own knowledge is that the big money wasn't there if you think about the big banks and even like been sacked you think of those adaptation is going.

five degrees Celsius five minutes two years
"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

13:46 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"This country to basically perpetuate a cycle with flood rebuild repeat yeah wise choice okay so here let me here's another hypothetical this is war fund and this was a previous episode I did with an environmental lawyer and we talked about sea level rise and what it might mean to get people to retreat from the coast in the notion of using federal power of eminent domain thinking like bend over backward I'm trying to get people to re re treat from the coast and some don't want to or they're just not enough money and there's all sorts of different reasons but let's say you have this power condemned the shoot swat is a coastal land because of eminent domain because we know the models are showing that this whole area is going underwater and then you're giving a fair market value and I think we're the RUB is it's like a fair market value when you're not factoring in that this was going to become a potentially degraded area what was it when it like all things are functioning normally what are your thoughts on on the government starting to use a more regular Tori approach to kind of get people away from the coast and let's say you're not speaking on behalf of NRDC or something I'm not I'm not falling for that. disclaimer I will answer your question anyway there may be a point in the future where the use of eminent domain uh becomes an option that community start to look at or even state or federal government starts to look at we're not at that point right now right now here's here here's the situation that we are dealing there are a lot of people who are tired of living through repeated touch and they are unable to get the assistance they need from their local state and federal government to relocate even now it's to their benefit immunities benefit and to the federal government's financial benefit to do so that's that's the problem we need to fix I tied with that problem they need to fix or tied as a priority fixing that problem is we need to stop building things in areas that we can accurately predict today that we're going to have to unbuilt at some point in the future you know as long as communities continue to allow development in low lying coastal areas or flood plains we're we're just making a bad situation worse the the old adage is if you want to get out of a hole the first step is to stop digging and we haven't quite figured that out yet okay I'm going to do a few pivots here and this question was actually given to me by someone who deals with disaster and risk and they wanted to know what your thoughts are on nature based approaches to Flood Management Yeah we think we think nature based approaches are fantastic and those those approaches can be married up quite nicely with a Graham aimed at buying out flood prone properties the ideal situation is you help people escape a flood prone air area you reclaim those properties and you put either through ecological restoration and or installations of so-called green infrastructure or natural structure systems you restore some of the the natural hydrologic functioning that of that land and that provides flood mitigation benefits as well as a lot of other co benefits so so these things need to be seen as a continuum of of a of a single strategy ideally bandaged retreat should have a few components what my what my team is mostly focused on it's Kinda that that first step how do you help people move out of these horrible areas the second step is well how do you make sure there is somewhere for those people to go in the same community so you've got to address that housing issue if you want people to retain remain in your community there has to be places for them to move and the third component is how do you make use the properties you've now acquired to lower the flood risk for everybody else it seems to me it is you're trying to get a community to think about abandoning in Area I don't I don't know if Dec- gets into this week we've talked a bit about the psychology of people who stay in areas but then also the psychology of convincing people to leave in it seems to me is part of your pitches like we're GonNa take this land and where to turn into sand dunes I don't know if that would be an attractive thing for people you know are going to end up doing something positive but I'm sure it's part of it is that an area that you guys can think about is again the sort of the psychological approaches to what's happening here that is a great that's a really great I point to bring up we actually worked with an economist at the University of Illinois Dr Amy Endo and she had a Grad student to study that study found that people were much more inclined to want a buy out if their property if they know Oh that it's not going to be redeveloped that is actually going to be returned to nature and that that's a sentiment that's actually born out in a book by somebody who was a guest on your show last year Elizabeth rush in her book rising she interviewed some of the people from Staten Island who accepted buyouts after era cain sandy and unequivocally some of the people she interviewed said that one of their biggest fears is that these buyouts just a way to get them off land so other people come in and redevelop it and profit from their from their problems and I can't remember the quote exactly but when they insisted that these properties not be redeveloped that was a real game changer the people were much more inclined to participate in this buyout effort if they had assured the property was Gonna be redeveloped than we would stay that's a pretty strong sentiment yeah well it seems to me like I and maybe this is happening I speak like a New York the they're quite progressive but right now and be at Florida Louisiana that there be should be public service announcements sort of on on going basis sort of saying you know we're going to have these coastal challenges and opportunities for Retreat and and really highlighting if there is this transfer of land that it's going for were restoration to a nature based approach and on top of it just being sort of a natural setting it's there to climate proof that community it makes the rest of the community a bit more secure and we should spend the next twenty years is putting these messages out even if it's not actively happening in an area and there's just a low for lack of coordinated communication just getting people open to the idea and yeah that would be great if we could see more of that. Let's do that Doug come on singer how to do that I'm game I'm ready to do it there's a flip side to that too is we do pathetically little in this country to actually help people understand the true flood risks they are living with INTRODUC- study last year and we found that there are thirty states in the US where if you are buying a home the current owner. or has no obligation to inform you pass flood damage or whether they are legally obligated to maintain insurance of that home so people are basically denied in some ways denied information when buying home about the flood risks that that come along with that that lack of information is further compounded by the fact that if a person goes in the absence of this disclosure if a person's like well I'll go check out FEMA flood maps they'll give me some indication of risk well you must flood maps Prieta Day they can be ten twenty even thirty years out of date so what you're looking at is a map of flood risk from thirty years ago Oh not the president and even if it isn't up to date map seema's flood maps don't believe in climate change they they say nothing about how flood risk may change in the future sure they they don't incorporate any projections of sea level rise they don't allow for the potential for extreme weather events which seemed to happen more and more frequently days so he really underinformed people out the flood risks they face well I'm going to get back to about communication adaptation layer on the episode but I think misogyny and like you said maybe this notion of let's work on something and our d. c. you know I think look at the foundations foundations fund a lot of work and I you know Whoa I don't think people recognize what adaptation really is still kind of put it in this box assist technical wonky thing in it isn't it's really this is going to be a generational struggle and I've talked about this before in the podcast and usually the word propaganda we think of in a negative way but if you go back to war who in the victory gardens and those kind of thing that you know that the government was just getting people thinking about these issues and I think we need to start having those broader communication strategies just it's so alien to most people when even start talking about the saint here we go to a conference and we think everyone's talking about it no one's talking about and so there would love to see groups like NRDC in the big ones really kinda come up with broader communication strategies. I think there'd be a huge demand for it all right I I went on my rant there I think it's Iran? Okay well listen I want to come back to some adaptation cabinet later on but I want to get to a few things I I hold that thought I just I jumped the gun there's this tension and the climate change community between mitigation and what I mean is the mitigation of carbon emissions sort of like the Paris accords and all that and then the adaptation side of things and I think a lot of groups are included struggle with like what are you gonNa emphasize what's really going to be the primary focus and how do we communicate these issues and What are your thoughts about those tensions I think that's an existing tension whether it's at an organization like NRDC or or any number of other laws airman advocacy earlier in my career I worked at organization a New York called environmental because of Newark and I felt the same way like doc was in the early two thousands and I was like look this climate change issue is hugely important we have to throw everything we Mary I was not very oh to talking about adaptation right that was a that was competing proposition and could be construed as while you can't work on adaptation because it's basically saying you're not gonNa work on emission reductions well then in two thousand twelve hurricane sandy hit New York for me that was a real eye opener I was like wow you know that that is a climate change event that we just saw in the people in New York City and the broader metropolitan area are now dealing that was the eye opener for me that we no longer have the luxury of working only on emissions reductions we have to work on emissions reductions and working climate adaptation is no longer and an optional event and the past few years of storm and hurricane in wildfire seasons here in the United States if made that painfully clear national panel on climate changes but rolling out over the past year the national climate assessment and you know take your pick of the hundreds of scientific studies that have come out it's very clear that that we we must work working on climate change now means doing everything we can humanly possible to to reduce the emissions the root cause as well as grappling with how we help nature and how we help a human communities code things that has become more prominent in the last five ten years you guys have been working on the mitigation side for a while but are those like two camps or is there a lot of integrate Russian now I think the reality is it's largely two camps we have a very large investment staff and resources and effort over the past several years on reducing emissions but there's a growing awareness that the impacts of climate change are quite evident today with only one degree of warning and even if we achieve our loftiest goals emissions reductions and keep future warming to two degrees Celsius..

NRDC Doug US president INTRODUC Iran seema FEMA thirty years two degrees Celsius five ten years twenty years one degree
"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

23:53 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"In the flood insurance program is built on that assumption and we know that that assumption is is wrong because of climate change what's really the likely scenarios they're just going to be a massive pot of money to say hey we're we're gonNA help you buy or I I think I'm from Florida originally and build in the place is that we need to build and to rebuild in the in the very same places after each of these major storms that have been hitting in recent years here's a thought experiment that you never get to do in real life but I think of places like sandy or Katrina and you see the numbers that are kind of go in hundred billion two hundred billion now say the storm never hits and you took that you're talking about real money right but let's say instead in advance preemptively you had two hundred billion dollars and this is of course our Congress does not work and you were trying to get people to migrate from these really high at risk is in Louisiana would two hundred billion dollars even be enough to be a drop in the bucket kind of get the the numbers away from this area that are at threat I don't know but it seems like even if we are super proactive trying to get people to treat from the coast is the money that we're talking about is cheaper just to go through the storm event and come in and clean up after that why that sort of sets the easy thing to do now in fact we did a simple analysis couple years ago looking at this problem where where we just looked at properties that FEMA characterizes as a severe repetitive loss properties so these are homes that by definition have flooded at least four times and in reality you look at the data he's homes at flooding average of five times inch for a vast majority of those home they are worth other property values about one hundred and ten thousand and the National Flood Insurance Program is already today eight paid an average of one hundred thirty four thousand dollars in damage claims on those properties so about thirty six thousand properties that classified by FEMA as severe repetitive loss properties but they're they're the real canary in the coalmine for the millions of homes that are going to be increasingly USC of repeated flooding because of sea level rise and escalated incidents of inland flooding based on the numbers we've seen it's quite cost effective you've for many of these properties to simply help that owner relocate fast what they WANNA do rather than continuing to pay to rebuild them over and over again and we just were hemorrhaging billions of dollars in this country to basically perpetuate a cycle with flood rebuild repeat yeah wise choice okay so here let me here's another hypothetical this is war fund and this was a previous episode I did with an environmental lawyer and we talked about sea level rise and what it might mean to get people to retreat.

two hundred billion dollars one hundred thirty four thousa
"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Everyone pretty much they have a chance to rebuild they'll do it do you feel like okay on the coast there's a better chance that people are just GonNa WanNa flea that area that's a good question if you look at where FEMA has financed by out in the end they do fund buyouts funded about forty three thousand buyouts over the last thirty years or so through other programs not through the arts program most of those have taken place on an inland locations so on rivers not beachfront homes I think there's probably Friday reasons for that but reality is I think people who most of our flooding problems are not necessarily what we consider beachfront house uh-huh they really are properties that are located further inland they may be in a coastal area but they're not the houses that are right on the which you think about the psychology of where you live and I I would guess when it comes to people living on the coast there's just not that long tradition of living there are people in the interior of the country they might have been there three four five six generations where sometimes you might be the first generation living on the coast just not as connected to the landscape so Bersin Opportunity there when we've talked about I WANNA get into it some of the sea level rise by outset are happening I think you're hitting on something that that is true the longer people will reside in an area they have a stronger connection to place in maybe a buyout isn't as attractive as somebody who's more recent who's who's moved to the area more recently in coastal areas you tend to also have like on in beachfront properties they also tend to be newer housing stock and their bill to a more modern building code which may require the house to be elevated considerably if you've ever been to a beachfront community you see all these houses stilts and the reason is because building code requires them to be built that high so that they are less risk of flooding or storm surge new look at inland the housing stock tends to be older and it may be wasn't built to protect the standard a so it may be more vulnerable to flooding coastal beachfront park Pity I wanNA talk a bit about some buyout programs and is there a successful example of a program I think Hurricane Sandy and maybe even going back to Katrina that a lot of money flooded into these areas and I think people were getting innovative with how to kind of get people to start thinking about not living near the coast can you can you share an exam couple of like a successful in or at least it's a work in progress yeah I think that took place in Staten Island after Hurricane Sandy are are one of the more successful models you could point to that case there was ample funding available fat came that funding specifically came through Hud's community development block crat resources there was a commitment by from the homeowners a large numbers of them have been dealing with flooding for years in Sandy was kind of the tipping point for them where they didn't want to leave their community but they knew that stayed in that neighborhood was not in their long-term interest pity longer so they appealed directly to the state of New York for assistance to help them relocate in New York deliver that assistance and it was one of the more successful hundreds of homes were bought out most of them were bought out in less than a year's time or a little over a year perhaps which sounds like a long time but I have to say sadly for a federally finance buyouts that is a record breaking pace if you're dealing with a FEMA finance by out a report we recently released found that that assistance can take over five years to reach a homeowner after a flood has taken place and that's really that's really unacceptable but even looking at the buyouts Staten Island where a lot of things came together to help people do what they wanted to do and move out devotional location that doesn't happen everywhere unfortunately those those things are the exception rather than the rule and we really need to get better at how to help people we'll make the decision to relocate and provide them the resources that they need to relocate otherwise managed treat is just it's really unmanageable that there will be nothing that resembles what we think managed retreat if we can't get these programs to deliver assistance to the people who need it the most and in a timeframe when they need it I guess what we're seeing now especially with these hurricanes it's almost like trial runs we know it's going to happen on much longer larger scale but these trial runs were learning hopefully a lot from but I guess what we've learned is taking too long they take way too long and there are there's there's a super negative consequences with that I mean the most obvious of which is you're leaving somebody to live in a place that's not safe so that's the first problem the second problem is a lot of people who see their home flood and they're approached about a buyout in the time they are waiting to get an answer on whether their home is going to be bought out or not many of them endure another flood that has the high personal cost associated with it nobody wants to have their flown their home flied much less have their home flipped multiple times and if they have flooded surest that's also a burden on the taxpayer because we're we we will we are paying to rebuild that her multiple times while paperwork gets moved from desk to desk to determine whether we should perhaps by that property out he'll now that person to move somewhere safer and then the other the other big problem problem is this really contributes to existing inequities in our society so if you're poorer person at a person who's who who's on the lower side of the income spectrum it's financially very difficult to live in this purgatory we place people in who are waiting for a buyout you literally find it difficult to afford to continue living in a place with you don't know if you are movie or not moving so if your your furnace breaks on your house while you're waiting for a buyout do you put the money out to replace it because FEMA is not paying for your new furnace plus the the value of your home so that's money that you're going to you can afford to lose are you gonNA continue to maintain the house it needs a new roof or you're going to replace that so we really put people in an uncomfortable situation in and you can see how this plays out in areas that have been affected by flooding recently the Houston Chronicle did an amazing story last year about how people who are desperate move out of homes in a flooded multiple times in recent years most recently Harvey and probably in Tropical Storm Imelda earlier this year people have basically given up on getting a publicly financed by out and they are selling their homes for a fraction of the value to real estate speculators just so they can get away from the home and then those speculators are fixing house flipping it to the next unsuspecting fire or renting them out and perpetuating a problem if distance could have been delivered yet more timely fashion the flooding problem could have been eliminated forever on that property again a thing of two notion of people's estate speculators that go in and Kinda our scale experiments Oh a neighborhood and staten island but if especially along the coastal areas if we see this this sort of migration away from the coast that we think is coming we'll just start abandoning homes right they were not paying the mortgages and other people were not buying these homes and is that a potential scenario in there's step what that means is just you're going to have a lot of people go into bankruptcy and I guess the cynic in me thinks that's a more likely scenario than like well the government has a very wealthy optioning buyout plan but they'll never be enough money for it yeah you're you are a capsulated what some of the challenges we're facing you're very well Doug let's look at this problem from the perspective of the homeowner okay so they know they have a flooding problem they would love to get away valuable asset they probably have just abandoned so people do that it's certainly not to their financial advantage to do that but but they get to a point where that seems like the best solution and nobody wins in that scenario the second option they have is they could sell it probably a loss because the market for flood-prone Holmes isn't really the best most robust real estate market so they're going to probably sell it at a loss and move away but what did we accomplish there while now we've just perpetuated a game of musical chairs and a rather dangerous game of musical chairs where we've just swapped one person for another in the same bad situation in the third option is is what we talk about when we're thinking about the topic of managed retreat is public financing is available to actually help people move to higher ground and escaped an area that's increasingly vulnerable because of the impacts of climate change you know that is where we need to get to this country is it going to be expensive well it ain't going to be cheap but it's probably not dramatically more expensive than what we're spending to build in the place is that we need to build and to rebuild in the in the very same places.

FEMA WanNa thirty years five years
"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Take advantage of people I think of the just the real estate crash back in two thousand eight two thousand nine that there's money here to kind of do these small it well what are their options to get away from that as you pointed out one one would be to abandon your home to simply walk away from it you know the most the most to build in the place is that we need to build and to rebuild in the in the very same places.

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"nrdc" Discussed on America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

"Quite a bit of a non I think for the manpower we have to throw at it we're going to dig into some of the policy work that you do but I guess I'd still want to dig down a bit more into the work that you're focus is on the national flooding program in so what are some of the shortcomings it seems like every six months I see some sort of headline like well if they make these reform warns if they do this or they're just punting the ball I mean what's really going on there yes oh Congress has failed for over two years now too authorize and Reform the National Flood Insurance Program it lapses by design every five years that enables Congress to tweak it in theory make changes and the program can proceed but since two thousand seventeen congress has really struggled to do that the house has been making good progress as even passed a bill under era the previous congress which was controlled by the Republicans has ability process under leadership of congresswoman maxine waters this new Chris the Senate has been kind of asleep at the wheel they never even brought a bill to committee to discuss so it's been very frustrating but enough of the process like maybe to answer your question directly what's wrong with the national flood shirts program if I had to boil it down to one thing Doug I would say the program is built upon a very flawed assumption and that assumption is that the flood risks of the past right accurate predictor of our flood risks in the future and every saying in the flood insurance program is built on that assumption and we know that that is something in is is wrong because of climate change well even if it's built on that assumption I'm just thinking of decades and decades of people after a flooding event we'll rebuild in this flood zones and I think folks that don't live in flood zones are thinking why are they getting money to do this and why are they doing this and so that in itself is a major flaw with the process right yet certainly as we had a report a couple years ago called seeking higher ground and it looked at this problem of repeatedly flooded homes that the flood insurance the program pays billions of dollars to rebuild over and over and over again and you know for for somebody who looks at this program from the outside that just insane like why are we paying so much money to rebuild homes five ten in some cases twenty or thirty times that have been damaged well that's that's unfortunately the way the program works the Flood Insurance Program is designed really first and foremost to help people reboot belt and there's no limitation on the number of times that the program will pay to rebuild someone's home but that's actually not the biggest problem the biggest problem is that even if the person realizes rebuilding is not a smart option and even if it would be more cost effective for fema to buy that house and allow that person to move somewhere safer the flood insurance program is incapable of delivering resolved it is only really focused on providing assistance to rebuild and in some cases rebuild in a way that will lower your flood risks it won't pay to completely eliminate your flood risk by allowing.

five years six months two years
"nrdc" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Kitty. Speaking of like to stress. Importance of adopting cats from animal shelters. Over five million animal shelters every year. Hope you catch to choose from. It's a sheet. More people don't adopt from shelters catch. Why bother will just get into more trouble tomorrow? What's that? Sassy is brought to you by the Ad Council. Shelterpetproject dot remember. Adopt. You're not wired to have a response to this sound. You're neutral to it. You hear it every time you finish your meal and never feel anything. But if we were able to associate this sound with a new stimulus save the food. We've achieved pulling a natural response from you. Save the food. Why are we doing this? He might ask save the food because this ad is trying to change your after meal behavior through brainwashing. Because food waste costs the average family fifteen hundred dollars a year. Save the food cooking and fifteen hundred extra books is like getting a payrise save the food touching your promoted which could pay for your child's braces. Save the food. Your promoted check out my prices. So when you hear this sound, rethink your behavior. Cook it store it share it. Just don't waste it for tips and recipes visit save the food dot com. Brought to you by NRDC only the best. Sweet welcome to the best of the weeks Saturday. Was carefully selected segments. Laurie and Julia did all week.

nrdc council
"nrdc" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Radio. I'm rich Denison hurricane Florence now. A tropical storm is blamed for at least four deaths in North Carolina. Governor ROY Cooper several more deaths are under investigation woman and her infant died when a tree crashed through their home this morning. A man was electrocuted while plugging in a generator and another man was docked knocked down by wind and died. Former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort pleading guilty to federal charges today agreeing to cooperate with special counsel, Robert Muller. Fox's Rachel Sutherland deal allows the sixty nine year old to avoid a second criminal trial on charges related to his work as a lobbyist for the Ukrainian government Manafort has agreed to give up its homes and New York Florida in Virginia as well as four fit a life insurance policy and money in numerous Bank accounts. White House says the plea has nothing to do with the President, Fox news. We report you decide. For tips and recipes visit save the food dot com. Brought to you by NRDC and the Ad Council. across the land joepags dot com. Facebook Twitter, Instagram, Email, the live stream is there as well. As the Joe pags show bland along for the ride that is Carrie locking bringing it like she always brings it accent. When she is bringing it.

Ukrainian government Manafort Denison hurricane Florence Governor ROY Cooper Fox Carrie Joe pags North Carolina Robert Muller Paul Manafort Facebook NRDC Rachel Sutherland Trump White House special counsel Twitter Instagram Virginia
"nrdc" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Alert I'm Steve Rappaport to former Trump associates. Turned convicted. Felons attorney, Michael Cohen pleading guilty, to campaign. Finance violations and other crimes while one time. Campaign chair Paul Manafort was convicted, on eight counts of fraud those two Bank fraud charges each carry maximum sentences of thirty years a piece each. Tax fraud charge comes with a maximum of, three year sentence and that reporting of a foreign Bank? Account carries a five year sentence Jerry unable to reach. Verdicts on ten other count- FOX's Jared Halpern. Supreme court nominee Brett cavenaugh meeting with Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer. Today, data shows that Brett cavenaugh has less positive response from the. American people, than, just, about any other nomination. No Democrats have publicly endorsed cabin offer the high court Fox News we report you decide Save the food dot, com brought to you. By NRDC. And the Ad Council Stations everywhere joepags dot com Eight eight eight nine four one. Pags that's the phone number glad to have you along. For the ride Carrie get. An expert on dodges or on Chrysler's or And.

fraud Brett cavenaugh Steve Rappaport Supreme court Chuck Schumer Trump associates FOX Jared Halpern NRDC Paul Manafort Ad Council Stations Michael Cohen Fox News Carrie Chrysler attorney Jerry thirty years
"nrdc" Discussed on  News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Places not all customers will qualify see your, participating dealer for details do not, want to have a response to this sound You neutral to it You hear it every time you finish your meal. And never feel anything but if we were able to associate this sound, with a new stimulus save the food we've achieved pulling a. Natural response from. You save the food why? Are we doing, this you may ask save the food because this ad is trying to change your after meal behavior through brainwashing, because food waste costs the average family fifteen. Hundred dollars a year Save the food teaching and fifteen hundred extra bunks is linked getting a. Pay payrise save the food touching your promoted which could pay for your, child's braces save the food touching your promoted check out my. Prices so when. You hear this sound rethink? Your behavior cook, it store it share it just don't waste it for tips and recipes visit save the food dot com brought to you by NRDC and the Ad Council I did the best I could do The best I could tell The flu Has reached that point where like Johnny cash in that last Robert.

Ad Council NRDC flu Johnny Robert Hundred dollars
"nrdc" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You by NRDC To be invisible Turn crew Apathetic co worker not assaulted Out of the box and. Into World Vision with monster Back everybody Jason and Alexis in the morning coming up on eight. Thirty four thanks for. Being here everybody it's going to be a simply stunning weekend. Weatherwise Gorgeous gorgeous ninety. Nine degrees everybody like. Consistently. High eighties into the nineties no clouds whatsoever so Nice short enjoy. Maybe.

NRDC Alexis Jason Nine degrees
"nrdc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The NRDC suggests that about two thirds of the counties in the US. Are affected, by wildfire smoke to some extent, that's amazing What you did here's an analysis of tweets kind of after the fact is this something that's almost ready to go mean could you use this in real time in. Some way That is our eventual goal. And right now, one of, the biggest, problems that we see with that, is in, order, to get the most high quality tweets we have to rely on. The hashtags rights, alike it's hashtag car fire hashtag Ferguson fire and, those tend to give us you know tweets clean on those keywords tend to give us the highest quality. Tweets but of course if you're building something like this in real time you can't really rely on those hashtags because in. A lot of, cases they, haven't even been developed yet so we're trying to figure out what are the best key. Words to give us of those really high quality data points but I'm wondering I mean Hugh here you are? On on the national radio program and you're telling people about this is there a way to to get people to think about Twitter as. A way to help you get information like. If everyone used the hashtag, in everyone gave you certain types of information about their location and the type? Of smoke they were seeing you might get a lot More data than than you've ever had before that is an excellent point and we are hoping to work with, local managers in promoting those types of norms and. Actually it's funny, that you mentioned it, but just this morning I was, on Twitter, and, I was looking at some of the posts around the car fire. And I noticed, that there were users policing other users and asking, them not to conflict multiple fires a single post and found that to be so interesting that these norms. Are kind of evolving and are being self policed by users on Twitter how much do you have to cancel out the. Noise though that, you get, with any sorts of large information coming from sources that might not be reliable I think. Of myself as a news person who uses Twitter a lot but every time there's a breaking news story you? Have to look things with a little bit of a grain of salt is there are a lot of data that you're getting the maybe. Isn't all that useful yes As with. Any data source as you pointed out there's gonna be some level of noise and. With social media sources just because you know, were reaching millions of people there might be a lot more noise and there is an intensive data cleaning process that. We go through and as we're building a real time monitoring system for fire that is something that, we have to be very aware of there's a couple of other sources that are out there right now there's an account on Twitter at wildfire, signal and the EPA has an app called smoke sense can you tell us about those and how they might interact with some of the work that you're? Doing yeah I think it's a really great time to be using social, media data and basically just crowd source data, as a whole in all these multifaceted ways to target the specific issue in terms of the Twitter bought wildfires signal it's a little bit different than what we're doing. Because What Descartes labs has actually done is they identify active fires on the basis, of a governmental database and. Then they use a satellite to take pictures of where the smoke is coming so it's kind of it's. Kind of a more distant perspective on how smoke is traveling, and smoke sense as you mentioned the app by EPA is. Another great example of bidirectional communication that can be done you know. We have the use of smartphones however they're not really able to harness social media conversations which. Tend to be much more prolific than users of a of a particular app wildfires seem to be getting? Worse, is this something that in the next couple years you think you can operationalize at a higher level than than you all right now yeah we're definitely hoping to scale this project out you know not just.

Twitter NRDC US Hugh EPA
"nrdc" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"To plan it the only habitable one we're aware of to look like fucking venus and plenty yes those are the good guys okay okay so so how does the climate lobby talked to these people do do congresspeople actually listen to them do they they have to leave fails to or is it do you guys get in deeper do they do they it help with the bills like you you get to help with bills and is that good or bad right so that's what we're going to dig into today which is how does your phone call become law or not so andres we like to dial it back a lot of time dumb it down it's mostly brian do represent our listeners how does a group like yours differ from someone like the nrdc or three fifty dot org when you say citizens climate lobby what are we talking about sure the fantastic and amazing thing that i've been able to see this year that citizen citizens climate lobby does that i've never seen any other organization do is that they get folks into action into congressional offices we get them writing op eds calling attending pound halls working with each other in the community like no other group i've ever seen so you have a couple of a lot of different groups and say yes we have volunteers and they're out there that this what's dollars citizens climate lobby is an actual movement i think they just reached a hundred thousand folks on the ground they have chapters all over the country they have members in every single district which is fantastic and what's great about it is these volunteers don't wanna sit back and sign a petition anymore they they're they're pissed off about what's going on and they wanna do something they they don't wanna sit down and take it anymore right so they are writing to their newspaper they are going to the hill going to their district offices like you guys mentioned they're calling in talking about the issue and that's really starting to make some headway one of the things that citizens climate lobby does is they work with the climate solution caucus in the house it's that caucus that's made up of the.

nrdc brian
"nrdc" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"nrdc" Discussed on KGO 810

"Me down see i made sure there were no low hanging branches when i set up my campfire and before we left eye drowned up my campfire stirred it's drowned out again then made sure it was coal visit smoky bear dot com to learn tipped to prevent wildfires brought to you by the us forest service your state forrester and the ad council only you can prevent wildfires he's in downington bearman odd kgon a visit relieved that there is just not going to be jobs in rural america i mean that i honestly i look at that and we even look at this kind of industrialization of farming and that everything become giant farms and rego wave of the big cities and we don't come back that me this look like a longterm demographic change join the conversation with even their men weekdays from noon until on the next generation of k g o f ted you're not wired to have a response to this sound you're neutral to it you hear it every time you finish your meal and never feel anything but if we were able to associate this sound with a new stimulus save the food we've achieved pulling a natural response from you save the food why are we doing this he my office save the food because this ad is trying to change your off the meal behavior through brainwashing because food waste cost the average family hundred dollars a year save the food teaching and 1500 extra bucks is like getting a pay rise save the food teaching your promoted which could pay for your child's braces save the food teaching your promoter check out my varieties so when you hear this sound rethink your behavior cook it store it share it just don't waste it for tips and recipes visit save the food dot com brought to you by nrdc and the ad council.

food waste hundred dollars