38 Burst results for "NIH"

Fresh update on "nih" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:48 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nih" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"Out and Bloomberg Quick Take This is a Bloomberg business. Flash equity markets are trading mixed right now, and the day's economic news was mixed as well. We began today with word on U. S manufacturing. It expanded in June at the fastest pace. In records going back to 2000 and seven, however, the services PMI was a little disappointing, and at the same time sales of new homes dropped unexpectedly in the month of May. A portion of that decline, though, could have been tied to higher prices. The affordability portability issue becoming a factor. The median sales price At a record high $374,400 right now we have the Dow off about 1/10 of 1% in the broader market. In meantime, the S and P 500 up about 1/10 of 1%. The NASDAQ comprising 2/10 of 1%. We've got energy shares tracking the price of crude oil higher. We learned a short while ago U. S. Crude supplies were down for 1/5 straight week last week. WTF above 73 the barrel. Meantime, a CDC advisory committee is reviewing data on messenger RNA vaccines and their possible connection to heart inflammation. So we have shares in the RNA vaccine makers trading lower Pfizer, for example, down 1.2% Moderna off more than 5% right now. 10 Year Treasury up in yield by a little more than two basis points 1.48% right now on the 10 year, I'm Doug prisoner. That is your Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Dad. Thank you for that update. Well, we have a bunch of virus headlines have Morgan Stanley planning to bar employees who are not vaccinated. Against Covid for entering its offices in the New York area, Really Wall Street firms trying to figure it out. We also saw that about a million people in Sydney will be barred from leaving the city as Australia racist to control an outbreak. Of the Delta variant Tim. We just continue to muddle through this. We certainly do. Fortunately, we have Dr Mario Ramirez, emergency physician, also managing director at Opportunity. Labs, also pandemic and emerging threats coordinator at the HHS during the Obama administration. He joins us now on the phone from Washington, D. C. Dr Ramirez. It's great to have you with us. I want to start with the delta variant. Because, as we learned from the CDC today, it's spreading rapidly here in the US now accounting for 1/5 of recent coronavirus cases when you see data like that, What do you think? So you're right. This is a really concerning trend, And I think this is this has a lot of folks, you know, quite a bit more concerned that we've been in recent weeks. Because this particular variant as you mentioned is highly infectious. And as a result, you know, the doubling time has been pretty short. And so we're seeing, you know, quite a significant increase in cases caused by the Delta area. The reason that's important is a couple of things. So you know, if we look over to the UK, we can see that in a country that has pretty broad vaccination rates. Their case counts, it started to go up as a result of the delta variant quite significantly. The reflection on that here in the United States, though, um it was a little bit different because we use primarily the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine, But what we have in this country are large geographic swaths. Where the vaccination rates are quite low, and you know what you essentially have, then is a vaccine. Barry heard virus period highly infectious. That's going to be circulating in communities that are not well protected. What does that mean? Well, that means that there's a significant chance for cases to go up in parts of the country that are not well vaccinated, and I'm looking primarily at the southeastern United States and parts of the Great Plains region. You know, there are a lot of estimates across the board. I think most people are settling on the potential for 1/20 20 to 30% increase in cases in some of those areas as we start to get back into the fall, because I think what we are wondering is what is the fall as it gets colder again. And as we're facing more of the delta variant, what does it mean? And I do wonder about those of us who have been vaccinated. Should we be thinking? And putting a date on our calendar about getting a booster. The data so far shows that the advisor in the Moderna vaccines both work extremely well against the delta variants. And I want to put you know listeners minds at ease if you are vaccinated. You are overwhelmingly protected against this variant. The numbers that we're seeing out of the UK still show and 88 to 93% efficacy against this particular variant. But the question about how long the immunity lasts is still an open question. And that's the question that's being studied very aggressively by the NIH and by others, And you know the signals that I think most of us are starting to look for our you know when do people who were previously vaccinated towards the end of last calendar year start to experience some breakthrough infections. And if we start to see an increase in breakthrough infections, we will sequence those variants and look to see if it's being caused by the delta Arians. Or is it being caused by something else? And when we start to see that signal, that's what tells us that it's time to start vaccinating people again. Unfortunately, don't have that answer yet. I'm wondering Doctor. If this is indeed fast spreading here in the United States, and if it's indeed infecting people who have not yet been vaccinated. Does that get us to a point? Where we end up reaching herd immunity because the people who haven't been vaccinated become infected with it. The question of herd immunity. You know, at this point, it's something of a sliding scale..

United States 88 New York Sydney June Barry 1.48% $374,400 1.2% Pfizer NIH UK Morgan Stanley Bloomberg Washington, D. C. MAY 2/10 Last Week Barack Obama
Fresh update on "nih" discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

00:37 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nih" discussed on STEM-Talk

"Or even when researchers criticize at the responses to criticize the critics. It's typically ad hominem in response. You know you. You saw that near ks senior saw nina's case Well not only that even The academics people don't say that one of my fundamental problems with the nurses health study at harvard khazei. The researchers involved. Walter willett and mayor stamp for another have driven Nutrition thinking in this country. They're very. they're considered to be very influential because they're at harvard on. Not and they have this big study that generates associations between disease and and diet and they assume that the associations are causal. They don't advocate that they be tested. They don't go down to congress to lobby for funding to test them. They don't insist to their funding agents at the nih that they should test them. They just say look. Because we've done this. We assume this is true. And there's copious evidence said it's not but even then if nothing else if they were real scientists. They would be lobbying to test their hypothesis. That's what scientists do they test hypotheses. I mean we can go after it on so many different lebron's the initial problem. Here though said is simple just this idea that obesity is caused by overeating. It is everywhere in this field. It influences how we think even about heart disease and cancer and diabetes and it's naive conceptual because it is caused by overeating. But if by reading the wrong things so Over eating well but offering want to use a phrase like overeating. Your it means. I know i'm pulling your leg. Yeah ok does your leg feel it okay. You know we. We're talking about cute. Jank diets. And i actually know a person that consumes incredibly unhealthy Genyk diet and has not experienced many of the benefits that so many people do. And i'm exaggerating here. But essentially This person has died of crisco remember crisco shortening sort of crisco and bacon. Die that now. I'm exaggerating unite. Tease them right. But this is the kind of things this guy devours and He somehow from podcast Got the idea that the quality of what he eats doesn't matter it it sort of as long as it's fat right so let me just cut to the chase and say this is not working for him and shot surprising. It's not working for them. Right and i understand. This is nothing like what you're suggesting was the reason i bring this up. You might wonder why did can bring his unusual friendship. Well the reason i brought him up is this is exactly how many of the critics essentially cartoon the key to jank diorite. They sort of have a escaping cartoon of it that it's the crisco and bacon diameter. it's the You know some other broader and bill yet nuggets and sort of a cartoon it's way of dismissing something without real serious discussion and I think that's widespread a ucla particularly in the media particularly journalists..

Congress Walter Willett Jank ONE Harvard Khazei KS Nina Genyk Harvard On Critics Many
Fresh update on "nih" discussed on Dennis Prager

Dennis Prager

02:06 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nih" discussed on Dennis Prager

"At the Wall Street Journal. By a professor of medicine at U. C. L. A Medical school and professor of epidemiology at Yale. About the the The non reporting of risks with regard to the vaccine. He's not saying neither of them are saying Don't take it. Think we need to be honest to not allow politics to determine whether we talk about it. And he doesn't see why Children, young adults and people who especially this is the this to me was the tip off. Even if you had covid, you should get the vaccine. While you would never know it from listening to public health officials Not a single published study has demonstrated that patients with a prior infection Benefit from Covid 19 vaccination. Did you know that, my dear listeners Has been reported on any of the mainstream lawyers. No That's why you don't know about it. No a lot more about covid and lockdowns and masks, listening to the show and not only my show, I'm just using mine is reference. Than reading. The New York Times Washington Post CNN watching CNN, etcetera. That this isn't readily acknowledged by the CDC or Anthony Fauci is an indication of how deeply entangled pandemic politics is in science. This is this article is what we call a Hand grenade. Or if you will bombshell. Not a single published studies demonstrated that patients with the prior infection benefit from Covid 19. That this is not readily acknowledged by the CBC or Anthony Fauci is an indication of how deeply entangled pandemic politics is in science. Finally, public health authorities are making a mistake. And risking the public's trust. That my dear friends is what we call an understatement. They have lost my trust entirely. It's an incredible thing. I never I never imagined saying that For me five years ago if somebody would have said I have no faith in the CDC, NIH and all these other organs. Of public health. I I would have thought they were a cook. I admit it. And I would have been wrong. Public health authorities are making a mistake and risking the public's trust by not being forthcoming about the possibility of harm from certain vaccine side effects. There will be lasting consequences from mingling political partisanship. And science. During the management. Of a public health crisis. I salute The Wall Street Journal four. Publishing that particular piece. That takes courage. I'd like to remind you that my column yesterday. Poses a question that I'd like you to ask. This is to me. An unanswerable question on the part of those Who lie about America being a racist country. And asked them why and have millions of blacks from the Caribbean and Africa moved here in the last 50 years. When no Jews moved to Germany in the thirties. Why would that be? Are are black Africans fools. Are blacks in the Caribbean fools. Jews were smart not to move to Germany. But blacks are stupid to move to America. That's what they're saying. I read comments on my pieces all the time. I read comments on other pieces to I find the comments section Very important by the way, and I'll tell you why. It gives me an idea of the readership of that particular website. If the comments are stupid, even if they're on our side. Then it doesn't speak well for the readership of that particular website. So that's one reason I read comments. The bigger reason is to see, for example, at The New York Times, where there is largely a herd. Of readers. I get a chance to read what the left thinks. Unfiltered. And it's very, very helpful to me. So I read the comments on my own. And to my great interest. Nobody refuted the argument. Then he left his comment on my pieces, and there was no reputation. Why do blacks moved to America if it's systemically racist? Either They're fools or the people who say it systemically racist. They're fools. You can't you can't have both right? Right? We will leave in all black society for a white supremacist society run by whites. Is Ridiculous. Simply ridiculous. That was the column yesterday. And get it. Town hall or Dennis prager dot com is probably the easiest. And then it goes to many other sites. 1/8 Prager 776. Abram X candy. Who Now has a piece in the Atlantic, which is another wasteland, which was once a thought, thoughtful magazine. Our new post racial myth. Post racial ideas the most sophisticated racist idea ever produced. He is a contributing writer at the Atlantic. Andrew W. Mellon, professor of the humanities. And the director of the Boston University Center for Anti Reese. Racist Research. Uh, I didn't know that. Yeah. Gives you an idea of the low level of Boston University. Give you an idea of the rapid deterioration of our universities in into thoughtless indoctrination, Mills..

Andrew W. Mellon Caribbean Germany NIH Boston University Africa CBC CNN CDC Yesterday Millions Research Boston University Center For A U. C. L. A Medical America Anthony Fauci Both Dennis Prager The New York Times Five Years Ago
Former New York Times Science Writer Calls on Dr. Fauci to Apologize

The Dan Bongino Show

01:32 min | Last week

Former New York Times Science Writer Calls on Dr. Fauci to Apologize

"So here's that former New York Times author and science writer saying Listen, Fauci just come clean, Admit we screwed up. We gave funding taxpayer money that made its way Did Wuhan lab that created a possible bio weapon and was engaged in gated function? Research? Just fess up. Americans are very forgiving people. Check this out. It's clear that the Wuhan Institute biology particularly Dr uh, mainly Shi Was doing. They report. They published an experiment in 2017, which seems to me to go way beyond the terms of the of the moratorium, however, lucents languages and I think we're going to see In the next few weeks, Uh, Dr Foster being asked Well, even if he didn't think he was supporting any gain of function Research Institute is this research published wagon to Shane a violation. Of the terms of The NIH grant to and I think at that point we may see Dr Fauci say, Well, doctor, she was doing illegitimate research. He was doing research, which I did not authorized, but was forbidden by the terms of the ground We gave her night. I don't know that's the case. I think it's possible that this is how The situation will turn out. Why do we trust these people to this is finally we have someone a former New York Times science writer coming out and stating the obvious that regardless of what Fauci said, it appears obvious based on the evidence Now that we funded this

Wuhan Institute Dr Uh Fauci Wuhan New York Times Dr Fauci Dr Foster SHI Research Institute NIH Shane
Breaking Down the Wuhan Lab Leak Hypothesis, Dr. Fauci and Other Government Officials Involved

The Dan Bongino Show

01:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Breaking Down the Wuhan Lab Leak Hypothesis, Dr. Fauci and Other Government Officials Involved

"So it appears that there's some kind of and I'll get to this moratorium in a minute. The United States government has a moratorium on funding research that would make viruses more powerful. Gee, I wonder why we put a moratorium on that. Because we could create a whole bunch of really deadly viruses, and that would really suck. Sounds like the government finally did something right when they weren't doing something wrong. Hey, we shouldn't do research like that. But it appears a sub agency of the NIH led by Dr Anthony Fauci. May have approved this grant that went to this eco health alliance that eventually made its way to the Wuhan Institute of Virology, where it's believed. Now, this virus may have leaked from Mm. Oh, it gets better. Here's the third part of this daily caller piece again. They're talking about this Christopher Park, who was the State Department person who apparently did not want to open the Pandora's box looking into this stuff, according to this Vanity Fair report. He says Park was not the only government official to oppose pursuing the lab leak hypothesis, however. The Nano another until Vanity Fair that an intelligence analyst struggled to find a report written by officials working at the Department of Energy Lab that Anna must be a whistleblower. The Nano told the island he viewed the report is being intentionally buried within the classified collection system. Department of Energy officials then attempted to block State Department officials for meeting with the report's authors did Nano alleged okay? So just clearing that up a bit. We have funding paid to echo Health alliance through FAO cheese group there. Making its way around the moratorium against this kind of funding that makes its way to a Chinese lab. We think this virus may have leaked from, and apparently there's a report on it that the government's burying in its own classified system who's burying it? What are they covering up

Dr Anthony Fauci Eco Health Alliance Wuhan Institute Of Virology Christopher Park United States Government Department Of Energy Lab State Department NIH Vanity Fair Nano Echo Health Alliance Anna Department Of Energy Park FAO Government
Questions on Wuhan Lab Funding Must Be Answered

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Questions on Wuhan Lab Funding Must Be Answered

"I just happen to have standing by america's leading and favorite economist. Brian west brave. I trust portfolio brian. Good morning how are you you. I am excellent. it's turning into spring and summer everywhere. that's awesome. I just happened to follow a conversation. I just had with dr francis collins director of the nih about the funding of the wuhan institute of technology. And i'm not a scientist and i didn't stay at a holiday but if you give a grant to an organization are you giving a grant to everyone in the organization for all the research they are doing or can you segregate the funds effectively. Brian westbrook as an economist. In all my experience. I what i have learned is that you cannot beggar gate the funds. I'll just use one example definitely not as dangerous at least two health but in illinois We started a lottery and of millions of dollars every year that that was going to take it from people that were playing was supposed to pay for education. Well they they moved that money that education but they took away other money so in in the end Money is fungible. They spend it wherever they want. They promise all kinds of things but then when the doors are closed and no one's looking they do what they want.

Brian West Dr Francis Collins Wuhan Institute Of Technology NIH Brian Brian Westbrook America Illinois
Simple Lifestyle Changes to Prevent Alzheimer's and Dementia With Dr. Dean Sherzai

The Chalene Show

02:32 min | Last month

Simple Lifestyle Changes to Prevent Alzheimer's and Dementia With Dr. Dean Sherzai

"One of the most interesting statistics. I've heard you talk about. Is the effectiveness of what the companies have been able to do and the effectiveness of certain types of exercise. Can you share with us. What is it we need to know. So i was part of the biggest clinical trials in the world that ucsd which was the number one neuroscience program at nih in an at columbia mind everywhere and after four hundred studies that worked on mice. Those poor mice. I was part of those. Da teams that cut their heads off and then we studied. It's terrible after all. Those studies are success. Rate has been zero. We have zero drug that does zero percent in slowing down or stopping disease. Now we have gloves that affect the symptoms era seven but even the pharmaceutical companies don't claim that it slows the disease so zero after billions and billions of dollars and all these experimentation yet and now these nutraceutical companies. You know the blue jellyfish pill and this and that they're making hundreds of millions of dollars on zero data and why because some young guy was able to buy their right. You are oh and do the right trademark and then just put some things together and sell it as a good name because it has targeted or cognition or neuro in it. So it works. Here's what works harvard eddie. Large wealth power incredibly. Well done study if you walk. A brisk walk. Not you know when we tell our patients direction all dr shares. I i'm in the garden Those are great. Those are meditation exercise. You gotta get short of tire if you do. Twenty five minutes brisk exercise every day. You lower your risk of alzheimer's by forty to forty five percent. Why is there nobody talking about it. Because there's not a hundred percent effective and for the younger people. You are more likely to abstain from alzheimer's if you start at early we're talking about nutrition. We call it neuro by the way we're not any. You are on nutrition exercise unwind which is stress management ours restorative sleep and always optimizing mental activity. By the way. None of those. You have to pay anybody well for food. You have to go somewhere to buy food. But basically it combined the fact of it we've extrapolated. We said that's kind of as much as ninety percent of alzheimer's and dementia can be prevented

Ucsd Harvard Eddie NIH Columbia Alzheimer's Dementia
NIH director on the 3 COVID vaccines

The Bobby Bones Show

02:13 min | 2 months ago

NIH director on the 3 COVID vaccines

"Dr collins. It is such a pleasure to have you want. how are you today. i am just fine. It is great to be on your show with you bobby. I'm a big fan so terrific to have a chance to talk about whatever we're going to talk about. You are the director of the national institutes of health. What does that mean. that means. I'm the guy who oversees our nation's investments in biomedical research. The national institutes of health is the way in which discoveries get made and clinical advances occur. And it's my job to all of this in a forty two billion dollar a year medical research investment which for the past year has been all about covid. Nineteen as you might guess and we've made some real progress with vaccines and what this way. I'm glad to have you on because this is the guy to ask about vaccines. I've had one shot. Eddie's got shot lunchboxes got a shot. Now we're the inside the two shots system here because we didn't johnson and johnson. So can you explain to me what the difference is in these three vaccines and if we should look for any of them specifically well let me first say they are all wonderfully effective and safe vaccine so the bottom line is you should take what everyone gets offered to you as soon as it gets off. Because this is how we're going to get past is terrible. Ovid nineteen pandemic. Yeah the pfizer moderna vaccine. Those are two shots they're based on something called messenger. Aren a the johnson and johnson is one shot and is based on adenoviruses approach. But they've all been tested in trials of at least thirty thousand people each and been shown to have safety. Records are really quite impressive with no hint of any real troubles there and a highly effective way protecting you against getting sick or dying of covid nineteen and that's what we are all waiting for and now it is here so i know people may be a little resistant about wait. A minute debate rush. Did they go too fast. I'm the guy who's been overseeing all of this at the nih libya sure you. I've never seen anything done better than this. In terms of the way in which the trials were conducted in strength therefore the conclusions about being safe and effective so. Roll up your sleeves america. It's time to get past this pandemic

Dr Collins National Institutes Of Health Johnson Bobby Eddie Aren Pfizer Libya America
COVID-19 vaccine trial involving college students to focus on transmission

Lance McAlister

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine trial involving college students to focus on transmission

"The study on college students will look at whether the Madonna vaccine prevents asymptomatic transmission within the next five or so months. We'll be able to answer the very important question about whether vaccinated people get infected a symptomatically, and if they do do they transmit the infection to others? Dr. Anthony Fauci says the NIH will follow 12,000 students and 25,000 of their close contacts. Half the students will be vaccinated immediately, the other half

Dr. Anthony Fauci NIH
"nih" Discussed on GovExec Daily

GovExec Daily

01:48 min | 3 months ago

"nih" Discussed on GovExec Daily

"Center went to work in in forty eight hours designed vaccine that i now have in my arm from moderna because they had all that experience to build on and within sixty five days that was already in a phase one trial and by july. It was innovative three trial. In by december there was the data. Fda and saying yup goodwin. Let's start distributing amazing story favoring impressive switching to a little more of a managerial question. Your agency has over fifteen thousand. Employees is many of them. Were those who can have been working from home during the pandemic. How have you been working in to keep up productivity and morale amid that and also you know having one of your your top officials dr anthony fauci be under of an attack from republicans and others including the former president. How have you been able to to manage all of that. I am an amazing team. That i get to work with. Everywhere from people. Working at the bench to people like davao cheever both infectious disease institute and also being public health spokespersons always telling the truth and unflinching even when he gets negative feedback for various sources is a privilege to work with tony. And i have worked with tony for twenty seven years since i've been at nih so we know each other pretty well. We talk almost every night about exactly what has happened that day and what plans will need to make for the next day So yeah he is an incredible leader but across this amazing workforce called nih. There are so many heroes and people who have been absolutely flat up working as hard as humans can For the last..

december twenty seven years forty eight hours tony july republicans over fifteen thousand anthony fauci both three trial sixty five days nih one Fda next day phase one trial moderna dr davao cheever
NIH Statement Raises Questions About AstraZeneca's Vaccine Data

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:36 min | 3 months ago

NIH Statement Raises Questions About AstraZeneca's Vaccine Data

"Company to work with the dsm be. That's us to review the efficacy data and ensure the most accurate up-to-date efficacy data can be made public as quickly as possible. Those are such long sentences that i feel. We need to translate a little bit here so we were told yesterday. Seventy nine percent efficacy which is pretty good for a vaccine so that sounds good but then there is this concern expressed suggesting that maybe if you look at the test results different way you don't see seventy nine percent astra zeneca saying in response to that. Well that's exactly right so there so the dnb is saying look at all the day to look at the newest data and the company. Just put out a release said the numbers published yesterday. Were based on. A pre specified interim alice's with a data cutoff of february seventeenth. So they're looking back at data that was collected as of february seventeenth and the dsm be seems to be saying that between then and now we have more data which makes your efficacy numbers. Not look as good. That seems to be what's happening here. I think we can interpret that as well. That would mean does it. Not that a few more people in this study got sick. Got covert and so the seventy nine percent rape didn't quite hold up right. They got sick and they got sick in the vaccine arm of the study. Not the placebo arm of the study. That's why the numbers don't look as good so we still think this is a pretty good vaccine but maybe not seventy nine percent. What are the locations for actually getting this approved in the united states. Exactly it's still a good vaccine. Not quite as good and this is just a strange turn. And it'll be up to the fda to analyze

Zeneca Astra Alice United States FDA
CDC finalizing guidance on what's safe for those who are vaccinated

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

CDC finalizing guidance on what's safe for those who are vaccinated

"On what vaccinated people should do and not do now that they're protected from Cove it ahead of its release. Dr. Anthony Fauci of NIH says small gatherings should be okay when everybody's vaccinated if you have vaccinated people Either in the same family or good friends that you wanna get together with socially, then you can have that small gathering, says Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. But the big thing is that everyone in that small group is vaccinated. Also, these gatherings should beware where you're in the home you're not out in society with is 50 to 70,000 infections. You know all of you a vaccinated but remains unclear is a vaccinated people can catch and pass on the illness. But he says the overall risk to a vaccinated person is relatively low. Mike Murillo w T O

Dr. Anthony Fauci Dr Anthony Fauci NIH National Institute Of Allergy Mike Murillo
Bringing Hope for Heart Failure with CCM Therapy with Simos Kedikoglou

Outcomes Rocket

05:57 min | 4 months ago

Bringing Hope for Heart Failure with CCM Therapy with Simos Kedikoglou

"Cmos such a pleasure to have you here today. Thank you very much sean. It's great to be here. Thank you and so you know you are In from the uk and a love that you know the work you guys are doing from there is translatable. You know the nih and there's a lot of learning that we could do in the us health system and overall just In general across the globe. But you know before we dive into the work that you're doing at impulse than amex tell us a little bit about you and what inspires your work in. Healthcare against cat is eight phil to work in because you cannot do well for our employees for shareholders for the people of the impulse team by doing good for the patients getting the best thing for the patient galloping damage what inspires every day. We have quite a lot of Gauged on our website where patients themselves are talking with them or they spontaneously talked about how we have been able to change. That lives in. This is very motivating. That he's Everybody wants to have professional fulfillment but seeing this patient at being able to play with the grandchildren go shopping. Were their partner win. The davis likud then is something we find very motivating. Yeah for sure. And it's just a an amazing time to be able to do it. We do in health care and so talk to us about your company and how exactly you guys are adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes they now makes has developed. Ccm technology which is for patients in with caught fire. We had intervention had feigned grew. Having implantable device is for those patients that have exhausted financial statement by that not yet sick enough to qualify for a heart transplant or a full replacement off the palm of device. This is a lot of patience. Six or seven million patients globally. Roughly one one and a half in the united states and these the hatfield epidemic is growing fast the american heart estimates that is growing aspect four percent but he had a number of grocery four percent but he had are very valid our patients they can walk at most one flight of stairs. They can walk a thousand feet and then they stopped short of breath. They edit three from deep official daily life. They cannot go to church or the synagogue. They cannot go shopping. They cannot spend time with family went. We do is to try to help them to leave the latch that we have developed so extensive clinical trials and genetic development a device that makes them be to enjoy life again and we have immortal that the hope is here and i think this is how we think we're adding value now. We have also shown on many occasions that will reduce there okay. The frequency of their visits to the hospital the space course very much and so we save on resources. We have a detached of technology allows them to go for long without the pledge. Michelle we do. Take into account the economics. We actually value to the system but we also create value to the patients themselves by to join that lives. Now that's fantastic and simos so the so the work you guys doing. Obviously you guys have brought the technology to the us really globally. You're based in europe. But sounds like you're making a big difference here would you say makes. Ccm therapy just different or unique and what it's able to provide to patients show the communist based out of the united states and the technology brain development has been done in the united states. You jesse is unique is that we are helping people through a completely different way before People getting mushroom shorter treatment. Obviously everybody will exist for excitement before they concede that any device but instead of moving to the very invasive transplants ridiculous divides thinks that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars Ways for the patient we have stimulate or show. Take very unique concept we had. We had to develop survey stake in more than twenty years of research and more than obligations that basically trains the myocardium eight single it like when you go to the treadmill and you Start getting exercise overtime over the three months winter. You start feeling better. It's a very similar without device to very simple implant. It's now the fifth generation of the infants advantage simply for forty five minutes at basis typically. Go back out the same day at home and they don't even need anesthesia for implantation. Just like the dacian. This feeling better. They see the effect building up and This is what they consider. Unique is not only that it's a completely different not replacing the pump. Were just training the supporting the pump and training it to make able to deliver the blast at body needs but also that it's a fairly simple process. You know justified the five minute implant. The patient typically has to charge because we usually childhood by any to charge launch a week for forty forty five minutes and we have shown that more than ninety nine and a half percent of patients soundtrack. Because they see improvement cho- i would consider the uniqueness here is the concept itself which is malaysian. But from the patient's standpoint relatively big help for a relatively low invade not very invasive procedure and not quieting loss from this patient other than a weekly detach very good very good and is it charged externally or how how is it. It is a tax completely Just like your to say back. The judging and In new generations of the device which i'm happy to talk we are actually improving what we get out of. The device show not only the patients chancing but also devices being every week so we get out of the typical court lahore liberty three months in check your device which is just a bad into the basin. We have to think it through from the beginning in a way that is convenient to the patient inefficient for the healthcare system.

United States NIH Sean Davis UK Michelle Jesse Europe CHO
NIH launches research on COVID-19 long-haulers

Radiosurgery New York

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

NIH launches research on COVID-19 long-haulers

"Institutes of Health is launching research into the long term effects of some covert 19 patients. Dr. Anthony Fauci says Some recent studies have shown up to 30% of recovering covered patients report symptoms that can last for months and can range from mild, annoying to actually quite incapacitating. It's referred to as long haul covert 19 and symptoms include lingering brain fog, breathing problems and depression. Fauci says new NIH research is being launched to understand the causes and consequences.

Institutes Of Health Dr. Anthony Fauci Fauci NIH Depression
Fauci says NIH to study ‘long-haul’ COVID-19 symptoms

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Fauci says NIH to study ‘long-haul’ COVID-19 symptoms

"Dr Anthony Fauci says the NIH is going to make some progress on what it calls long haul covert survivors. I'm happy to say And yesterday there was the first in what will be a Syriza's of research opportunity. Announcements released for NIH initiative on this puzzling syndrome, where now the central apparently is some form of chronic condition. That was not had before Covert. But that just hangs and hangs on

Dr Anthony Fauci NIH
Dissecting Webflow With Digital Marketing Specialist Lachlan Kirkwood

The Fractal Marketing Podcast - with Gerard Doyle

08:53 min | 4 months ago

Dissecting Webflow With Digital Marketing Specialist Lachlan Kirkwood

"So this episode armed joined by kirkwood luck is a digital marketing specialists based knee may in brisbane and much like may as background working across tech startups and digital agencies. He's responsible for utilizing the latest digital marketing strategies to enhance conversion outcomes. Luck also runs. Click truro platform to help digital marketers. Connect with jobs they love. I love the idea of that because there is much quake out there but it's not always loved doing so i love that idea lachlan. Welcome to the episode. Thank you very exotic jumping boom crite. Sorry laughlin has the company web flow. And we're gonna pull apart web flow from the outside from a market his point of view we look at what we love what we hate what we're curious about. We don't understand what we think to better and we're going to see if we can work basically web flow from the outside what marketing is doing it. Also a little bit about the that whole space about web design and non code and everything behind that and that movement so lachlan for those people playing along at high. Can you tell us a little bit about web. Fly before we dig into it. Yeah absolutely so. We're pretty ubiquitous right now in the tech industry. It's pretty much interrupting the whole no code. Move it on over the past couple of years and it really has been in the past twelve months that no codes taken. The wolves stolman essentially. What occurred is just tools that allow you to build products without having to actually see kurt itself. So it's almost like visual programming and this certainly being tools out there for years. Things like wordpress that it'd been able to do that full people but the tools a getting won't powerful these days or you can create user accounts and just like dynamic content across websites and being around for a very very long time. Actually it's been through many iterations. I think it was in two thousand and nine found. Start working on it. But the reason. I guess it's gotten so big is because the whole creator right now is booming especially throughout covert wherever almost starting to explore what it could be to build their own businesses and people without technical experience. More in pal emba build anything in the space of a couple of weeks and the other big reason is that the tackles better so you can scale things much better on no code these days much easier to design things with custody. Assess without even having to know how to write. Css and two boys strengths. That's what they specialize in the most. And the reason i chose web flows. Because i'm actually contracting for a company called bubble and they one of the other leaders in the no code base is actually one of our competitors is that i for years have worshipped his marketing strategy. I think what they're doing is absolutely fantastic. So i always take inspiration from one day doing and try to add a little fight onto it if bobble great so this space that i love when something like no code is invented because like you said it already existed my people already using. He said wordpress. Maybe they had weeks or squarespace. And you know he wasn't given a name and then marketers and advertising and branding type people were always brilliant at taking something and then it already existed to a certain degree and then creating a little definition around creating a movement was wet flow. Did you say they jumped onto the nike. Instead of position cells around that or would you think will instrumental of really pushing the whole non code movement hit by the found. That bubble actually didn't prefer or didn't like the cut because they thought it was like another blockchain kind of hardwood before using so they prefer visual program because that is descriptive. As to what it is way floor didn't coined the term. I think the community just started giving it that night because they wanted names for like who they would not software developers but there will so people who can build software so what you call them so they just started calling himself. No code is and where floor really saw about as an offer changes to kinda mold that identity within the industry and they started using that pretty commonly throughout debris raining. They'll using i know they have no code. Which is like yield conference the no code space which the first people to coin so yeah definitely been writing that way and trying to push that as much as they can now and even a problem. Now we're really starting to embrace the whole code movement and use that within content that we share. So let's let's get a little bit into that besides just heads completely around it so people who in one sense no code is in the fact that they they built a website on wakes card but actually the designer of code starts to feel to me like somebody who has an appreciation of code all the need for bespoke but doesn't actually code the base back end. Because when i look at web flood look at their interface. It's a bit more complex. It's not it's not week there is card. You can just go in there and you can adjust by the pixel you can change something from sixteen pixels. Seventeen pixels you can. Actually edit the actual definitions is not just drag and drop is that. Is that how carter defines themselves. It's it's more than just not cutting with no card. That's almost like a simple version. This is much more. It's a bit like being vegan. Not just about not eating animal products. It's about the movement of veganism. No code is basically the vegan so the coding world further point. Do they then shout about. I don't like vikings yes. Yes and yes absolutely on the avid note of myself. And the reason. I contract bob because i was using bubble for year and eventually ended up just out the founders and often producing more full them so i guess i fit quite nicely into the digital market out. My background in tech sought ups. I can read some strings of code. But i definitely can't write anything. Hdl's probably the furtherest. My knowledge goes to. But i certainly have an appreciation for it. I know how important it is and yet there is definitely staple learning cove to tools like web particularly bubble because bubble. You're actually writing logic. You just don't see the java script that you're writing it just visually for you. But it certainly does take quite a bit on the senate and the one of the reasons that i love web blow it so much and i'm happy to dive into the sun is just the amount of content created around education for even just like on boarding people to that product is phenomenal. I think that's one of the reasons why eighty so while you let's trump strains that so what i always do. My first love of marketing was seo. That's the first discipline i got gotten. So my depot position is eight sticker dominion and have a look and look at it and kind of guys. Sixty three thousand referring domains. Thirty five million back lanes but whatever that's worth but five hundred and ten thousand six hundred eighty seven organic monthly traffic. So i'm looking at. Nih risk worth one point six million dollars worth of sea traffic right so good start but to your point you know that half a million organic keywords. That comes from amazing content and that content that goes beyond sort of someone searching for no code web design till this is about understanding the pain points of a persona and giving first and then sort of building from matt can you. You've obviously looked more at the may what what do you feel like. They content strategy is for this particular persona so it wasn't a casa Previously in haas about the found is all web flow and when they initially started a business the actual personas that they created and it was two of them that they just laser focused on. That was all. They focused on building for and the main one was a an existing software. Developer knows how to write code. He knows how sorry they know. How to build custom websites or prox- but they just want a streamline that time so they might be a freelance that might have an agency and they can only just. I'd sell that time for money. And you know the time it takes to build a custom. Product is just much longer than it is to build it on web play with have existing templates or you can just drag and drop elements so that was one of the main problems that we're going to solve the thing you'll notice on that blog is suddenly post a low content around like the industry but then may educational content. Is things like a series where they actually educate those uses. All those personas on how to better themselves. So they've got like a blog series for building Agency oil building a website with good. Seo or even if you're building a costume e stole just how to build that still but how did you first customers how to build your attention with customers how to create a u x so that way you know your conversion rate increases so they really want that cost us to succeed and i think that's why we're succeed so

Lachlan Kirkwood Luck Laughlin Brisbane Kurt Nike Vikings Carter BOB Senate SUN Matt SEO
The Biden administration is inheriting working COVID-19 hospital data

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:54 min | 5 months ago

The Biden administration is inheriting working COVID-19 hospital data

"The biden administration is inheriting at least one thing around covid nineteen. That's working hospital data from american public media. This is marketplace tech. Molly would on the first full day of his administration. President biden signed an executive order designed to ensure a data driven response to covid nineteen and future public health threats. Now the administration already faces a big choice around cova data in july. The trump administration directed hospitals to stop sending data to the centers for disease control. And instead send it to the department of health and human services and hhs asked the data analysis company pollen tear to harmonize this whole massive information at first hot mess but by the fall the system was really working and now is tracking relations at least really really well. Alexis matter goal runs the kobe tracking project at the atlantic. He says the biden administration should try to ignore the messy politics in favor of the good data. You know part of it is. Cdc is seen as less political organization versus hhs in which you know it's seen as more a part of the administration did not have standing apart. You know one of the things. I really learned this reporting is that description is not totally accurate. In all cases you know the people who built this new hospital data system. They're all career civil servants. And so it really takes getting pretty deep inside these agencies to really understand the dynamics within these very complex organizations so what choices does the biden administration face around this data collection right. They could try to push the data collection for hospitalizations back into cdc into this sort of less flexible and older system or they could keep it inside. Hhs and to one of the things that i've been really worried about. Is that sort of to do this. Sort of abstract good of having the data collection be you know in the place where it belongs that you actually take away the system that working really well right now and that's incredibly transparent for the public. Do you have any sense from the one week by administration has existed of which way they might go. You know. I think the real thing is that the vaccine data is on right you saw. Cdc director will lemke saying you know she wasn't sure about the vaccine data right now and i just got to say i mean that was a system that was designed and built inside the cdc. I mean this is arguably the first major pandemic to exist in the big data age right like it. Sounds like you're saying there's just a skill set there that might not have been developed. Yeah it's not. As if the cdc doesn't collect of course cdc collects tons of data bud for different purposes. It's one thing to need rough and ready data to make decisions today. It's another thing to collect data for research projects over time in which you really want like precise answers but you have a lot of time to develop. Those data sets the questions. Do you ask the process that you build in the pandemic response. I would say by primary criticism of the cdc on a bunch of different levels is they've just moved too slowly. It hasn't seemed enough flake crisis. I mean the early example of that for me was in the very early days when the cdc had put up there cova tracking apparatus. They just didn't update it on the weekends. At a time when cases were like doubling like they stop updating on friday. They'd updated on monday. And there'd be twice as many cases as when they stopped you know. And i just thought to myself like guys. Everyone is working the weekend right now. Like we need to know what happening. The public needs to understand what's happening. You can't just take the weekend off. And i'm happy to say that the vaccine tracking the cdc is doing. They're updating it over the weekend you know. It's like right so so maybe this is a good. Maybe this is a good sign. You know that the administration cdc maybe as reinvigorated and has some renewed sense of purpose and are treating this like the crisis that it really is. Talk to me a little bit about palin tear and its role in this data collection because pailin tier is a name that inspires some dread either in the book or with respect to privacy and transparency. Like what do we know about. Its role in this data collection and how much transparency there is in in what they can. Use this data for to pailin here. It was co founded by peter thiel Who i think for a lot of democrats become sort of a republican supervillain and peter thiel and pailin tier have a lot of government contracts. People are rightfully worried about the extent of their reach into the federal government. But here's the thing people used the fact that. Hhs is data system which is called. Hhs protect was built by pollen tear as a reason to move data out of hhs. The problem is that. Hhs protect actually grew out of a cdc system also built by pailin tier also nih. They also use talent here so we have a system in which pailin tier is pretty thoroughly threaded throughout our public health surveillance infrastructure. Which in my mind. The way that i would set it up if i were doing this. Probably not on the other hand. It's not really an issue of hhs versus cdc. They both used talent here. Right pal to your says that they don't use that data that's that's flowing into system. They built for anything else that they basically just built the database in their hands are off it for what it's worth. Do you think we have that in writing somewhere in federal contract that may over tax.

Biden Administration CDC HHS President Biden Pailin Molly Alexis Lemke Atlantic Peter Thiel Palin Federal Government NIH
Fauci on WHO, COVID-19 variants, vaccines and more

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Fauci on WHO, COVID-19 variants, vaccines and more

"Of the Cove in 19 virus or drawing the attention of health leaders here in the U. S and Dr Anthony Fauci of NIH, telling W. O P one particular mutation is concerning because current vaccines and treatments don't seem this End up well against a mutation of the virus being seen in South Africa appears to be more troublesome than others out. There really knocks out the effect of certain of the monoclonal antibodies, but it also diminishes significantly the efficacy of the vaccine. Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads up the National Institute of Allergy Infectious Diseases, says the mutation doesn't make the vaccines. We have useless, but we need to be ready to we don't have to do it now. Modify if necessary. The vaccine is also watching the strain in Brazil and also the one that's now dominant in the U. K. He says. This all drives home the need for people to get vaccinated here in the U. S. You don't want to see Virus take over in this country, then suppress all the virus that's here.

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr. Anthony Fauci U. National Institute Of Allergy NIH W. South Africa Brazil
California reports case of highly infectious COVID-19 strain

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

California reports case of highly infectious COVID-19 strain

"Apparently more contagious strain of the Corona virus has shown up in Southern California Governor Gavin Newsom broke the news during an online conversation with Dr Fauci of NIH. This follows reports earlier this week of a confirmed case in a National Guardsmen in Colorado who hadn't been traveling. There's a second suspected case in Colorado now. The Western cases have triggered a host of questions about how the variant circulating in England got to the U. S. And whether it's too late to stop it. In that virtual conversation, Fauci says, you should expect to see more variant virus cases quickly spreading across the country. Gonna start

Dr Fauci Gavin Newsom National Guardsmen Colorado Southern California NIH Fauci England
Mexico Begins Covid Vaccine Rollout

Coronavirus 411

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

Mexico Begins Covid Vaccine Rollout

"By april first. The chief scientific advisor for operation warp speed said the frequency of allergic reactions to the pfizer vaccine is higher than what would be expected for other vaccines discussions are underway between the vaccine makers and the nih about

Pfizer NIH
"nih" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:45 min | 6 months ago

"nih" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Recall something That happened a long time ago in this very auditorium where many of you are sitting right now, when I first came to the NIH is the fellow and training from my medical residency in the summer of 1968. I was introduced into the extraordinary place that we're in. Right now. The National Institutes of Health was so much of the research that has gone into conquering many of the diseases that we know now have really been addressed in such a way as they've had a major impact on the health of the nation. This is true of covert 19. It is particularly meaningful to me as a member of the N I H for so many years. To be receiving today with secretary a czar and Francis Collins and several of our health care providers of vaccine that essentially had its origination in the fundamental basic research that's conducted here at NIH by our scientists, as well as by our grantees and contractors over the years. This What we're seeing now is the culmination of years of research, which have led To a phenomenon that has truly been unprecedented, and that is to go from the realization that we're dealing with a new pathogen, a virus that was described in January of this year to less than one year later to have vaccines that are going into the arms of so many people, including myself. Dr Anthony Fauci. And this is second vaccine approval comes as the coronavirus that shows no sign of stopping it spread across the US confirmed cases in the United States Now over 18 million, there've been over 318,000 deaths, with an average of 3000 people dying every day. Also it NIH today has mentioned by Dr Fauci and getting vaccinated publicly. Alex Cesar, secretary of health and human services. I'm so pleased to be here for this official kickoff of the vaccine developed by the NIH Vaccine Research Center, Madonna, Barda and other research partners, and I'm pleased to be getting this vaccine myself. We've all said it is nothing short of miraculous to have a safe and effective vaccine within one year of a novel virus becoming known to the world, But when we need a medical miracle, we know where to look. We look to the brilliant dedicated scientists at the NIH. And we look too passionate, relentless researchers at America's innovative biotech companies as a member of the HHS family, It fills me with great pride that the NIH and other parts of agent just played such a significant role in developing this vaccine, which will save thousands and thousands of lives and help bring this dark chapter to an end. In the long and storied history of the other. I H This is one of your finest accomplishments. I also want to recognize the years of work and investment that went into delivering this vaccine. It took more than just one remarkable year. But years of dedication to develop the M or in a vaccine technology that many once considered a long shot. Once we have defeated this pandemic, I believe that both the success of Operation worked speed and the M R in a platform ticket. Biology pioneered by NIH and Barda should reinvigorate our optimism about the frontiers of medical science and how we can bring the public and private sectors together to tackle our toughest challenges. What I look back on my time at HHS putting together Operation Warp speed will be one of my proudest memories not only because Ow s vaccines will save lives, but because they have reminded Americans to think big when the government and industry charged together toward a really Bold goal. We can achieve unbelievable things. I know that these kinds of efforts have been a focus for Dr Francis Collins. The active partnership that he mentioned which he has spearheaded under Ow s involves more than 20 pharmaceutical companies, Other government agencies and other partners and the NIH is also continued to expand its accelerating medicines Partnership for other serious health challenges like Alzheimer's and schizophrenia. Close. I will note that as extraordinary is this scientific achievement is getting this vaccine is more or less just like any other vaccine we receive. We have to follow the right mask wearing and social distancing precautions today, but otherwise, this is just like NIH healthcare workers or HHS employees getting their annual flu shot. Americans should also know that this vaccine has been through the kind of searching and independent review that they expect for. The drug or vaccine at the Food and Drug Administration. I made it a personal priority to ensure that we were not cutting any corners in this development process that the standards and data being used were fully transparent and that the final decisions made on these vaccines were made by the same career FDA scientists who would make the decisions on any other vaccine. Modern would be receiving this vaccine today, and Americans can be confident in this vaccine and each vaccine the FDA authorizes for covert 19. These vaccines are going to save so many lives and help bring this pandemic to an end. Thank you all for having me here today and on behalf of a grateful country. Thank you to everyone at the NIH for your work this year, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex A czar. President Donald Trump tweeting today, distribution of both vaccines is going very smoothly. Amazing how many people are being vaccinated record numbers our country, and indeed the world will soon see the great miracle of what the Trump Administration has accomplished. They said. It couldn't be done that tweet by president Donald Trump after the opening statements today at NIH. It was time for the shots themselves here is and I each director, Dr Francis Collins. Dr Collins tell us about why you're getting vaccinated today. Well, it's an incredible privilege to serve is the director of the National Institutes of Health where so much of this work has been happening over the course of this tumultuous year. I get to talk a lot about these vaccines and their promise for ending this terrible global pandemic. It's one thing to hear me talk about it. It's another to have me roll up my sleeves. Say I believe that this is the way we're going to get through this. This is something that the evidence has shown in rigorous scientific analysis to be safe and effective. So I'm rolling up my sleeve And I'm saying Dr Baylin, bring it on. All right. Well, thank you so much. Thanks for coming and showing us the way. Are you done yet? Oh, just not much of me. That was no problem, People. Excellent. Thank you very much So, And Miss Chan is gonna give you a couple papers for the big day, huh? NIH director Dr Francis Collins. By the way, we have the video of these leaders getting vaccinated at our website c span dot.

NIH Dr Francis Collins NIH Vaccine Research Center HHS Dr Anthony Fauci secretary President Donald Trump Food and Drug Administration director United States Dr Baylin Trump Administration Alex Cesar Miss Chan Barda America independent review
Fauci receives Moderna vaccine in televised event at NIH

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:20 sec | 6 months ago

Fauci receives Moderna vaccine in televised event at NIH

"Veteran veteran Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci received received Madonna Madonna vaccines vaccines in in a a televised televised event event along along with with some some frontline frontline health health care care workers, workers, Dr Dr Fauci Fauci said said years years of of good good science science led led to to the the phenomenal phenomenal rapid rapid development of the vaccines. He is considered the nation's leading authority on infectious disease Secretary is our said the vaccines will help bring a dark chapter of American history to a close.

Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci Madonna Madonna Dr Dr Fauci Fauci Infectious Disease
F.D.A. Panel Endorses Moderna's Coronavirus Vaccine

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

F.D.A. Panel Endorses Moderna's Coronavirus Vaccine

"A government advisory panel has endorsed a second covert vaccine. This one from Moderna, along with the NIH. This clears the way for an emergency. You author emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration, which is expected to come quickly. According to the FDA. The vaccine is 94% effective and unlike fighters vaccine, it would not require ultra cold storage that would make distribution of little easier after the authorization. U. S officials plan to move out and initial shipment of nearly $6 million. Most of those will go to healthcare workers and nursing home residents.

Moderna FDA NIH
"nih" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"nih" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"HHS and NIH is weekend program it Boseman Lynchburg Ohio and of the god is just a away radio broadcast it is written all the churches of Christ so you it is everyone there for that to hear these words of mine and does them shall be likened unto a wise man who built his house upon the rock it is written and everyone that here at these words of mine and doeth them not shall be likened unto a foolish man who built his house upon the sand it is written and it came to pass when Jesus had finished these words the multitudes were astonished at his teaching for he taught them as one having authority and not as their scribe when he was come down from the mountain great multitudes followed him and behold there came to him a lot for a worship him shares large if thou wilt thou canst make me clean all rounder he stretched forth his hand and touched him saying I will these all made clean I understood where his leprosy was Clinton's and Jesus sales on to him see the old tell no man but go show yourself to the priest that offer the gift that Moses command for a testimony under them.

HHS NIH Boseman Lynchburg Ohio Jesus Clinton Moses
"nih" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

12:19 min | 2 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WTVN

"NIH. Gain every day to remember the forgotten, man. This is the Sean Hannity show this precedent that we have how is trying to unravel everything that she did an Obama again. And if I ever become a one issue voter, it will be about pollution and the greenhouse effect on the president, please. I don't want to talk about traveling. Honoring. Please. I wanted to talk about but I'm not interested in your one is. Uh-huh. All right. We'll be right back after that little fight. Apparently. According to some news reports that they was paid six. They actually it got really nasty behind the scenes actually read each other's throats with names that we can't even use on the show legally. So yeah. Well, we love Republicans as as people on the left just when they're dead Camille. Pollyannas with us back with us provocateur iconoclast, and one of the more interesting people I've ever had the chance over the years to interview. How are you? Hi, Sean as a democrat. I'm embarrassed by the behavior of my party for the past few years and the elections for heaven's sakes. There was a duly elected president. And now it's incumbent on my party to clarify its agenda and find a strong candidate that can appeal from coast to coast. And and there's all this endless almost hallucinatory obsession. Okay. With was tearing the president down and thereby weakening the image of America in the world. What is in your view? I look at the democratic agendas almost singularly focused on destroying Donald Trump. We know where they stand. They want open borders. They want the crumbs back the tax cuts that President Trump past. And I don't hear any policies that I think would benefit the American people like I say, the forgotten men and women that are struggling and out of work in poverty on food stamps etcetera. And I think I I don't see an agenda that's going to be one that's gonna help make the country better. No, I it's like a cloud of hysterical emotionalism that's coming from. I think this a complete isolation detachment of the educated elite and the the urban media in the United States. I'm speaking as a professor of media studies, the self destruction of journalism itself over the past few years is going to have a terrible effect in the long run on our democracy. When the president says fake news or I say fake news. Or because I think a lot of it is fake my analysis that I I. Can't really watch a whole lot of it. But we do for pure, I guess entertainment and political purposes pick out, but it seems like it's every second every minute every hour every day. It's hate Trump. And without any exceptions on some of the cable networks. Well, I've had to stop watching TV news completely. Hannity's on at nine. Professor. That's not fair. What are you doing? What are you doing? I got to put food on the table. You know, you killing me. What's that about? I thought we were friends. Well, I I I used to watch the network news and CNN all the time. And now, I tuned in CNN for the hurricanes, and that's it because I'm bearable these people living in their bubble in Manhattan, and Washington and Los Angeles, I teach in Philadelphia, but I live in the distant suburbs. And I try to observe actual social reality in the United States. All right. And I think that's what what's pouring out of the the major media is absolute what can I what can I say? It's the Spanish inquisition. These people are I twisted. Truly mentally twisted people who are so focused on tearing down other people's beliefs. You know, without presenting it go here an agenda of their own. You know, I like to I I really like conservatism, and I'm a conservative because I liked the ideas that I believe when implemented work peace through strength works lower. Lower taxes, less burdensome regulation works. I've never I can't really point to a left wing policy that I can embrace and say, you know, what that's a great idea. That's going to help people because all they've done is frankly created more dependency. Yes, I voted for Bernie Sanders right in the in the democratic primaries last time around, but I'm well aware of the impracticality of of the socialist puzzles that are endorsed by particularly many of the younger now elected officials who appeared to have no clear grasp on on economics. Okay. And how in fact, a nation's wealth is generated. I think there's just a kind of a lack of practical understanding this too much adherence to buzzwords and and compassion as as a general flag instead of the GOP, at least has has a sense of of. Yeah. The way economies actually work in the modern world. I don't think the GOP really has it. I think Trump has it. I think a few Republicans have it. I think real conservatives habit. But I have more contempt for the Republican party that frankly has just become a watered down version of the Democratic Party. And the thing that I hate the most in life is I don't see courage. I don't see these people fighting and taking a stand, and they say one thing on the campaign trail, and they do something entirely different. When when they get in a position of power, and that frustrates me. I think healthcare was a great case in point Bo bombs, president sixty five times Republicans vote to repeal and replace then when it mattered the nowhere to be found. Oh, absolutely. Yeah. I mean, I was one of the few Democrats criticizing ObamaCare before it was ever a past trying to warn the party. Don't me going down that road essentially, Nancy Pelosi even pulled out a plan. They have been in an in the drawer. For years and was was saying things like what we'll find out. What's in it once it's passed? And so on all the problems in Alabama care. I think we're very very clear way down the road. You know, look the promises boring. Keep doctor your plan. Save money. Millions lost their doctors and plans. Now, they have only one option and nobody's saved any money. What do you think of what are your observations about Donald Trump? I'll tell you one thing that I do like about him as the world feigns outrage at every word or tweet that he sends out there. I think it's selective and phony. And I think they're all pretending. I don't think we're a bunch of snowflakes that have not heard these words before or known people that are combative in our life before I love that. He fights any when he's fighting for the American people. That's good. But what are your general thoughts about him presidency and his enemies that want to remove him from office? Well, he's you know, he's a practical man of business. It was brought in essentially from outside the all of the parties structures. There has been a civil war going on inside the Republican party as well as inside the Democratic Party for years now. And I think that's he represents a wave. It's obvious. It's happened in Brazil. It's happening in Europe as well. The electorates are are sick and tired of politics as usual and want someone to come in and and deal with the problems themselves outside of Ideo ideology. And that's essentially what he brings the kind of whatever chaos. You know, the media are have been decrying in the Trump administration is coming from the fact that he doesn't he was not a politician. He doesn't have a huge cadre of a allies and supporters in the political stablishment. So he's been feeling his way. But I think the news media has failed spectacularly, and it's a tax on him for since since the election. Maybe the more they attack him the more. They they're driving the country away from them selves in toward Trump. That's what that's what I see him. If the economy continues strong. I've been saying, hey, I seems to be no doubt that Trump will be reelected. I hope to vote for a democrat. They have to give me a nominee. I can vote for and not a crow who would that be? You wrote you wrote a piece about how Hillary wants Trump to win. Again, would be who why do you say that who would be the person you'd most be inclined to or most interested in hearing more about this time? Well, you can you can see by her behavior by this hogging, the spotlight that she's been doing okay that she's been essentially cutting out the legs from from all the democratic candidates who would like would like to build up a national profile. I mean, I think her behavior. Fellow Democrats has been absolutely appalling. An and classless. Well, I would I had high hopes for a camera Harris. Okay. Bye. I heard her behavior has certainly not been such an eight in the last year or so that I would believe she could draw votes from the broad mid section of the country. So I I've been looking at candidates possible candidates. For example, governor Steve Bullock of Montana and also congresswoman Sherry abuse, dos from Illinois, I this is the kind of kind of heartland manner a warmth without the sarcasm, and the sniping and the elitism, that's so characteristic of an Elizabeth Warren, you know, or or of Kirsten gillibrand is all over the map. You know? I find President Trump hilarious like for example. I look at your writings, and, you know, a lot of times I'll laugh out loud. And I think I I can I know you. Now. Well, enough, I think that I know that you'd like to push peoples buttons and make them think I can only imagine what you're like in the classroom. I frankly would love to sit in on a lecture and watch that endeavor unfold because I'm assuming you're teaching a bunch of snowflakes and the shock and awe of their precious little value system getting challenge. Do I got to imagine? That's a pretty interesting experience. Well, I at a practical vocational art school. Okay. So I I don't have as many snowflakes as are pouring into the elite schools. Well, but still there's a little shock and all the best teachers I had I had a really great professor at Adelphi university. When I went there a year, and he was a sociology guy any he's just out of his mind. Okay. If you want me to say communism's great, and I'll get an A. Okay. I understand the game. I can play that way. And or I can just stand up to you and say, you're an idiot. And I can't stand your stupid book that you're making us by. And I'm wasting my time. I'm in this class, and then you suffer and you get the appropriate grade of of daring to challenge the views of the professor, right? Well, my my voice, and my views are available to the public, and my my new book is provocations. Okay. Which is a collection of essays on a huge variety of things from Hollywood to politics to my longstanding proposal that religion comparative religion be made the core curriculum also undergraduate education. I mean, as I believe that only by understanding the great world religions of the. Thought through history can people really hoped for any kind of multicultural understanding of some of earth's today. All right. Camille Polly is with us. A new book is called provocations a seven hundred page essay collection, including well, her best choice to satires of of Hillary Clinton all listed in the index. If you wanna get a copy, we'll put it up on Hannity dot com. I'll take a quick.

Donald Trump president Sean Hannity us Trump professor Democratic Party Camille Polly Republican party Hillary Clinton CNN GOP Obama NIH. Bernie Sanders Nancy Pelosi Brazil Europe
"nih" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"With your health but also inspire you to take some action because information without action is just depression and i don't want to leave you the press this morning so let's get into it that's what are we are talking about the top two things that you need to know to make sure you never yet heart disease and you never get cancer we are talk about how do you actually prevent things like diabetes and if you do get it what do you do how do people reverse it how people been able to go off their medications we're gonna talk about that i'll share a couple of different examples of what people have done in the past to reverse or diabetes we are talk about what the ice just did to hear about the news the in nih national institute of health jira happen to europe they did they just allowed the scientists in the labs to go back to making deadly new viruses in the labs we're talking about what that means for you and what that can look like for the future so i was in a conversation with a man who was probably mid50s and the conversation goes to health as it usually does when ob in the conversation it's what a passionate about and with what i think about it's what i try to problems now solve four and you don't you know he he gets in the conversation it.

depression heart disease nih national institute of heal europe
"nih" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Think it was indicated not an think we should do it after looking at some of the guidelines there are few guidelines out there that lane in the direction of potentially doing it you know the uh the medicare guidelines in some of the nih national institute of aging they've indicated that it might be a good thing to start doing for most patients in the future with that in mind i went through and i looked at a variety of the cognitive assessments were available most of them are very simple very short and i think that's part that's the goal actually for primary care providers in doing this is to keep it simple keep it short we picked one of the ones that it was a little bit more involved it was a longer it was it was the more difficult one of all of them it took significantly longer to complete but at the present exceedingly well on it so that was not driven at all by any clinical signs i have who was driven by the president's wishes in he he did well on these so there you go on any is got to 100 on the the test thirty out of thirty thirty out of a questions uh and as his physician said it wasn't because clinically he thought the president needed it it was simply because he was the president's wishes he deals with the president's sometimes up to three times a day uh he uh uh interacts with the president and has seen no signs that would indicate to him that the president has any type of mental issues or dementia alzheimer's or anything and the montreal cognitive tests that they took is the more advanced one to show if there's any early signs no indication of dementia no indication of any type of.

president alzheimer medicare nih national institute of agin montreal
"nih" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Our mutual desire for nih to engage in outside the box thinking and incorporation of new funding into this research is finally fulfilled despite our advocacy and advancement there has been negative to flat funding for down's syndrome research over the last couple of decades this is also a significant disparity is compared to other developmental can dishes are comparable disorders and my written testimony also includes a kind of chart tracking those budgets as you can see despite being the leading cause of developmental delay in the us in the world down's syndrome is one of the least a genetic conditions by the nih from two thousand in one to two thousand six nih annual funding from down's syndrome research plummeted from twenty nine million to fourteen million despite significant growth of the nih budget during this time from two thousand in one to two thousand seventeen if down's syndrome had increased at the same rate as the nih budget up or down we would be at seven hundred forty four million today over those two decades worried about three fifty i'll leave you with these final numbers based on the cdc there are three hundred four hundred thousand people estimated with down's syndrome living in the us today live birth have increased from one in a thousand in two thousand in two to one in six hundred ninety one the life span of a person with down's syndrome has more than doubled to six years today up from twenty eight years in the 1980s with increased live births and doubling of life stand there will be a relative population explosion of people with down's syndrome in the united states to be clear the number of people with down's syndrome is getting larger not smaller and so is the need our children and adults with down's syndrome for american citizens deserve to know.

nih united states twenty eight years two decades six years
"nih" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Our studied this was a very preliminary uh uh uh ask say to try to see if the biomarker that we characterized in mice was actually present in humans and we found that it was at least in this initial study we're now planning a clinical trial based on this preclinical work uh hopefully to start in the summer pending funding decisions from the nih have to actually go after this kind of biomarker in a ah in the brain been obese patients uh the the biomarker looks the same i mean mice and men and where we're literary your budget i mean you you can you can say that glitch what does it actually physically look like as it is a spark it it's sort of a spark if you look at the power of the electric graphic signature you can also look at the frequency of which the sign of sort of pattern of activity is president if the lowfrequency signature with robust power and so depending on the kind of x y access you're looking at it can look a little bit different uh what we're seeing right now is certainly preliminary but it's definitely a robust signal uh that we think will be detected by this very same device it's important to actually go after that biomarker in the disease state of interest based on the mouth study being a bingeeating study its most logical to to look at human binge eateries and the most severe been jitters for example patients who have malignant obesity or very severe obesity that if they'll gastric bypass surgery for example we're starting to realize that despite how effective treatment is there are suboptimal outcomes and those kinds of patients because of this behavioral problems or lack of control around sued those are the kinds of patients that will be targeting with this kind of clinical trial mostly resembles what we saw in a mouse model and i think it's important to also wreck nice that it may be diseasespecific although there's some similarities between bingeeating in obesity uh oh cd or obsessive compulsive disorder uh other kinds of a pathological impulses pathologic gambling for example addictions of all sorts of sexual addictions even uh these disease states could very you know and so it's important to go one step at.

nih president obesity gastric bypass
"nih" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WTMA

"Was a very preliminary uh uh uh ask say to try to see if the biomarker that we characterized in mice was actually present in humans and we found it was at least in this initial study well now planning a clinical trial based on this preclinical work uh hopefully to start in the summer pending funding decisions from the nih to actually go after this kind of biomarker in a ah in the brain been obese patients uh the the biomarker looks the same i mean mice and men area where where literary your budget i mean you you can you can say that glitch what does it actually physically look like as it is a spark it it's sort of a spark if you look at the power of the electric graphic signature you can also look at the frequency of which the sign a sort of pattern of activity is president if the lowfrequency signature with robust power and so depending on the kind of xy access you're looking at it can look a little bit different uh what we're seeing right now is certainly preliminary but it's definitely a robust signal uh that we think will be protected by this very same device it's important to actually go after that biomarker in the disease state of interest based on the mouth study being a bingeeating study its most logical to to look at human been jitters and the most severe binge eaters for example patients who have malignant obesity or very severe obesity that if they'll gastric bypass surgery for example we're starting to realize that despite how effective treatment is there are suboptimal outcomes and those kinds of patients because of this behavioral problems or lack of control around food those are the kinds of patients that will be targeting with this kind of clinical trial mostly resembles what we saw in a mouse model and i think it's important also wreck nice that it may be diseasespecific although there's some similarities between bingeeating in obesity uh oh cd or obsessive compulsive disorder uh other kinds of a pathological impulses pathologic gambling for example addictions of all sorts of sexual addictions even uh these disease states could very you know and so it's important to go one step at a time to make sure that the signature is behaviorally specific we don't want to be blocking natural rewards for example i am struck again by the compulsive behavior of.

nih president obesity gastric bypass
"nih" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Very preliminary uh uh uh i say to try to see if the biomarker that we characterized in mice was actually present in humans and we found that it was at least in this initial study well now planning a clinical trial based on this preclinical work uh hopefully to start in the summer pending funding decisions from the nih product to actually go after this kind of biomarker in a ah in the brain been obese patients uh the the the biomarker looks the same amine mice and men i'd area where where literary here but i mean you you can you can say that glitch what does it look actually physically look like as it is a spark e sort of a spark if you look at the power of the elector graphic signature mayo you can also look at the frequency of which the sign of soda pattern of activity is president nickel lowfrequency signature with robust power and so depending on the kind of xy access you're looking at it can look a little bit different uh what we're seeing right now is certainly preliminary but it's definitely a robust signal uh that we think we'll be detected by this very same device it's important to actually go after that biomarker in the disease state of interest based on the mouth study being he'd been gene study its most logical to to look at human binge eateries and the most severe binge eaters for example patients who have malignant obesity or very severe obesity that i failed gastric bypass surgery for example we're starting to realize that despite how effective treatment is there are suboptimal outcomes and those kinds of patients because of this behavioral problems or lack of control around food those are the kinds of patients that will be targeting with this kind of clinical trial mostly resembles what we saw in a mouse model and i think it's important to also recognize that it may be diseasespecific although there's some similarities between bingeeating in obesity uh oecd or obsessive compulsive disorder uh other kinds of uh pathological impulses pathologic gambling for example addictions of all sorts of sexual addictions even uh these disease states could very you know and so what's important to go one step at a time to make sure that the signatures behaviorally specific we don't want to be blocking natural rewards for example i am struck again by the compulsive behaviour of gambling does savski wrote about it articulately because he suffered from.

president obesity nih gastric bypass
"nih" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"To the rapid response platforms g k was partially motivated by the the two thousand fourteen epidemic of ebola in west africa uh we responded to that the outbreak with our primary scientific partners the at nih and went from the start of a phase one clinical trial to the start of the face three clinical trial in five months rather than usual five years or even longer but it was too late and so we we need to be able to react faster so again just came any other groups are working towards these these reforms um in in the ideal we would have continue to hammer even improve our surveillance we identify a pandemic threat it would be fenced uh posted to the cloud research laboratories with downloaded uh create a vaccine mainly in a computer identify the gene segments that are needed for that loaded backup to the cloud in they would come down to different manufacturing facilities that are using that platform using it every day for a standard vaccine say influenza many parts of the world but then when the pandemic threatens base interrupt their routine manufacture start making pandemic vaccine within weeks and months we have millions or or billions of doses that's the ideal i gloucester considerably there but i think those to sort things we can hope to look forward now i think that's an excellent point to make i know that some of the work that we've been doing is using seasonal influenza virus as a model system for trying to set up those kind of real time diagnostic efforts sequencing efforts identify these pathogens spread the word around see what new variants are coming through um it's even more lens as a way to model which you would want to do eventually in a pandemic and so i think some of those efforts are you talking about are probably not that far away for free zones where we understand it well like influenza i know what the target should be in terms of the the.

ebola real time west africa nih seasonal influenza five months five years
"nih" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Is everchanging last week we told you we were going to dig into some studies find out some things of interesting that we're going on and the developments in medical research well they're just astounding and so we're going to break some of these studies down for you an it might surprise you so that we go over some of her favorite's this one degeneracy this there's a study of the nih nasa is still a neurological disorders and stroke and is long been believed that the brain is exempt from plumbing right so it people don't know how things leave the brainer they assume i guess that they don't but basically back in eighteen sixteen there was a medical scientists who said that there is actually plumbing or these limp systems in the brain and in the biscuit laughed at years go by decades ago by and now look at their hm a steady the founded on mri that there actually is a limb system in the brain the drains out all the the junk all the trash so why is this important you may say it's important because we know that there is a brain immune system connection right right and now we've got some answers but even more so if we know that there's pipes to clean out the trash and maybe perhaps those parties being cuadra now working properly is the cause of things again master parkinson's or or different neurological diseases that nobody has thought about this because they didn't think it existed the nobody's actually looked down these avenues at the first one i would think carb is alzheimer's disease yet because without santer trash you get a buildup of what's called amyloid plaques in our obviously if the drainage system is clogged you're gonna get a buildup of abnormal chemicals i'm not saying that's the case but that's sort of the first thing that comes to mind so i think this is very important nothing's going to spur wad of new research well we interviewed the researchers and if we get his name moves from the arusha roger chose through the new identified galil lump name these grill webs in his most recent article they were actually able to image the glee all emphatic system and so we even had the conversation i mean this those two years ago so with him and like wow what a what if we could open these up i mean there were studying sleep cycles is to win the.

nasa parkinson nih immune system alzheimer's disease arusha two years
"nih" Discussed on Katie Couric

Katie Couric

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"nih" Discussed on Katie Couric

"Uh some of it is genetic and uh so we're you know we created a genetic bank and or doing research to try and get to some core and we're making some progress there um ah you know we fund it a hundred and fifty research projects around the world nine different countries um and with each each one you know we're we're finding we're finding things out and it and in the more successful ones they now because there's so little research money that a you need a proven concept to get funded by the nih for example we are providing the seed money so that out of the box kind of thinking on epilepsy can get that funding so aptly stand up to cancer yeah we air market particular matt announced specific amount of money for kind of these pie in the sky ideas and by itself iin the sky yeah exactly an at you now that like nine out of ten promising research proposals are not find at right i'll even so even added in those that aren't right of the box don't received finding one of the things i learned when i get the peace on cure is that all this research in epilepsy and and the really the same can be true for cancer there's this intersection aladi now with scientific research where in out at break 3s with epilepsy research may be incredibly helpful for things like parkinson certain addicts are allowed out or less orders and similarly even i i think i remember at them saying that there there's some claes to cancer in that can be found in this research so i think one at that promising things that i've witnessed in the last decade or so is not much at the science is helping out there i was on there i i believe in science and i believe that there is no problem that won't ultimately yield two intensive.

nih matt cancer
"nih" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:36 min | 4 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of this affected your work at the national cancer institute but let me say that the nih funding actually has gone up substantially both in two thousand sixteen and in the current fiscal year and the house subcommittee and the senate subcommittee have done their markups for fyi eighteen and both of those subcommittees all have proposed further increases for nih so that so then that provides a sense serve of security that cuts that you feared were coming or not coming in that has a major impact on the work that you're currently doing in the work going ahead with that yeah it's not i wouldn't say our work necessarily away the work of the entire biomedical research enterprise now we we still think bobo hopefully be moving forward because our you'll with we all agree that pair congress sees the value of biomedical research the importance of you and i some of the three people here and since the authority laughing has ago knows where i'm going of the three people here the one who has been in the crosshairs from basically minute one is is to seal riches as president of planned parenthood you were earlier talk checking about so that the politicize politicisation of of health care but also the politicisation of the services that planned parenthood provides and constantly being the focus of we have to defined the fund planned parenthood that was happening while barack obama was president of the united states how has life at planned parenthood and the political pressure that you're under changed now that we are it in the trump years in trump administration will first of all let me just say i am course thrilled that the nih and this work is continuing to get funded this is work that is critical to our patients and to people everywhere and i i think what we just how to make sure is that then the people on the receiving end of these kinds of vaccines and this kind of preventive health care that they did is available but generally people of low incomes and people who live in parts of the country where we're seeing the highest incidence of of a you know less than optimal healthcare outcomes it's a tough time right now for women's health red large i don't think simply planned parenthood obviously.

fiscal year nih congress president barack obama united states the house senate bobo trump
"nih" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"nih" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"For nih research hospitals of four that act but it's also supposed to try to end terminal illnesses like cancer and as she votes against that would really turned milf about her beside the fact that she never returned our phone calls we invited her to come on the program many many times by the way if she would agree to came in and debate with you would you dude radio fantastic i love it okay well don't hold your brother that one but we'll consider that to be a an invitation extended we did zinni's return phone calls to my to my producers at the time would bother me most about her was when she started talking about the small business people you didn't create that business uh the the taxpayers paid for rose and police department and fighter problems if those business owners didn't baker roads and fire department in all of that and for some lee who was never involved in creating a job it was it was arrogance uh that that really turned me off well you know missing a lot of it since to my wife is bennett a job creator with her own company we've had a you know fifteen years of success with that i've worked for assigned company like i said that did worked with a lotta small businesses to get them up and running its hard to start run and operated business in his state let alone you know just with all the competition and other states with new hampshire just north of boarded without sales tax but the other thing it's funny you touched on his i could go on for an hour massachusetts is a state where our textile mills from law are the gun industry in central mass the fishing industry in the south coast brockton the shoe factories in brought in those were the companies that i paid for the public schools i mean it chorus man started public schools in massachusetts before him it was industry that paid for that pay for the hospitals paid for the roads she's got a completely backwards and it really that really.

lee new hampshire massachusetts nih zinni sales tax fifteen years
"nih" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"nih" Discussed on Science Friday

"Received it the it's not clear we don't understand why there is this discordance in some pregnancies and up to now no one's really been able to monitor the different placenta to see if this might be related to percent of function but that was what were one of the exciting things about the study we could show that the twins that were smaller were related to the smaller up for our the will to the percent with the poor function so now we can start to think about what are some treatments that might be useful and have a method of monitoring whether to injury mr going to be effective your study is part of the human placenta project to deny age which funds research aimed at understanding the role of the placenta in health and disease so like to bring honour director dr anne diana bianchi is director of the national institute of child health and human development nih welcomed the science friday thank you ira happy to be here now we're happy to have you you know 'cause we never get a chance to talk about the placenta many people don't many people don't talk about it but everybody was connected to one point am very important when you look at your bellybutton that one and that the placenta and the other end was connected via the mboko court to the actual oregon felt now is the placenta actually considered part of the fetus so it's interesting because it has components of both the feet of and the mother so it is the majority of it is fetal tissue genetically but there's a there's a backside to it that interconnect directly with the mother's womb at that part contained tissue from the mother but they're very closely connected in fact 9 out of some accent the placenta invade the mothers.

dr anne diana bianchi director nih oregon national institute of child he ira
"nih" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"nih" Discussed on Science... sort of

"National yes the the same we're going to wait not the and i am age which gave rats mental superpowers in the secret mim the in i don't think you support nuts now should support them because that's movies scared me who trailed did not like it when also kidding and you should also give you should also support the on i am is a division of the nih said this physical is it okay to the nih is like the nci and also the the the anc eyes national cancer institute which is a division of but larger nih which funds all the smaller institutes but i mean the nih has traditionally been one of the better funded yes american science organizations for good reason because it's the thing that studies how you not die yeah exactly so it's i don't think this is a very partisan issue i would hope not to say you're you should let your representatives know that you support researching how to not die yeah that'd be great so i would hope so everyone yes that's my that's my very simple find what is behind the whole finish yes so all eu anti niddle lewis so we just lost his listeners we'll speaking of carcinogens who let's talk about were drinking the next segment coming up next in just a moment.

nih nci anc