35 Burst results for "NHS"

A Life in Leadership: Dr. Daniel Zinnel

Supporting Leaders

03:15 min | Last month

A Life in Leadership: Dr. Daniel Zinnel

"All right one. This episode of supporting leaders podcasts. We have dr daniels in all and we discover that we went to the same program at creighton. our past probably like just just crossed each other But i'm so excited to have you on the show. Thank you so much for taking time out of your day to have a conversation with us looking forward to it. So let's just start off and share with us a little bit about your background. I mean you seem to be involved in so many things. You can definitely tell. You're an advocate for a lot of different groups of people and and you're engaged in political things. The arts Work so share with us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Well i'll start at the beginning. I was I grew up in northwestern iowa outside of a tiny town called pomeroy which is about six hundred fifty people Youngest of four grip on the farm right across the road from my dad's parents my grandparents. So i saw them every day growing up which i am very grateful order but in small town iowa you have to do everything be involved in everything so i was in all four sports played. The charm sang in the choir. Did all of the things was in. Nhs or h ffa. So i truly am grateful for that Well rounded nece that. Allow me to really try so many things. And i think that's still kinda tested to my career in my life. I like to be involved. In a variety of even today North west island's pretty conservative and so growing up as a little boy was very challenging to to recognize what i was going through to see others. Who were like me and should not be alone and so i went to iowa. Central community. college burst in fort. Dodge years and then moved to into moines in two thousand six to perform at adventure land. So you're at adventure land in the summer of two thousand six and if you know eventually know there's a stage that comes up from out of the ground i performed Had eight shows everyday. They were short set. So it wasn't too long but i we a country show at patriotic show in greece. So that was a ton of fun. And i think really helped me develop competence in front of people because you have to have confidence when performing And then i started going to school full time while working fulltime in. I did that for ten years. Finish undergrad did a masters in health and then completed the doctor of education and leadership from creighton. But my career really started in nonprofit type. Still were still working nonprofits but it started working with individuals with intellectual disabilities and technically and still employed doing that type of work. That i transitioned to more part-time respite. But i have a client that i worked with since two thousand six which is just wild to think about the had that relationship with him for so long

Dr Daniels Iowa Creighton North West Island Pomeroy FFA Moines Dodge Fort Greece
What Is the Healthiest Diet Out There?

Food for Thought

02:07 min | Last month

What Is the Healthiest Diet Out There?

"This week's food for thought sees. Nhs dietitian and runner. Charlie watson and i explore to enjoy a healthier diet and what we can do to make those better choices. Hello charlie hi. Thanks so much for having me on the podcast. Such a pleasure. I've been so looking forward to this episode. I think just because it's going to help so many people because it's just easy as it is To tell you clients to stay tougher thing in moderation because that phrase is definitely one that we tend to use definitely and motivation is so different for everybody that you can. You can think you'll giving one piece of advice. And ashley the way that somebody interprets is so different to the way that you interpret or your mom interpreters your or your husband or whoever so yeah. It's something that we might have one interpretation but other people have many different ones. I and i think that's part of the complicated nature of our jobs but equally how things are portrayed in the media or online in particular. I felt most people online these days to get to get information of course and it's even more difficult. How do you read between the lines. How do you interpret how anyone's going to see what you have to say. Because what is i. Guess the question. Everyone wants to know is what is the healthiest diet. Charlie is the one out there. So i was thinking about this and i and i don't think there is one particular diet that fits everybody because we are all so different. We will have individual needs. We have individual goals. Health concerns health history. And so i think the healthiest for you is the one that makes you feel best. Both mentally and physically. Because i think that's such a big part of our eating is our mental health and the social aspects. and the you don't want to stress even if a diet is making you feel great physically. If it's adding a lot stressed your life might not be the best one for you. So it's about finding what is right for you. What makes you feel at

Charlie Watson Charlie Ashley
Necas scores twice as Hurricanes top Lightning 4-3

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

Necas scores twice as Hurricanes top Lightning 4-3

"Martine H. as captains for poor performance by scoring with three fifty three remaining giving the hurricanes a four three win over the lightning NHS finished with two goals and two assists as Carolina pulled within one point of Tampa Bay for the central division lead on the first TV show you know you have more confidence a little more more even more time on the ice and I don't know I just feel so good Dougie Hamilton set up the game winner to extend his team record point streak for defenseman to fourteen games the ball toward to nothing until Cedric Paquette and Sebastian aho tallied in the sixty two second span early in the second Andrei vasilevskiy stopped thirty six shots for the lightning who have dropped two straight for the first time in a month I'm Dave Ferrie

Martine H. Dougie Hamilton Hurricanes NHS Tampa Bay Cedric Paquette Sebastian Aho Carolina Andrei Vasilevskiy Dave Ferrie
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | Last month

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
UK: Shortfall in vaccine deliveries will delay jabs

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

UK: Shortfall in vaccine deliveries will delay jabs

"British health authorities say covert nineteen Bucks nations for people under the age of fifty eight may be delayed for up to a month the delays caused by short fall in supply partly due to reduced deliveries from the serum institute of India Britain's National Health Service says that vaccine supplies available for fires doses would be significantly constrained beginning of March the twenty ninth according to a letter from the NHS's chief commercial officer and a doctor as a result people under fifty shouldn't get shots unless they have underlying health conditions the put them at higher risk there is shockingly London

Serum Institute Of India Brita NHS London
EU chief warns of action to protect pledged vaccine supplies

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:47 sec | Last month

EU chief warns of action to protect pledged vaccine supplies

"The NHS is now warning that it will have to slow down its rollout because of a cut in supplies. But this comes after the European Commission chief as a vandal a and threatened to halt exports off the vaccine to the UK. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis off the century. And I'm not ruling out anything for now because we have to make sure that Europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible. Human lives civil liberties on but also the prosperity of our economy are dependent on that on the speed of vaccination on moving forward. Fatherland also demanded reciprocity from the UK, saying that the block is still waiting for exports off jobs

NHS European Commission UK
'Captain Tom' Moore, Britain's Pandemic Hero, Gets Funeral Worthy

Masters in Business

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

'Captain Tom' Moore, Britain's Pandemic Hero, Gets Funeral Worthy

"To a national hero. Funeral services were held today for World War two veterans or Tom Moore, who died earlier this month. Captain Tom as he became known, captured global attention raising millions of dollars for the U. K's and National Health Service. During the Corona virus pandemic. The 100 year old veteran gained fame for walking 100 laps of his garden to help raise funds for the NHS. I'm at Madison

Captain Tom Tom Moore National Health Service U. NHS Madison
Inside The UK’s COVID-19 Vaccination Rollout

FT Politics

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Inside The UK’s COVID-19 Vaccination Rollout

"Sarah. Let's begin with an overview of the vaccination program and how it's going we hit that big target of fifteen million jobs to the top full most vulnerable groups and it's now rolling out to all those over sixty in an effort to seventeen million more people. What is the government's next target. The vaccination rollout in the uk is going astonishingly well particularly in contrast to some of the other be pandemic grand projects like the test and trace program where the second best performer amongst large countries. Often fail and as of last night we've vaccinated sixteen and a half million people and way getting incredibly high take-up particularly in the older age groups in one or two of the age cohorts. I think it's even reached ninety. Nine percents and i think part of the reason for that is that the nhs has been in charge of the rollout in the nhl of course in the uk's immensely trusted brand if you like. And i think it's really been an advantage for the program that it hasn't relied on the kind of outsourcing the private companies that affected people's response for example to test and trace. I think one of the reasons that compliance with isolation has not been as good as it might be been is people have been getting calls from outsourced contact centres whereas here. It's the nhs that's been inviting you in your job. And the speed at. Which it's been done is astonishingly high when you think the first job happened on december the eighth and we're only now at the nineteen th of february and as a sixteen and a half million people already covered with that protection

Sarah UK NHS Government NHL
Katz Kiely Talks about how frontline.live helps the NHS with PPE and why they have open sourced the platform.

Sam Talks Technology

08:23 min | 3 months ago

Katz Kiely Talks about how frontline.live helps the NHS with PPE and why they have open sourced the platform.

"Can you tell everyone is listening. Walk is frontline live and then how you first came about forming it. 'cause you did an amazing campaign and support early in the lockdown so what frontline live is an online live data mac which means that any healthcare worker here is on the front line who finds themselves short at ppe. And therefore is at risk of getting ill can either tweet a request using hashtags hashtag frontline map. Hashtag the postcode so we can make sure they're actually at a healthcare organization not just collecting. Ppe reason and then hashtag what it is they need or they can fill in an online form of frontline dot live and we will then do two things one of them. Put a dot opin on a digital map so that people can see with the need is but also now because of a new partnership two other organizations the healthcare workers association and met share supply drive. It means that we basically have a warehouse of free. Pp which all partners of what rated long and hard for by raising money and getting donations. And because of a partnership with hermes it means that as soon as somebody on the frontline requests vp. Because they're shows of it we can get free p. p. to them within forty eight hours. How did all of this started happening. I moved back to my house in sheffield so in lockdown home alone on zoom call with a friend of mine who is a senior us. I'm saying i can't get a delivery. I'm gonna have to go to the supermarket and she said okay. I can do one better than that. I'm going into the hospital tomorrow. We don't have any masks of probably be dealing with people with covert line flown. Can you imagine that feeling so then. Of course i became a little bit hyper aware of this particular problem. And because everyone on every social media channel that doctors nurses health care workers saying we have p p that's bound on the other side there's this incredible uprising of entrepreneurs who assisting forward money three d. printing visors. That's companies like brutal and burberry. And i'm barbara who've pivot their entire system that can make pp to give away so we've got people desperately in need and scud going without pp's any of us would put up with and people are trying to solve the problem but they couldn't see very other were and so then. I hear on the news one day. Burberry making scrubs. There's an nhs trust because they didn't have to contact burberry have had to go through some ministers in the government to ask them how they conduct bribery. Oh for goodness sake. This is ridiculous. Because i'm all about technical innovation so i thought it can't be that hard surely to find a way of making it easy for people on the front line to say i haven't got this so that people who've got supply can get it and quickly. Yeah that was my beginning and a guy who used to work with who used intel is at ucla now on run did to him. About how hard would it be for us to be able to collect data and put it live on a map so that people can see what's going on and we chatted for awhile for about an hour and then i didn't hear anything back from him midnight that night i get any email. He's already got his team on it. I'm like oh so then fast. Forward six weeks. I've had about fuzi. Volunteers who've sat forward the most incredible people people who well known in the industry. People go better things to do with their times. they busy. Who sat for just getting this. Were absolutely and we're going to make this happen so six weeks later. We launched the service in the first three month period. When all of this stuff you're talking about how they've got. The timelines has stepped forward giving his full page. Spreads is giving us full page. Adverts ocean outdoor gives us sixty with the biggest digital out of home screens across the country. So we can put stuff out there. Not one penny changes hands. A snapchat talked to the general manager. he goes. Yeah wherever we can do to help. We'll do a national campaign. you give gives your assets. We'll sort out view. I have never in my career. Repos talk about purpose and actually fears purpose. You will look forward to enjoy getting out of bed in the morning. But i've never seen anything like this in my life. The sad side of that is that the nhs in my humble opinion and i we were talking about this before. It's the jewel in our crown. It's something that we should be quite rightfully proud of. And then by an example we partnered with united health who have about one hundred thousand frontline. Health co worker members talking to them. And i'm saying i keep hearing stories from people on the front line that actually the idea of people tweeting their requests is really difficult because nobody does speak cow and people are being told not to use the service from my mouth. It being told not to use it. Yeah people are being told if they speak out about the fact that appea- shortages they will lose their jobs. Assist crazy if you can't do your job one wi fi. Find another way to do it. That's most entrepreneurs will okay. I can't go x. y. And found a way round it exactly and the system should be set up in a way. This is about somebody complaining about something. It's if you don't have you're putting your life at risk. Six hundred forty doctors nurses have died. Because there isn't enough got enough. So basically i'm finding out it's absolutely known as endemic that people inside the nhs all tolls not speak up about things and told they will lose their jobs so we moved it from just twitter to having a fool where people could Report anonymously if they were too scared to speak out off the fifteen hundred. Ish request for p. P. i reckon about eighty percents of them were done anonymously by people who was scared to speak out and some of the comments they left on those forms. Joss person frankly interesting. We've been up from. You has improved or got worse vitton. What's your gut fail. It's been interesting because there was a point where there was a story or other media about the fact that management we're turning healthcare workers to be quiet and then matt hancock said in the commons. This is not true. people will be protected. It's definitely from my perspective. People are less likely to speak out and obviously we had a bit of downtime where we registered frontline is a charity because there weren't as many cases and he gave his time to consolidate and build townships so we decided in september. Do a to find out whether or not people in healthcare organizations feel confident. They're going to have enough p. p. to see them through over this next crazy time which is become crazier guess. How many percent said they felt fully confident. They'd get enough. P p twenty eight. Wow wow wow wow that super-low eight percent of frontline healthcare workers believe they will get enough to keep them safe during this time that scary as a number. That's scary.

Burberry Healthcare Workers Association Fuzi Snapchat United Health Sheffield MAC Barbara Ucla Intel Matt Hancock Joss Twitter
Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

"Collier who is obviously very prominent pro. Israel researcher and journalist. He tried to navigate through some of the reasons why israel has been so successful so fast and he says it's never going to be a single cause about why israel has responded so incredibly he says of course. Israel was an enormous high price on life. No soldier is left behind. And then he talks about the coup pat holum system and that is not one central player in the vaccination like the over here but several like cl- elite mcabe may hit it. This is the sort of multiple. Nhs scenario that we have in israel and it means that several brains in each community organized separately to deal with her impatience obviously science and technology great economic driver for the economy and the id system. There's no real bother about anonymity. It's not a big thing in israel. People know pretty much. Everyone is in many of the systems are integrated and of course a militarized system to handle mass events community like kibbutzim and small towns cities on the west bank as well. Everyone knows must've been the the half keyboards how farm communities which are becoming sort of districts and towns of of major cities and they respond well to hostile acts. This is a. This is kind of a security issue where the threat isn't from from bombs or rockets. It's a threat from house which is a similar threat. Yes i mean. There's much more to say on that as well. I mean you'll right in the the emergency response in israel is sadly perhaps very well refined become very well. Refunding has had to become very refined over the years. And we see that mentality driving. Israel's attempts to quash the virus and to get the vaccination writes all the way through one anecdote which struck me was that in one vaccination center recently. They run out of time so the vaccines enter had to close and they still had those of the vaccine left which had to be used that evening or so. Nurses went out into the streets and grabbed a piece of delivery guy and gave him a shot. I mean that sort of can do spirit has been viable. But i think there are other elements like practical elements as well the contributed towards success so for example early planning israel paid reportedly over the odds by some degree to gets these first vaccines in. Benjamin netanyahu himself developed a personal relationship with the bosses pfizer and promised to give pfizer israeli data about the vaccine use in response to getting these these first doses and of course there's always in a position to give them that data because it's got one of the best digitalized health system in the world which allows for that data to be harvested and then to be used in further research but there are other innovations well so for instance israeli scientists found a way of getting more doses out of each vial vaccine than had initially been intended therefore stretching it further and in addition when the vaccines arrived on these huge pallets in bangor in airport rather than take them out like that. The israeli logistics experts decided to find a way of abortion them in small books style. Size insulated boxes they could remain at seventy but be taken out by most bikes or whatever and post out into small centers throughout the country in the community so the people didn't have to travel too far sickly during lockdown things like that all of these small but vital innovations have contributed towards this message. Success all the way from the initial negotiations and securing those vaccines all the way down to the grassroots rollouts and everything in between it's been just a magnificent display of guinness with with the nostril national spirit. I was indeed a very privileged to speak to around leads. The head of research it collegiate. Who runs through the extraordinary artificial intelligence and data which israel has what they've mapped millions and millions of people in the israeli gene pool and of israel's gene pool extends to two hundred nations around the world it's an extraordinary level of data which they can then feed to monsieur buller adviser which is which is an incredible gift to be able to give enrich. We are very fortunate to be standing on. The shoulders of giants are people at the nineties. In israel where smart enough to create an electronic medical records and make them ubiquitous over the system so since mid ninety s collegiate we have had electronic medical records in all of physicians offices on so in every hospital ward and so does abundance of data of massive amounts being collected in harnessed for the use of our patients. This puts israel ahead of the curve in terms of planning and alleviating major medical problems which afflict the whole world. I think that is proving to be true. Because we put into practice into scale concepts that in other places are considered the theoretical and so we have at khalid been practicing predictive modeling in practice for over a decade now so tens and hundreds of thousands of people receiving care based on personalization and predictive models in massive scales for a decade. So i i do think that the availability of data the availability of the will to change and transform the system as well as the innovative spirit of the local eco-system within the health sector and from the outside all communist together to create a very interesting setting for innovation in practice. And this is four million people. Isn't it so you can help kill the world with all the different afflictions the different health issues that you see amongst those millions of people and they have arrived into israel from all four corners of the world so in a sense every population around the world can benefit from the data. You find the differences between people. We are now moving into an innovation driven strategy where we will try more. And more to take the insights that we've gained and take them out to the world in various ways in creating spinoffs and startups within khalid and also by allowing startups organizations from around the world to test. Drive their new ideas. Collegiate so we can actually prove whether or not they making a difference.

Israel Pat Holum Pfizer Collier West Bank Benjamin Netanyahu Monsieur Buller Bangor Giants Khalid Collegiate
UK aims to give 1st COVID-19 shot to all adults by September

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

UK aims to give 1st COVID-19 shot to all adults by September

"Christens foreign minister has announced ambitious plans to have all its citizens vaccinated by the end of summer this year Dominic Raab announced the aim is the nation's healthcare system battles the worst crisis in its seventy two year history all target is by September tenth of all foods well the adult population and at first as if we can do it fast not great but that's the road map ready beleaguered hospitals are missing another cave at nineteen patient every thirty seconds putting the service and its most precarious situation ever speaking on Sky News rob urged the British people to help the NHS as much as they could to everyone watching shows to focus on is it here into the room so we don't overwhelm the NHS which is under serious pressure Karen Thomas London

Dominic Raab NHS ROB Karen Thomas London
‘Next few weeks are going to be the worst’ of the pandemic, England’s medical chief warns

The Briefing

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

‘Next few weeks are going to be the worst’ of the pandemic, England’s medical chief warns

"So corona virus restrictions could soon become tighter. That's concerning government. The latest lockdown isn't being followed. Strictly enough what could change then. Well two main things are under discussion possible rules. Banning people from different households who owns in support from together and potential strip to mosque wearing that could see face coverings mandatory in offices and busy outdoor areas. Like supermarket cues boris. Johnson met his cabinet colleagues last night to discuss. If the lockdowns working england's chief medical officer professor chris wissies doing a series of interviews. Today he said the next few weeks will be the worst of the pandemic so far for the nhs

Chris Wissies Cabinet Johnson England NHS
Johnson under fire as UK again faces onslaught of COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Johnson under fire as UK again faces onslaught of COVID-19

"As the U. K. becomes the epicenter of Europe's Kevin nineteen outbreak one small prime minister Boris Johnson's koncept of government is under fire more than three million people in the U. K. have tested positive for the crate of iris and eighty one thousand have died thirty thousand in just the last thirty days U. K. opposition Labour Party leader kissed alma believes this is down to the British government's bad communication without nine months of mixed messages from the government it's really important about the thought messages out even with the new look down the medical director of primary care for NHS England Dr Nikki Kanani says the virus is searching throughout Britain should be looking at one in thirty people carrying the new variants of cave it and often people are not symptomatic as well ninety also pointed out that medical staff are at breaking point this is been going on for the best politic here now and people all excell Skerritt Chavis London

Kevin Nineteen U. U. K. Opposition Labour Party Boris Johnson Dr Nikki Kanani British Government Alma Europe NHS England Britain Skerritt Chavis London
Mayor declares major incident in London hospitals

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Mayor declares major incident in London hospitals

"London mayor Sadiq Khan has declared a major incident as of the rapid spread the new coronavirus there and threatens to overwhelm the capital's hospitals with cases not exceeding one thousand one hundred thousand people even other emergency services on the strain with the for example firefighters now driving ambulances Khan says the city is at a crisis point a major incident is defined as being beyond the scope of business as usual operations on is one which is likely to risk life and wealth that risk of the NHS hospitals around the base of the course of the next couple of weeks if the Barnes continues to spread on people continue to be hospitalized the man's if we do not take immediate action now all NHS could be overwhelmed I'm more people will die Charles through this month London

Sadiq Khan London Khan NHS Barnes Charles
The E.U. Authorizes the First Vaccine to Fight Pandemic

Inside Europe

02:13 min | 5 months ago

The E.U. Authorizes the First Vaccine to Fight Pandemic

"Yes, British nursing and everyday conversation, reassuring someone who's about to get a jab and then with just two words for done for history is made. But if you think that was the moment the world's first ever completed, covert 19 vaccine was given to a patient 91 year old Margaret Keenan. It happens with typical British understatement, but it is no less extraordinary. Never before has a vaccine being made so quickly and with such high stakes Care home in Eastern England. Nurses helped us safely record the reaction of those most at risk and whose lives may depend on the vaccine. One elderly resident put it in the starkest terms. Well, it's our life, isn't it? You be for us, too. You know what a load of Dead people. Hmm. That's very true. And you have to see your family again. That's why I'd So will you have great? Have it? Yes. Yeah. So why do you think it's important to you to have it? Well, if no either I go to the hospital You know, being ill or drop dead. The reason the U. K is the first to distribute the vaccine is in part due to its hedging its bets the government put in billions of pounds worth of orders for different vaccines without knowing which would be completed first all be the most effective. Luckily, the UK had orders for this finds her by on tech vaccine, which has proved more than 90%, effective as the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson explained. We purchased more than 350 million doses of seven different vaccine candidates and the UK was the first country in the world to pre order supplies of this fires. A vaccine Securing 40 million doses. Through our winter plan. The NHS is being preparing for the biggest program of mass vaccination in history of the U. K. And that's going to begin next week, and

Margaret Keenan Eastern England U. Boris Johnson UK NHS
U.K. issues warning after 2 allergic reactions to Pfizer vaccine

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

U.K. issues warning after 2 allergic reactions to Pfizer vaccine

"Health Service not to give the company's corona virus vaccine to people with a significant history of allergic reactions. The drug maker issued that guidance today after two NHS workers Had what health officials called adverse responses. A patient informed leaflet from five patient information leaflet from Pfizer says signs of allergic reaction might included. Itchy skin rash, shortness of breath and swelling of the face or tongue as Corona virus cases.

Allergic Reaction NHS Pfizer Rash
UK Set To Begin Administering COVID-19 Vaccine As Early As This Week

Morning Drive with Casey and Elliot

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

UK Set To Begin Administering COVID-19 Vaccine As Early As This Week

"Shipments of the Corona virus vaccine, developed by American drugmaker Fizer and Germany's by on tech have now been delivered to the U. K. The delivery comes two days before it goes public in an immunization program that is being closely watched around the world. Around. 800,000 doses of the vaccine were expected to be in place for the start of the program on Tuesday. Chief pharmacist Louise Scotland is excited for the occasion. It's a momentous occasion, the NHS has been planning extensively to deliver the largest vaccination program in our history, so it's really exciting vaccinations will be administered at around 50 Hospital hubs in England. This correspondent Karen Chan is

Fizer Louise Scotland Germany NHS England Karen Chan
UK gears up for huge vaccination plan watched by the world

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

UK gears up for huge vaccination plan watched by the world

"Shipments of the current virus vaccine developed by American drugmaker Pfizer and Germany's by on tech have been delivered to the U. K. the delivery comes two days before it goes public in an immunization program that is being closely watched around the world about eight hundred thousand doses of the vaccine were expected to be in place for the start of the program on Tuesday chief pharmacist Louise Coughlin is excited for the occasion it's a momentous occasion the NHS's been planning extensively and fit to deliver the largest vaccination program in our history said it's really exciting backs nations will be administered at around fifty hospital helps in England Scotland Wales and Northern Ireland will also begin the vaccination rolled out the same day Karen Thomas London

Louise Coughlin Pfizer Germany NHS Scotland Wales Northern Ireland England Karen Thomas London
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:09 min | 6 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Can potentially stay the system and craig pass t more quickly being social care creating sort of properly funded system which people can get access to probably and social care would free up space as well and and in something. The government do more quickly if they choose to grasp that nettle when and indeed made even more easier if they decide to have a more relaxed policy on immigration for people who work in social it. Is there something that could have done this summer. That they could have been feeling the results of right now. I mean in terms of decisions that should be made in the summer to make the second wave. More by the jess. What could they have done if you the health secretary. Wha- what would you have wished into existence. I think they did have to spend money on tests and trace but at the same time they could have created substantial step down capacities down beds. Essentially community has large community hospital type facility. Because that's what's clogging possible bed. Does disease people who convalescing he convalescing somewhere else. Yeah and there was. There were bids from the nhs for that kind of capacity as well as for for money to build and make adjustments to hospitals and enable. Were things that would've would've made a second wave more straight for more a little easier to handle. And dave do you know if those are the proposals that were turned down by the treasury. Yes there were the treasury. Did turn down some proposals for that. Kind of capacity Do you do we know why were. They not thought to be too important to. They not think they would be needed or at the time with the. Nhs there was a big focus home as you related to. The policy was to not have a second wave of corona virus so a great deal of energy and money wasn't spent on planning for a second wave instead. The focus was on trying to quickly try to start catching up with planned care which had been cancelled and delayed from the first wave. I think the other reason which was given was there other facilities already there were nightingale hospitals and things like that but know unfortunately they just not not of the scale and not of the right kind of facility which which could be used they have however started in the north west started using the nightingale hospital. Which is in the dementia conference center for non kovic. Step down care in exactly the way they were talking about this. He's condo facility so they've they sort of done that as a halfway house but it costs. Central manchester is quite a long way from black paul or south yorkshire cumbria say whereas if they were looking to create more of those facilities around the region which and indeed back round england which which would have helped. Well they say. Hindsight is twenty twenty but i i think that really applies in this scenario given how many countless billions the government has spent on this virus so far to deny building extra capacity Is one they may be regretting already. Fraser dave thank you so much for joining me.

nhs Fraser dave nightingale hospital treasury manchester craig secretary
"nhs" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"nhs" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Even with protective gear. You're putting yourself at risk. I are you worried about your family. I'm not concerned about what would happen to my husband or I could be one of these people who's an outlet who develops his very severe form of the disease. Statistically that is unlikely. We're our parents and We've we don't see them and I have no idea as much as it pains me to say this when I will see my parents again or indeed if ever I will be doing to look after yourself at the moment trying to exercise in the house doing gardening speaking to loved ones five face time and actually what does feel that repeat tick is doing things that I know might make this a bit better some in some way my husband's a GP trying to help my husband to out setting up a service for patients in his health authority because it may make a difference and actually sitting there not feeling like you can be is is hard and I've asked myself a lot of the past few weeks. What is worse at the moment being able to help or not being able to help? Because if you want to tell you wouldn't always be at risk and you'd be probably be paid for spending time with the family. It would be difficult and you'd be scared but you'd be safe. We'll be able to open essentially being part of lots of people's grief putting yourself at risk on a daily basis and never seeing family many but I always come back to the viewpoint not being able to help is an absolute privilege and I will always be grateful for having been able to help seen huge support for the NHS. I mean last week. People across the clapped millions of people. I wonder if you could hear that. Clapping where where you were what it meant to you and also what examples of kindness you've seen in your local community all the the examples of kindness and goodwill Undesired to help sell abundant they are coming at us from your line goes on. It's just lovely. Didn't hear the clapping. I was in any recess but I did. My mom did a MEA video clip off. Everybody in the industry clapping. I was fully aware of it and I thought it was a complete lovely thing to do totally united and we've had local businesses who've given US clean Pez socks we've had drinks delivered we've had thousands of Krispy Kreme donuts delivered we've had Jamaican meals take away curry pizzas from Papa. John Being you name it. We've people if something we need it arrives people have loved the concept of the idea behind the NHS but have have been out of love with it for a while because has its underresourced and people don't feel that it hasn't sometimes down on occasions. I think that the the love the NHS has been very much regenerated renewed and the support out there to make sure that the NHL continues to thrive and deliver in these awful times is. What's keeping everybody going? Laura thank you so much and thank you and your colleagues during. Oh it's an absolute pleasure and as I say I know this sounds a bit cheesy but it is an absolute on. That was Laura mcclelland questions about whether the NHL is ready to cope with this crisis. Still being asked in a week that saw a record number of deaths including thirteen year old boy do keep up with this story on our Guardian Life blog and do listen to our science weekly podcast. Which now coming out three times a week to cover this crisis. That's it for today. A huge thanks to Laura McLellan. This episode was produced by Elizabeth Kassian. Sound Design was by Ian Chambers the executive producers on Coal Jackson and Phil Maynard. We'll be back tomorrow..

NHS NHL Laura McLellan US Laura mcclelland Krispy Kreme Laura Elizabeth Kassian Guardian Life Ian Chambers Phil Maynard Coal Jackson John executive
"nhs" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"nhs" Discussed on Today in Focus

"People of the NHS. It's the institution that makes people most proud to be reddish it's more trusted the Royal Family Team GB and then a big show the armed forces and don't politicians Noah and as is not for sale for us to say loud and clear. We are the Party of the NHS all the evidence shows that love of affection for its cuts across party political boundaries on a practical level. Any of US individually in our families loved ones reliant at birth Edessa and many times in between it's because voters rely on it and love it that the NHL is at the heart of this general. Election the Boris Johnson. Jeremy Corbyn have very different decisions about how to run the health service leading to rouse about privatization privatize -ation drug prices on a possible trade deal with Donald Trump. Look I think everything with a trade deal is on the table when you when you're dealing and trade. Everything's the table from the Guardian. I'm initiative Astana today and focus is the NHS up for sale in the NHL is famous across the world as a state owned and state run health system But there are private companies involved in it. When did that begin although Labor now under Jeremy Corbyn Joe McDonnell are seeking grit political capital title on political trouble for Johnson? Co about privatizing. Anna's yes it was actually their party. The Labor Party that took more substantial steps towards introducing private companies. Dennis Campbell is health policy editor for the Guardian and The Observer. I was on a Tony Blair. In the early noughties two thousand and two three in response is too large numbers of people winning longtime for planned operations. Things like a cataract-removal a hernia repair a new hip knee. Being something I've got the waiting lists have come down. Dramatically treatment for things like heart disease and cancer completely transform. The Blair government issued a number of contracts. What we're called? Is Independent sector treatment. Centers they were basically contracts for privately. Run medical facilities to do lots and lots of these operations to get the politically unacceptable witness. Stunt okay so that happened under new Labour in two thousand and ten. The Tories came to power. It is only three letters long long. Letters live hopes David Cameron said his priority was an H. S.. The narrative is that the Tories allowed creeping privatization beyond what we'd seen before that is that true that's right. It's true that the amount of money going to private companies has been going up every year here for the last five or six years. At least it's very hard to get absolutely exact figures of this. The Department of Health Sound. You'll come out every July. Show that in twenty any fourteen fifteen it was eight point seven billion and last year twenty. It nineteen had gone up to nine point two billion title of what that's out of a total one hundred twenty five billion in England last year a knots about seven percent of the budget just in the last few days The Guardian has reported that the number of the patients who then a chess has paid for to be operated on in private hostels in England has pretty much doubled since the conservatives came to power in two thousand ten from roughly the three hundred thousand people a year to over six hundred thousand people a year. I'm what are the arguments that driving up private provision. Well the arguments are that the Anna chess as we see almost every day on the news visibly cannot cope with the demands. Being placed upon demands for energy has Kara going up to four five six seven percent a year then a chest budget and staffing and capacitor things in terms of operating theatres and so on is not keeping pace with that therefore increasingly energy trust in England are having having to do a little deals with local private hostels to take on fifty patients here under patient. There undo them to keep their own individual trust witting lists done. You'll also have the for the government politically difficult reality that the total number of people waiting in England for a planned knowledge and Operation Hospital is now over four point four million people out as Salat so one in every fifteen people in England is waiting for an operation met in. We're waiting for many many many months sometimes over six months and occasionally over a year therefore the private private sector is back in the space where increasingly winning contracts now because the concourse and. Why didn't they spend that taxpayer? Money on increasing their own resources rather than on private companies because the main thing chess lacks staff doctors nurses particularly. They all take time to train on one of the signal failures of the government signal failures in recent sneers towards the NFL has been a catastrophic loss of focus on the workforce problem. And yet it's taken them for too long to realize the scale of the problem on the nature of the problem means that ten years Trinity Dr Three or four years to in Midwife that it takes ages to turn that ship around here are the companies awarded contracts. There are literally hundreds and hundreds of private companies that provide healthcare on a smaller large-scale to the an England probably the best known The we are. The Guardian of focused on a lot in recent in years is version. Care One of Richard Branson's companies eight at the last count hard more than four hundred different contracts to provide different sorts of of care and different sorts services so then the private hustle group spar hospitals They they do quite a lot of these operations. So there's there's a vast array most of them are not names that are known to the to the public. Some them operate on Innova localised basis on this very few those kind of big big companies okay so that's the current state of play. What has the impact been on Kerr? So in truth it's a mixed picture. That'd be unfair to suggest all privately provided healthcare is a perk. It's definitely not quite a little bit. Services that are provided are run perfectly adequately adequately there are no problems raised about them by patients by regulators by stop groups anything but we have seen some significant problems. There's a long and and sorry history of private providers winning contracts from NHS organizations usually by undercutting them in price to quite a large degree and then finding surprise surprise of the count- provide the quality of care in the West expected on either. Having the contract taken can wife them or sometimes shively how contract back because they can't deliver it properly because healthcare is expensive and complicated. It's not an easy thing to make money out of several years ago on the south coast of England company called Co performer. One Country to provide a non urgent patient transport services taking people requiring health care to and from from Hustle. Appointments not kind of sexy stuff not having blue lights not the stuff of TV dramas but really really important for the patients and their and their and their families on the huge undercut the local energy service have been doing it for years and years on the call. The service went to rack and ruin literally almost from day. One cancer patients weren't being taken in for their operations. Kidney patients weren't going into Alice's also says weren't turning up. There was a huge outcry and rightly they lost the contract now. ofter seven months of misery. The controversial company is to be stripped of his contract. All of Sussex Care Commissioning groups agreeing. CELESTICA has been quite right a lot of examples like that and that's physical health. But the private sector's being heavily. Used in mental health services isn't it. There's a real emerging problem not about privately funded inpatient mental healthcare since the start of twenty. Seventeen the care called the commission. The chess regulator in England has issued very critical reports under put into special measures. No fewer than thirty different private mental health hospitals in England. Thirty in less than three years on private companies are making. I think it's about one. And a half billion pounds. A year of Energy has budget goes to proudly provided mental health care. That's incredibly worrying worrying. I mean half. The government acknowledged these problems. Do they accept privatization. May Be to blame have they done anything to rein in what's interesting about. What s prioritization? As politically shoe nar is that certainly theresa. May's government accepted publicly in detail. The need to greatly rule back privatization position of chess care in England and recently Anna Chessington produce the legislative proposals the basis for a bill to unwind a lot of the increased competition competition outsourcing that flowed from the underlying health and social care. Act Back in twenty twelve some clear yet whether Boris Johnson has the same desire that treasa mated to roll this back. Would you rule light expanding the use of the private sector in the house service. We are putting thirty. Four billion didn't few. BBC's lower couldn't bargain. She asked him. Would you continue the extension privatization and and she has unsurprisingly to me. He didn't say no what I what I will tell. You have coasted dentists optometrists and so on who. who was? That's interesting because it's pretty clear to me that the Tories worry about the NHS as an issue they know that voters really care about it and they know that they have historically got a bad reputation. TATION destroy I mean. Members of the public and staff have confronted. Boris Johnson on. His endless hospital visits Chris. Coach's player Dominic Cummings the Tories. Chief strategist strategist has been previously filled. Basically suggesting that a lot of Tory. MP's don't care about the NHL. Was One of the core problems of the Tory party brand going back decades. Yes people think by the way and I think most people are right. The Tory party is lone likely basically. Don't care about people like me so they're trying to show that they do care about this but is it about perception rather than reality. So Energy has privatization politically. It's tricky particularly for the Tories for whom it appears to be toxic recently just last week. The guarding got hold of a leaked copy of a a set of instructions. A handbook in effect.

"nhs" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Talking Politics

"I feel it's broken because the government feels it survived the wind s survive but if it's about survival then that probably means that go didn't make it so we're past the point of broken getting yeah yeah so the cracks the cracks to appear is what i'm saying and then the cracks will wind but the other point i would make in response to that is just the mood that i encountered and i'm very sensitive now to what people actually say and it was a politician than you pass their words very very carefully and you think what do they mean what is this about and i'm not really sure why it should be any different for anyone that your quoting and listening to in an article like this because after all everyone votes everyone is representative and i think everyone brings a personal philosophy to the polling booth so i was taken aback with how people didn't seem to feel the nhl was forever that it might might break people have already a really allowing for this that really startled me i thought it would be all about how can we save this but i'm not talking about a lot of people but just if anyone is thinking that it's interesting that a soon as i started talking about how can we get more money in people far away looking there is and started talking about some other countries system some other fantasy of of a painless way or perhaps painters only for them where they would somehow not have to pay any more but we get a better service if we did it like america org lying ireland or if we just ease the sponges out of the system i think there is a tendency amongst the most vociferous supporters of the nhs.

nhl ireland nhs representative america
"nhs" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Yes when i mentioned japan in the context of the population on my reporting for this piece where people were very much on it talked about meetings with with providers of assistive technology and so on but i suppose what one would hope would be that the young old will be the ones who end up helping the old old it may be that's the real problem is that we've extended lifespan without a corresponding increase in health span the consequence of that is people are gonna have to retire either later what jobs left yes yes but i think you do have to stop wondering about how resources are distributed because you're back at that baffling point that we've reached so many times before some is to get through where every time automation is brought in we also do end up working harder and i mean i am some people getting richer yes that's right that's right there is a bigger kathy its tail problem and this is maybe when you start to get to the real heart of the matter is not a very comfortable heart which is that idea of the exploitative wealthy who are getting more and more of the of the cream from benefits of visionary and automation it's open to challenge in the sense that if you look at what is actually owned in the world in terms of wealth yes rich individuals and families do own a lot sovan wealth funds do along the biggest slice of the pie is those old people leicestershire all the other old people the people who have private pensions so many of the problems from the nhs are because the tax take is too low tax sued too low because international corporations come very very clever very efficient but also very tax evasion very clever finding their their money from the tax man or just finding ways pants and the beneficiaries of that cleverness in many cases are pensioners who have private pension plans of some of them are very rich but not all of them are some of them are just comfortably off on even that and so you have this big problem.

japan nhs
"nhs" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Exactly this this real mika yes mckay yes i mean this is something that a lot of people don't appreciate about america how much state funding the res and how not just medicare but even some of the private caste system 's where they try to control costs are actually moving towards the nhs even as the nhs was them so there is that kind of weird we'd convergence but what happened as far as i understand it with the lens little forms was that they ran up against a really fundamental problem which strange even though it's blindingly obvious never really seem to occur them which was that if you are looking for and efficient healthcare system the cheapest the one that works it's the nhs as soon as you start bringing in the ideas as labor did of patient choice or you can choose any hospital started another one as soon as you start bringing in this idea of contracts and hospitals competing with each other which is what land did then you're gonna start raising the costs and landless thing was he was entering this world where labour alongside their foams had at least poured in huge amount of money and he remembered he was a conservative in the sense of competition contracts privatization someone but if he goes conservative in the sense of austerity and it was when sturdy really starts to buy his reforms hit the buffers over hospitals started to go into the red the gp commissioners couldn't cope and that's the system that the current regime is trying to respond to answer that there are the politicians like lands p who do or don't test some of these others to destruction forget some of the things that might work and underneath you got the wider twenty years story of how these ideas come from the states wall somewhere else and how they enter the system and our hard they are to this law.

nhs america twenty years
"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Absolutely part of the system is indeed is being further improve conceptually with something cool universal credit which we simply we looked up ecu ninety seven but the technological barry's of that time it to great media siaosi with universal credit is you can have a system and in his question of numbers you put in needs of the universe will credit is far less generous than the tax credits we have then now onto the present day an the nhs yup an your a free says the now you're no longer pum sector to the treasury just say something about what the nhs means to you as a citizen rather than as a former official bureaucrat tre were i mean the interesting thing about the and ensures and i say this as a cross bench politically neutral to the person is is the lost an eye in league great socialist institution in this country and it's it's regarded with extraordinary affection by the british people and in my lifetime whenever anybody has dead to challenge the principle of providing healthcare free at the point of views dave invariably hatzor retreat very rapidly from that position so it is i think deep plea loved it is embedded in british consciousness in it chimes with the long i think this sort of the streak of the british people which modest see fairness but it's long told me gene 'provision which is free at the point of views within having to be rationed uh i mean politicians will never say health carries russian but it is this but coups the one thing which was wrong being which the great fathers of the nhs soil but once every go healthy not bevin and people will need to use us nhs less but the reality is the people's demand for health care is infamous and with technological developments they want more and more of it and on top of which we now have issues like in aging population say from me as a citizen it's it's is one of the great conundrums of government heidi you ensure the nhs is well enough resources to waiting lists reasonably under control.

barry tax credits treasury nhs official
"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"The sense of war is required out so the problem at the moment is in essence you get particularly obviously through the political process they have cake and eat it narrative arm and so you we're giving one percent extra in terms of funding but you can have sevenday services transformed mental health first class carol care and we'll do it all by this magic of efficiency that you can't see a no one's other else's ever done and i'm actually of the city the other thing is that if you look over the last couple of elections all the political parties have promised a bit more money but none of them have promised anywhere near the amount of funding in is also actually then there isn't much challenge accountability because he if one party raises it and said the other party's manifesto or they can come back and say well you have not got the answer either of a some of those longerterm issues it's too easy then for all political parties just to duck away from it laws question for me and we want optimistic here because that is the point of this podcast eat i think is really important that we on this question which is can the nhs be sustained in in the poll that you did last year you eat with very striking 88 percent of the respondents supported a taxfunded nhs as we have now i think that shows what how the bridge people feel meet this can be done count every 20 billion pounds as a launch in one sense but as a you know proportion of the overall budget public spending which is what 750 yep yep said under 50 billion we're not talking about things it's going to break the bank said cup of things i would say that i really important for why i'm optimistic eliminating tab on this issue is a seventy of aniversary the nhs and if you think back to when it was founded in it we come out the war we were absolutely broke and the fabric of our country was in tatters and that.

nhs 20 billion pounds one percent 88 percent sevenday
"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"A select committee the look to the future sustainability the nhs and they argued for a body a bit like the office of budget responsibility that does all the focus on our economy now they don't decide or economic policy should be that's a political decision and we live in a democracy and oster wanna live in on those decisions a political health budget is one pound in every five of tax that we pay that's got to be a political decision you can't have someone who isn't accountable to the public making a decision but actually you could improve the transparency and accountability for those decisions by putting in place something like an ib are which showed people if you wanna health service that delivers this or quality and access with this so of health need this is the money you would need these actually other human resources that the eu would need and this is the top cern all you'd old offered muir of climate change yeah of the climate change committee that sets carbon budget yeah for five years cycles ahead yet either you could easily imagine that kind of for that kind of thing i think labour had some kind of proposal at this lost general eighty eight in the midterms are also quite attractive to and it's very interesting and other recent months jeremy hung has been talking a lot more about the need for longerterm planning the short termism that we had at is one of our problems in in in our nhs and we've realised as well with infrastructure we've now got the infrastructure commission because we've been rubbish hillary clinton taking the decisions out of pole nath with some people's illustre take the politics of health and i can see the ambition for that but they're all deal with this remit about who's going to be taxed how much you're going to spend an awful lot yeah but at least let's have some objective of.

nhs eu cern muir hillary clinton climate change jeremy five years one pound
"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"The community and we can't get people out of hospital into the community simply because they should care is being cups say much and the senate can me says is thought easier to cut social cabinet is health care because people care about the nhs the nhs is one of britain's greatest it's frankly a lot sexier than social care light you have 24 hours any have e all you have casualty have in a meals on wheels yeah exactly you don't have that and so i think people and the media take less of an interest from me see special care cops they don't necessarily pre effect that is going to have on the nhs and say i think all social care services i mean i could never be essential what they have incredibly how joked today and that pressure that with failing from having these cuts is coming right device rent health care if you want to integrate the tea and last week's cabinet reshuffle suggests that that's what they're very much trying to do now we need to look at funding across the board and not just for health and justification okay we need to think more holistically even that another question to do with a anymore you experience any some people will look at this and i still want to avoid the conclusion that is about money and will say all while it's just because lots of people coming to any you don't really need to be there how much of the and issue do you find that is an eighty doctor say any on county wreck any and i find this and actually really quite frustrating than people say that because people don't come to a any for a good day out at night he's sitting there hours waiting to be seen you've come to any because you asked the and because you need care and whether you've come pick his ecomog gp appointment because our community services have been ravaged or whether you're coming because one one one service or pharmacist to send un people comes amy many many different reasons and i think put the blame on the patients arriving at the door is very very shortsighted if people are coming unnecessary to any we need to be asking the question why we don't need to be blaming these people and i get.

senate nhs britain community services 24 hours
"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"An awareness of of of escape people's notice the nhs is isn't feels like it's in a real crisis you've got the sort of not just went up russia's but in a winter crisis operations canceled massive pressure on a unease uh nazis who are leaving the profession and i think a daily things is just the i think people from all parties have said this isn't just a normal you know normal this isn't just a full of while this is what happens in a wood to this is much more serious than that and i think you're a year for me it's not that mysterious the nhs is the head of the lost six seven years it's it's kind of were set of increases in terms of financial settlement about wh i think he's about one percent a year in real terms and historically used to be more thoughtful real fallujah and so i do think it's that mysterious as to why it's happened on an we've also i think it's feds say had to quote lov messages from junior doctors nurses others sank please talk about the nhs said i think you know i think we owe it to two overs to patients but also to them to talk about this and and just talk about will what can be done and when we look for reasons to be cheerful basically it but basically the answer as money so it's kind of figuring out how to get more funds to the nhs i think that's partly what we want to talk about today and i think i think it's important to what we're going to do is going to get a view from the front line from dr hanna barham brown who's a junior doctor working emergency medicine on our way i think is important to solve get that sensible what's it really like day today at the moment and house a different from before that we're going to be hearing from need to charlesworth who is the director of research and economics at.

nhs russia fallujah dr hanna barham brown charlesworth director of research six seven years one percent
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Hello welcome to kofi how shops the spectators plus kupu cost to are two stories you can rely on the nia that one's about rail thyroid is and the nhs health crisis and here's discussed both all katie boos on isabelle hoffmann says while wearing lost about the nhs health crisis again dominating the headlines is this actually a crisis do you think i think there's a big serious question about the longterm sustainability if the nhs in terms the services it currently provides free at the point of access and this question has being posed for many years but no one's really died on sort because really it involves squaring with the british public that either they're going to have to cough up a great deal more money and taxes or certain things are going to have to stop being available on the nhs in it's always much worse in winter because people are more likely to get sick and went up shaky old people and the more likely to end up in any and there's been an interesting sort of pendulum swinging the loss two days we had the times front page yesterday which was about the cost of missed appointments to to the nhs doctors saying we spent years telling patients off on that they can't miss appointments anymore we need to try and think of something else because this is causing the health service serious financial problems this is day we had jeremy hunt apologizing to patients full cancelled appointment switched to shows that there's no one coals of the problems with the nhs we always have an ageing population we have in the pieces he problem we have a a mental health crisis in one of the the key fact is actually in these missed appointments are missed psychiatric appointment so it's not a case of people just being lazy is also a case of something going wrong with people being able to get to those appointments because that over the very sick and it does look like a crisis in the longterm is it a shortterm crisis at the moment i think his aides always very easy four opposition parties t i'm over blow what was going on in a unease but it's very difficult to find a doctor who will be sanguine about the state of their emergency department or indeed there keep.

isabelle hoffmann nhs jeremy hunt kofi katie boos two days
"nhs" Discussed on FT Brexit Unspun

FT Brexit Unspun

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on FT Brexit Unspun

"One other heavy it could be around eu competition law where sydney some within the nhs field that this is the case opportunity to get out from under competition law which obliges many contracts within the nhs suddenly anything above a certain costs threshold to be put out to tender and of course the role of the private sector within our uk taxpayerfunded nhs has always been very controversial in a way that i think people elsewhere in the world bats find a little odd bought it certainly is quite deep rooted in the minds of many people in the uk is absolutely rajabov and i think is not so much about privatization for lots of people in the english right just as it is about the feeling they have to jump through loss of hoops to award of contracts to anyone who might want to tender when in fact what they think they're trying to do is create a coordinated integrated care system were as much as possible is done by the same organizations but one i would say about this is it's far from a done deal the when we leave the eu we won't be bound by similar commitments in future and that could happen in two ways firstly the eu may not be keen as part of a trade deal we on with them for us to backtrack from current levels of mocked access to one of our biggest economic sectors and secondly and this is a bit more speculative but all the material that we've seen on the uk's trade deal stretch after brexit really bangs this drama of we all gained campaign to liberalise trade in services we are going to campaign to open markets to uk services now will not sit easily alongside at the same time trying to close off one of the biggest areas of government contracts in the uk to other countries healthcare providers i think a lot of people in the nhs would welcome it if those regulations could go but are not sure will be a straightforward as perhaps some think in the grand scheme of things for me the important overall question for the nhs in the brexit negotiations is can we get a deal that heads off some of.

sydney nhs uk eu healthcare providers
"nhs" Discussed on FT Brexit Unspun

FT Brexit Unspun

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on FT Brexit Unspun

"Move to the uk to work ought to be involved in research will in teaching so one of the things that we're pushing for very strongly is what's called the mutual recognition of professional qualifications if we don't have that we're going to find a large number of doctors who would have worked in the nhs simply won't be able to but mock i gather this mutual recognition isn't universally popular there are a couple of areas where i think many people in the nhs would see a bit of opportunity to get off some eu regulations that they don't like that much and a couple of the most prominent on in the area of if you like regulations star where eu regulation has always been greatly welcomed his regulations manchester off is the provision that it puts in connection with our duty to recognize professional qualifications from elsewhere in the eu for example that means that we can't necessarily test the clinical skills of eu migrants come here to work says nurses in the way that the nursing regulation in the uk would like an on the flip side that because we have to comply with what other european regulates want recognize nursing courses in the uk have to meet certain criteria for example the khambiev accelerated to be fit into a shorter period of time other or any other areas way you think the nhs could benefit from being outside the eu so this this directive called the working time directive which limits the hours work workers can work in a week mostly to 48 and the application of that to the nhs over the last fifteen years or so as a pretty major effect on the way the medicine works especially of more junior levels and there's a perception that it's kind of undermined the ability of junior doctors to basically by working heroically long hours similtaneously work in caring for patients as well as getting a let training and i think a loss of docs as in the hs particularly those who remember an older generation would see a bit of a chance to go back to the old way of working with potentially see that as a way to address some of the workforce shortfalls in that chess moment now the kind of health warning the palme.

uk nhs eu fifteen years
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Or something which could basically transform the nhs in five or ten years of fundamental belief is there in the medium to longterm digital what we fundamentally transformational in where the healthcare is delivered both in the acute sector but also in primary a to longterm jumping what ten years fifteen years 10year fifty horizons it'll fundamentally transform the way the way that healthcare is consumed by the population we shouldn't forget the power of the nhs internationally as well and their organisations luck my phillips that looks at the nhs and sees a fantastic will class organization the we can actually work with within the uk to actually deliver some tremendous breakthroughs and where the healthcare is delivered and not to use that as a advantage to uk plc internationally in terms of delivering growth and prosperity for the country as well so not only can we actually deliver a better healthcare system we can also actually fuel growth who in the uk economy tara certainly there are more take developers in london now been there are in silicon valley so surely won't be any chance with the investment we should be able to nurture new technology as well as by at has been completed by the company sna and that's the reason that we sat up digital health tools london which is a cabaret shen across london with a three act and how science net lacks mad city and a day stack them outside centers as well to try make it much simpler if a great stitched lie dares to scale across the capital we are just claes in the first year of aarp accelerator programme which has taken thirty one of the best companies and given a very structured support was like go thing governor we don't give them money naturally gommorah we give them a priceless package of support instead and the money that we do have we spend in to support the nhs roy is actually we think it's that way round and so to the people on the program that we've just ask the net promote scorn at slightly higher than amazon apple the people you talking that earlier so i think the company's feel wellsupported and we really delighted that one of the patient innovators who came up he hacked his and cost me back.

nhs uk healthcare system london apple amazon ten years fifteen years 10year
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Welcome to especially because he has chance for these this is going to talk about the nhs and technology now the two had a fairly tortured relationship in the past to there is that ten million pounds spent nhs it system it didn't quite work out the way people thought been recently the cyberattack vitesse parts of the nhs paralysed the nhs is massive organization if it gets technology right the gains could be huge so why has our health service founded suharto reform in the way that other industries have done what if anything can help i am joined now by professor tony yung the very first director of innovation for nhs england by tara dernley who is the chief executive of health innovation networks which has been set up by the nhs to accelerate the use of technology and by neil measure of the chief executive of philips which is kindly sponsored this podcast so if i can start with you professor young now you're the first innovation director the nhs has ever had now i remember talking to simon stevens just before he became chief executive of the nhs and he was saying that the technology opportunity was absolutely huge here you have the nhs were the biggest organizations on the planet but has barely begun the youth technology in the ways that other industries hov certainly it's quite far behind this murray can counterparts which is where he used to work now he sought technology as a brilliant opportunity to get better nhs care for not very much more money.

nhs professor director chief executive philips murray suharto tony yung neil simon stevens ten million pounds
"nhs" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The nhs has for decades had a waiting list let me tell you what's happening and this is before it really begins to collapse nhs doctors routinely this is all backed up with faxes from forbes magazine any chase doctors routinely conceal from patients information about innovative new therapies that the nhs does not pay for as to not distress upset or confused them this charlie guard come to mind terminally ill terminally ill patients are now classified as quote close to death so the nhs does not have to provide any kind of life support or end of life uh uh benefits we must be the very definition of jeff panels yes it is it is it's just the beginning when you're saying if you are having hip surgery and use be you smoke or you are horribly overweight all they have to do is just if you think there's going to be like oh well that one eighty scientifically that was the number know the only number that they care about is three point two six billion that exists so if everybody got their weight under thirty of the b m i they will reduce it and say only those who have a bmi of twenty five the nhs expert.

nhs forbes magazine