35 Burst results for "NHS"

"nhs" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:28 min | 4 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"So once that's done we'll have a more accurate view, but there's been thousands and people have been contacting us across social media leaving messages and telling us how they feel about the NHS, which has been really lovely. I suppose the other thing is that since clapping for carers stopped if people had taken part in that it's another way of being able to say and share your thanks. So I think so. I mean, at the start of it, it was so much support this needing. I mean, we, as frontline 19, we offer a counseling service to frontline and.

NHS
"nhs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:20 min | 7 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Profit above human need and that is why we're facing crikey environment. Socially, so it's very important to realize that there is really one cause and that is that our current people in power are lawmakers are not serving us. They have to bed down. And they're. And the number one is to increase profit. And if we don't take a start to get there, we're going to see every aspect of our lives corrupted by the profit motive. So I think it's hardly vital that we realize that the only third powerful every human right we enjoy was one by people who had hope by people who believed him better. I think one of the reasons that we need it to live on the issue is because the in fact about poor for me get overlap with the interest of the privateization of and if you look at the Tory party, one of their main sources of money is the healthcare of it. So we have actually personal financial interest in this area. So you do have been thinking to become very obvious why that thing is happening because it's making a few powerful people very rich. So what we do Francesca. What do you want us to do? What do you want us to do? Because I feel like very angry and very motivated, but they've got a big majority. What is it that we can be doing? You can write to our MP, and go to the website and pay the production, which clearly listed. But I think in the broader sense, it's very important to try and engage with all kinds of media, so shifting away from the mainstream narrative that often just confirms corporate infrastructure and beyond that like what says, don't let me take your hope because if they take our home, we have no chance change. And if you look for well, it's great. Every human right we do enjoy today with one by people who can't hope we believe a better. When you spoke before about feeding overwhelmed, you know, all the deals that sewage that that's in a bitch. Yeah. I feel powerless. So I think it's very important that Peter talked about building community and thought often more than life may have been like, there are no society and we will set pro. Economic units. But that bullet. I cope with a shower or bullet that is. We are all in it. We are all dependent on each other. There is no vulnerable people with open vulnerable situation. So we need to realize our common humanity. And only numbers will we ever achieve. So we've got to come together and break our common humanity. Thank you so much for your. Is there anything you came to say that you didn't get to say? No, I think we covered it. It's up to you. Now you know what's going on? I've empowered you. We've informed you. Anything you'd like to plug. Yeah, so if you go into YouTube, I've made a film, which explains this in a lot more detail. It's an hour and a half. Please watch it. It's called the great the great NHS heist. NHS heist. Arm yourself with the information to combat the propaganda that is being voiced upon us. The more of us that are informed, we can produce an army of people who are putting the correct the truth out there. So we need more help to put the truth out there. Everyone should watch that as soon as possible tonight. I know successions on. Is this more important? Yeah, Francesca is getting excited about Succession. But excited. I mean, I am very excited. I thought what Succession first, but then I'll definitely watch the great NXT kick it back to what we're talking about. Sorry, sorry, sorry. Can I say a huge thank you for inviting us on the covering. We all really appreciate it. Well, we are that sort of non mainstream media sort of weird other outlet that people listen to that we're not in the we're not in the corporate pocket. So I think we have to be, we have to be responsible. Also, Jen's very persuasive. She calls me all the time now. I used to be the one calling Jen going, oh, can you come and do this Tuesday, fundraiser or whatever? And she is realized it's time for payback. So she calls me and goes, I've got a thing on. Can you find some famous people to sign this letter slash can we come and do a guilty feminist? And I'm so delighted because it's great when somebody I love and trust is bringing me stuff. And what an amazing panel for us tonight. I have before I actually can do. A big part of that alone is we've got loads of amazing people and planning your good health videos for us. If we want a couple to film video, what the yes means for them and share their own story until the website only is going to go viral and have a chance to create another math movement. Great. So could everyone get their phones out now? And you need to make because this website is going live on Wednesday. So you need to make a note. You have to make a video saying why you love the NHS, the NHS has been there for you, and now you're going to be there for the NHS. You need the NHS, the NHS needs you, et cetera. And the website that you're going to plug is your C two. What's that hashtags as well to that? Well, if you want to get need you and all the info about what we're looking for in videos on the website any social media tags or is it all directing to the back to the well, we thinking of your advantage because we're very boring people really. Okay, great. All right, so you're interested. And you can tag in these guys tag the guilt of federalist if you want. If you don't want to make a video, make just a tweet about how the actress has been there for you. But ideally we could if all of us did a video on Wednesday, that would start to make it go, because then other people go oh, I want to do that. I want to get to your friends, your mates, your family members. People you know you're like, oh, I know so and so that's really politically active. I know so and so that's really into whatever. Just contact them and just say, listen, I'm sticking up a video. Will you retweet it? Some people might not be comfortable putting up a video, but they might want to retweet it or favorite it or share a story or share a post or share a feed or whatever the hell's going on, I don't know, I understand social media. But that is the most important thing to do.

Tory party NHS Francesca Jen Peter YouTube
"nhs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:08 min | 7 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"DNA jet code. The world fair date will be now. Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. They managed to defraud or practice beloved NHS, then everything will be up to God. And it's really important to add that rich people won't be safe either. You know, don't let that keep. It's all I had money. Report from the Mediterranean, share the world often heavily targeted. And so unnecessary treatment which I think I remember seeing all of that played out in scrubs. Where they would they would try and get people to have these full body scans so that they could because there's something wrong with everybody. And it was just to make people hypochondriacs. And reach a reunion. The profit motive should be healthcare. I was clearly lost by the campaign which you asked me about and over a forward. I do for the time is not only about saving her pressure and again. It's about defining what kind of country we are, because the idea that quality healthcare is a fundamental human right. That everyone did that. And the idea that we collectively fund our carefully cover is the beautiful one and should be for violence. And we've become said, well said Jess. There's certainly a lot of support for that in the room and I know that there will be when the podcast goes out. The campaign website is your NHS needs you dot com and it launches this Wednesday, the 27th of October. Is that correct? Yeah. And this option will not that you can take email in your okay and loving them not to vote for this awful Bill. Okay, so we'll all do the 5 actions. Yeah, Jen. Oh, yeah. Sorry, what? I'm going to do all of the actions. I just wanted to ask doctor but one last, I wanted to ask you another question very quickly. You've got time doesn't have to be one last question. Okay. Because again, this is I'm getting all of this from Francesco. She's my Oracle, but she said to me that I should definitely ask you about renationalization of the NHS would be the actual only way because even if this bill is overturned, it doesn't mean that the NHS safe, does it? No, because the private corporations are already embedded within the NHS. We need to pull out the market, which we at least 10% of the NHS budget every year. We need to undo the toxicity of private finance initiative debt where the NHS estate has been saddled with very expensive, unnecessary debt, which is being used as an excuse to flog off the land. This is a premeditated financial collapse of the system. So that needs to be removed. And we need to get rid of this bloated management bureaucracy, which is purely required to run a market. And has no interest in delivering safe care. But one thing I want to mention is how do these companies make profit? We've already we've already talked about the denial of care. But it's also about cutting costs. And one way they cut cost is to make sure that they have the cheapest staff. Not the best qualified staff. So you have a race to the bottom in terms of standards and in terms of numbers of staff. So you have unsafe staffing, unqualified people or less qualified people. Having to give you poor or second rate care. And that does nothing for U.S. patients, and it does nothing for the healthcare giver who ends up suffering the moral injury of having to supervise and neglect. So what you're basically saying is that they're trying to make doctors less skilled and the doctors that we have at the moment. They're replacing them. They're replacing them. We've got dot with people that aren't as qualified as. Yeah, they weren't because it's cheaper. Part of this bill is to deregulate the profession. So you know. You don't need to regulate doctors. No. Deregulate doctors. No. Well, they want they want to remove the requirement to have qualifications to deliver health. What? Are you kidding me? That's not they can't do that. We're not. I wouldn't put anything past them, right? So what they want to achieve is this is called de skilling and task shifting is how to ask shifting to seriously they're talking about this. They're saying, can we do skill? What does this mean though? Explain. Well, it means instead of having, instead of seeing a doctor out of hours, which you used to, now we have one one one, which is basically a school lever looking at a computer screen, right? Now that's going to be replicated across normal hours, GP service delivery. Have you noticed GPs are being scapegoated at the moment? Yeah. This is no accident. Right? So whenever you have now, we're in the phase of the managed decline of the NHS. We're quite deliberately we're having reputational damage inflicted on the NHS. People's experience is getting worse and worse. And the government aren't going to say, well, this is our fault because we deliberately defunded it for ten years. They're going to say it's a GP's fault. They're hiding from patients, and that's where we are. And that's sort of why I want to come in on which is to say that the NHS right now isn't perfect. And so when we say we need to be protecting our NHS, I understand a lot of my friends, a lot of my patients, I speak, to say, well, I find it really difficult to get a GP appointment or I'm not getting the quality of care that I want. And I think that is part of the process of this managed decline because then it means that we start thinking, okay, well the only option must be bringing in this private healthcare company, that is something that has been premeditated and planned. I think we went into the pandemic 40,000 nurses short. We spend less than half of what other comparable countries do on healthcare. We have half the number of hospital beds per capita. We're already in a state where the NHS is basically on its knees. And it's only really being held together by the goodwill of the staff that are in it really pulling their weight, and then the way that the media and government respond is by scapegoating very publicly. It opens the way for prioritizations and for alternative options to come through. But what I would say to everybody here and everybody listening is that the first thing that we need to do is educate ourselves and know what's going on. And then also hold our policymakers to account like Francesca said before we are the ones who pay for the NHS. We are paying for service out of our taxation. And when we pay for a service, we need to expect a certain standard of care. And if that means that you want to be able to speak to your GP or access certain medications or whatever else that is, for you to decide, you are, you are the public that are paying for this. It is your NHS. It's your service. And yeah, we need to take back democratic control of it. I worry though about burnout for doctors and nurses because they are understaffed. I feel like we end up blaming the people that are there. It's a bit like I had a headmaster who on the last day of term every year would be furious that half the kids hadn't turned up. So he would round up everyone who had turned up and put them on the parade ground, and he would shout at all of us, because this is a disgrace, how dare the school year ends with the school year, how dare people not turn up and we're the ones that have turned out. Why shouting at us? They can't hear it. They're not here. And I feel like this a bit with the NHS is that people say, well, this quality of care is good enough blah blah blah, but you're shouting at someone.

NHS de skilling Francesco Jess Mediterranean Jen Oracle Bill U.S. Francesca
"nhs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:09 min | 7 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"An NHS doctor public health academic and activist. Doctor bob gill is an NHS doctor campaigner and creator of the documentary, the great NHS highest. Please welcome to the stage, Rita and barb. Arena, hello, thank you so much for coming out, doctor Rita. Thanks. I really appreciate your time and also your extensive expertise. I'm sure you've got other things to be doing. I'm from. And doctor brogue, thank you very much for coming. Thank you for inviting me. We're very, very excited to hear what you've got to say. Now we're also going to be joined by somebody on the screen above. This is very exciting for us. This is the hybrid world we live in now. Wow. Our next guest is a comedian speaker actress writer and active campaigner. Please welcome to the screen. Francesco Martinez. Hello, hello. It's delightful to see. Am I really big? You're my son. You are like God. You are. You are. You're the size of a building. This is sort of like Godzilla Martinez to be honest. I'll take that. Yeah, well I'm very excited. I'm sorry. We're going to have to say, oh, we can see you down here, so actually, we're better off looking here. Yeah. I was a little camera so this way. And so if we turn around Francesca can't see us. So we're seeing you here hello Francesca. Can you see us? No, I can't. I can hear your lovely boyfriend. Oh, yeah, you can't see us. In fact, I did get the memo about that. But don't worry me because I'm getting you very beautiful and photoshopped. Keep imagining us that way, yes. Oh, I think we won't send pictures. We feel very privileged to have this episode tonight here at the guilt of feminist. Because I think we're going to get some insights that we wouldn't otherwise have. And we really do need to know about. So first of all, I'm going to go to you bob. Can you give us the privatisation overview? So for anyone who lives as a globally, the United Kingdom is very proud of its socialized medicine. And we've had that since about the 50s, and that was hard fought for hard one and Americans are always so astounded that whatever we've got, we can go, we can get it seen to a prescription is 7 quid. And if you really can't afford it, the government will pay your prescriptions as well. Doesn't matter what kind of medication you want. It's 7 quid. And if you need an operation, it's all there. So we don't have a history of privatized medicine in this country. Of course we do have private medicine options like buoy, but they have to be better than the NHS or no one would use them and very few people do. Compared to our population, only rich people. Only the kind of people that run the country generally have beeper or similar. So bob, can you tell us what's going down with privatization in this country? Sure. While I was listening to you early hours worried about drifting into men's planing. So forgive me. No bob, we've specifically booked you to mansplain. Okay. I should have said that in the bio doctor bob is an NHS doctor campaigner and mansplain. Who creates it, but you're not matured 'cause man's spreading is telling us that we already know as if we don't know it. You are just explaining because we don't know. We wouldn't want to know. So you're invited here as an honored guest, whatever you tell us. Unless you tell us like feminism is about equality. I'm not going to show this. It's best that you don't bother. Stick to your expertise. So I will take you very quickly through what's been going on is taken several decades. It spans the political spectrum. In fact, it closely follows my career. It started back in 1988. That's when I went to university. And that's when a document was produced by MP's olive and Jordan redwood called Britain's biggest enterprise. This was commissioned by a right wing think tank called the center for policy studies. And it set out how we would go from a publicly funded publicly provided system to an American style insurance system without anybody noticing. And it said, without anyone noticing. No, I put that bit in. Oh, okay. But there was the agenda you think. That was the agen no thinking about it. They quite clearly put it in there. There were 5 steps. And this is how we're going to achieve it. But central to the plan was to keep it as quiet as possible, otherwise it'd be a significant public pushback. And what they've what they've actually achieved, I've explained this as running a marathon, the privatization marathon. They've done 25 miles. And now they've come back to the stadium. This is the final stretch. What they've achieved is introduced a market a totally bogus market up until 2012. Where you had the buying and selling of healthcare services within the NHS. They've installed a very bloated managerial structure which sucks out a significant proportion of the healthcare cost. And they have set up the NHS assets to be stripped. And if I divide that up into three, you have the land and the property, you have the patient data and of most interest now is the NHS budget. And while they've achieved so much, most of the staff and unfortunate most of the patients in the public have no idea. Because we're not being told, the NHS logo appears everywhere. We're still not paying when we access services. So it appears as if nothing has changed. The reality is that we're very close to finishing the job and what the current bill that we are here to try and raise your awareness about what the current bill will do is essentially turn the NHS into a logo and a funding stream. The NHS will no longer be a provider. Everything will be outsourced. And the control of the budgets will be handed over to united health and similar companies. America's biggest insurance company, private insurance company. This bill is currently waiting to be turned into a law. Yeah, so it's been through his had three reigns in parliament has been to the committee stage. It will come back to parliament. Why have we had absolute zero coverage on the main media, so sort of television and main broadsheets haven't even touched on the fact that this bill is about to go through and what the impact will mean for every single person in this country. Is this a question for you Rita? Yeah, so I called up a friend before the show who works in the media. And I said, why aren't you covering it? And he said, that most of the stuff that's in the media is what is happening in government and the sort of battles that are happening in government. Because that is what brings stuff to the forefront. And so there's something to be said about the lack of clear opposition from the opposition. Because really we need to be debating this quite publicly. And the fact that we're not, I think, should be very concerning. But then I guess if we look at the government's and the media's track record over the pandemic, I mean, around the world, we are known as plague island..

NHS bob gill Rita Francesco Martinez Godzilla Martinez bob hello Francesca Jordan redwood barb center for policy studies Francesca Arena United Kingdom united health and similar comp Britain parliament America government
Not Right to Say Only Women Have a Cervix, Says Starmer

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:55 min | 8 months ago

Not Right to Say Only Women Have a Cervix, Says Starmer

"So here's this the the head of the labor party in the uk a sir. Nevertheless non the sur not nevertheless in sir moreover we go for kier storm denied that it was correct to saying only women have services. It's something that shouldn't be said. It is not right. Conservative health secretary sajid javid called the opposition leader's remarks a total denial of scientific fact adding and he wants to run the nhs. The national health service. A monday labour's shadow chancellor. Let me explain. What shadow is in the parliamentary government's. That's the person who would be in that position. If that party came to power so the shadow chancellor is rachel reeves struggle to answer whether it was transphobic to say that only women have services. This is a woman responding to the question from. Lbc what's obesity. You know something broadcast inc. So what's the l for london. Lucy reeves initially evaded the question before responding rather flustered when preston game is it transphobic. Look i just. I don't know even how to start answering these questions. I don't find them helpful. The the the woman would be chancellor of the uk doesn't know how to answer the question. The only women have services.

Sajid Javid Labor Party Rachel Reeves Parliamentary Government National Health Service Broadcast Inc. UK NHS Lucy Reeves LBC Obesity Preston London
Shake, Rattle the Roles: Britains Cabinet Reshuffle

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:10 min | 8 months ago

Shake, Rattle the Roles: Britains Cabinet Reshuffle

"Britain's prime minister starts today with a very different cabinet than he had yesterday on. Peculiarity of british politics is the cabinet reshuffle. A sudden reordering of who's in charge of what in the government this one was. Well telegraphed and members of parliament had been pressing. Boris johnson on. Who shouldn't be in charge of much with all the talk of cabinet. Reshuffle can the prime minister guarantee that the foreign secretary will finally be sucked that any shuffled or does he intend to the world and competence reshuffles serve many purposes rewarding loyalty punishing perceived foolishness and setting or resetting a political agenda but they're messy and embarrassingly public ministers shuffled past the cameras outside downing street toward their new fates expecting a promotion. Knew it might not seem like a great time for such disruption with the country focused on what the pandemic will bring next and on britain's role in the crumbling of afghanistan but the prime minister has plenty of other business still to attend to and now a new team to tackle. It was expected that. Boris johnson would hold reshuffle. He has space to do so. Now and macelroy is a senior editor at the economist. Britain's coming out of the pandemic enough to do something like that. that wouldn't look like distraction. He won a tight vote on tax raising last week to fund the nhs and social care so he feels that he sweeps all before him. And this is the time to clear out some deadwood and makes them promotions. And what is the dead wood. That's been cleared out with the most. Prominent deadwood. That went out was dominic robb brexit. Here a lawyer. He became foreign secretary and went through that role. I think without great distinction. But he did it and then got into terrible trouble. When the fall of kabul happened. He was on holiday with his family and he didn't really appear to respond quickly enough to the

Cabinet Boris Johnson Britain Macelroy Parliament Afghanistan Dominic Robb NHS Kabul
Boris Johnson, Inviting Battle, Prepares to Break Vow on Raising Taxes

The Briefing

00:34 sec | 9 months ago

Boris Johnson, Inviting Battle, Prepares to Break Vow on Raising Taxes

"Johnson is today announcing a tax rise to pay for the effect of lockdown on the nhs it breaks the tory manifesto meaning. He'll be facing down rebels from his own party. The prime minister is expected to say that national insurance will go up by around one and a quarter percent that could generate more than ten billion pounds for the nhs for months. We've been told a solution to the social care. Crisis was coming but political editor. Ben reilly smith has learned that the new phones will i e goto reducing. Nhs waiting lists. Now let's let the claims. The plans are a

Johnson Ben Reilly Smith NHS
What Does It Mean for the UK To Warmly Welcome Afghan Refugees?

Woman's Hour

01:39 min | 9 months ago

What Does It Mean for the UK To Warmly Welcome Afghan Refugees?

"Morning. The government has set out more details of operation warm welcome the scheme to resettle thousands of afghan refugees all of those who've arrived on the afghan relocations and assistance policy. The scheme are helping. Those who helps schemes gives me helping those who helped the british military in uk. Government in afghanistan will be given immediate indefinite leave to remain the government's pledging twelve million pounds for additional school places. Three million pounds to support. Nhs access and a five million. Pound top fa- councils in england wells and scotland to support the and meet the costs and help meet the cost of renting properties. Here's mr for overseeing. Afghan resettlement victoria atkin speaking earlier on the today program. We ten thousand people who are in quarantine hotels that moment This is the largest ever evacuation scheme in living memory and so it is going to take off and local of an charges local communities a bit of time to put this framework in place. But that is what we're working on and so today's announcements not just indefinitely to remain but also our determination help children Start their education again. The extra funding for them to support them a school the funding for adults to learn english. Those who don't speak english well also The promises in relation to housing the discretionary funding. We're giving to councils. This is all part of enormous Exercise in integration. And just remember that the of the twenty thousand who will come here over. The coming years will be women and children.

England Wells Victoria Atkin Afghanistan FA Scotland UK Government
Aspirin May Help Treat Aggressive Breast Cancer

BBC World Service

01:06 min | 9 months ago

Aspirin May Help Treat Aggressive Breast Cancer

"Breast cancer scientists. The Christie NHS Foundation Trust in Manchester here in the UK say the commonly used painkiller could be employed to make tumors, which are hard to treat more responsive to anti cancer drugs. Starting a trial to see if the painkiller works Health correspondent Simon Dettman reports around one in five breast cancers are triple negative. It's the type that hormone treatment and most targeted cancer drugs don't work against, and it disproportionately affects those aged under 40 and black. They face a treatment combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy that can come with side effects. If the clinical trial in humans using aspirin is successful, it could boost the effectiveness of the immunotherapy drug, a value map, which helps immune system target and attack cancer. Charles and Animals have been successful Doctor and Armstrong. The trial leads says that inexpensive aspirin combined with immunotherapy could ultimately provide a safe, new way to treat breast cancer. Simon Deadman. Let's get the

Christie Nhs Foundation Trust Simon Dettman Cancer Breast Cancer Breast Cancers Tumors Manchester UK Charles Armstrong Simon Deadman
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

02:27 min | 11 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"And some teachers working in the mayfield that they are doing as challenging job as the nursing staff who've been working in hospitals but yes as as you say there's not that level of affection and one of the things i find absolutely fascinating bounce researching. This book is when you talk to people who work in the health service in terms of structure its management even as i think it senior doctors less so as junior doctors. They don't have that romantic view the nhl for them. There is either frustration particularly for doctors of frustration with the management frustration with inefficiency of frustration. With the fact that the computers are ancient and take ten minutes to turn on and so on if you talk to the management at the nhs. They have well. I suppose very managerial attitude towards it is. It's the health system and some of them have worked broads. Stevens for instance has worked in america or he doesn't talk about that quite say much these days because of the british fear of the american health systems suddenly sort of sneaking up behind us and turning us center similarly on equal country in terms of how comes to america. I think one of the things about the nhl. The things that makes survive is the fear that at any point it could be taken away from us and so the protect the nhs line was so powerful during the pandemic because there is already a deep seated british in security that this miracle of public service shouldn't exist and maybe won't exist if we stop believing in it. yeah. I think it is fascinating. But there's there's obviously a backlog in education as well as in healthcare yet. I mean everyone in westminster knows got the nhs backlog is is a is a is going to become a bigger bliscoll issue. Vani education bible even though it you could all but the education backlog probably has more profound economic implications for the future of the country. the neonates s. one does and it is another can of curiosity of this of the british debate that we seem to think that are only two forms of healthcare system available. We're going to the us version and the issue whenever talks about the netherlands. All over the german system done which in terms of covert has done very very well and hospitals and the like is well. Thank you so much that all of this your book and reading your biography of nhs when it comes out thank you so much..

nhs nhl mayfield us Stevens westminster the netherlands
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

05:35 min | 11 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Paul and right now i think he's fraught with risks for the government because by giving the government more direct control over the health service when the health service has to make some very difficult decisions. I mean i you to some people may think that you're going to have to choose. The de prioritize kind of quality of life karen inverted commerce to prioritize other forms of move directly life threatening tap if decision was being taken by the chess and it was silence even successor. He was going on the mall program to talk about that decision. I'm in the public reaction to that. Would be would still not still be difficult but would be different from the health. Secretary did making a decision but we all too deep prioritize treating the following list of conditions in attempt to play the waiting list in other areas. And i think this is. This is one of the big questions. So the government eluded this debate about who the head of the nhs should be and that there is amanda per child. If you look at such can previous illness who point to to replace marconi's governor of the bank of england. He went for andrew bailey. Who was a less high-profile candidate with deep experience in the bank but is much less of a public figure of carnivals and so amount of all these andrew bailey stall candidate for the jets. And i've been there are some people in government. He think that having someone who is less of a political simon stevens less likely to go public. And that lobbying for more money might be helpful. But i also think there's a risk that if you have someone who is who is very low profile then with combine that with the health and social care bill. I'm what is happening. Is going to be even more directly government's responsibility but is now in terms solve public opinion and public perception. And just think it is very easy to see all the problems for cast on but if you care stormer then they know there is a potential attack longview the next action which.

andrew bailey karen chess Paul simon stevens marconi bank of england nhs amanda jets government stormer
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

04:35 min | 11 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"I suspect we both knew the arts to this. Is who gets blamed. Is it the nhs in the public. Faith starts to dwindle in the nhs in the way that it did in the late. Nineteen actually that people were starting to lose faith in the system that they were turning private when they could even actually medics were were using the the opportunity to do private treatment on these long waiting lists quite often or is it the government. He gets the blame and i didn't. You think james. I think to me. It's pretty clear that given the dynamics we've got at the moment with the rainbows and the clock for carriers and all the things we've had over the past year for the nhs versus a picture of politicians who have messed up on on care homes who have one of them has been pictured snogging in his office. I think it's going to be pretty difficult for politicians to move this blame onto the nhs. I was talking to a cabinet minister recently and they bought the political problems of dealing with the background. We're going to be so cute. In the autumn labor would end up putting ahead in the polls towards would fall back behind because they would lose so much support because people become so irritated by the backlog. The question i've got the you is about because you are rising this biography of jesse georgia a huge number of people in the house of us. How long is it going to be until the kind of wasting this return to normal all are we never going to get that all. We're going to talk about yet. Ain't jackson pre covert and postcard. Because i mean in cynical. Tom's there's always electoral implication. Here which is andre. Think the tory party. Which has since the brexit referendum on the boris johnson tried to china itself into going to high priests of national religion when it comes to be h s. There has been none of the tory skeptcism margaret thatcher used to admit about the nhs. None of the kind of ken clock tough love. This is been very much more we will give. Nhs whatever it feels it needs when you look at this. How long will it be before. Manchester returns to where it was in terms of waiting lists and times pre covert. Yeah it's a really interesting question and if you talk to. Nhs leaders. And i'm not just talking about the sort of people who run nhs ingram. It'll say those. He represents an hsa providers for instance he represent foundation go. Nhs trusts. now they will say that it's important to have a sort of can-do attitude to this..

nhs jesse georgia house of us tory party james cabinet ken clock boris johnson andre margaret thatcher jackson Tom china Manchester ingram
"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

03:34 min | 11 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"New podcast available. All spectators usual towels on the challenges facing the nhs post pandemic is. You've really put your finger on something here. Because looking at the political landscape for the next few years. I one of the most stadium faxes that the waiting list is now forty. Four three million people long and expected to grow even longer in the coming months as more people come forward for treatment will be able to get face to face. Gp appointment cited javid the newly-appointed house actually said this week. But seven million people had not presented for treatment during the pandemic..

javid
"nhs" Discussed on The Leader

The Leader

02:51 min | 11 months ago

"nhs" Discussed on The Leader

"From the evening standard in london. I'm david malls land and this is the leader. We all know about this attack on chris. Witty chief medical officer at the weekend. The prime minister called it despicable harassment by thugs. But what's sense. Emerged is at health. Workers and volunteers on the front line of the vaccine out in london are also being physically and abused by anti vaccine evening. Standard's revealed that at least one boras calling for extra help to deal with the problem. The story was broken by a health. Editor ross lied. Who's with me now. Ross what's been happening and where so. Many listeners will be aware of the video of the attack on chris. Witty that you've made it cloth through the weekend and this wasn't the first time he had been harassed in public and discussion of that happened. Gist of the city hall win. The mayor's london health board may not basically as steady can plus the nhs chiefs in london on some council leaders in what then came too late. Was that volunteers and any chase with staff in london and also been harassed possibly not quite to the same degree of been grabbed in the street and having an armpit rain upon what has been happening. Is that a number of incidents of card vaccination sports noronha partly. It's a primarily we're vaccine eastern bossi's are going into states we are sort of anti vikes a brigade or people who are opposed to jobs have criticized a beverly abused even physically abused some of the people involved in trying to administer the jobs in this includes yes the sort of chess workers but also a even more worryingly the volunteers you know just your average london. He turns up with a clipboard to try and tell people to go to help etc. See them all over the place and these people are falling victim on the front line. Which is very alarming and multi created. See how distressing this wars. And a general please veil for the metropolitan police to help a fast and a city said he would take up It's also off seeing that. A mayan investigations have found that some cancels night when that she standing these buses into the community are sending them with security guards. A such concern. The sort of ruling group of anti axles causing trouble and somebody actually tweeted today after the story online to say that he had had people standing in line presenting themselves as just regular joe waiting for job but once they get inside the center actually going on into abused people trying to administer the jobs. So it's always equate a cd issue of quite extraordinary. Actually about chick incidence. I was getting my second astrazeneca jab in waltham so today and the were the have been security guards there. Just kind of watching the queues..

london ross lied london health board nhs chiefs chris noronha bossi boras Ross city hall david chess metropolitan police joe astrazeneca waltham
Coronavirus Vaccine Could Be Made Compulsory for NHS Staff, Minister Says

UK Column Podcasts

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus Vaccine Could Be Made Compulsory for NHS Staff, Minister Says

"Vaccine minister. I'll we has confirmed that the government is considering making rotavirus vaccines compulsory for an stoff. Nhl staff have been eligible to receive a job since the first phase of the vaccine. Roll out but the fight. There is no requirement for them to take out. The offer has become a widely debated issue Can i ask why. Would it become a widely debated issue if an staffer and then he way Believing in the efficacy of vaccines because surely they would be the first to be jumping on us. Well yes except. We're about to show mike the really the nhs stall fano going to be given the opportunity to speak because somebody's going to speak for them but fascinating how all of a sudden the vaccine is just an awful. There's no pressure to take it. There's no phone calls and tax coming through from the government. It's just there on offer if you want to come forward and say you'd like it. That's fine if you're indicating home. And you say i don't want to accept your offer. What are you going to get the see any way

NHL Government Mike
A Life in Leadership: Dr. Daniel Zinnel

Supporting Leaders

03:15 min | 1 year ago

A Life in Leadership: Dr. Daniel Zinnel

"All right one. This episode of supporting leaders podcasts. We have dr daniels in all and we discover that we went to the same program at creighton. our past probably like just just crossed each other But i'm so excited to have you on the show. Thank you so much for taking time out of your day to have a conversation with us looking forward to it. So let's just start off and share with us a little bit about your background. I mean you seem to be involved in so many things. You can definitely tell. You're an advocate for a lot of different groups of people and and you're engaged in political things. The arts Work so share with us a little bit about who you are and what you do. Well i'll start at the beginning. I was I grew up in northwestern iowa outside of a tiny town called pomeroy which is about six hundred fifty people Youngest of four grip on the farm right across the road from my dad's parents my grandparents. So i saw them every day growing up which i am very grateful order but in small town iowa you have to do everything be involved in everything so i was in all four sports played. The charm sang in the choir. Did all of the things was in. Nhs or h ffa. So i truly am grateful for that Well rounded nece that. Allow me to really try so many things. And i think that's still kinda tested to my career in my life. I like to be involved. In a variety of even today North west island's pretty conservative and so growing up as a little boy was very challenging to to recognize what i was going through to see others. Who were like me and should not be alone and so i went to iowa. Central community. college burst in fort. Dodge years and then moved to into moines in two thousand six to perform at adventure land. So you're at adventure land in the summer of two thousand six and if you know eventually know there's a stage that comes up from out of the ground i performed Had eight shows everyday. They were short set. So it wasn't too long but i we a country show at patriotic show in greece. So that was a ton of fun. And i think really helped me develop competence in front of people because you have to have confidence when performing And then i started going to school full time while working fulltime in. I did that for ten years. Finish undergrad did a masters in health and then completed the doctor of education and leadership from creighton. But my career really started in nonprofit type. Still were still working nonprofits but it started working with individuals with intellectual disabilities and technically and still employed doing that type of work. That i transitioned to more part-time respite. But i have a client that i worked with since two thousand six which is just wild to think about the had that relationship with him for so long

Dr Daniels Iowa Creighton North West Island Pomeroy FFA Moines Dodge Fort Greece
What Is the Healthiest Diet Out There?

Food for Thought

02:07 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Healthiest Diet Out There?

"This week's food for thought sees. Nhs dietitian and runner. Charlie watson and i explore to enjoy a healthier diet and what we can do to make those better choices. Hello charlie hi. Thanks so much for having me on the podcast. Such a pleasure. I've been so looking forward to this episode. I think just because it's going to help so many people because it's just easy as it is To tell you clients to stay tougher thing in moderation because that phrase is definitely one that we tend to use definitely and motivation is so different for everybody that you can. You can think you'll giving one piece of advice. And ashley the way that somebody interprets is so different to the way that you interpret or your mom interpreters your or your husband or whoever so yeah. It's something that we might have one interpretation but other people have many different ones. I and i think that's part of the complicated nature of our jobs but equally how things are portrayed in the media or online in particular. I felt most people online these days to get to get information of course and it's even more difficult. How do you read between the lines. How do you interpret how anyone's going to see what you have to say. Because what is i. Guess the question. Everyone wants to know is what is the healthiest diet. Charlie is the one out there. So i was thinking about this and i and i don't think there is one particular diet that fits everybody because we are all so different. We will have individual needs. We have individual goals. Health concerns health history. And so i think the healthiest for you is the one that makes you feel best. Both mentally and physically. Because i think that's such a big part of our eating is our mental health and the social aspects. and the you don't want to stress even if a diet is making you feel great physically. If it's adding a lot stressed your life might not be the best one for you. So it's about finding what is right for you. What makes you feel at

Charlie Watson Charlie Ashley
Necas scores twice as Hurricanes top Lightning 4-3

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Necas scores twice as Hurricanes top Lightning 4-3

"Martine H. as captains for poor performance by scoring with three fifty three remaining giving the hurricanes a four three win over the lightning NHS finished with two goals and two assists as Carolina pulled within one point of Tampa Bay for the central division lead on the first TV show you know you have more confidence a little more more even more time on the ice and I don't know I just feel so good Dougie Hamilton set up the game winner to extend his team record point streak for defenseman to fourteen games the ball toward to nothing until Cedric Paquette and Sebastian aho tallied in the sixty two second span early in the second Andrei vasilevskiy stopped thirty six shots for the lightning who have dropped two straight for the first time in a month I'm Dave Ferrie

Martine H. Dougie Hamilton Hurricanes NHS Tampa Bay Cedric Paquette Sebastian Aho Carolina Andrei Vasilevskiy Dave Ferrie
Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

FT Politics

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Covid vaccine: PM to have AstraZeneca jab as he urges public to do the same

"When johnson talks about the uk's world-beating response to covid nineteen vaccine pogrom passes muster. It's been an unqualified success or one of the reasons. His conservative party are so far ahead in the polls over twenty five million brits have received their job so fall but the government unexpectedly announced show fall in the number of vaccines delivered in april juice. Supply issues and the debate has a geopolitical angle. To given the you struggling with its own vaccine rollout slovan the line. The european commission president on the block might even consider export controls. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis of the century. And i'm not ruling out any anything for now because we have to make sure that europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible so sarah. Let's begin with the overall state of the uk's vaccine pogrom based on what was set out in december. It's pretty much all going to plan fairly high levels of takeover ninety four percent i believe and the government is insisting that all over fifty will have had their first job by the middle of april. So what's the problem. Well a week ago we would have said. This was indeed the most Astonishingly amyloid success and a sign of vessel. Buoyant moved around it. Was that the with some very clear briefing to a couple of the saturday newspapers suggesting that we were actually going to move to the over forty's much sooner than expected so it was a bit of a jolt to find out on wednesday that in fact. Nhs people involved in the program had been told that they must hold booking any new appointments throughout april because the been a sudden very significant reduction in the supplies available so that really has put the first serious dent in the narrative which right from december the eight. I think it was the day. That william shakespeare became one of the first two vaccine as now suddenly. The government is in the unaccustomed position of having to explain what's happening and explain why some of the public expectations that they'd raised so hard may not be met to be fair to the government. They still absolutely insisting they're on track with the two big dates that they've set for this program that all over fifty should be vaccinated by the middle of april. And all adult britons. Who wants a job will have had it at the end of july. But there's no question that it's been a difficult political management problem for them this week and very much not the position that they'd hoped to be in the club. Let's have a look at why this might be happening and seven. I spent a lot of this week speaking to people. Whitehall trying to figure out exactly what was going on behind the scenes with matt. Hancock gave us a of clarity in the house of commons and the government is pinning own production issues. The first one is this batch of one point seven million jobs that we sent back for testing and the second thing is the supply from the soham institute of india which again the governor's put down to supply issues but others are saying that actions being blocked by modi's government from shipping out to the uk. Exactly it is pretty opaque what's happening. There are two elements. Here that can hold up. Supplies one is the genuinely technical difficulties in producing a complex biological process. I mean it's not straightforward zanu vaccine and a lot of the manufacturing sites haven't made this sort of marin a vaccine before it scale factor. You could say none of them have because this is the first one. That's the fiso won. The astra zeneca at novartis vaccine is also level to a complicated process. So there are technical supply issues and then there at the political ones. You alluded to and i don't know whether the serum institute of india supply has been blocked for political reasons because india was having rather a good downturn in covert cases. But that's turning up again. Unfortunately and there are feelings. That indian government wanted to have it at home. This is so. I think if we look at the context of this a lot of it is actually not that much of a serious problem that we were crunching the numbers this week and april is a significant moment in the vaccine program for the uk. Because yes they were vaccinated all over fifty which according to people like christie chief medical officer of england which uses ninety nine percents of deaths on messages the pressure on the nhc s. But eneko you have to install the second jobs. Really the po- gum began to scale up towards the end of january and eleven week window. The nhl is set between the first and second doses. That really kicks in april and but hancock said this week that really still going to be delivering about fourteen million jobs throughout april which is low though. It's been in march but it's still a pretty high number so it's probably good to keep it in context with feels really what's gone wrong. Here is expectations that the rogue briefing about forty s really feels like delivers come off the bush tourism bush. Johnson's tried to restrain for much of twenty twenty. One yes and i think some. Nhs officials were less than delighted about that huge raising expectations last weekend. In a way. I think this was always going to be a difficult point for the program. It was absolutely predictable that at the point at which second doses to scale up there was going to be a deep in first doses. So it's perhaps unfortunate that there wasn't more subtle public preparation. You're absolutely right international standards even in april. We're still going to be doing more. Vaccinations than many of our counterparts. So it's particularly unfortunate wasn't better preparation. Because i think in the minds of a lot of britain's the will now be a sense of this program isn't doing well it's stumbled. It didn't have to be this way that it could have been very differently presented. And after all as i said the government is still on track to meet those two deadlines that it says now clive. We need to put this in the context of europe as well and we heard from s. the von d'alene at the top. That and you still really struggling with its vaccine vo loud but the most baffling things. She's seen this week. Is the story about the astra zeneca job and how effective or side effects. That may have in this concern. Over blood clots we heard from the ama from the nhra in the uk from the world health organization. All saying there are no concerns about blood. Clots and ashes annika vaccine yet at didn't stop lawson countries from halting giving out the doses. It's a very complicated picture on side effects. At least the spotlight turned away from efficacy. Before countries in continental europe were worrying that the astrazeneca vaccine wouldn't work well enough to older people. I think the efficacy questions have more or less be answered now. The spotlight is on whether they're adverse side effects and a few of those have been discovered there. These two different sorts of blood disorders do with abnormal clotting thrombosis that have been detected in people who just been vaccinated in norway in germany elsewhere on continental europe. The numbers are tiny. I would say fewer than twenty around the continent. Investigation is still continuing. There's no proven link with the vaccine. But a lot of vaccine knowledge ists the might be a link. But that is no reason to stop the vaccination program when it's saving tens of thousands of lives probably and people have said that just by halting for a few days the astrazeneca vaccination and continental europe. This week until the european medicines agency said it was okay that would have cost lives. It loves cost lives directly because people weren't getting vaccinated and it also probably unfortunately of cost lives indirectly because all the publicity about ad side effects will just undermined confidence in the vaccine

UK Government Soham Institute Of India Astra Zeneca Serum Institute Of India Eneko European Commission William Shakespeare Whitehall Johnson Modi House Of Commons Sarah Hancock Novartis NHC Bush Matt
UK: Shortfall in vaccine deliveries will delay jabs

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

UK: Shortfall in vaccine deliveries will delay jabs

"British health authorities say covert nineteen Bucks nations for people under the age of fifty eight may be delayed for up to a month the delays caused by short fall in supply partly due to reduced deliveries from the serum institute of India Britain's National Health Service says that vaccine supplies available for fires doses would be significantly constrained beginning of March the twenty ninth according to a letter from the NHS's chief commercial officer and a doctor as a result people under fifty shouldn't get shots unless they have underlying health conditions the put them at higher risk there is shockingly London

Serum Institute Of India Brita NHS London
EU chief warns of action to protect pledged vaccine supplies

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

EU chief warns of action to protect pledged vaccine supplies

"The NHS is now warning that it will have to slow down its rollout because of a cut in supplies. But this comes after the European Commission chief as a vandal a and threatened to halt exports off the vaccine to the UK. All options are on the table. We are in the crisis off the century. And I'm not ruling out anything for now because we have to make sure that Europeans are vaccinated as soon as possible. Human lives civil liberties on but also the prosperity of our economy are dependent on that on the speed of vaccination on moving forward. Fatherland also demanded reciprocity from the UK, saying that the block is still waiting for exports off jobs

NHS European Commission UK
'Captain Tom' Moore, Britain's Pandemic Hero, Gets Funeral Worthy

Masters in Business

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

'Captain Tom' Moore, Britain's Pandemic Hero, Gets Funeral Worthy

"To a national hero. Funeral services were held today for World War two veterans or Tom Moore, who died earlier this month. Captain Tom as he became known, captured global attention raising millions of dollars for the U. K's and National Health Service. During the Corona virus pandemic. The 100 year old veteran gained fame for walking 100 laps of his garden to help raise funds for the NHS. I'm at Madison

Captain Tom Tom Moore National Health Service U. NHS Madison
Inside The UK’s COVID-19 Vaccination Rollout

FT Politics

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Inside The UK’s COVID-19 Vaccination Rollout

"Sarah. Let's begin with an overview of the vaccination program and how it's going we hit that big target of fifteen million jobs to the top full most vulnerable groups and it's now rolling out to all those over sixty in an effort to seventeen million more people. What is the government's next target. The vaccination rollout in the uk is going astonishingly well particularly in contrast to some of the other be pandemic grand projects like the test and trace program where the second best performer amongst large countries. Often fail and as of last night we've vaccinated sixteen and a half million people and way getting incredibly high take-up particularly in the older age groups in one or two of the age cohorts. I think it's even reached ninety. Nine percents and i think part of the reason for that is that the nhs has been in charge of the rollout in the nhl of course in the uk's immensely trusted brand if you like. And i think it's really been an advantage for the program that it hasn't relied on the kind of outsourcing the private companies that affected people's response for example to test and trace. I think one of the reasons that compliance with isolation has not been as good as it might be been is people have been getting calls from outsourced contact centres whereas here. It's the nhs that's been inviting you in your job. And the speed at. Which it's been done is astonishingly high when you think the first job happened on december the eighth and we're only now at the nineteen th of february and as a sixteen and a half million people already covered with that protection

Sarah UK NHS Government NHL
Katz Kiely Talks about how frontline.live helps the NHS with PPE and why they have open sourced the platform.

Sam Talks Technology

08:23 min | 1 year ago

Katz Kiely Talks about how frontline.live helps the NHS with PPE and why they have open sourced the platform.

"Can you tell everyone is listening. Walk is frontline live and then how you first came about forming it. 'cause you did an amazing campaign and support early in the lockdown so what frontline live is an online live data mac which means that any healthcare worker here is on the front line who finds themselves short at ppe. And therefore is at risk of getting ill can either tweet a request using hashtags hashtag frontline map. Hashtag the postcode so we can make sure they're actually at a healthcare organization not just collecting. Ppe reason and then hashtag what it is they need or they can fill in an online form of frontline dot live and we will then do two things one of them. Put a dot opin on a digital map so that people can see with the need is but also now because of a new partnership two other organizations the healthcare workers association and met share supply drive. It means that we basically have a warehouse of free. Pp which all partners of what rated long and hard for by raising money and getting donations. And because of a partnership with hermes it means that as soon as somebody on the frontline requests vp. Because they're shows of it we can get free p. p. to them within forty eight hours. How did all of this started happening. I moved back to my house in sheffield so in lockdown home alone on zoom call with a friend of mine who is a senior us. I'm saying i can't get a delivery. I'm gonna have to go to the supermarket and she said okay. I can do one better than that. I'm going into the hospital tomorrow. We don't have any masks of probably be dealing with people with covert line flown. Can you imagine that feeling so then. Of course i became a little bit hyper aware of this particular problem. And because everyone on every social media channel that doctors nurses health care workers saying we have p p that's bound on the other side there's this incredible uprising of entrepreneurs who assisting forward money three d. printing visors. That's companies like brutal and burberry. And i'm barbara who've pivot their entire system that can make pp to give away so we've got people desperately in need and scud going without pp's any of us would put up with and people are trying to solve the problem but they couldn't see very other were and so then. I hear on the news one day. Burberry making scrubs. There's an nhs trust because they didn't have to contact burberry have had to go through some ministers in the government to ask them how they conduct bribery. Oh for goodness sake. This is ridiculous. Because i'm all about technical innovation so i thought it can't be that hard surely to find a way of making it easy for people on the front line to say i haven't got this so that people who've got supply can get it and quickly. Yeah that was my beginning and a guy who used to work with who used intel is at ucla now on run did to him. About how hard would it be for us to be able to collect data and put it live on a map so that people can see what's going on and we chatted for awhile for about an hour and then i didn't hear anything back from him midnight that night i get any email. He's already got his team on it. I'm like oh so then fast. Forward six weeks. I've had about fuzi. Volunteers who've sat forward the most incredible people people who well known in the industry. People go better things to do with their times. they busy. Who sat for just getting this. Were absolutely and we're going to make this happen so six weeks later. We launched the service in the first three month period. When all of this stuff you're talking about how they've got. The timelines has stepped forward giving his full page. Spreads is giving us full page. Adverts ocean outdoor gives us sixty with the biggest digital out of home screens across the country. So we can put stuff out there. Not one penny changes hands. A snapchat talked to the general manager. he goes. Yeah wherever we can do to help. We'll do a national campaign. you give gives your assets. We'll sort out view. I have never in my career. Repos talk about purpose and actually fears purpose. You will look forward to enjoy getting out of bed in the morning. But i've never seen anything like this in my life. The sad side of that is that the nhs in my humble opinion and i we were talking about this before. It's the jewel in our crown. It's something that we should be quite rightfully proud of. And then by an example we partnered with united health who have about one hundred thousand frontline. Health co worker members talking to them. And i'm saying i keep hearing stories from people on the front line that actually the idea of people tweeting their requests is really difficult because nobody does speak cow and people are being told not to use the service from my mouth. It being told not to use it. Yeah people are being told if they speak out about the fact that appea- shortages they will lose their jobs. Assist crazy if you can't do your job one wi fi. Find another way to do it. That's most entrepreneurs will okay. I can't go x. y. And found a way round it exactly and the system should be set up in a way. This is about somebody complaining about something. It's if you don't have you're putting your life at risk. Six hundred forty doctors nurses have died. Because there isn't enough got enough. So basically i'm finding out it's absolutely known as endemic that people inside the nhs all tolls not speak up about things and told they will lose their jobs so we moved it from just twitter to having a fool where people could Report anonymously if they were too scared to speak out off the fifteen hundred. Ish request for p. P. i reckon about eighty percents of them were done anonymously by people who was scared to speak out and some of the comments they left on those forms. Joss person frankly interesting. We've been up from. You has improved or got worse vitton. What's your gut fail. It's been interesting because there was a point where there was a story or other media about the fact that management we're turning healthcare workers to be quiet and then matt hancock said in the commons. This is not true. people will be protected. It's definitely from my perspective. People are less likely to speak out and obviously we had a bit of downtime where we registered frontline is a charity because there weren't as many cases and he gave his time to consolidate and build townships so we decided in september. Do a to find out whether or not people in healthcare organizations feel confident. They're going to have enough p. p. to see them through over this next crazy time which is become crazier guess. How many percent said they felt fully confident. They'd get enough. P p twenty eight. Wow wow wow wow that super-low eight percent of frontline healthcare workers believe they will get enough to keep them safe during this time that scary as a number. That's scary.

Burberry Healthcare Workers Association Fuzi Snapchat United Health Sheffield MAC Barbara Ucla Intel Matt Hancock Joss Twitter
Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:50 min | 1 year ago

Israel's incredible Covid vaccine rollout story

"Collier who is obviously very prominent pro. Israel researcher and journalist. He tried to navigate through some of the reasons why israel has been so successful so fast and he says it's never going to be a single cause about why israel has responded so incredibly he says of course. Israel was an enormous high price on life. No soldier is left behind. And then he talks about the coup pat holum system and that is not one central player in the vaccination like the over here but several like cl- elite mcabe may hit it. This is the sort of multiple. Nhs scenario that we have in israel and it means that several brains in each community organized separately to deal with her impatience obviously science and technology great economic driver for the economy and the id system. There's no real bother about anonymity. It's not a big thing in israel. People know pretty much. Everyone is in many of the systems are integrated and of course a militarized system to handle mass events community like kibbutzim and small towns cities on the west bank as well. Everyone knows must've been the the half keyboards how farm communities which are becoming sort of districts and towns of of major cities and they respond well to hostile acts. This is a. This is kind of a security issue where the threat isn't from from bombs or rockets. It's a threat from house which is a similar threat. Yes i mean. There's much more to say on that as well. I mean you'll right in the the emergency response in israel is sadly perhaps very well refined become very well. Refunding has had to become very refined over the years. And we see that mentality driving. Israel's attempts to quash the virus and to get the vaccination writes all the way through one anecdote which struck me was that in one vaccination center recently. They run out of time so the vaccines enter had to close and they still had those of the vaccine left which had to be used that evening or so. Nurses went out into the streets and grabbed a piece of delivery guy and gave him a shot. I mean that sort of can do spirit has been viable. But i think there are other elements like practical elements as well the contributed towards success so for example early planning israel paid reportedly over the odds by some degree to gets these first vaccines in. Benjamin netanyahu himself developed a personal relationship with the bosses pfizer and promised to give pfizer israeli data about the vaccine use in response to getting these these first doses and of course there's always in a position to give them that data because it's got one of the best digitalized health system in the world which allows for that data to be harvested and then to be used in further research but there are other innovations well so for instance israeli scientists found a way of getting more doses out of each vial vaccine than had initially been intended therefore stretching it further and in addition when the vaccines arrived on these huge pallets in bangor in airport rather than take them out like that. The israeli logistics experts decided to find a way of abortion them in small books style. Size insulated boxes they could remain at seventy but be taken out by most bikes or whatever and post out into small centers throughout the country in the community so the people didn't have to travel too far sickly during lockdown things like that all of these small but vital innovations have contributed towards this message. Success all the way from the initial negotiations and securing those vaccines all the way down to the grassroots rollouts and everything in between it's been just a magnificent display of guinness with with the nostril national spirit. I was indeed a very privileged to speak to around leads. The head of research it collegiate. Who runs through the extraordinary artificial intelligence and data which israel has what they've mapped millions and millions of people in the israeli gene pool and of israel's gene pool extends to two hundred nations around the world it's an extraordinary level of data which they can then feed to monsieur buller adviser which is which is an incredible gift to be able to give enrich. We are very fortunate to be standing on. The shoulders of giants are people at the nineties. In israel where smart enough to create an electronic medical records and make them ubiquitous over the system so since mid ninety s collegiate we have had electronic medical records in all of physicians offices on so in every hospital ward and so does abundance of data of massive amounts being collected in harnessed for the use of our patients. This puts israel ahead of the curve in terms of planning and alleviating major medical problems which afflict the whole world. I think that is proving to be true. Because we put into practice into scale concepts that in other places are considered the theoretical and so we have at khalid been practicing predictive modeling in practice for over a decade now so tens and hundreds of thousands of people receiving care based on personalization and predictive models in massive scales for a decade. So i i do think that the availability of data the availability of the will to change and transform the system as well as the innovative spirit of the local eco-system within the health sector and from the outside all communist together to create a very interesting setting for innovation in practice. And this is four million people. Isn't it so you can help kill the world with all the different afflictions the different health issues that you see amongst those millions of people and they have arrived into israel from all four corners of the world so in a sense every population around the world can benefit from the data. You find the differences between people. We are now moving into an innovation driven strategy where we will try more. And more to take the insights that we've gained and take them out to the world in various ways in creating spinoffs and startups within khalid and also by allowing startups organizations from around the world to test. Drive their new ideas. Collegiate so we can actually prove whether or not they making a difference.

Israel Pat Holum Pfizer Collier West Bank Benjamin Netanyahu Monsieur Buller Bangor Giants Khalid Collegiate
"nhs" Discussed on A Cuppa Happy

A Cuppa Happy

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"nhs" Discussed on A Cuppa Happy

"Hi everyone is somehow one of the producers of a cup of happy now. I'm sure you away. The joss is a big fan of the nhs so we thought you might like to hear about new show. The comes out today. It's called our voices in the nhs. There's a link description. And i'm gonna play the trailer for you now. I'm alex amelia and welcome to our voices angel. I'm be on my my school francis. I am thirty states for real people to tell the real stories. We never get to hear. Have you ever wanted to delve further into the lives of others to understand the world a different way in this series we welcome and it just professionals who now live and work in. The uk will immerse ourselves within their stories as they work tirelessly to help their patients. Our mission is to provide a platform for people to tell short stories from their own lives. These people may have taken a familiar path. Our voices invites you to see and experienced the world through new eyes community by subscribing to our voice. Podcast dot com. Subscribe wherever you. Listen to your podcast. First episode is our on tuesday the nineteenth of january. Listen unsubscribe for more episodes. Come in every tuesday. Today's sponsor is brought to you by nature. Made the number one pharmacist recommended. Vitamin supplement brands nourished by nature made is a personalized vitamin regimen. That removes the guesswork of selecting supplements. That are specific to you. Backed by forty five years of science delivered right to your doorstep and costing on average less than two dollars a day nourishes your one stop shop or customizable. Supplements visit nourish dot com. Get started today powers. Some of the world's best podcasts. Here's a show. We recommend win. South carolina happened keyboard. Thought it was like a fluke. That's got to work. I just had a month where nobody was really expecting. Anything out of the campaign. But i was able to explore what a printed entity with afflicted the general election exploring websites explained brands and gradients really finding the voice of the biden campaign. Structurally in visually. Today i'm talking to senior creative director of the biden harris presidential campaign. Robin kanner robbins. Personal story is twisty and beautifully american and feels as bright and hopeful as a victory gradient. I'm amy divers and this is clever subscribed to clever ever. You get your podcasts.

alex amelia tuesday forty five years today Today Robin kanner robbins nineteenth of january one thirty states less than two dollars a day First episode South carolina joss dot com one stop shop francis biden harris number one uk
UK aims to give 1st COVID-19 shot to all adults by September

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

UK aims to give 1st COVID-19 shot to all adults by September

"Christens foreign minister has announced ambitious plans to have all its citizens vaccinated by the end of summer this year Dominic Raab announced the aim is the nation's healthcare system battles the worst crisis in its seventy two year history all target is by September tenth of all foods well the adult population and at first as if we can do it fast not great but that's the road map ready beleaguered hospitals are missing another cave at nineteen patient every thirty seconds putting the service and its most precarious situation ever speaking on Sky News rob urged the British people to help the NHS as much as they could to everyone watching shows to focus on is it here into the room so we don't overwhelm the NHS which is under serious pressure Karen Thomas London

Dominic Raab NHS ROB Karen Thomas London
‘Next few weeks are going to be the worst’ of the pandemic, England’s medical chief warns

The Briefing

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

‘Next few weeks are going to be the worst’ of the pandemic, England’s medical chief warns

"So corona virus restrictions could soon become tighter. That's concerning government. The latest lockdown isn't being followed. Strictly enough what could change then. Well two main things are under discussion possible rules. Banning people from different households who owns in support from together and potential strip to mosque wearing that could see face coverings mandatory in offices and busy outdoor areas. Like supermarket cues boris. Johnson met his cabinet colleagues last night to discuss. If the lockdowns working england's chief medical officer professor chris wissies doing a series of interviews. Today he said the next few weeks will be the worst of the pandemic so far for the nhs

Chris Wissies Cabinet Johnson England NHS
"nhs" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"nhs" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"For your family. The deductible has to be 2800 is many of us have experienced in recent years, hitting those deductibles with most health plans. Not that hard and so By that I mean, the health plans that are offered to us by most employers will have deductibles that large and plans he buys an individual almost always will have deductibles that large So that triggers your eligibility for this special account. That people who are in the taxes and money believe is superior to the 41 K. You're offered it work. The Roth IRAs You hear me up about? Because in a chess, eh? Allows you to put aside money. Each year. That Can grow tax free all through the years, and typically, you will get a deduction up front. For putting money in NHS, eh? Have it grow tax free and spend the money tax free. So an individual Who's buying coverage for himself or herself is allowed to contribute up to 3600 bucks. Into NHS A unless they're 55 older, so little different than the 50 and over rule for IRAs or 41 case. If you're 55 or over, you're allowed to put $4600 away. You have family coverage. $7200. So why would you do this? Okay, So remember You get an upfront tax deduction typically Money grows tax free. All through the years till you use it. Whichever year that is, and then the earnings on it when you use the money tax free..

NHS
"nhs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of NHS including worn out because of their age is a state of the corona virus pandemic outbreak has passed William the health secretary what was me looking delivering a new community hospital device agent will actually bring to my positions the next time I speak to Richard he's packing up his office to return north because parliament has ended early taking a full week Easter break so quiet here the moment I apologize I'm saying this is the last day of term is a week early and seventies off this corona viruses the major issue this week in the country and it's just Texas southern's dominates everything that's going on in the moment I know your standing in your office you're you're looking out of the window how different does it actually look to normal well this is totally empty normally it's bustling this bunch of people around but today it's just totally death what what what was the feeling amongst MPs I think there's a real feeling of concern for the constituents the thing that's the primary concern over still so people would rather and families as well because the honest and and yeah there's just a real feeling of uncertainty the moments about what the next few weeks gonna bring as we expect of a corona virus to continues to the cases continue to increase over the next few weeks so break this it's it's just not on the agenda anymore now well as it is still very much there is still very much there in the background but the the major concern obviously think of when everybody else is your health well being and that's the that's the top priority I'm I'm a some point you know this will pass we will get back to dealing with brags it's in the big leveling of agendas that's obviously MPs I mean you're really fighting for for our parts the country into that there really is at the moment the.

NHS William secretary Richard Texas
"nhs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Service the NHS he he is with us on the PC created for this time our key work case is made April twenty twenty and it's crunch time coronaviruses taken everyone of the streets except for key workers on the frontline these are human beings like you and me and my friends a new plan Amy I don't even ask how much sleep the news in late it worked for the NHS my mama people are doing what needs to be done what this fight will be easily won we know the crisis is real corona virus can kill we don't really understand it still that's why I got love for my people in the field sleeping at the wheel the people are dealing with the real file in this bottle hardly on the frontline in harm's way for how long because but they are the ones holding the world together right now on was kann convey the part they play Chauncey to day off the day bus drivers waste management I'm sure they're finding this face challenging teachers some of my parents cleaners some of them okay people are doing what needs to be done about this fight will be easily one we need to help the cause by keeping ourselves indoors is everything to live for.

NHS Amy Chauncey
"nhs" Discussed on Dental Leaders Podcast

Dental Leaders Podcast

15:45 min | 2 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on Dental Leaders Podcast

"To the dental leaders. Podcast today we have the pleasure of Interviewing Jeff. Pender who I've known for probably about nine years. Now he's nearly a decade and just chatting now before this interview. We learned so much about the different things that you've achieved in dentistry. And and the different things you've represented in terms of the women's groups and being on the GD and the F. GDP which will expand on learn a lot more about but jenny. I JUST WANNA start off by asking about your upbringing where you grew up and what your childhood was like I grew up in Doncaster and South Yorkshire. My father was a dentist and had a war for those days. Very beautiful practice. The town is a mining town balls but my father was a dentist. My mother was a dentist. Both my grandparents were dentists and they were dentists under the old nine thousand nine hundred ninety one act where they hadn't got any as the other people call them proper qualifications and then. I've got two uncles. Two cousins and to my brothers are dental technicians are still to this day to your mother must have been a real pioneer one of the very very early. Lady Dentists. Yes she was and it's only fairly recently found out that she got a Carnegie Scholarship. Her parents were very well off. If you were a dentist. Sort of pre nineteen forty eight. It was a bit of sometimes could be scratching a living really so without that scholarship. She wouldn't have been able to go to Glasgow University and yes there. Were only two women dental students there at the time that ultimately the war came along and She was called up and my father was also called up and they met when during their service in the Rif on and the rest is history from that point of view. I'm Mother didn't work again as a dentist after after she was married. Partly because there was no retraining schemes. There was no. The tax system was such. If she worked she actually would by father would been a tax bracket and so she really wouldn't earn anything and he also don't think was very keen on her to do it so so her career sort of went into abeyance which it which is a pity. But that's how it was so your childhood. Were you memories of being the kid of to dentists. We were in a town. Where a lot of the dentists and doctors hunter sort of fairly closed social group. A lot of them had come out of the forces after the war and NHS began in one thousand nine hundred forty eight and that was really when our fathers practice took off in a big way in particular making dentures because they had a lab on the premises with for three technicians. Every Friday was denture day so and I remember going up to the lab to be had a measuring thing on the on the wall to be measured as we grew in height so it was a common thing I was I studied in card if it was a common thing my patients. She's telling me for their wedding present. Their parents used to give them a full set of dentures. Says the pictures would be nice for Gossiping rather lightly. I heard it from the horse's mouth just to be the oldest. If in patients who tell me well could could Wales Buford. Scotland was different as well. It really a bit like the myth of the dentists put his knee on my chest when he was taking my tooth out that goes round and round and round pick so we decided to be a dentist was always we always going to be a dentist or was there a moment when you realized well what does this. I will always wanted to be a doctor. Actually all those years ago I went to boarding school for for seven years from when I was ten and the teaching physics was absolutely terrible. We were girls and it wasn't really that somebody came from a local grammar school so I failed physics the first time in fact the second Tom. I only scraped through with me when I went to the local tech to retake by a levels. So it didn't get into medicine the quotas then they only took fifteen percent of women the maximum twenty five percent. There was just as many women wanted to get in so anyway so ultimately going to Sheffield University. Physiology was bored stiff with it. So I asked if I could change the dentistry and my dad agreed to fund it. And so that's why so. That's what that's what happened. And was was changed over that time was quite simple and straightforward to do going from physiology to yes it was actually the cost was law will other course in dentistry was four years so yes it was easy. It just meant an extra year university that my father had to fund. Because we didn't we only got the minimum grant really. So why can't why were their quotas back in the day? I mean you sort of refer back to solve your boarding school and and and you know it wasn't predominantly female. Assail all mixed fifty fifty. That was it was it was all female. It was all all sorts of yes. It was all famous mixed boarding schools back. Then I mean we had just just up the road past the crossroads where we used to go for walks. There was an army apprentice school right and we're not allowed to go. We go left or right at the crossroads across not across many women with their own. Your calls dental perch four out of forty so but you were popular then it sometimes. It has its advantages. When I couldn't I couldn't bend we had to make our own. Adams cribs things in those days and I was actually hopeless at bending wires so you know it seemed to be that the men were better at that so somebody Jews to step in and help oppy days. Yes so going back to applying for medicine. Which is what you wanted to do. I guess rebel against the dentists in your family. The reason you didn't get in probably because they have quotas back in the days that the first time you kind of felt like you were discriminated against as a yes. I think it was the headquarters because they could It was not until the nineteen seventy five. Six Discrimination Act was passed that there does it all changed and of course now. We've swung over probably to these slightly more women applicants for either medicine dentistry as well then again. The second thing I found I was being discriminated against was applaud folks. When I went to work I applied for permanent health insurance to cover me if I was sick and I did it through dentists provident and I discovered that to take on a sort of extra thing was through friends provident life and for that I was had to pay a premium of seventy five percent more than men for being female. Was that standard practice. But then yes pay more and what was. The reason for the other said women were sick more often. It didn't a pregnancy. Didn't cover anything like that and I saw. This isn't right for me. If I think something is not right I will stick at it and pursue it so ultimately I went to the equal opportunities commission as it was then and said you know what about this so they agreed to fund the case so we took the case to court and actually we lost we lost then but but but little bit later on things did change. So what was it about? I mean I'm sure there were many women in your position who probably thought okay. A higher premium is what it is and then you come along and say I'm taking this course sunshine. What about you the made you just saw the thing? I'M GONNA a difference and I'm going to going to stand for women. Well the something within me that stands up for anybody or anything that I think is it. Just Reggie comes from Geneva. My grandma my grandma who had eleven children of whom of the of the six brothers? She was determined that my grandfather was gonna get on and she was determined she. Her father was an ore miner from Cumbria and she was determined her some. We're going to be something and I think there is a very very close to know stories but yes interest and also through through doing you know one of the things. I've I've done since I retired and I. I was trading for it in the last years of retirement was. I've become a professional family history researcher. So I'd go. I've gone into a lot of depth of my own family to an also helps put life in perspective that understand where people have done what they what they did really so yes so I got the sex discrimination case was a lot of publicity before that a lady Coffee Simpson who was also on the General Dental Council with main who got so no no actually before that I was chairman of the GDP when it existed you may not remember that it was sort of the the but different the BDA but diff- sort of higher level was lower level lower level down on a really became. The chairman of that serve met Fiona Simpson and she found out. I was doing this case because so some publicity took about four years to come to court and she put her a petition in the Belfast. Dental school where she was working which she sent to me with all the signatures in support and so with her and because of the publicity we started women in Dentistry which was nine thousand nine hundred eighty five and we were discussing before I was saying. This seems to be a lot of new women in Dentistry groups that we had we had. Morrocon who who had. Who has AGGRIPA and Linda does something and we were all of them. Is it harder to be a woman in life than to be a man? Forget the industry for a moment no different. Yeah different and I was talking to my team about it last week and there were all these physical situations where my marketing manager. Lauro were saying you often. She's walking down the street and having to worry whether it's almost gonNa jump on her and she was saying that's not something that a man has to worry about and I get it. I get that but outside outside of those obvious physical strength situation. Is it harder to be a woman in life or not using the it's different and it's I think it's different at different times of life? I think there are certainly harder things in careers when it comes to the years when child having children becomes all the dentistry is one of the careers where you sort of least affected by the in my view because a lot of careers if you take five years out comeback nowhere near where you would have been whereas within the street. The primary relationships the with the patient. And if you've got a good patient relationship you can come back and hit the ground running. So what about obviously back your back then use? You saw this this situation where men and women weren't getting the same treatment as far as insurance but with job prospects with the way patients. Talk to you the way bosses talk to you the way you're someone who's going on in politics in teaching and so forth. Would you say it's hard as dentists to be a woman back then and now what's what what would you say about no? I don't think it was hardest actually to be a dentist search back in those days. What came out of the women? Dentists Women Dentistry was. There was no maternity scheme for women dentists in the NHL which was a big huge was a huge gap and actually we found that the really the BDO. We're not interested in the BEDIA was at that time overwhelmingly male and none of them were interested in this except one person called Diana Scarlet. Who took it and run with it and ultimately the wasn't maternity scheme in in there is a maternity scheme which we were directly responsible forgetting. So you know there are if there are things that need addressing the weren't interested because it wasn't of any interest to men in general you know they've got other things to be more interested in politics so if you haven't got any women around there to be interested in it it doesn't get done so that's where we sort of were able to fulfill a need really to do that when when you were working on on the GDP you you mentioned that you'd sound various panels and hearings and things like that. You're talking to an price that you're talking about how you will stand up for anything if his unjust did you ever find yourself in a situation where you thought this is. A dentist was up and pumps. It wasn't his or her fault or whatever it was let to be. Fair is less common back in their nowadays. These are these every case is less common but it was dealt with in a different way. They had a preliminary proceedings committee. Which of course there were there. Were I think fourteen elected dentists but there were also there were heads of dental schools and although there was criticized as sort of them in us. That was a lot of very sound sensible capable people and you felt that it was a privilege to be there because you've been elected by your peers so was over in just one year and one sticks out in my mind it may seem like we had to preliminary proceedings committee so we the which were mostly dentists. One layperson there was just a few people. We used to have a huge bundle of papers to look through most of which came to nothing. And it really. There was serious professional misconduct. And it really. I think was the Moore seat. The serious ones that got through that went through. It has its faults but this particular case was a young was the youngest chop from.

Dentists Women Dentistry Lady Dentists Coffee Simpson chairman Doncaster Pender jenny Jeff Glasgow University NHS South Yorkshire Sheffield University General Dental Council Carnegie Scholarship Scotland Wales Buford Tom NHL Cumbria
"nhs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It is on a normal Monday morning the NHS it's an institution in this country funded by the taxpayers and provides everything from annual physicals cancer surgery at no cost to users which after the global financial crisis the UK government really cut funding increases when prime minister Boris Johnson he said last week he hopes to push the peak of coronavirus cases in the late spring two way flooding the system if we delay the peak even by a few weeks then our NHS will be in a stronger state as the weather improves and for you have people suffer from normal respiratory diseases more beds are available and we'll have more time the medical research runny nose he's a critical care doctor we talked to he says if the government's plan doesn't work you can come to resemble parts of Italy if we are unable to change public behavior and we see a rocket spreads then the NHS is very quickly going to find itself overwhelmed as this happened at number eight in Britain's house of Commons last weekend Davey he's a member of parliament with Liberal Democrats he's confronted Johnson over healthcare funding given the NHS has to face the corona virus challenge with a wreck shortage of nurses and the care sector with over a hundred and twenty thousand vacancies doesn't promise not to grieve the three conservative governments since twenty fifteen sure to fix the roof when the sun was shining I don't know actually a record number of doctors and nurses in all fantastic NHS watching the NHS struggle has been tough for a lot of Britain's because it has a special place in people's hearts here when you to Coles directly comes out at the top of the things that make this contest B. precision this is even a deceiver he's a chief analyst at the king's fund Althea think tank something that's comprehensive universal and free at the point of use as a social construct I think speaks to something in the British license T. about a sense of fairness spouses and from being in it together one of the people talking with NPR's Frank Langfitt who is still on the line and Frank if schools are not closed events are not ending his life as normal there no of people avoiding public transit I just went to the train station our town a passenger traffic down two thirds people are out talking but a lot of people in our self isolating do not listen to government there frankly Steve doing it themselves thanks very much for your reporting really appreciate it thanks that's NPR's Frank Langfitt in London it's an P. on this it's John McConnell on KQ weedy at seven forty three with traffic again an update on an earlier cemetery bridge crash I would love to have it to be earlier and gone but it's not it's the been there more than an hour now westbound highrise the left lane still reported block traffic standstill across the span almost after the toll plaza the rest the commute is pretty good the beverage is backed up into the maze but not much beyond that the Dumbarton bridge in the Santa Fe over in the Richmond bridges neither one of those toll plaza have any backup there might be new crash in the peninsula three east in San Bruno at El Camino but on the off ramp Joe McConnell for KQED support for KQ weedy on Monday morning comes from amalgamated bank does not land to or support companies producing fossil fuels amalgamated bank.

NHS
"nhs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I think NHS is already stretched as they are getting at symbol GP appointments is a miracle you know is struggling we were struggling to get to get help as it is on a normal Monday morning the NHS it's an institution in this country funded by the taxpayers and provides everything from annual physicals cancer surgery at no cost to users but you know after the global financial crisis the UK government really cut funding increases when prime minister Boris Johnson he said last week he hopes to push the peak of coronavirus cases in the late spring to weigh flooding the system if we delay the peak even by a few weeks then our NHS will be in a stronger state as the weather improves and for you have people suffer from normal respiratory diseases more beds are available and we'll have more time the medical research runny nose he's a critical care doctor other we talked to he says if the government's plan doesn't work you can come to resemble parts of Italy if we're unable to change public behavior and we see a rocket spreads than the NHS is very quickly going to find itself overwhelmed as happened in Lubbock in Britain's house of Commons last weekend Davey he's a member of parliament with Liberal Democrats he's confronted Johnson over healthcare funding given the NHS has to face the corona virus challenge with the record shortage of nurses and the cast sector with over a hundred and twenty thousand vacancies doesn't promise not to grieve the three conservative governments since twenty fifteen sure to fix the roof when the sun was shining I don't know actually a record number of doctors and nurses in our fantastic NHS watching the NHS struggle has been tough for a lot of Britain's because it has a special place in people's hearts here when you do polls it regularly comes out at the top of the things that make this process to be British this is Yvonne undersea buddies a chief analyst at the king's fund I hope you think tank something that's comprehensive universal and free at the point of use as a social construct I think speaks to something in the British license T. about a sense of fairness palaces and from being in it together one of the people talking with NPR's Frank Langfitt who is still on the line and Frank if schools are not closed events are not ending his life as normal there no of people avoiding public transit I just went to the train station our town a passenger traffic down two thirds people are out talking but a lot of people in our self isolating do not listen to government there frankly Steve doing it.

NHS Boris Johnson Italy Lubbock Britain Davey analyst NPR Frank Langfitt Steve UK prime minister Yvonne
"nhs" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"nhs" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To fit within the fixed NHS healthcare budget is challenging but they are the ones who actually decide for example which cancer drugs will go to which he should populations through the NHS it's heartbreaking work but how is actually done can be found on the internet overall there is one guiding principle I remember it because it was told to me in an interview by the former chair of nice Sir Michael Rowlands he simply said that the guiding principle behind it all is we take care of each other so who do you want taking care of you and the health services you will receive at no charge citizens healthcare professionals in health advocates for for profit insurance companies the U. K. experience tells us that Medicare for all private insurance can co exist although the private medical insurance industry won't be quite so profitable one more again this is five minutes five minutes is produced at the studios of KQED FM in San Francisco five minutes is a production of technician media on Paul and from San Francisco I'm more again and this is the technician today on technician the first installment of our two part series Chernobyl then and now gleaning information from over sixty new interviews and recently released documents journalist Adam second bottom tells us what exactly happened at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor number four and what has become of it today next week in part two M. I. T. historian Kate brown looks at the impact on human health and changes to the environment both of which go far beyond the.

NHS Sir Michael Rowlands Medicare KQED FM San Francisco Paul technician cancer Adam Kate brown