35 Burst results for "NGO"

Comatose Russian dissident stable upon arrival in Germany

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Comatose Russian dissident stable upon arrival in Germany

"Russian dissident Alexei Navalny who is in coma after suspected poisoning has arrived in Berlin on a special flight for treatment by specialists at the German capital's main hospital a representative of the NGO that arrange the flight has confirmed that the plane has landed and that not only is in stable condition not on the politician and corruption investigator who's one of Russian president Vladimir Putin's fiercest critics was admitted to intensive care units in the superior city of Omsk on Thursday his supporters believe that T. he drunk was laced with poison and that the crime and is behind both his illness and the delay in transferring him to a top German hospital I'm sorry I. Sheckley

Alexei Navalny Berlin Representative Vladimir Putin Omsk Investigator President Trump
Millions of women lose contraceptives, abortions in COVID-19

Forum

00:42 sec | Last month

Millions of women lose contraceptives, abortions in COVID-19

"Millions of women and girls globally have lost access to contraceptives and abortion services because of the pandemic. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports the global health charity Marie Stopes International finds at India maybe most severely affected In India lockdowns and supply chain disruptions mean fewer women have been able to prevent unintended pregnancies or get pre Natal care. Marie Stopes International surveyed 37 countries and found nearly two million fewer women received contraceptives or abortion services in the first half of this year. The NGO predicts 900,000 unintended pregnancies worldwide, along with a million and a half unsafe abortions and more than 3000 maternal deaths.

Marie Stopes International India Lauren Frayer NGO NPR
Fresh air and fear of mass transit puts bicycles back on Mumbai streets

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:12 min | Last month

Fresh air and fear of mass transit puts bicycles back on Mumbai streets

"GonNa, start with Mumbai Bicycle Counselors Why are they getting on the bikes? Like most cities around the World Mumbai has started rolling out pop bike lanes to accommodate I mean I've I've seen a huge increase in the number of black as people sort of shook public transport during the pandemic but the city is taking it one step further than pop up bike lanes are going. Install in positions of influence in city, Council counselors for its twenty four wards who are going to advocate for cycling, which is really exciting. So they're gonNA essentially, they're going to be Negotiating with stakeholders like local businesses are the civic authorities, NGO schools and colleges. To help the rollout of black lines and black infrastructure in the CD and looking helping to set up Docs for for bikes for for people to pick him up from train stations, and even setting up training zones in parts of the city for people that aren't perhaps confident on their bikes to learn. But a bit of a backlash Montrose in some places over the provision ice lanes. Maybe, this is the city that actually could have used simple counselors because because to me, it seems like there's been a little bit of a breakdown in communication in Montreal or at least certainly in terms of engagement with with the local communities. Said, they're rolling out temporary black lanes as many cities are but. A stretch in in Montreal on a believe it's it's not street Notre Dame street West outside a few venerable restaurants and establishments. Has received some backlash from from the restaurant owners there, and actually we didn't twenty four hours the city at roll back their plans to the temporary Klein and sorry it had been installed removed temporary black line and I think for me here. The thing that's interesting about this story is clearly there wasn't enough consultation and and perhaps perhaps the solution. That I propose wasn't necessarily suitable for that part of the city which clearly is relying on people unfortunately, not unfortunately, the reality is that lots of people in the city still need to be able to drive their cars and drive to these restaurants and and perhaps a better solution that balanced bike lanes with car parking motive might have served the solution that.

Mumbai Bicycle Counselors Montreal Klein Mumbai
White Nationalist vs. David C. Smalley

Dogma Debate

06:24 min | Last month

White Nationalist vs. David C. Smalley

"Further ado join me in welcoming Gordon. Call? To The podcast Gordon thanks for joining me today men. Thank you for having me on. So you have a podcast, I can't pronounce it. I don't know why. To just sorry, go ahead. Yeah. Yeah. Tell you the name of myself? Yeah. Yeah. It's totally the name your podcast and and your your your reason for coming on today. So. I'm Gordon Call I'm the editor of American her dot Org. It's a blog website I host the podcast tune Americana which acting is you know the German word for attention right and then America Connor is a term that some people on. If you WANNA call what I am the right or the dissident right have used to refer to white Americans right It's based on the term for white South Africans Afrikaner. And the idea was to we needed a word to represent the unique white ethnicity of America, right because you know. I. My background I'm German and Irish right I'm a midwestern Mutt but I'm not German and I'm not Irish right. I if I went to either of those countries, I would not culturally fit in there. I am a unique. Example of my background and nation. But Our podcast acting Americana is kind of A. Talk Show I guess we go over different topics and news stories focused primarily on the Midwest and fly over country and we kind of examined them from a white nationalist or distant right pursue. Okay. So do you consider yourself a white supremacist? No. And it would probably depend on what your definition of white supremacist is I've a lot of times people throw that word around to me. What white supremacist connotes is this idea that you want white people to like rule over other races like I don't know like the antebellum south or something like to enslave black people or whatever. I have no interest in that quite frankly if I had my way, I would not live near anybody like I mean I have no desire to rule over other peoples I want to. But quite frankly, I want my people to have the right of self-determination and to be left alone. Okay. So in that in that situation, this is where. I think the the lines will be blurred is, let's say, let's say you had your way and let's say there is a section of America. Let's say thirteen states or fifteen states or whatever that is dedicated just a whites-only. When that became overpopulated and that white part of America wanted to. Expand. Its borders. What would happen I mean? You wouldn't just say well I respect that that's the line. That's the because we're segregated I'm not GonNa Cross it, and we wouldn't you try. Then at that point to take the land of people who weren't like you. I mean isn't that what's happening to Europe and America? Now I mean considering the huge population boom and Africa and the massive population and say China right white white people of European, descent and if you want to get into the what is white debate I'm not really interested in that everyone knows what a white person is. But white people make up like ten percent of the world's population. Total. And the only countries that are being flooded with immigrants of a different race are white countries. You don't see massive populations of Europeans going into say tenure, for example, that is viewed as colonization, which is viewed as an evil act by the left. But when it is done in white countries, it's viewed as progressive and diversity. Okay. So back to my point there's no. Okay. So if you want to ask like what like first of all this whole like ethno state thing I know that that was something that Richard Spencer brought up when he first came on the scene. Like. My thing is this. I whatever idea of an ethno state or whatever people have. You'RE NOT GONNA get that in the foreseeable future for one thing politicians don't even talk about white people in a positive light in America today. So the idea that you're going to have like a political platform of okay we're going to split the states up based on race is ridiculous because you know Donald trump the supposed-, White Supremacist Fascist Nazi president that we have or whatever. Right who all of his children are married to. Jews. Which you know somehow makes him a Nazi. I guess. Like even he the most he said about white people was believe early on in his campaign he mentioned the farm murders in South Africa and then I think like a few weeks ago on an interview he mentioned that white people are killed more often by police than black who which is statistically true obviously their arguments about per capita or whatever yeah which is which Is the entire point not something we could just brush off. I. Mean that is the entire point there. There are far more white people in the country which goes without saying that you know but the percentages are much higher if you're black for you to be shot. So that's why that's problematic is it states something that's a technical fact but missing the entire point of the movement. I mean I guess but I also like I gotta be honest there are tons and tons of political. Groups, NGOs advocacy organizations five Oh, one C. threes what have you dedicated to blacks and black interests just like there are plenty of them dedicated to Jews and Jewish interests. Or Indians right both like native American American Indians right and you know Hindu Indians Arabs what you there are no organizations at all that advocate for the interests of white. Americans.

America Gordon America Connor Midwest Donald Trump Africa South Africa Editor China Europe Richard Spencer President Trump
Reports: Miami Marlins Getting Buses To Drive Infected Players, Personnel Back To Miami From Philadelphia

Inside the Huddle

01:10 min | Last month

Reports: Miami Marlins Getting Buses To Drive Infected Players, Personnel Back To Miami From Philadelphia

"This detail from Jesse Rogers quote news out of Philadelphia, where the Marlins have been holed up for over a week. Team is getting sleeper buses to take the infected players and personnel back in Miami. That's a long ride. Rest will stay, then had to Baltimore, New York in Buffalo for what's going to be a really long road trip and quote Sleeper buses. If you heard that phrase before The hell is a sleeper bus. The hell was that? And where are they getting them from their borrowing buses from rock bands that would normally be on tour right now? Are the infected Marlin's going to make that 1200 mile drive from Philadelphia to Miami on deaf leopards, boss Then the other players, the ones who have not tested positive. They're going to stay. Are they going to stay in Philadelphia? They go to Baltimore and New York and Buffalo. Is that the plan? That's how the first week of the NGOs, MLB season's going to end with sleeper buses and cancellations. Again. I'm not even asking this to be funny or clever, smart or wise.

Philadelphia Miami Baltimore Buffalo Jesse Rogers Marlins New York MLB Marlin
How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

How I Built This

18:03 min | Last month

How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

"Hey, everyone and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're GonNa hear from Ta the CO founder of Good Wall Good Wall is a social network that connects high school and college graduates with jobs and scholarships. Today Good Wall has raised over sixteen million dollars with more than a million users on the platform I. Spoke with Taha, from his company headquarters in Switzerland where he gave me a rundown of goodwill's mission for people who've never heard of goodwill just tell us how how does it work? It's essentially a mobile platform that's designed for the next generation. We started off with high school students helping them build up their first profile showcase themselves in a way that I'm accentuates their extracurricular activities in particular, connect them to opportunities mostly scholarships in colleges and all. This happens within a positive and supportive community. Over time, we've grown with our members into the college and young professional space. Our whole goal is to level the playing field, maximize the potential of as many people as possible. So it's been compared to linked in is that a fair comparison I? Think there are similarities however, we're really focused on on our part, which is this next generation starting as early as sixty and guiding them through almost Sherpa in. Them through the future of earning learning and those opportunities. There are various features that we have that they don't, and we're really focus from a user experience perspective, and then from a community perspective, it's it's very different posts don't work here. You wouldn't find students talking about being on the chess team being on the robotics team being on etc etc on goodwill mean if you are, let's say eighteen years old and you're interested in applying to college. What does it look like you go to? While you create a profile for yourself and and then what you're going to goodwill, you help yourself our initial early adopters were mostly international school students who maybe didn't have as much guidance as others or since the US who maybe didn't have as much guidance from their parents from college counselors it come on. Here's he would other people are doing they'd be matched with colleges and universities and. Also. With scholarships based on their data on their profiles and then they'd be able to connect with like minded youth. So we had this girl based out of Jordan who was really into robotics science and unfortunately no one really around her who had that those similar interests and she was able to find others like her in the US connected Internet. NASA did incredible things afterwards actually many of our students have gone bound exclusive opportunities at. Like Oxford and others that we've partnered with an. Super fulfilling perspective. Yeah. It's really caused US checking it out last night and it's it's a little bit like if you didn't have a mentor or a guidance counselor like here you go. Yeah definitely I think a lot of early adopters were privileged in the sense that they had a lot of ambition and maybe they went to good schools. But over time we've especially with last year we've really. Put a lot of effort and a lot of energy towards helping youth who are maybe a little under privileged that privilege is actually not necessarily one hundred percent linked to financial situation but it can be for example, we're doing now with UNICEF death and other organizations in Africa for example, is running programs they are and were really helping you bring out their ideas, build up their confidence show who they. are in connect opportunities and it's been really really fulfilling and we expect to do more underrepresented communities in the US. For example, we're doing more and more there. That's where the biggest room impact is. At the end of the day, we are a social enterprise and it's very fulfilling to help youth who go to elite schools and connect them to lead universities and colleges, but it's even more fulfilling. Even more important for us to step in where the impact Delta's the biggest for, for example, youth in Africa who insert African countries that just don't have any exposure don't have opportunity. Don't have the guidance but do have access to a phone and can has result go through. So we're really trying to do more there in particular and are you started this company in two thousand fourteen with your brother? Where did the idea come from? So my it was my brothers idea both of us were born in Switzerland we lived in Iran the US came back to Switzerland. Our parents used to work in the humanitarian sector. My father worked for or Serb refugees around thirty years, and we experienced a lot growing up. We was like quite a contradiction going skiing on the weekend in in a very affluent privileged, no bubble in Switzerland whereas at the same time, we'd go in summer vacation and give candy out to refugee kids who are age your ten eleven and that that really did shake US quite a bit in throughout our upbringing we realized that we are. We are I'm here not because I'm smart but because I was lucky osborne that could have been born two doors down in that, my life would have been very different and I'm confident because of the experiences I had rather than because I'm innately able to do so and that's really what pushed us to say we were lucky in this sense what would happen if we were able to give those opportunities in terms of particularly experiences. So education is one thing traditional education is one thing but particularly experiences to millions of youth around the world what would happen how can we change things and that's where we thought it has to be mobile first it has. To be a digital solution and it has to be able to tackle millions and we wanted to go a step further. We said it's good to maximize one's potential but hopefully, we can do that in a win. We're very idealistic in that sense in a way that it maximizes or improved society as well or impacts society positively, which is our mission statement that if we have enough people that are exposed to not only improving themselves but as so often it's a form of education knowing what's out there if I hadn't gone to refugee camps or if I didn't have the background where my parents are Richard from Sri Lanka, would I really be so inclined to How this positive impact who knows I did have that chance I view that as an opportunity to give those opportunities in showcase through volunteering through being aware through connecting to people from different backgrounds. Hopefully, we can move the world forward I. Think it's needed now more than ever, right? Yeah. For Sure Tyler, the business for a second I think you've got around fifty employees the world you've got offices in Switzerland, the US Germany Serbia the Philippines mean you're growing you've got presumably some cash runway but these are tough economic times. I mean Lincoln just laid off a thousand people, their record numbers of people in the US for unemployment. So first of all. How is your revenue been in your business been impacted by the global economic slowdown? Yeah. I mean when it happens I think the first week where we started notice he was getting really serious I. Remember it. The first thing we did was we we had a board meeting and we talked about, okay what's our cash situation and let's make sure we get through this are along a be while maintaining the team for two reasons. One is like you don't want. Downward debt spiral. But also because we have the opportunity to have real impacting this time if we make the changes in adapt effectively, but we won't be able to do so if we don't have the team to do it so we've actually hired over the past few months and we've actually grown over the past few months and we've adapted to do. So the first week was really about scenario planning getting through that after that, we assume the worst but we. Ourselves decided. Well, there's definitely GONNA be less demand for recruitment is definitely less hires which hurts us which hurts our users or are members and we said, okay how can we can we help because if they come on in the no jobs? Well, it's a very bad experience, but it's also it's hurting us. So what we did was we put we put together this program better together and other challenges where youth can develop work experience at the end of it. They get certificates that show that they've accomplished these different challenges participated in it, and at the end, it can be used as work experience towards all of our partner companies. So it's actually giving them something to do some hope, and at the same time, this is generating revenue for us as one example of revenue for us. Another example is just before the crisis a part of our model is we work with large partners and a couple of these large partnership so. Leading recruitment than leading education routes, stunts or came to a halt. And then I don't know if this is despite coverted or because of covid other opportunities came about we've now partnered over the course of Kobe with market leaders in markets that we are not present in or were very marginally presents and he's actually allowing us to take up extra market share and grow in more significant way to timber onwards. Let. Let me ask you about the demographic that you target. Right I mean and I'm Gonna I'M GONNA use this term Gen Z.. Always cringe when I say because I remember like when I was in my twenties and people talked about Gen-x and their slackers and I would just cringe and you're older people talk about Gen xers and I was like, what are you talking about but just just to make this kind of simple we'll we'll just say Gen Z.. So if you're Gen Z. I'm sorry it's annoying I know. This is a really challenging economic moment if you are in high school now and you're going into college or if you're in college, there's a pretty good chance. You'RE GONNA GRADUATE INTO A world with very few jobs. You know a world that we haven't seen certainly since two, thousand, eight, nine and ten but maybe far far more challenging than that. What's your sense I mean? What do you think I mean do do you think that's that's actually true that that is likely to be the case for the next three, four, five years or more. Yeah, I think whether or not we go through a deep recession with mass unemployment particularly for the Youth USA next three four five years very probable that US at least in the short run or to suffer they're normally the last to be hired the first to be fired and that's justified for various reasons including ethical. Oh, they have less commitments than, for example, someone with kids, but it is incredibly difficult and the mental toil of, let's say an eighteen year old doesn't know what's coming up next we need to be able to be resilient and we need to be able to learn how to learn and adapt because we just don't know what's going to happen. So they could be a second. Downturn there could be a third downturn. It could be sustained downturns and US like across society but in particular for the youth they we have an opportunity they have an opportunity to take this and say, okay, it doesn't kill me. It might make me stronger and I can learn from this develop that resilience that five, six, ten years from now I'm able to deal with the next crisis in a more in a stronger way because I'm going to have to do that and some of the skills that need to be developed in my in my opinion or entrepreneurial thinking that ability to be flexible and resilient we we need to do more though the on just the the these massive stimulus packages and. Is trying to do whatever they can for sure this generation needs the government needs to intervene to be able to organizations needs to be able to intervene to support them to the best of their abilities in terms of developing skills and able to resilient. When we come back in just a moment, I'll talk with Taha about college graduates who will probably face a shrinking job market over the next few years stay with us. I'm Guy Roz and you're listening to how I built this resilience edition from NPR. For this podcast and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age aws dot org. Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition despite the economic slowdown tie and his company good wall have been able to grow their team and stay afloat. But as jobs are drying up across the globe. Many college graduates are looking for opportunities and can't find any if you're like in your early twenties now and you're looking for an opportunity and you can't find one. What would you recommend a young person? Do Who's who's graduating college is just entering the workforce and is kind of trying out different potential career pass. Is it a good time to just steer clear of the workforce for a while and get some more education which in the US means more debts? What do you think? Yeah, I think. Definitely, trying is important, but this might just be an opportunity to start your own thing. You know a lot of great companies came out of the last crisis because they just couldn't find jobs or that opportunity just wasn't there for your. So maybe start one's own thing. It's never been easier to start a business. It's never been easier to try something new. So if even. If it doesn't work. That's incredible work experience. You know when we talk to HR owes of some of the leading companies in the world, what are they looking for or what were they looking for before the crisis indefinitely after is that ability to be entrepreneurial even if you're working for fortune five hundred, so it can't hurt best case scenario you build something. Amazing. Worst case scenario. Fail and you take those skills and you leverage those skills and you keep your mind active. It's so important from a mental health perspective, keep your mind active and then apply them when the market comes back, which will at one point another opportunity. If if maybe starting yourself isn't it join some friends or join or reach out to small startups definitely volunteer is an opportunity. There are a lot of NGOs are nonprofits that need help or need support right now, build up your work experience gained some experience concrete tangible work experience that differentiates further rather than just having eight twelve months in your resume which are empty. Unfortunately, it might not help financial side and that's where that's where one has to be creative and it's it's just really tough and that's What does the government intervention on that front need to be because there's some that just can't afford to do what I just said, which is volunteer or build your own company because they don't have that safety net that don't have that opportunity in and unfortunately there in we're almost out of ideas because he go back to college, you just talked about extra debt but for some unfortunately are going to have to do it, and that leads to more a more philosophical discussion on what is there so much debt attached to a college education where you know in Switzerland, for example, I paid for my undergraduate I paid around a thousand dollars a year it's a leading edge I mean it's like A. Top universities and so that's a that's another discussion. Yeah. I agree with you I think that this is a moment to be entrepreneurial and it's challenging because you're you're right. I mean not everybody can do that from an employer's perspective you mentioned human resource officers, and by the way you're right I mean a human resource officer is very attracted to an applicant who started a business or try to start up in it failed. Because as you say, that's incredible life and work experience. What are some of the characteristics and sort of ways that quote Unquote Jersey works that might be different from previous generations maybe what their expectations for example? Yeah. It's something that comes up quite often the expectations are are huge I think even if we look at the generation before part of it is there needs to be in there. Always has been this need for grits for determination. I think post Covid, we're going to have very likely incredibly resilient and determined generation I. Think it's it's really great for I mean it's it's very tough. Love going to suffer and I hope I hope it will be as as few as possible but coming out of this generally on the whole, there's good reason to believe that this generation. is going to be really conscious a bit like after World War Two really conscious of financials very conscious sauce how lucky they are how privileged quickly things can change how precarious the society within which we live is actually it's a disease that, yes, it's it's it's it's serious, but it could have been a lot worse. It could have been worse could be one hundred exists and it's brought. Our global economy to its knees and you know we feel like we're often the masters of the universe and that's not just Jeb across demographics and we clearly aren't on I. think a little bit of humidity goes a long way. I love the energy of younger people coming in because their ideas are just so radically different from the way people in my business have have seen their profession What is your advice for employers looking to harness the intellectual power of Gen Z.? Yeah. No, it's a really good question. There basics of management that have been the same for every demographic every every niche within that demographic. It's look at maximizing the potential of the particular individual to different people react differently to different forms of management. Within this can talk about trends, but the ability to give them that chance to express themselves. The need for trust is always been there now definitely, so I mean even more so because they know what they're capable, but then also must not forget they are still with very few years of experience and being able to be there to give feedback to to tell them what they're doing. Right. Tell them what they're doing. Wrong. Both sides is critical. So just leaving someone out there in the world is not going to necessarily need to great results either but giving that safe-space giving that trust and creating an environment of being game your to maximize your potential and the. Direct, order may have worked. They may have been able to get away with it in the past, but some people might be okay with it but generally speaking that's that's especially for for you a lot of potential that's just not conducive for maximizing the potential where do you see your your business and what you're doing in five years from now what do you want it to look like I think for us it's always been about really helping as many youth as possible be as inclusive as we. And so we're ready serving youth in one hundred, fifty countries would like to go deeper in certain areas through our partnerships or load serve more youth in a more significant way. Provide more opportunities just re the best experience. That's probably what's most important. I think that's where we can have where we can make our contribution towards society. That's what we're good at, and now it's just about going to the next level. Yes. It's a challenging period, but we're going to be okay. WE'RE GONNA get out of this, and then it's about really taking this opportunity and doing the best we can because we are in a privileged situation if we were if we were unlucky which is the case for many other start ups I, friends who had term sheets for massive rounds of financing evaporates we hear the stories and then know they're just unlucky. So we're in this lucky position to be able to operate and to be able to do what we're doing. Let's. Make, the most out of it and I think that's our that's kind of our duty and I think that's yeah. TOBBACO

United States Switzerland Africa Good Wall Good Wall Taha Nasa TA American Jewish World Service Co Founder Oxford Youth Usa Jordan Osborne Richard Partner NPR Lincoln Officer
Should You Master Mind?

The Daily Boost

05:58 min | 2 months ago

Should You Master Mind?

"Before we get started I have to ask the question. I dwell on every single Monday, I've done it since how long since two thousand six thirty eight million downloads go, it's a lot. Have you done your homework? Serious. I stood emails every single week. Scott a bit. Listen new for years, and I finally sat down. I look at my goals. The roles that I play my life where my focus is what I really WanNa do. What I like, what I! What I'd like change. I look at I looked at that fine. And all of a sudden suddenly I found that was well. It was working and that's why a question because when you take the time to evaluate at least for a few minutes where you are. Then you can go or you to go until then it's kind of difficult remember. The perfect planner helps you do that, so just go to motivation. WE'VE DOT COM. If you haven't, it's in the resource section. Get the perfectly planner and watch the video. It's a cool video and it tells you exactly how to get the mindset. To really transform your life at about ten minutes a week with one single piece of paper. AUSE stuff. So. Let's talk masterminding. In nineteen thirty eight. The Pauline Hill had a book. Thinking grow rich, you might read that. It's like an a tenth edition. Now it's crazy. I think I read it five or six times maybe more. Change lives it at time when the depression was going on right, Kinda Creepy Beckham. And a lot of modern personal development self-help personal improve whatever you call it. A lot of it really began then because people were down at the dump, said he'd get lifted out of the dump. So thinking grow rich comes out. And, he popularized a concept called. The mastermind now it's interesting. If you track the word mastermind, you'll find that. It really was very rarely used up to that point. But after that point, damn, it just took off. Must have an impact on the world, isn't it? By the way mastermind is not a character in an Austin powers movie. In case you're wondering on masterminds, be Dr Evil Right. Napoleon Hell. And I believe this to be true said it was the True Path to success for anybody who wants it. Now if you listen. I define success. It's kind of a generic term. Right suggest what is what's accessible anything it could be success in you know having a Nice family, and we how many good job or a nice house or just being happy I don't care how you wanted to how you define success. That's up to you. So what about this mastermind, thing, why is it so powerful? Well Napoleon. Hill was the first to see this. He said a mastermind news the coordination of knowledge and effort. In a spirit of harmony with two or more people. For the attainment of a definite purpose. I like the spirit of harmony I like the two or more people and I like the. Attainment of a definite versus. South, collaboration isn't. Collaboration going on these days. It's different than a mastermind. Why is it different? Because when two mines come together. They create a third mine. It's invisible. It's an intangible force. It's a third mine. That's different than just getting your job at hey, how you doing that project doing this doing that? Okay fine chicken chicken chicken chicken off done. Now, it's different. It's that definite purpose. I do this a lot with folks on the phone. People that I messed around with. We'll talk to you about something. That's mastermind this not brainstorming. Tapping power that third mine. It gets even better. This is exciting, but mastermind process. If you don't have a mastermind should find one. Ed You can do with your colleagues it with family if you wanted to easier sometimes when you don't know folks. Ran Certainly could work. With persistence and intelligence. And use. Of discrimination in the selection of who you mastermind with. Your objectives will have been halfway reached even before you begin to recognize it and I did you hear what he just said. It's in the book and it is so true. When you have persistence. That's a very valuable trait. When you use your intelligence. Yes you have intelligence. When you discriminate in the selection of the people, you allow NGO group in other words. Into your mind. When you allow anybody to enter your mind, you're in trouble. But when you pay attention to who you're paying attention to. With persistent intelligence. Something magical happens. Just by doing that, doors swing open. Right then right there instantaneously when you do that. You're halfway. Halfway. To where you WANNA go and you don't even know it yet. Because now you have the support group now you're thinking differently. Have that power that third mind there? So how do you put this into play how to use it? People just got to be a master. Do masterminds have had masterminds masterminds right now. How do you do it? You can form it on your own. If I were you I would fine four or five people that you want to be like, and you are like as well, but maybe you just you're GonNa, all come together. You want to elevate yourself. Find four or five people think long and hard about this people. And you know it's okay. If you call up and say hey, let's form a mastermind. Let's get on the call. Now if you've never facilitated a mastermind, run mastermind, it's fairly easy to do. You can study that online. We'll have time for that today. But you can go out and find four or five people. The think the way you think and think they. WILL YOU WANNA? Think find a really be discriminated who you're talking to get together with the purpose of definite person purpose in mind. Don't just be a facilitator. Don't just raw. Don't just brainstorm. Don't just collaborate, don't do that. Allow, them into your world.

Pauline Hill Scott Napoleon Hell Austin
Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

Science Friction

05:49 min | 2 months ago

Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

"So. You're bad to make a Peruvian Pharma. WHO's suing Germany's largest power company W? A this is a heist could radically disrupt debate over climate action and week you'll also hear from our wwl representatives in a rare interview about the controversial case. Germany's shutting down all power stations over the next twenty years, so it does that mean for the transition of business. And he gone to meet the man who has become a thorn in the side of fossil fuel companies because he's dredging up their own data to challenge them. This is climate in the courtroom pot one. Murder. Looking. I am suing so that the big companies need to take into account that they should not pollute. Way of saying enough is not. He's not paid by anybody to do this. He knew that it would take years. He knew that could be lost. It could be one. He knew that he would probably be facing some animosity on the ground in his village. But. He decided to do this to just show himself and his children that if there is an injustice you can act upon. or It is like a coal. Companies surely won't even feel since they are so wealthy. We need to start from somewhere. The fend ourselves. Another goal. Record. No nobody's asking to shut up shop. We know that this transformation will take decades on the corporations can lead that effort transforming companies from simply providing liquid fuels for example. To invest in carbon capture sequestration to invest in offshore wind, for example particularly in the rich, western, world, concluding Australia where the preponderance of historic emissions have enabled our economies to grow wealthy. We need to decarbonised faster than the developing world so that they can have a chance. Proper development as well. What is the concern of people who live on islands where the water level rises? What is the concern of people who suffer from hurricanes that haven't been there before? Their concern is that greenhouse gases must be reduced greatly of course, our responsibility as a power generator through reduce your to emissions, and that's what we're doing. Closing down power stations, investing into renewable supporting co two targets, also the embiid ones porting energy transition. Third episode where taking you to the Philippines for human rights showdown over climate change that's commanding attention, even in the face of president deterred has discords for drug uses and jailing of journalists, but first. Why is a Peruvian Pharma and Mountain God in the central Andes, attracting such international attention? My Name is Dr Road of. I'm a lawyer in private practice on my practices located in Hamburg. Germany and I represent so Luciano you in his quest and case against. With just German Energy Utility look the road of a high and is regular attorney in private practice, but before that she co founded the pioneering Ngo, the Climate Justice Program in two thousand and three ended her PhD on international climate, protection law, after years working in climate policy. What I find is that people have been coming to me increasingly in the last ten years. Asking for advice on what you know what you could do with respect to the increasing inadequacy of action with regard to what the science tells us. And then in two thousand, fourteen I decided to take on the first case with just this RWE case since they've multiplied and the man at the heart of bet, landmark case was half a world away at the end of a correctly online. My name is sold. Luciano you year I am and guide. From family of a small apartments, daughter I am a forty years of age or the. So who lives in the bustling town of us and in the mountains, above what else is a gateway for tourists heading off on hogging adventures in the stunning coordinator Blanca Mountain range of the central, Andes. But for locals, those mountains are life. Komo From clouds he goes to the moments and these hills with our culture in the area. There is a great dependency on the fence in agriculture in what us. The Mon I are everything for a farmer in a month and guide. It is like an office that gives you subsistence cool more fifteen. About two. Hundred. And my client is assistance the with his family in the Small Village Code Yuba. I'm he plans potatoes and vegetables, and I'm raises Guinea pigs to then have food. He has children and his own old parents. So in the season he will take tourists up to the glaciers and Laguna. And so did his father when he was little bit younger,

Germany Peruvian Pharma Luciano Private Practice Small Village Code Yuba Climate Justice Program Murder RWE Laguna Andes Hamburg Blanca Mountain German Energy Utility Philippines Australia Coordinator
Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 3 months ago

Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

"As hard as it can be for most people to maintain social distance consider how much harder it is for refugees packed into makeshift camps that is the reality for one a million Muslim minority rocking guy who fled Myanmar their camps are in neighboring Bangladesh and those camps recorded their first confirmed deaths from covert on June first Michael Sullivan reports two weeks ago Bangladesh declared parts of the Cox's bazaar district where the camps are located a red zone and climb to lock down on those areas as the virus spread I think everybody is very concerned that the numbers are going to increase significantly Louise Donovan is spokesperson for the U. N. H. C. R. in Cox's bazaar if you look at Bangladesh's Utica Cox's bazaar the numbers are increasing very rapidly and we're concerned that the same thing will happen in the camps camps that have some of the highest population density in the world Rahm das runs the roving the relief effort in Cox's bazaar for the NGO care international it is four times the density Arafat New York City eight times the density of Wuhan city about how activities but here you are at and that he says make social distancing in the camps almost impossible your contact the people inside the house thirty four hours they have to go out for food they had to go to the community Charlotte they have to go to the house that does though it thank you photo make sure that all the a million people followed the thunder one million people aid groups are struggling to finish twelve new clinics for COPD patients with a total of nineteen hundred beds by the end of June Robert look what does food for the hungry opened the first a few weeks ago we are using it as a crime I think casting top style because of the need on the ground we had to modify each better faster and to ensure that we are responding to that I did to needs which is called his clinic has fifty beds for isolation and treatment of moderate to severe cases another clinic outside the camp has one hundred and fifty more but critical cases the require intensive care and ventilators we'll have to go to the government hospital in Cox's bazaar and that worries him the number of beds in Cork's Bastos de limited as I talk now I told you there any beds that are blind right now with that being said all I did accident dropping their question Keysight Torah the number of cases another concern Rohingya in the camps are reluctant to come forward for testing and instead self medicating with help from makeshift pharmacies inside the camps so Tom Raheem ola runs one after another not that excited again about it do you fear he's the go to the clinic the doctors will send them to a different team not just them but their whole families so they come here in the state yes me Dara is arriving activist who works for an international aid group to build awareness in the camps my name and the lamb are bad I hope they will guide you right now some deep blue sea yeah I'm afraid to go to the cleaning because they have heard there will be Q. we told them no and explain what isolation and quarantine are and we told them if there are C. will get treatment and Judy are better then they will go home but people are still suspicious the Bangladesh government's ban on internet in the camps isn't helping people get information either and then there's the rainy season which brings a slew of illnesses that present much is cobra does with costs eighty bones and fevers that leads people to self medicate for those elements instead of getting tested combine that with the fear factor and it's little wonder that some aid workers worry the number of cases in the camps is far greater than what's being reported so far

A drone that fights mosquito-borne illnesses

Science Magazine Podcast

05:40 min | 3 months ago

A drone that fights mosquito-borne illnesses

"Mosquito borne infections like Zepa Dangi malaria and she can. Cause millions of deaths each year, many different approaches have been tried to prevent their bites, bednets, asides, fumigation, and genetic controls Nicole. Colbert and colleagues wrote this week in science robotics about a new way to deal with deadly mosquitos. Using Drones Hainkel has there. How are you pretty good? How are you and thank you very much? This approach with drones it starts with a type of genetic control used for tapping down mosquito populations. How does that part work began a mass fear them and and big laboratories there sterilize, and then take into the fields, and then ultimately released trying to integrate them into the wild population with females, so if there's a bunch of sterile males out there. There the females are not going to have very much reproductive success exactly so when a sterile mating occurs the stereo mail transfer Cerro sperm to the female, and thus ingesting a form of thoroughly within the wild population, which, if done over time with weekly release for example you can sort of suppress population dumbed quite a low level. Why has this type of method been adopted, say instead of pesticides or fumigating the area and trying to just kill all the tax. So this is a technique that was developed in the nineteen fifties. It's been used successfully against particularly agricultural pests, such as fruit flies very environmentally friendly technique. It does not have any impact on the non target organisms. Pesticides are becoming more and more regular. It's around. The world's insecticides are purchasing resistance than the population of Mosquitos and become less effective over time, and at the same time we're seeing an increase in mosquito populations around the world. It is l. pictures is managed to. Arise from the forests of Asia on colonize every continent besides toxic in the last four years then get incidents is increasing dramatically, and in light of this whol of express an urgent need for attorney mosquito control methods. Why would you need to use a drone for this method of population control in previous sterilization technique pilot trials with excuse, they've always been carried out from the ground to move towards an operational level area is most likely the way that will be going forward. Offers many advantages over grind release. You can cover much larger. And a much shorter time. It's also much more cost effective. You have less vehicles on the ground. Less labor costs associated less gasoline an idea that he's drawing. Is that once? You purchase that you have a one time cost? It's capable of flying for Bremner Say Twenty Twenty five minutes. You could perhaps carry a few hundred thousand a week. I, read a little bit less, but it is possible with. With upscaling to carry a little bit more and offers a possibility to cover quite a large area and a relatively short time. I was surprised to learn that. Mosquitoes don't travel very far. Even though they can fly, they gonNA. Stick around where they are, and so it makes sense to drop them all over the place said of releasing them from one centralized spot. That's very true. That's particularly true of eighties Egypt. It's estimated to disperse fifty to a hundred meters in its lifetime so very short distances by grind. It would just be so much more tedious, but if you have a drawn, you can just go up there and ensure you're making a a nice homogenous distribution with your release, and perhaps aiden with the dispersal. When you tested this I in the lab. What did you have to optimize to get this little carrier that you made that attached to the drone? What did you have to focus on to get it to work? It was a really intensive twelve months in the lab. There was so many things that had to be optimized both from our side, and also on the side of the the X. Ngo that we were collaborating with we need to. To look at things like the idea of storage temperature traditionally when be up to the release of sterile insects, usually in a chilled state, so they're sleeping. We needed to know what the best temperature was for that, and also when we have kept them asleep I alone. Hell long did it take to wake up after they've been sleeping and that's particularly important when releasing by air because you want them to wake up before they reach the ground. Out Results, minutely bill determined the height that you can actually fly the drone up, so we were looking at that as well as things like the level of compaction, we want to try carry many mosquitoes in one flight as we can, but when you put look of them, you're talking tens of thousands one box. They're going to be weighed down on top of each other and the ones that the boom bill eventually become damaged, so we can optimize in the. The maximum amount that we could put in one canister, and ultimately how many Mosquitos could release per flight? Another parameter we look that was wind resistance. When you're flying a drone a certain speed, there's going to be quite effective wind when they come drawn, so we wanted to know have affected our I mean does disease damage wings can this fly is lethal? So we made wind tunnel Metex observe flight ability after being subjected to various speeds of wind and we. We also looked at the drop speed again to determine the height of release. So when you drop a sleeping skew, have quickly. Does it full and again that would help determine the height of release

Bremner Say Twenty Twenty Wind Tunnel Metex Zepa Dangi Colbert Fumigation Cerro Asia Nicole X. Ngo Egypt Aiden Attorney
Top E.U. Court Rules Against Hungary’s N.G.O. Law

BBC Newshour

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

Top E.U. Court Rules Against Hungary’s N.G.O. Law

"The top court in the European Union has ruled that Hungary broke European law by restricting foreign funding of civil organizations the European Court of justice at the restrictions discriminated against both the NGOs involved arms the donors Nick Thorpe reports from Budapest the course of justice of the European Union ruled that the twenty seventeen Hungarian low on the funding of non governmental organizations from a broad formulated both fundamental rights and the free movement of capital Viktor Orban's Fidesz government argued that it was necessary to make the work of foreign funded NGOs more transparent the NGOs replied that they were far more transparent than government backed associations and that the law was designed to punish those in Hungary who stand up for human

European Union Hungary Nick Thorpe Budapest Viktor Orban European Court Of Justice
Hungary 'broke EU law with foreign funding rules'

BBC Newshour

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

Hungary 'broke EU law with foreign funding rules'

"The top court in the European Union has ruled that Hungary broke European law by restricting foreign funding of civil organizations the European Court of justice at the restrictions discriminated against both the NGOs involved arms the donors Nick Thorpe reports from Budapest the course of justice of the European Union ruled that the twenty seventeen Hungarian low on the funding of non governmental organizations from a broad formulated both fundamental rights and the free movement of capital Viktor Orban's Fidesz government argued that it was necessary to make the work of foreign funded NGOs more transparent the NGOs replied that they were far more transparent than government backed associations and that the law was designed to punish those in Hungary who stand up for human rights

European Union Hungary Nick Thorpe Budapest Viktor Orban European Court Of Justice
Women In Prison

Mentally Yours

04:25 min | 3 months ago

Women In Prison

"Today chatting to classrooms. He's the managing editor of the magazine, a new magazine that publishes poetry and articles by women in prison today. We're going to be chatting to her. About what life is like for women in Britain's prisons. How them into health is affected by being in prisons, and what life is like at the moment during the covert epidemic. So my interest is like mice, people, you know they're all mental health. Issues in my family have an aunt. WHO's diagnosed bipolar, so we sort of grew up with that. And then. I went to school with Ended up just in a lot of trouble with the criminal justice system and when she was released from. Last time she asked. If I would help and get involved with the which when I look at it I was just delighted to. Because it's really important, it's it's not just for women in prison for women who've got any contact with the criminal justice system, so they could be women on in the community all they could be The partners of men they could be NGOs or other people involved in the criminal justice system went lawyers. Judges actually subscribed to twos. Quite it's quite a broad abroad with limited reach. This is kind of broad question, but what is it is particularly about women how to how women specifically affected by being in the prison system coming out of the issues that they face specifically so I think when you look at. The. Number of women who all incarcerated who we send to present. You have mental health issues vomited vaguely report, but he are half ago and Init- initial justice admits that over eighty percent of women have mental health issues on those mental health issues not treated in women's Prisons Stats men's prisons. They're much lower and then women things. I and depression is compounded, because only one percent of children actually stay in the family home. If mother is sent to prison, I mean that's an alarming statistic, and we need to think about being Zion, if not knowing what's happening to your child in your home and everything. In a while you're in prison where it's remind is usually you know nine times out of ten, a mother, or assist O or upon who can pick up the pieces in the Gulf to the children, but for women very often. They don't have those networks especially when it comes to child care. And women have also leads upon leads of trauma an emotional abuse. Again enormous report that was commissioned by Theresa May. He says that over fifty percent of women. have been the victims of abuse. Emotional or sexual or domestic abuse? In their lives, and of course, imprisoning them white disc, compacting that trauma and adding Les- Upon it, and what about the mental? They received. We'll maybe don't receive. When are actually in prison will? What's really frightening? Is that judges put women in prison thinking that they will get mental health support because you know, there are these massive I mean really enormous mental health contracts over six hundred million pounds. A year is spent on health and mental health. They called the justice health contracts, so these are given to provide his including. National Health Service, foundation trust and private providers like. A and Really. Women just cannot access them they. For example at Drake Hotel which is the prison? In the Midlands is meant to be a fulltime psychologists in the time psychiatrist, I'm case paid to provide that service, but actually that has not been a full time. Psychiatrists death of a two years. They've just not been able to fill the role. And they'll get in training. US is or nasty to on. Day contracts who don't have any commitment to being in that position and that she looking off the the patient doodle is just it's just a job, so we are really concerned about mental health and women's specific health services like menopause connect like. A. Logical problems PAP, Smit's things like that and just not being done for him in prison

National Health Service Managing Editor United States Smit Britain Theresa May Gulf Zion Drake Hotel O
Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:53 min | 4 months ago

Trump administration is rushing to gut environmental protections

"Your host for the program is David. Cosso a DC based healthcare policy analyst. And we invite you to comment on the program by visiting the healthcare policy. Podcasts DOT COM. Now here's David. Welcome to the healthcare policy. Podcast I'm the host David Intro Cosso during this podcast discussed with Professor Michael Burger Executive Director of the Sabin Center for Climate Change at Columbia Law School. The trump administration's efforts to unwind the nation's environmental regulatory rules and the status of Climate Crisis Related Litigation. Professor Burger. Welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. Professor Burgers by was posted on the podcast website on background to state the obvious we interact with the environment constantly as a result. We are exposed to harmful animal-borne germs like viruses bacteria parasites or so called zoonotic diseases. Scientists s made more than six out of every ten known infectious diseases and three out of four new or emerging infectious diseases. Come from animals. Think Dengue Malaria Rabies covid nineteen according to the National Academy of Sciences. The environment is responsible for thirty percent of premature deaths. He Fi far higher percentage than healthcare prevents. This explains why minority Communities Face Higher Kobe. Nineteen related mortality. Upwards of three times their immune systems have already been compromised by degrade environment for example poor air quality despite for recognizing the adverse effects. The environment has on our health. The for example environmental impact statements. The trump administration has worked aggressively to gut the nation's environmental protections according to the Save Insanity Administration has unwound or ten zone wind approximately one hundred environment regulations ranging from power plant and car and truck. Co Two emissions. Mercury and hydrofluorocarbons emissions. Who was protecting wetlands from oil and GAS LEAK RULES REGARDING PESTICIDE? Use drilling fracking and coal leasing rules offshore oil and gas drilling rules etc concerned. The climate crisis listeners. Mary call my having discussed research. Polishing Twenty sixteen that concluded the adverse health effects resulting from the healthcare ministries greenhouse gas or carbon emissions our response properties Roberts of nearly one hundred thousand deaths annually in the US alone with begin discussing ministrations attack on Varma deregulations centers. Michael Burger so with that Professor Burger. Let me start by asking. If you can briefly describe the same incentives work sure The Saban Center is a think and do tank housed at Columbia Law School. We focus on Climate Change Law across the board meaning. We look at both mitigation related issues. How to go about reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as adaptation issues to respond to climate change impacts that are already happening that will only increase in intensity and frequency over time. We are not policy shop so we don't do policy analysis. We're really team of lawyers. That focus very much on the on the legal aspects of climate policy. I and we do this at all. Scales of government from the from the local to the global We have a number of different things. We do On the side of our think and do tank We do what thinks generally do we produce a original research and writing on a range of climate law related topics we also produce An put up on our website free for public. Use a number of different resources for researchers lawyers policy practitioners students and others. These include our climate change litigation databases both US and non us. Our silencing science tracker our climate deregulation tracker which we launched on inauguration day in two thousand seventeen our legal pathways deep decarbonisation database which includes Hundreds of model laws setup for governments at all scales to adopt To achieve deep decarbonisation in the number of other tools on the do side of our thinking do tank We engage actively with partners including international organizations Domestic and international NGOs. Political staffers And representatives other academic institutions And others to leverage our expertise to have an impact on the real world so in this regard be Senate comment letters on environmental impact statements to end proposed regulations. We filed amicus briefs On behalf of scientists coalitions cities and others in big climate cases And we regularly seek to influence an inform public decision making around climate law and policy. So you're busy. Yeah we have our hands especially these days. Yes Okay. So let's go to these days So my next question. Let's get to the meat of this Though would take hours to detail the administration's assault on the environment. Let's focus on air quality since among other things accounts for a seven million deaths worldwide or degraded air-quality so Let's focus more over again on this subject. So what's the administration's policy toward amongst other issues Power Plant emissions. This was the Obama. Administration's Clean Power Plan Auto Tailpipe pipe and particularly as well of course methane emissions which is a much more potent greenhouse gas.

Professor Burger David Intro Cosso Policy Analyst Columbia Law School United States Professor Michael Burger Save Insanity Administration Professor Burgers National Academy Of Sciences Barack Obama Assault Sabin Center Mary
The United Nations Are Fighting misinformation about COVID-19

UN News

01:52 min | 4 months ago

The United Nations Are Fighting misinformation about COVID-19

"The UN on Thursday launched a new initiative to combat the growing scourge of covid nineteen misinformation by increasing the volume and reach of trusted adviser at News on the pandemic UN Secretary General Antonio Qatar issue announced the initiative verified said the world could not hand over virtual space online to those who traffic in lies fear and hate the UN chief noted how misinformation spreads online and messaging APPS and post the person through savvy production and distribution methods to counter it scientists and institutions like the UN. Need to reach people with accurate information. They can trust he added verified led by the UN to pump the global communications home to you. News will provide information around three themes science to save lives solidarity to promote local and Global Corporation and solutions to advocate for support impacted populations it will also promote recovery packages that tackle the climate crisis and address the root causes of poverty inequality and Hunga. Do you in refugee agency. Hcr and the International Organization for Migration IOM according on Malta and other European states to urgently bring to dry land around one hundred and sixty rescued refugees and migrants stood at sea aboard to captain. Morgan vessels a separate group of twenty one people mostly women and children who already evacuated and disembarked in Malta. Several days ago those remaining have been on board for some two weeks the standard corn period for Covid nineteen without any clarity on disembarkation. The agency said it was unacceptable to leave people at sea longer than necessary and raised concerns about reports that governments have been ignoring or delaying sponsors to distress goals especially a sharp decrease in state led an NGO search and rescue efforts. They reminded European states of their legal obligations to immediately assist people in distress and they cannot be traded away with the offer fuel and eight.

UN Covid Secretary General Antonio Qata Malta International Organization For Global Corporation Morgan
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

07:15 min | 4 months ago

How I Built Resilience

"Hey welcome back to how. I built this resilience edition so we just heard from some industrial. Who actually started her. Culinary career at Chez Panisse in Berkeley and. Her Mentor was none other than Alice. Waters Alice daughter Fanny Singer. Join me to talk about how shape unease is doing during the crisis and how we can keep local farmers and business by buying straight from the source Finney. I know that you are sheltering place that your mom right now in Berkeley of all. How are you guys doing? How are you holding up? It's it's sort of strange very surreal. Moment I live in San Francisco and I do still have apartment there. But you know it's a one bedroom apartment and my partner and I are together. We both were working at home. And there's no outdoor space than being in Berkeley was not just to be with my mom who I obviously concerned about to. Just because I wanted to fee `sort sort of insane person about disinfecting nail and all the things in a little bit more German centric than my mother so these things were these work concerns of mine but also I mean to be Berkeley in a place that has really rich outdoor environmental NGO to walk through one hundred thirty seven pad this in the hills of the Berkeley into just feel to walk for ten. Miles is like the only thing I think kind of keeping me from total insanity. Alice tell us a little bit about. What's going on with Chez Panisse right now? Obviously you've been closed for five. Maybe six weeks. What's going on with the staff right now. We really paid the step their time off so that when it comes time to reopen that they would be there and available we had the good luck to get a kind of bridge loan from some wonderful friends of the restaurant that are helping us get to the point where money comes from the government to pay people. Some are on unemployment and some are being paid a portion of their salaries. But it's really important to me that people are paid at this time. If I have to ask my friends I have my friends Alice. One of the things I read about which is super cool. is that Obviously you work with a lot of small farmers all over California and a lot of these farmers presumably. I mean they supply restaurants so first of all from your conversations with with farmers that you work with you supply your restaurant and other restaurants. I mean what is their situation like I mean? How long can they go like this without having restaurants to supply? It's very serious. What's going on with our whole organic farm community because they really have a only the farmers markets to bring food to and the number of people that are going to farmers markets is not what it usually is so. We're trying to figure out how to buy that food from the farmers and we have a project in Stockton California The mayor of Stockton is very enthusiastic about getting or Ganic Food in the public school system and serve at this moment in time. He asked if we could help buy food from the farmers said that he can give an stockton and I thought that that would be a perfect way for us to begin building that network that we're going to need for the public schools and were putting little recipes into the box so that people know how to make very simple dishes and may given at least four thousand pounds of food away in Stockton Alice. I I mean you've talked about this for years that when you were a little girl. Your parents had a victory garden at home in New Jersey and that you really are encouraging people to plant their own. Things actually inspired me so much. I've got some ceilings. Here can you see some big lettuce there? You go and I'M GONNA hopefully. That'll be lettuce in a couple of months. I mean I don't have a big backyard. I have a small space and got a planter but for people who don't have a backyard who might live in an apartment I mean what are some ways that people can think about growing their own food that keeps looking at Brown Finley and he started by chanting food out in front of his house? In that little parkway between the sidewalk and the street and it caused a lot of controversy and he actually cited for violating. Some ordinance got any went to court. He wanted his case and he actually has planted that whole strip of land. So sort of thinking about him. I did the same thing I cup. That little plop right in front of my Bad I think you can plant like you have done and planter boxes on a balcony. I hope that the community gardens began to surge research and unite. My mom planted the little section. That's just in front of our house because even though we do have a garden in the back she wanted people to think about this victory garden moment and the potential for even the most throwaway pieces of land. It's now planted with a few different edible things and she's already gotten notes through our mailbox thanking her for taking this kind of actions embolic being encouraging people. And you've just seen this proliferation of gardens now in people's sort of little forgotten front yards and people sowing seeds all around the neighborhood now and way. It's really incredible. I've just never seen anything like it before you know. One of the things that you've talked about is the idea of buying local produce supporting local farmers wherever you are in the country around the world and you know one of the questions that that we're getting from folks on facebook Tuesday from Bell Zelezny also which what are ways that we can help. Small farmers are other ways of their places where we can go buy things from them especially farmers who are used to providing restaurants. I if you are at a loss for who you're farmers are do. The work researching call the pharmacy. Are you having trouble? Are you imperilled? Is there a way that I can help? You facilitate a network of deliveries. Can I help you deliver? But also it might be a question of just helping them figure out logistics or even knowing who they are. Where their farms are I mean? I have friends in. La The lines were so long that they weren't able to get any food so they just started figuring out who the farms were that they could drive out to so they could still got great produce. And I mean it's been a little bit more problem solving and resourceful and also knowing that the farmers are maybe really good at growing vegetables. That don't necessarily know how to work. A whole distribution network. And if that's something that you have extra time for facility with like make the effort because they do need us

Berkeley Alice Chez Panisse Stockton Alice Stockton Fanny Singer Finney San Francisco Ganic Food Partner New Jersey Miles Facebook California Brown Finley Bell Zelezny
UN Chief on the release of the updated COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan

UN News

01:27 min | 4 months ago

UN Chief on the release of the updated COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan

"Six weeks ago the global coffee nineteen pandemic began to eat some of the world's most fragile countries. I asked governments to step up for the world's author vulnerable people in a spirit of solidarity compassion and for site. The response was prompt and generous. We now have more than half the two billion. Us dollars we asked for United Nations. Our NGO partners at achieving results. For those who need it. Most water and soap are being delivered to vulnerable. Refugees hospitals and clinics are getting support life saving information campaigns are reaching millions of people and the Global System of air links eastern sporting medical supplies and equipment to someone ended in twenty countries worldwide. We are ramping up to seven hundred flights months for cargo and besseges my message to the simple. We have made a good start now. We must built on it. We need six point. Seven billion dollars to protect millions of people and help stop the virus from circling back around the globe. Humanitarian aid is not just a moral imperative it is a practical necessity to combat the virus if covered nineteen rix faulk in the Buddhist classes. We are all risk. I heard your strong continued support for this appeal thank you.

Rix Faulk United Nations United States
How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

The Electorette Podcast

10:03 min | 5 months ago

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. Have A conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco is the Vice Dean and a professor at New York University School of law and she joins me to discuss. How state governors can use their authority to help slow the spread of Kobe. Nineteen in prison and jail populations around the country. Many local governments have responded to the corona virus outbreak with stay at home orders or by enforcing social distancing practices but very few had a comparable response to reducing the spread of Corona virus in the incarcerated population as well as to the jail and prison staff and to their families. Rachel Barco and I discussed a recent report that was published by data for progress which provides a detailed outline for exactly how local governments can act. Now slow the spread of covert nineteen in prisons and jails so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me so I think it's become increasingly obvious that you know while the current virus outbreak is dire generally for the rest of the population that it's even more dire in the incarcerated population people who are in prisons and jails and one of the obvious reasons as to why that is is that you can't socially descends properly in prison or in jail. But what are some other factors? You're certainly right at environment in. These facilities is such that people can't distance themselves but they also don't have access to some of the key things that health officials have told us. We need to try to stop the spread so people who were incarcerated often. Don't have access to soap. They charge in many facilities for soap. And people don't have it. They don't have hand sanitizer They don't have access to easily easy access to water to even wash their hands. So you know the kind of basic hygiene practices that we think of as necessary for prevention aren't things that are accessible there And then you you add that to the fact that the population of people who are inside these facilities leans toward people with preexisting health conditions and very older people. Who are there as well so you have a particularly vulnerable population should this spread within the facility? they're more likely to get serious cases in death as a result right. That's another factor that I hadn't actually considered that. The percentage of older people in the prison population is. It's actually grown quite a bit in the past decade or decade and a half. I think there's something like a tough percent of people who are over aged fifty five exactly and many even much older than fifty five past sixty past seventy. The populations that were were most concerned about. Yeah and and also they aged faster. I think just generally medical professionals tell us that people who are in car serrated kind of a person who is chronologically aged forty five is really more like a fifty five year old based on just the harsh conditions of living inside prisons. One of the things we aren't really talking about are the peripheral people who are involved with the population right like the prison guards or even the doctors and therapists that come in and out of prison then of course the families who are also kind of a risk. Yeah and if you look at New York which is where I'm located right now. There are almost nine hundred employees of the corrections department who are infected with Kovic. Nineteen so staff. The people who work in these facilities are the. It's not as if the virus is going to distinguish between the people who are there because they were convicted of a crime and the people who work there. It's going to spread to everybody and when we're talking about people who work there getting it they in turn we're gonNA take it outside. The prison walls back to their homes back into their communities. And so it's GonNa be a source of spread to the community at large when we're talking about it's spreading within these facilities and in addition to that thinking about the people within prison facilities who work specifically on medical issues the medical staff. You know these are not large numbers of people who do that and so if you get high rates of infection among the staff who are designated to treat people with inside these facilities. You're really looking at a looming crisis. Because if they get sick you know there aren't people to replace them. And now we don't have people to take care of the people inside who get this and you can just see how it very critically conspire onto a crisis. President NGO population. I don't think that they're being counted in the current projections for infections and deaths right And those projections are kind of scary already. Yes I've seen a couple projections. I believe it's the. Aclu has tried to do one to figure out if we did bring into the projections. What is happening now in prisons in jails in what it looks like going forward you know we we see exponential growth in terms of the number of people dying in infected when we factor that in. Because I don't think the existing models are properly accounting for how much more rapidly the spread of this virus would be inside prison facilities. You know it would be as if we had an unaccounted for. Really large proportion of people on cruise ships and because it spreads so much more rapidly in an environment like that. If your model wasn't accounting for that you would be under counting and I think that is the problem with most of the existing models that are out there is. They're not accounting for the much more rapid spread inside prison in jail right. So so what? We've seen generally in relation to the responses response. That kind of been working and I live in one of the states that that's had a really good response. I live in Washington. State where governor Jay Inslee is in charge. We've seen responses on the local level to the outbreak specifically on gubernatorial level. Like I said Jay Inslee. You know governor Cuomo Gretchen. Whitmer you know all democratic governors. I should run out but have any of them responded in a significant way to prevent the spread in prison and jail populations no and it's really disappointing. You know. I think that this isn't one of these left right. Republican Democratic Issues Savelly. It's it's basically both failing to address what's going on. You know there are. There are at most playing. You know at at at at best what we've seen them do is maybe some small numbers of releases but nothing that is commensurate with the problem in the risk. You know so here in New York. Governor Cuomo has done nothing to address the fact that we now have more than a thousand people who have covert nineteen inside our correctional facilities staff and people incarcerated both and he hasn't released anybody you know it's just I. I'm not sure what accounts for it. But it's an enormous blind spot and and it's true You know across the states you know. I should say there are some governors who have done some things and you know some of it may may surprise people that you know for example Oklahoma. The governor there has has granted a fair number of commutations letting people out earlier from their sentence in light of what's happening and you know that's a Republican Governor. And you know we've seen a few others who are trying to make an effort to have at least said that they would have releases places like. Vania a New Jersey but unfortunately the announcements that they made haven't yet been followed by actual releases that match what they promised. So what we see when we look around. The country is essentially really small numbers of people being released from these facilities and so in what ends up happening is they're crowded and the fire starts to spread and it starts to spread to the staff and it goes into the communities and so it's really the situation that we would hope that we'd have governors getting ahead of it but there are efforts thus far have been really disappointing is the nicest way. I could put it sure and you said that you know. This isn't partisan or shouldn't be partisan but of course in this climate everything. Everything's partisan just about right so we can talk about that later. So one of the solution that's being proposed as just what you hinted at is clemency or early releases. So how would that work exactly? Well there's a couple options for governors so a commutation would be a sentence reduction that's permanent basically saying look we know we gave you ten years but the is the Governor Im- going to say The eight years you've currently served as enough and released. You're done the other option that a governor has and sometimes with commutations. Governor could just do that with the stroke of a pen and other times. They need to go through a board or some kind of process so so. That's actually a mixed set of options for governors in

Rachel Barco Barco New York Jay Inslee Governor Cuomo Gretchen Governor Cuomo New York University School Of Jim Taylor Skinner Washington Vice Dean New Jersey Oklahoma President Trump Whitmer Professor
"ngo" Discussed on Jonny Gould's Jewish State

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

10:37 min | 6 months ago

"ngo" Discussed on Jonny Gould's Jewish State

"In. Unfortunately that's a pretty common process but and everything. The UN does relate to Israel their UN NGOs involved we do the UN aspect of it and the UN watched as the we do the NGO aspect when they do the UN aspect and that fills in the puzzle. Pretty WELL INDEED I. I'm very very proud to say that Working with Hillel Neuer at the Geneva Summit for Human Rights and democracy is on my CV as I interviewed the UCD rape victim For Rita her laugh on state. Twenty eighteen I I saw that. That's I think that is definitely something to be emphasized. I've been to some of the Geneva summits they are an alternative to what the UN was supposed to be what it should have done in the UN Human Rights Council. What they don't do because of the political and economic financial corruption and he'll end. The Geneva summit is an ultra very important alternatives like parallel world. A GERALD. Let's talk a little bit about yourself now. Now despite the accent a u are one of us on true you were born asking. Do you caught me. I say We'll have to start some elocution lessons. What happened to your accent. You completed a joint bachelor's degree in physics and Near Eastern Studies at the University of California. That's possibly where the accent is being evolved in one thousand nine hundred seventy three and then a master's degree in physics In San Diego in seventy five and then you began teaching at the Bar Ilan University in Nineteen ninety-two a professor of political science. See you never came back hand Gerald. Why didn't come back to stay? I came back to visit quite frequently and Well I was two old. My parents decided. That's in the early fifties. Being raised in California was a little bit warmer Sunnier than being in London. So they ask me so I was raised in California and I did. My University Studies in Originally in physics and it turned out that I had spent the year in Israel humiliated enough With that other things I always had this And he said the eight Sahara. I wanted to do something that I found. I always had the political bugging me so I did the Middle Eastern studies aspect At the site. Show that not really a hobby. That is a major issue and I spent. The the transition was gradual. Those were different times where worrying about a job at income was not a particularly high on the agenda at graduate. School was basically free. I did a doctorate at the In the middle of my physics doctorate I went I was asked if I was interested in a fellowship to go to the East Coast. And there's a personal issues involved in that too. There are a lot more Jews in New York. And there are in San Diego California in the nineteen seventies and. I decided that was a better place for me to Anchor myself so I went to Cornell University initially as a one year fellowship in international politics and science technology. I did a lot of work in nuclear proliferation. Research about Which related eventually to what Iran and Iraq and other countries are building weapons? I became a consultant to the American government. Something is accused me of doing for a while. I on nuclear proliferation areas but that eventually led me into then I came through Israel. I've always wanted to make and they did that. I spent ten years bouncing back and forth. Eleven years made Aliyah in nineteen eighty two teaching at Bari. Line and Since then teaching international politics and the the NGO emphasis came much later after twenty years of doing the nuclear and space and other high-tech related international politics. I've had really the the privilege of doing what I want to do. And when my interest change being able to do that finally Gerald can I ask you about your forecast for this? Incredibly Long War of attrition. You didn't think that twenty years after you set up NGO MONITOR THAT. You would still be doing this. And IT IS INDEED. A lifetime's work but not without great achievement not without changing perceptions and indeed policies with Corona virus with isolationism with Brexit with the challenge to the European Union X. Essentially with so many European peoples looking at the European Union for example in Italy at the moment a real resistance against Europe and the potential for Russia and China to be aiding European countries during this time Can I ask you how you think this will shape our world in the future? Will you or your successor. Still be doing the same things in twenty years time or will there be some sort of victory in this. Very painful war of attrition. I'm often accused of being two-handed academic on the one hand on the other hand giving all these answers that are and I'm GonNa do that now to you. I'll give you an optimistic pessimistic image. I don't have a crystal ball and I Have as they say. That's enough trouble. Understanding the past going to the future is even more complicated on the one hand this is. There are a lot of change that are taking place and they were already starting to take place as taxpayers and governments recognized slowly with paint painfully. How much money was being wasted on these types of campaigns the all the western European governments almost all of them from Finland north down to Spain. Even in the South Greece's exception even Italy provided on the order of two two hundred and fifty million dollars for humanitarian aid and Human Rights and democracy dumping it was part of a religion of Post War Western. Europe and civil. Was the the darling that was going to implement it for all? The reasons explained at the beginning because they're outside of politics. Volunteers wonderful people that it had become a big business with massive salaries for the people who ran them with something was largely ignored. If this is the faith in. This is shaken for the reasons that you pointed to. If it is now clear the money is needed for health fighting krona for things inside the boundaries of each country the EU. Then perhaps we will see a change for the better more responsible behavior. It's also linked to the way in which the Israeli Palestinian conflict seat. We've spoken in generalities but all my example of it has been Israeli Palestinian examples the NGO world is obsessed with Israel as the media as the UN for the same reasons. So if you look at the distribution I remember giving a briefing in part in the European Commission matter Brussels on their funding showing that the European Commission is where their NGO funding was going and them. How much more money went to the Israeli Palestinian conflict with a of the human rights issue quasi-surreal in the world and they said one of the members of this can't be right. You must be inventing these data if this current crisis of corona and the crisis of the UN of the EU itself leads some critical rethinking. The budget we may see this part of the activity the client. I don't think it's going to be shut off. I don't want to speak for twenty years but I think even ten years there may be less money going into it. It may be a little done a little more responsibly. But I would be surprised if an answer and the question that gets back to the Israeli Palestinian is still going to be the obsession of so many diplomats and government officials and journalists and the idea going to solve this problem in the way to solve. It is to throw money at at NGOs claim to be promoting peace and human rights democracy and humanitarian aid. And do it blindly as has been done in Europe. That's the pessimistic. Well I'm not sure. The opposite optimistic of the Pesident pessimistic perspective is a this is so deeply entrenched that it will continue. The optimistic perspective is that it is so counterproductive so wasteful. I often ask European officials. You've been in charge of or your your term in office. You have distributed five hundred million euros of picking a number two Ngos of which may be Quarter has gone to Israeli Palestinian groups. What have you achieved? I have never had any European official able to answer that question. Usually they'll say well we'll have to get back to. You ought to ask my people with what we've accomplished but there's never any one of this. No peace certainly. The Palestinians are no closer to human rights than they were twenty years ago. They're killing it oppressing their own people. There is no progress towards a viable Palestinian economy. Despite all the aid for what are they achieve? If the I they now are able to look at that question seriously and reach the conclusions that should be obvious. Then maybe in ten years from now we will see a fundamental change. But I don't go into this optimistically. I think it the best one can say. It's a neutral fifty professor Gerald Steinberg. Thank you very much indeed for joining me today on Johnny Gould's Jewish state and I thank you for asking tough questions and hopefully giving me the opportunity to provide some serious answers so thank you keep doing what. You're doing my sincere thanks to professor Gerald Steinberg founder of Ngo Monitor and to Ichiro Vinnie and Nitsa flutes for making all this possible. In the first place scroll down my other episodes. You'll find something of great interest until next time is his Jonny. Gould is my Jewish thanks..

UN Israel Gerald Steinberg European Union UN Human Rights Council Europe California Geneva Summit San Diego Israeli Palestinian Italy Hillel Neuer University of California official Ngo Monitor European Commission Johnny Gould
"ngo" Discussed on Jonny Gould's Jewish State

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

12:57 min | 6 months ago

"ngo" Discussed on Jonny Gould's Jewish State

"Prime Minister while heading Ngo Monitor and it seems the information you gather is a form of defense intelligence the Israeli government that is also true. Isn't it Gerald that you do have an association with the Israeli government well? I know many many academics around the world including Israel who are consultants. I've never worked for the Israeli government any kind of this. This show position I have on occasion been consultants a formal consultant one or two cases many years ago actually not on NGO related issues and since my former wife of stealing nuclear arms control and I do participate as other heads of organizations other academics as an expert in various round tables. That government offices put together but The the idea that sound high may secret agent working for these rather government is also ludicrous. Then today took on my CV. The section that says consultants and turned into far more than it is if I was a employees. I would've put that out there but I've been careful not to do that And our information there twenty people working for Ngo Monitor twenty two actually and most of them are researchers. We have people who speak different languages and and focus on the NGO campaigns and funding of Germany and France and Belgium the UK other places. So this is not a one man. Operation we publish all of our material. We have an extensive database. Anybody and I make that very clear. It's all public and the Israeli government is looking to use it as much as the British government than I do speak to members the British government. Nobody's ever accused me of being a secret agent of the British government that they're welcome to do that if I speak to. Basseterre is for many different countries and speak in parliament's Candida speaking US Congress etc. So this is all part of this Attempt to discredit the work that we do yes. The Israeli government uses the material that we the research that we are that we find. Frankly I would be very happy of other organizations would be able to do the research that we do. I'm often asked why. Don't you expand work these wing for other issues other countries? It's a fulltime job is to do the ones that we're looking at near but I think it's there's nothing secret about it. It just means digging down deep and reporting what said and whites raw and who funds it is. The funders are critical. That's one of the main contributions of Ngo Monitor if a government let's say the British government through the DFID Department Sprinter National Development Give Star two million or three million pounds a year to something called the Norwegian Refugee Council and that money is used in various ways to advocate against Israeli government policies. And often going to other NGOs in secret ways and we publish that information because it is available on the Norwegian government website. And it's not that hard to use Google translate or find some of the way to translate. That's not being secret agents. That's not providing Secret Intelligence it's doing research. And that's what I am. As a researcher and academic now there have been some very significant wins after two decades of lobbying particularly among e U countries funding terrorism with grants to Palestinian NGOs. The truth is getting closer to a wider audience. Now that these grunts coming out of our tax dollar pound euro is going directly to agencies. You then pay other. People who are specifically involved in educating youngsters in the ways of terrorism and big victories are now beginning to happen. Thanks to NGO Monitor. Thanks very kind words and I think it's worthwhile looking at how this came about. It's as much the negligence. The blindness of the officials that are handing out the money as it is the our our ability to uncover that information. It's not secret it's I have to say that as we begin to see little bits and pieces. Like when you're digging in the garden and you're uncovering roots and you see something. That looks strange. Doesn't belong there and you pull out of the more you pull. The bigger it gets and the more frightening gets injured monitor and it has a database over two hundred organizations that be covered that we write about that. We investigate that. We publish and this grew obviously didn't over the years we've added a few each year and one of the strangest aspects of this was a number of years ago. We began to see a few organizations. Where do the Palestinian groups mainly that have of the The sounds and lights that go along with a human rights NGO organizations like Self Defence for Children International Hyphen Palestine. Which is part of a network of organizations around the world called defence for children international and defence for Children International. Mostly does what it says it's sets out to do. Tries to defend. Children were caught up particularly in more areas but the Palestine group was very unusual in many ways. I in it. It's it's constitutional structure was sort of in but not really under the wings of the DC the over global group and then we began to see that they they would they were getting money they had UN Status Ecosoc status. It's called the they were able to walk in and out of the UN building and speak hold side events. They got money from mainly from European governments. Equality You. Yes you're in those days pre brexit your taxpayer money. But many of their officials user Palestinians had terrorist backgrounds and that we started off with one one name that rang a bell because there was an individual who was held by the Israeli government tried and was later released. But will I unable to travel? Long Story It was still considered to be too close to the Palestinian popular funds the Liberation of Palestine the PFLP so we looked at one organization and we noticed that this was something stranger human rights organization all the triplets of being in the UN framework and speaking in UN and defending children was had some people at one individual who was linked to the PFLP to make a cut to the chase. We now have eight organizations that are connected to the PFLP. With I believe over. Seventy board members fficials employees of these organizations. Apparently I say this almost certainly I'm waiting for one of our researchers to give me a final record but I believe that we have enough evidence to show that in the Nineteen Ninety S. This is a theory that we now think we can demonstrate the PFLP realized. Well I'll use this. In a non-diplomatic term the naievety the Gullibility of diplomats and other officials who hand out money and to give the Premature of being a human rights organisation. They didn't bother to do a background check system. They're dealing and so they in the late. Nineteen eighty s establishes network which is all related to the PFLP is an access goes with access means ability to recruit is funding. Because most of these sign up for and get their grants of half a million or a million euros every year and nobody looked at the details. I have to say that the European officials we present this information one after another. I remember speaking of the Swiss parliament and we showed the data their own data and showed them how the money was going to organizations. Had this clear. Pflp link. And I'm not sure I could use the term. They fell off their chairs. They got very excited. Some said No. This can't be and said we need to have an investigation. It took about a year. They cut off the money and then there were four or five governments that were doing the same thing similar reaction so had they done their homework had. They looked to see who they were giving money to wouldn't have had to do it. They wouldn't have been embarrassed to have this come out armament in the newspapers and being forced to shut down that funding it is startling to me that once one government falls over and admits that they've made a terrible mistake at naievety that the domino's don't fall elsewhere that you actually have to take the case around the rest of Europe to do this Gerald. Does that surprise you because for me? It says disconnected. It's as though there's not the political will shrug of the shoulders From other governments like our own here in Britain I have to reemphasize. This is a big business. It's really an industry. Billions flowing. I don't remember what the total British government funding for humanitarian aid and human rights NGOs but it's a considerable amount of money and commitment to earn raw is sixty five point five million pounds Which is why Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem Flirt Hassle? The home was part of a delegation coming here to urge Britain to stop that. And of course we have home secretary in the form of pretty who really supports the British case to cut off Tara funding such as this? It's amazing because you you talked about unroll which I would go back to our previous conversation. That's more within the realm of a UN watching Hilla lawyer it's a UN funded framework. We're NGOs clay minimal. But that's parallel to have money going to unread money going to something called the United Nations Office for the Commissioner of Humanitarian Affairs which has a massive office that will massive budget. Which is I would be surprised if the British government gave less than they give time and then they have the NGO funding all. This is an parallel old run by different individual. Usually and they don't either they don't speak to each other or they just have so much money they have to give away. They don't even bother to look at the details. You said that you were surprised. And one should be surprised. That governments don't learn the lesson when they see what happens in another government. But I think that that's also part of the global. Swiss didn't announce that they're stopping funding for this group of NGOs and the framework that was established to give them their thinking was on the list. Each government paid over a million Euros Swiss frank almost the same amount every year. The Swiss cut up by a quiet. They didn't tell anybody they were embarrassed. Then the other governments we had to go and show the government the governments and then in fact they did speak to each other and it was easier each government cutting off the next one but it wasn't automatic at all because it was all done very quietly again because the barrister factor. I think what's happening in Britain nail. Well what's the age of krone? It's very hard to predict anything but even before that the Certainly the Tory government would have been very different. If corman had been prime minister. I think that we would all been bashing our heads the walls but the Tories and Pretty Patel certainly knows about it but others as well who have served in different positions analysts. Burt who had that physician a few years ago? Now had the position of being head of the F. I d. Among Physicians Michael Gobert others. They realize the amount of waste and the need for fundamentally changing the way the process works In giving out aid but it's such a strong lobby. It's very difficult to end up with very very nasty fights in parliaments and.

Israeli government British government Ngo Monitor UN PFLP Norwegian government Britain Prime Minister Gerald NGO Israel Swiss parliament consultant UN Status Ecosoc Palestine Germany Children International Google
"ngo" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

11:33 min | 8 months ago

"ngo" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"The the the non-political political issues out. There that are going to help our world become a better place to then you know sending out information across the world or across a population for campaigning to get more money in right to then spread more awareness. So it's kind of just like a nice little cycle there of send some money so we can let other people know this. Cool the thing that you know. Now that you know who we are and think-tanks operate in this realm to Oh for sure right seriously your political affiliation. I know people hate to hear this but in this in this conversation your political affiliation does not apply does not matter. But we're about to tell you is very true. The majority of the time that a politician has a smart policy plan. It didn't come from them because they're typically not going to be professors. It came from. I don't think tanks came from NGOs. It came from places like Alec A. L. E. C. A.. In a lot of times these groups are on the ground somewhere that I have the best visibility for a problem or a big issue right absolutely which So it's we're not saying that's necessarily bad it's just perhaps a bit disingenuous when you get that Messaging from a politician. Wait a minute politicians or disingenuous. Say it so we kind of we all know this listen. We're all jaded to some extent at this point but it is. I think good just to know what you're saying. been that these NGOs. A lot of times have a heavy hand in policy-making absolutely I think to your point that They're able to be more specialized right so they can really have the the smarts specifically to deal with a particular problem like climate change or to really help develop a policy where every aspect has been fully thought out invented before You know these politicians politicians maybe shop around for what they consider to be the best form of that plan and then they go with the one that maybe has the best backing or the most Bona Fides right right or what. They're what they're masters allow them to endorse. which I know sounds super cynical? But you're right. It's not a bad thing. It's actually very very good thing that politicians lean gene on this expertise because you're pointing. All of these organizations are more nimble and they will tend to have a depth of understanding that can get lost in a big bureaucratic traffic machine. But okay so I know we're getting a little in the weeds here There is one great hilarious way to think of NGOs in in to differentiate them in. It goes like this Bingo Bingo Bingo Bingo and of course Quango love that band. We was Ingo twice Ingo e NGO and then I can go maybe even go okay. Yeah O N go in go go oh okay got can go bingo Bongo. Phyllis let's do these Radio Blanco right. Oh boy here we go just So somebody just Take take this from this moment on and you will have all the examples in audio format. Let's just go through them really quickly. So the real ones to SCO. Let's just go round Robin Shirt Deserve a one in particular you WanNa hit been of was BINGO stands for business friendly international. Ngo think of something like the Red Cross and Ango E. N. G. O.. That's an environmental. NGO think of Greenpeace perhaps the World Wildlife Fund. I'm torn between this being my favorite or the number number five but we've got gone go government organized non-governmental Organization such as International Union for Conservation of Nature. I'm sorry very government organized non governmental organization. I swear to you the real thing that just mean that means that blasted right past the government said okay. We're going to set aside money. We're going to give it to this place. We're going to start to your example the International Union for Conservation Nature. But then. So you know you all go ahead. Yeah take the money and run. And then we have INFO NGO an international NGOs like Oxfam and finally Congo. I love it a quasi autonomous Ngo an example here would be the international organization for Standardization Asian. Highly important thing I propose that we we start an NGO to change the pronunciation of Quango to Quango Just sounds so much more fun I feel like I know a guy there must. There's a guy who lives in our neighborhood somewhere whose street name is probably Quango. Then there could be the obvious Ted nugent tie in and call it Quango Tango there we go. I hope his last name's Tango Tango if you're listening that's cool. We were just in in Los Angeles and I always think of that road that Langa showing Yeah yeah that's an outlier. 'cause like sunset COSMO. Oh in someone in the back is just like W th probably as create significance to somebody somewhere. My favorite Los Angeles adjacent a name for a town is Rancho Cucamonga. Yes pretty fabulous. I feels fancy just here and it does so all of these things the the Bingo Lingo Congo in Indigo Quango. Ongo they all they all get their money from a couple of easily identifiable places or types of places aces membership dues. You're you're a member of World Wildlife Fund or whatever so every month or every year you give the money because you want wild animals hostesses. There'll be a thing when your kids grow up and you get a really fancy lovely calendar with private donations There's a there's a very clever everything that oh we'll go back to the second. The other two are the sale of goods and services. Right by this Mug by this t shirt a portion of the proceeds Blah Blah Blah and the other one is grants you apply to a government or another organization. They give you money to accomplish name going back to number two private donations. The very very clever thing about private donations. The me me me make me sound like a jerk to say is that it is not altruism for L. Philanthropist to donate sure maybe they want to help that because but they're also saving so much money in write-offs When they when they donate as much when they donate a portion of their own proceeds Minnesota? NPR and one of these well. It's definitely a a nonprofit. I wonder that's a good question. Because it receives so so much government money it does but it also does what you're talking about with the pledge drives and the private donations and also lots of grants air you know was funded by a grant from the Johnny. Johnny and Catherine T. Macarthur Foundation any Annie E. Casey Foundation the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Zach. All the big. So even if it's not it's certainly functions in in a similar way to some of these NGOs that we're talking about absolutely and as big impure fans Both on the federal and regional level. We just want to say we know that you probably don't like doing. The pledge drives either so soldier onward. Folks do a great job. Yeah but Ben yes are these groups. They sound eerily similar to the special interests. People are always accusing politicians of pandering to. That's right it's absolutely right. Because they are special interests. Their special interest just happened to be extensively again on the surface benefecial I. You are absolutely not wrong long. They are very much special interest groups. I do want to do on a bus. The scam real quick while we're on the concept of private donations. This happens all the time. If you go to your local cool grocery store especially around the holidays you know you're ringing. You're buying magazines dog food and egg whites. I don't know whatever else shoe cleaner cleaner. I'm getting a real picture of your life than duct tape something to burn your fingerprints off. Whatever and then at the end of the transaction they say would you like to donate eight to this holiday joy to donate a dollar five dollars ten dollars right NASCAR right at the register very easy to say yes? Here's what's happening with. Those companies are taking that money that they're getting from individual grocery store customers. They're pulling it into you a single fund and they're using it to make large charitable donation that offsets their tax burden. So what. You're actually doing what you're actually doing. No you are helping people on the way but what. You're actually doing his pain that grocery stores taxes for them man. Kroger while you do me wrong like that I just. That's yes. I'm pretty sure that's what's going on. I would love to be wrong. I think that's called loophole. Then that's what they're found it but don't you feel like a jerk. Sometimes you want to donate and you say no you know. What do you say like? I don't want children to have toys. I think dog should just why. Yeah no I agree. I think the my problem just personally speaking personally here is that I am so embarrassed by the thought of denying a one dollar donation at any point when someone points at me and says would you like to donate. You're already paying. Just click this thing. I I have to say yes. So if you ever want to squeeze money out of me Just make it look like seem like a charitable donation and hit me while I'm doing a transaction. You view typically give handouts to panhandlers. I did for a long time. Then what happened Matt. Who Hurt you? I I just who I can tell you an actual story. I know yes. We're going to take a break. Jeez Paul he's staring at me during the throat is. We're going to go to break soon. I promise I I. I gave a gentleman in a wheelchair more money than I generally would. He got up and walked away didn't he. No he he. He took it like just snatched it from me and then just wheeled off really quickly but was very much just like I got away with it kind of thing. I don't know the way the way I felt afterwards and I also went to. I went to school Georgia state in downtown and I think it just the interaction that type of interaction occurs so frequently get numb to Kinda. Yeah well it's tough because if you want to truly help someone in that type of situation just handing ending them cash. That is transferable in. That moment probably isn't the best way to do it many times. That's going to be enabling. Perhaps behavior here that is already occurring but again I don't have all the answers. You know you one thing you can do is donate to an organization like ones that were talking about right. Yeah but then you don't really know exactly where your money's going and probably only a small portion of it is going to truly helping those people anyway boba perfect. That's fairly because what if there's more to the story behind these NGOs. Why do some governments want to ban non-governmental on governmental organizations and what if the goals of these organizations on paper are not their actual goals on the ground will will.

NGO World Wildlife Fund Los Angeles Indigo Quango International Union for Conser Alec A. L. E. Ted nugent International Union for Conser Robin Shirt NPR Kroger Phyllis Red Cross Congo Bona Fides COSMO Oxfam Georgia Melinda Gates
"ngo" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

13:34 min | 8 months ago

"ngo" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"They don't want you to know in today's episode. We're revisiting a topic. We picked up in two thousand fourteen both as a video and as a short audio podcast. This is this is something that may be controversial to some people. It may be personal to some of US listening today as we're going to do our level best as always to stay objective we're talking about non-governmental organizations the street name NGOs most of us are vaguely aware of these institutions and oddly enough enough they're defined by what they are not rather than what they actually are there just non-governmental the whole definition is the thing that they are not in the name and that's tricky because this is an umbrella term it encompasses everything from you know the Red Cross the Red Crescent to Greenpeace from the world wildlife fund onto Oxfam and so many many many many more and typically these organizations are going to focus on a distinct set of concerns or problems. uh-huh right human rights equality or fighting dysentery. It's usually the kind of stuff every human being can get behind. You know solving living world hunger philanthropy. Yes saving the cute animals doing the right thing. I always confused philanthropy with philandering. Those aren't the same thing are they in in a way the both mean lover men. Let's true lover of humanity is true I- i- confuse them as well. I NGOs are all about distribution and it might surprise many of us Especially people who've donated to one cause or another might surprise to learn that NGOs are not squeaky clean and as you. Toby as their proponents would have us believe. In fact many people a growing number of people will argue that these institutions nations and organizations are at the very least disingenuous. Maybe even evil. We'll get to that but first things first. What exactly is this term were throwing around? What is an NGO here are? The facts are old pals at the Oxford English dictionary Have a fabulous definition edition for what an NGO is they define it. As a nonprofit organization that operates independently of any government typically one whose purpose is to address a social or political issue and in fact the term non-governmental organisation was created in article. Seventy one of the charter. Sure of the United Nations in Nineteen forty-five And that's when a select club. I guess you could call it of international non state agencies were given observer status to some of of this bodies meetings yes so that means instthat. Let's just make up an example. Let's just say the Red Cross is now allowed to hang out in the room. During during meetings that might Might be applicable to its mission to save lives. They don't get to vote because they're not countries yes they can maybe make some speeches right but the big thing is the do not have voting power and there are other entities that have observer status us in the United Nations. This is different because that select group of organizations and institutions that were allowed to be called. Non Governmental Organizations. Were already very very politically connected. They were already kind of in the room. Now the just get the name drop the official designation nation but again like you said no they are addressing social or political issues. The only common factor. That these this this original regional group had back in forty five was that they were not government agencies and they were technically businesses. They weren't making money hand over fist or if they were that was a secondary aim will. There isn't the idea that they're nonprofit or not for profit right geos. Like that's the whole one of the major points right. Now they can distribute money. Yes I'm very hinted distribute. Today they can distribute money or funding to take donations and take donations of course from any number of donors But they're not supposed to keep it in rural it over there supposed to invest in their mission and so originally the UN said. Okay you're you'RE GONNA be a advocating for human rights. You're going to be advocating for the environment. Ah or quote unquote development. Another umbrella term. That can be very tricky. So Ngo really can be any kind of organization so long as it's Extensively independent from government influence. And as you said Matt is not for profit there are a ton of the now and they're just gonNA keep GROWING YEAH IF YOU CHECK OUT NONPROFIT ACTION DOT ORG and this is a group that tracks the stats. That that pertain to NGOs. They estimate that there listen to this. Roughly ten million non governmental organizations worldwide. That are functioning and and I mean that's a lot right. You're if you think about that and has been mentioned they're not out there trying to make profit for things but they are trying to function and quote quote. Do good do some kind of social good so they are trying to get in as much money as they can through donations and as we'll see later other means look. Let's go to a fact here. In twenty eleven people donated one point two billion dollars to various non-governmental organsations and then just three years later by twenty fourteen that number had risen to one point. Four Billion Dollars so by twenty thirty this number number is expected to make the meteoric rise up to two point five billion so more than twice what it was in twenty eleven they are also so huge employers were talking about a gigantic mass of people Two quick examples there more than six hundred thousand NGOs in Australia Stralia and their employees make up eight percent of the Australian workforce while it does eight percent doesn't sound huge until you think of you know the fact that it's the entire nation and continent of Australia. What do you think that's Australia apart? Oddly enough not not that much The NGO industry is huge in the United States as well as Western countries part of part of the reason it seems so big is because again the term has so much leeway it encompasses so so much stuff you know one NGO can be doing something entirely different and irrelevant to the aims Rak titties of another NGO but get this this. If all the NGOs in the world were country they would have the fifth largest economy in the world. That's according to John Hopkins. They're here they're here to stay there growing you know as as you pointed out They are going to be at least a two point. Five billion dollar business within the next you know ten years and a ton of people worldwide depend on them both for employment and perhaps for some aspect of their lives. Whether it's from water being treated and cleaned in in some remote part of the earth. Were you know a shelter. Her being provided in created as in you know talking about development on the good side at least yeah right. We're throwing shade already already. Just remind everybody that you know we mentioned at the top here. A lot of people think these things are evil in a general sense. We're we're just making sure to point out that there is real good that is occurring. Yes the guy it gets to accomplish yet. So maybe we'll save some of this discussion for later. Hashtag tag not all NGOs yes and this becomes incredibly important as we continue because our big question is what do NGOs do. Their activities include but are are not limited to the stuff we just named environmental work advocacy human rights Social Betterment and sometimes this'll happen on a large somewhat abstract attract scale and sometimes it will happen very locally like this. Ngo is just providing this specific type of water pump to a specific region on a continent. Or we're just passing out life straws. That's what we're doing. Lifestyles are great by the way. They're incredibly reasonable if you don't have one and if if you Like me believe in building. Go bags for your home or your car. You need a lifestyle we talked about this. Why don't we have something I want you to know branded life Strauss? I would love that. The dog about we came up so you can like what. Drink out of like a puddle with one of those yes. That's pretty cool. Yeah I would do it. Just for the novelty of drinking out of a puddle title. The only I think the only problem is that they can't filter us some heavy metals so the according to the latest reports life straws are not as useful in the continental. US As we would have wanted to believe because the pollution is rampant a different episode. What Oh oh oh man different episode? So it's a that's a story for different. Abe NGOs are on the front lines in the trenches of combating these problems and making a world in twenty eighty five or world in thirty twenty. A place where people would still like to live zoo. The thing is they're not all created equally and they have different broad categories of the two big divisions are what we call operational NGOs and advocacy or campaigning rule NGOs they overlap but they are different entities so operational NGOs actually have to mobilize resources in in the form of their financial donations Things like raw materials Volunteer Labor So that they can. Actually you know keep keep these projects and programs going. It's a really difficult and complex process. A lot of moving parts and these NGOs usually have some kind of H. Q.. You a a built in bureaucracy and all kinds of support and field staff then you've got advocacy or campaigning. NGOs that carry out kind of similar alert types of activities but There's kind of a different balancing act that goes on between them You still have to raise money. Of course the name of the game for any NGO but on a much smaller our scale and it serves more of a symbolic function in kind of strengthening The identification with particular Taylor. 'cause that donors might have I mean it sort of goes into the whole idea of the Nah Not pure vanity. But there's something of a status symbol involved in participating in some of these NGOs and this kind of bolsters that so when you persuade people to donate time it becomes more valuable successful campaigning. NGOs I have the ability to kind of get large numbers of people to mobilize for very specific issues and types of events. Yeah the advocacy COSC- campaigning. NGOs are think of them as the raising awareness. NGOs have funding. WanNa keep the lights on. It's more important to us that we get people to Volunteer X. amount of days out of the year etc and these distinctions like a lot of on paper distinctions. Get real money when we go to the field field operational NGOs you know if if the impact of their projects doesn't seem like it's really moving the needle. Then they'll go of course they'll go into campaigning. Where are they gonNA say now? We don't do that here. And these operational NGOs especially the big ones always run regular campaigns. These are at least they support other affiliated organizations that are running campaigns and then sometimes on the other side NGOs. That are campaigning. NGOs I feel like they cannot ignore immediate real problems in their policy domain. So like if you are an NGO that wants to raise awareness and support report in society for Human Rights or for women's rights. Then you may say you know. The problem here is happening so blatantly. Recently it's so pervasive and we have the tools to fix it so we can't hold off. We can't just have a raise awareness dinner gala. We need to put the money Directly into assisting the victims of these crimes so they can they can trade back and forth or material that chameleon like and there are other. NGO's that specialize outside of these primary functions. Right there's a there's a whole other kind of arm of NGOs. It was called the research institute. You've probably heard of these before they're really grade. Were one of their primary things they do to increase knowledge and understanding and these you know will rain across the whole spectrum of course from those You know who are just looking to promote academics..

Ngo Red Cross United Nations US Governmental Organizations Toby first things first John Hopkins Australia Greenpeace Oxfam official Matt Australia Stralia research institute Strauss
"ngo" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

16:39 min | 1 year ago

"ngo" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"So going back to the Portland issue. You mentioned that. NTFS says who streets our streets elaborate more on that were they really believe that these streets it's being the city of Portland itself belongs to them in that I mean they not only do they reject the authority of the state through policing food right they that's why they do own community policing the encouraged victims of violence you know because sometimes some of these some of their own people we'll have been beaten. They encourage into cooperate with police cozy. They believe vigilante justice so they they want to chop rates society that runs parallel to the legal system the intimidate people into silence into supporting them. You know there was a business owner. I know Portland and who put up a large banner that said something like fascist off or something like that and I just thought that was weird because I knew of the owner and many businesses importantly do messages like that and just read. I read Sean and you know why. Normally you're not so political. Why did you you put this big. Downer on recently when there was another right on the seventeenth of August and this person just let me know that we do that so they don't target Argonne business so in this is something I hear repeated in other places kind of like as as a small business owner in Portland which anti do target business because they anti capitalism they view entrepreneurs and successes like manifestations of oppression so the addition to targeting individuals they talk property so I wonder if that me contribute to why we see like social justice messaging on so many he businesses importantly in a way that doesn't really seem organic. I think it's because ANTIFA allies have created an atmosphere where people `fraid to even just politically neutral and if they don't show the flag they're gonNA get destroyed one foreclosure so there's been some attacks late on your recently. What are those yeah so. If you read the headlines in the past two weeks whether comes from media matters or Solano the daily they're going after a rolling stone going off to me so there was an anti fought in undercover anti-fun format such quite amusing he he was interviewed on the left wing blog kind of not really well known place and he accused me of being essentially party to violent Komo come no conspiracy by right-wingers releases eighteen minute video the all it shows is mu standing in a public street in area where there was some right wing protesters but this was was used in frame does evidence that I was part of the group was aware of what they were doing talking about absolutely false defamatory but it's repeated. you know this like the left-wing media particularly with the online publications the whole thing operates like a machine gene you know so one narrative from a fringe blog than is repeated over and over on these other other headlines and other other publications that have a much wider reach and then they set the day set the knew anything about this so so you wrote a piece of a spectator yeah ah was in UK. When this stuff is breaking. I woke up like on last Tuesday morning and then seeing like my inbox was blowing up with all these people calling me like you're fraud. You're going to jail and I'm just like what is going on and then I see oh. These headlines Do daily beast all these journalists all these twitter tuck months re amplifying saying this message to try to bring me down. It's absolute rubbish. Robbie swath at reason did a really great piece that was published. basically debunked these narratives is because he analyzed video which none of the other places we're willing to do it doesn't show anything incriminating on my part at all but the goal. I mean I think they're all doing this because because the view me as a threat to onto like Antifa for so long has been able to attack citizens in property basically impunity and these are just private people who have no breach right but when it came to the attacking me they messed with the wrong person because I'm not back down and on top of that I have an audience and so ever since then I mean I never wanted myself to be so centered in the story but I've continually had to speak out over and over because I am not giving up on this. people don't recognize how extreme even violent this movement is in even those who are not engaging in street hooliganism like the whole ideologies extreme. It's really working to destroy this country country and that's not an exaggeration. How many members are there an empty. I you know I get Ossis an icon. I don't I don't even estimate because there's no formal membership. I'm bishop. It's like technically they say that they'll all anonymous and the relationships between one faction and other somewhat tenuous so it's hard like this is like why actually really appreciate the attention senators like Senator Ted Cruz and other in other congressmen and of course president trump that has been bringing on Antifa because like federal authorities intelligence officials need to look into this foreign funded. I've seen no evidence that so I can't speculate wouldn't it make sense of a foreign country that wanted to usurp our system. Would they be pro. ANTIFA that would make here's what we've seen so there's been a law of reports that an attention on how Russia played a role in to trying to put it single on the narrative in politics in America leading up to the twenty sixteen election in people kept focusing all the pro-trump stuff to per Republican. Stop what what got much less attention is Russia's role and amplifying very defensive narratives and movements coming from the left and why was there are special counsel on that there should have been like I mean some of the block motto facebook pages that had very wide reach selling merchandise this and all that like I think you know we need to be like thinking of foreign actors as just being pro-trump. I know they're working on trying to divide this country in whatever way they can so whether these pro-trump stuff or anti-trump stuff and unfortunately not enough attention is paid into how foreign funding has helped amplify defensive movements on the left every day. President and trump is facing unprecedented obstruction harassment from the liberal mob and they're fake news allies. He's been exonerated twice and they're still calling for his impeachment because they know Congress is their last hope he needs your support now more than ever text. Charlie two eight eight zero two two and receive official trump alerts directly to earphone. You'll gain exclusive twenty twenty updates directly from president trump himself be the first to know when new trump merchandise is available and you'll even be able to put your input on key key issues to help shape the twenty twenty campaign again. All you have to do is text. Charlie two eight eight zero two two while Democrats and the fake news media have spent the last two years focused on bogus witch hunts president trump has been working around the clock to make America great again. Make sure you're getting your news directly from the source by texting Charlie Charlie two eight eight zero two to again be sure to text Charlie two eight zero two two today this was paid for by the trump make America great again committee a joint fundraising committee authorized by and composed of Donald J trump for President Inc and the Republican National Committee that is dedicated to making America great again based on the arrests that have been made who are these people cool and other cities have been some arrests made yeah you mean like nationally roar these people background some of them are just normal people on but people who decide to put on a hockey mass in this is insidious nature of it for example so just this past weekend there was an ANTIFA counter demonstration Russian and Boston several dozen thirty six. I believe so and the Boston police release the name that's right and the locations where these people so some people start to look into these. Some of them are just teachers which teachers teachers on this list yeah. I've seen that important on as well. You shouldn't be surprised education discipline. That's a great. That's a great point yeah the education. Are these high school teachers or this one. I believe there's middle school so I mean the various disciplines when you I think you for saying that go ahead. Okay donate to turning-point. USA everybody to save your country. Go ahead in Philadelphia. There are three people facing felony charges related to you the alleged beating of two Marines lost you and one of them was a democratic operative and he's been photographed with maxine waters and so some of them are actually people who work in progressive politics is that too and then there's some of them. This is is just anecdotal from what I've seen based on the arrests in Portland which sometimes do hop in the young people who look like they may have some some type of personality disorders in drawn until the violent extremist ideology right yeah so there's teachers that are they had to go to some. INFORMA- college and they're teaching the next generation that on their weekends they go put on a hockey mask and go beat the crap out of journalists that they disagree with essentially essentially is what you're saying yeah sometimes they don't. They're not necessarily the ones who are swinging the bouts of throwing the bricks right but they're just there. I mean there's many people who to help anti-fun and ways that don't engage in violent for example they how people who watch the COPS WHO monitor faces of journalists that they don't recognize if you if they if found militants know that somebody cannot be relied on for consistent favorable coverage they will harass them and medicine and make it so they either com record or they're pushed out I mean on the seventeenth of August the most recent right and Portland Washington examiner reporter who was harassing. I you know about that and he left the area because they were threatening violence against him. That's what they do if I if I went up to ANTIFA destroyed understand. I would be hospitalized in five minutes or less how I mean. How is this acceptable well. It's not it's just our country is in such upside down on state. I mean if the if these folks were make America great again hats they'd be arrested for even saying the violent threats this whole whole battle is asymmetrical in the narrative has been started his because the the right-wing right wing is so dangerous and deplorable and fascistic whatever that binds us of Serie they need to be destroyed the ends justify why the neighbor including violent area Maquiavelian yes so violence chaos civil unrest whatever it takes by any means nest. That's actually the name by any means necessary anything else you wanted to mention before. I say one or two things I haven't you wind up plug or that. You're on your mind in this topic so it's been in two and a half months. There's been no arrests trying to keep an open mind about police. I met some of the rank and file offices and a great men and women but it seems is like the issues coming from higher up. I fortunately didn't have been taken on on the client..

Portland America Antifa Charlie Charlie Donald J trump business owner President president Russia hockey twitter Boston Senator Ted Cruz Congress Robbie swath Sean fraud UK Republican National Committee INFORMA
"ngo" Discussed on Mission Daily

Mission Daily

10:00 min | 1 year ago

"ngo" Discussed on Mission Daily

"Have that perspective and get this lens that makes makes the solutions to get that water to that place in that you were talking about is done in a credible way but not done from the ivory tower perspective at it should just be easy yeah and that also ties is back to the transparency of how did that happen. How did that water and that program get. Maybe more efficient or maybe more effective and then how is that then communicated back to the funder to within skill that program it's interesting so i was in the in worked for the government for a long time in the military and and i think i don't actually know this for a fact but i'm pretty sure box. It's now <hes> working with u._s. Army so we are the right i thought so but it's one of those things where like you take something like cloud storage like clebration insecurity in all those kind of like important facets. You'll get something like that where it's like if you're an ngo using pen and paper like you have no hope to be able to show show the impact that you're really doing approved the things that you are doing on the ground like you just have no hope you have no opportunity to perfect example and quote of our international rescue committee has a number of office is doing economic development work in the field and they had reims in rooms and buildings full of paper invoices that their funders required they see so in a project that they pursued digitized that that paperwork which again were just invoices to prove to the funder that they were in fact implementing programs and utilizing the money money for the right thing as they digitized that not only was the visibility <hes> faster for what was happening in the in the in that invoicing area to get more funding but the program itself became more efficient efficient between new york and cordova and the other four places that need to communicate so these stories are very real accelerating impact accelerating the ability for the sector to get more support to do more of what it does best and i think out add to that to that you know again i was. I was applauding paper documents for the us army in two thousand and thirteen agree. This isn't one hundred years ago right. Now is essentially very recently and u._s. Army has quite a bit more money than the average ngo and so and it's things like that that i think people kind of just forget you take for example. We've had a bunch of your ceos on our i._t. Visionary show <hes> and how brilliantly smart a lot of these i t. leaders and technologists are in large companies. The average india ngo doesn't have a c._i._o. That is you know leading digital transformation nations someone that actually owns that i'm curious like how do how do we allow or create a situation where if you don't have that type the head count if you don't have those type of leaders on the ground necessarily to do a digital transformation. How do we kind of like approximate that sort of thing or you know like cities having thank. C._i._o.'s is a new thing for example. I mean this is like so obvious now in retrospect but i'm just curious like what are you all seeing on the ground. I would say a couple things on what what we're seeing being. The first is that again looking at intermediaries like net hope other organizations like tech soup that sit at the center of tech and <hes> a nonprofit are doing a lot of work to try and solve that issue to try and gather the insights to try and pilot things with organizations that do have c._i._o.'s house right that can invest in that can share with they know <hes> to benefit others. That's absolutely a vision of what net hope is trying to do and tech soup another one doing that for at a much larger scale they they they have over a million nonprofits around the world that are that are members of tech soup so i think that's one thing i think intermediaries are important. I think investing in intermediaries important to salute basically the centerpiece of of of october philanthropic strategy girvan this something years and what do you mean by intermediaries the way i would describe it as ecosystems that sit at the intersection of of in this case nonprofits in technology so instead of an organization or company making grants one by one to organizations to maybe help them with technology we can make one grant to an organization that has the leverage in the reach and the network to serve in that hopes case fifty seven and tech soups case over a million and have have an outsized impact hopefully on on what we're able to drive to those organization recognizing that i mean digital transformation journey right and it starts in different places for different organizations. Small guys are really just trying to get stable insecure systems and platforms you know and then you move in. It's it's not something you leapfrog. Even though cloud is amazing has great opportunity in the sector <hes> you still have this journey and so how do you help folks in this journey. Nonprofits are still trying to utilize technology -nology that was built for enterprise for profit companies sources. <hes> you know things that were built for the nonprofits themselves or or helping bridge that and then they don't have the capacity even the large nonprofits the underside enterprise nonprofits are not well funded we could talk about maybe the funding issue and yeah overhead issue there <hes> and then the small nonprofits don't have i._t. Staff they have the accidental techie. It's the person who sits closest to the printer is or the social media person is is there technologists so recognizing that investing in these intermediaries that can add scale support organizations is super super important and for us to also go in depth with some of our strategic partners is important as well and showcase. I would just throw in that the that the nonprofit technology enterprise network also about three hundred different technologies are surrounding the many hundreds of thousands of organizations that their content reaches is another intermediary your listeners to check out as well and these are these are they're all very well proven with network tech zubin and ten organizations that have helped the multiply the impact of our programmes a capacity building group in the tech sector dramatically way i would just add on the dimension so making philanthropic investments in these ecosystems is important but it's also like there's a lot we can do within our own companies to to address the issue of nonprofit tech capacity right so all of us donate and discount our technologies for nonprofits in some way <hes> that helps tremendously and this lead just cross some of those barriers of of cost right and justification another. I think probably more important we can help us to get our employees and our in-house expertise not sort of wrapped around these organizations and i was gonna actually turn it to peggy because they do something absolutely amazing in this area and i'll start by. I was on the other side running charity and i can tell you overwhelming it was when people come to see us technology and use that one because my board was brute ticky from the area and i <hes> so what was very appealing for me very sweet ease they intentionally from day one from the moment nitwit was in edison section with gobert a founder it was about building the capacity and it's about helping the sector as a whole so we yes we care about technology and wanna take you to drive chant and help a nonprofit it does sound a price accelerate the mission but how do we build capacity to those orcs and ha- delivered to your asset so when we think of all of you agrees right within over technology with people thinking about knowledge so we spend a lot of effort through swiftly bono and sweet capacity programs in our where we match our employees we's charities charities to basically learn about the technology and we've also pushed that even more to what it's all business functions. We have marketing employees that know about marketing and they can help yep so it goes back to us so what brings us to the table is. I love what you say about enabling capacity. That's really what we spend a lover a way i write. We enabled her employees. I'm pleased to give back yeah. Let's say peg it to your point their mental model wise like you look at the assets of a of a corporation and specifically technology corporation their superpowers typically their platform or technology or their suite of technology and their people but there's also the institutional assets like office space like brand influence. I mean you can imagine a voice exactly right. If if we're able to elevate organizations doing important work that others can jump on board where winning and i would say also that for the mental model of the other asset of the company being your customers and the admins of their technology you can imagine what unleashing that can mean as well so people that are raving fans about are unique technologies where frankly have already put together the four technologies represented in this podcast to have those customers in the edmonds of those teams in our customer base <hes> against against these challenges that are out there that technology can help solve or build capacity is also important so we can't can't forget that asset near like so for example were <hes> michigan small company but but <hes> like we're part of the sales one program like we we from the essentially from the founding of the company did that. I think that there's a lot of companies out there big and small small that want to figure out a way to do something but they're kind of in that like what should i be doing and then if they're a big company and they are maybe doing something they're like like. Are we doing the right stuff. Are we doing the wrong stuff. You know are we kind of swimming in circles. So i'm curious you know from a funding perspective for for the companies that are trying to make sure that they're you know dollars or are tracked that they have impact <hes> that it's like you know authentic authentic to the to the organization to do you know certain things you know if you're wag for example you know you're gonna be working. A lot of of you know <hes> we. We interviewed them talking a lot about what they do and stuff like that. I'm curious like when it comes to organizations that are thinking about <hes> how can they they do more like what what are some best practices there. I'll start by saying. I think you hit it on the head like the it has to be. It has to be so tightly aligned to your business strategy that no one whatever say oh gosh. Why are they doing that or what's the impact of that. Is that really what they should be doing with those sources so if you're at the beginning of the journey the easier in some ways right really look at where your company isn't where it's going what your core assets are. What makes you unique sometimes. It's.

Army ivory tower C._i._o. york cordova peggy edison founder edmonds michigan one hundred years
"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"The global the action now when we engage our there apostle in a third nodding impactful it's my job to measure how they are succeeding in sailing and help the conservation petitioners actually realign our strategies every it'd be more impactful it's our understanding of the system works you need signs for that european union signs for the development of how you're going to actually work to the creative changed in leisure soon to know whether you actually jaejean tad what does it eight for someone to land a leadership position light years a conservation ngo what kind of expertise experienced as wide need to have one of the things i think this was critical in is just a full on a passion for the the work you do i think because it's that passion that drives you to get up every day to seek more and more information to seek out reform our people to help you to find solutions i will tell you when islas in graduate school when i was undergraduate i could not have charted a course explicitly to this job i was in a field i worked army impacts of climate change on because decisions in for my budget agree and that is at a time when grab unchanged wiz jaski gaining tippy on any she in the early nineties but is certainly wasn't mainstream and it certainly was very it was an obscure idea for most most people at that time and wisconsin chardonnays asians most environmental organisations were not addressing if i had charted wanted to chart the course to my job today it would have done a fool's decision to choose climate change because no conservation organisations were working on the issue it turns out to be one of the biggest issues that are facing conservation today i i suspected that but i was really a working to a via better scientists to better understand the systems and to really be able to.

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"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"So now i'd like to focus more on you and your raw wwf alba first like to ask you why did you choose to work for this particular ngo i have so i i was i came to work for w two s big has the potential for the kind of change that i would like to see i'm i'm deeply concerned about the future our communities across the globe and deeply concern for my son's future that we need to take action at a global scale on many of these environmental issues to ensure that he and his family out clean water clean air stable climate and i felt like wwf this a place i could come in high the greatest impact at this point in time that has a lot to do a wwe us will reach a lie deeplyheld valued the need to work with communities and work with in communities for change and wdbo us is grounded into these costs the globe and that you need to do things that are in need to activate people to be engaged in ways that are socially and culturally responsible two holidays you the planet and it's that through that understanding than you can really create create change the wwf is the rate institution for me at the right time to be able to bring britain sophisticated science both in natural sciences in our understanding of tigers and lions and also does sophisticated social sciences in technological sciences it end combined is sciences in a way that help us help us work with partners better to achieve she conservation in where exactly to you as chief scientists the wwf responsible for overseeing our global than signs team which has a social scientists natural scientists data scientists in technology technologists and food scientists and overseeing them to help develop our goal was strategies that connect with our local community work in a way that creates change and what we also have to do is designed the measurement system to make sure that we know were having the change we seek were not chest in gauging activities across.

wwf wwe britain
"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"A tub or a hamburger the slight bees for taste like me but it's not be that has the has less impact on the planet so that's another way to intensify our production and make sure that we are still allowing ourselves some of those things of a real likeness tasting without having to have a without having to destroy one as we do so simple choices in new how how you think about food in which you do is good in your everyday life is really important the last one is probably as important as far as eating less meat is not racing said forty percent of all food that is that is produced on this planet is wasted that means that we have forty percent of the agricultural land that is that is used to produce inefficiently ciller wasting that much so we could intensify our food production on existing cropland and not waste food and lower our meat consumption and we would have uh we would be able to save room for worlds wildlife light tires light elephants lights of rhinos henry the snow leopard we'll said so teddy to be asked is why the most wellknown conservation ngos out there at so how does organization go about attracting public attention and support sale wwf understands a across the globe how important people are to the change that were seeking people at a senator center of creating a change communities across the road or at the center of of of the of making the change and if if they don't understand it they don't even they're not gonna create the change and so it's really important and we understand is globally in all one hundred countries are aware that were connecting to communities in were connecting to the citizens of the in ways that connect with way they understand.

food production wwf senator forty percent
"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"Welcome back to science for the people i am unique a half with me now is rebecca shaw chief scientists at the world wildlife fund rebecca welcome to science for the people lend so much for having me today is really a pleasure to talk with you all right so have star off first with just a brief overview of what wwf dies as a conservation ngo wwf is a global conservation ngo we have six thousand professionals around the globe working in one hundred countries to attach nature and the natural systems that since the human health and wellbeing i can go on to explain in depth with that needs if you like sure it looks i'm here about the mission a wwl's mission is to stop the degradation of the planet's natural environment in to build a future in which humans lived in harmony with nature future in which he urged sustain nature in a way that sustains us so we do that by focusing on the world bercy batterer sees a fancy word let it actually just needs all the diversity of habitats and verse in animals and natural resources that need an clean air clean water and of course he notion and we also to make sure that those stay healthy me promotes the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption seventy nature that were really within uh within the boundaries of nature so that we can sustain in order to achieve this mission wwf focuses uh broadly on a range of day ecosystem that your audience will recognized by the league including force oceans freshwater wildlife our climate system and of course la system that is near and dear all our hearts our food systems are agricultural systems that for sure we understand immediately why those are important seekie tiny ski tommy some of the car a programs you guys have in place a wwf yet intended to be as i mentioned before we were on these big systems the rug of forced abortions trash hot our wildlife climate in food and so we organize ourselves around those those systems and we asked ourselves our were he uh we look at each system carefully using signs understands i have assists work how human demands on those systems change.

natural systems wwf forced abortions rebecca shaw
"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"Vice uh denied state's fishing globally are but at the same time i see a lot of hope and opportunity in working with a d the engaged private sector and communities around the country so how can of conservation ngo be effective despite limitations caused by governmental influence i think the an organization like like conservation international can continue to be relevant and continued to be a can scale are impact of instock were needed now more than ever in the absence of of a government our involvement or engagement on east issues um and saw for also released either the ball rental of empowerment because uh to me it highlights however or uh ngos are to be active in the space to keep the public informed to give the public in october two navy to do something out to be the meaningfully then a lot of worry so i'll say that that for me it really is on the time for us to lean n and to step up and and more aggressively in actedly up address these issues had arm i think that's a great note to end on charlotte thank you so much thank you cuadra speaking radio that was shilo rock of climate change lead at conservation international up next we have rebecca shop chief scientists at the world wildlife fund signs for the people it's a weekly radio show and podcast that explores everyday life from a scientific perspective we are a member of the skeptic network collection of blogs podcast and video content focusing on science and critical thinking to find out where science for the people heirs near you or to listen to past episodes check out our website at signs for the people dot c a you also find links to sports at patriotic to connect with us on facebook and twitter and to subscribe to the podcast in iteens and now back to the show.

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"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"The are very large public advocacy uh or or darpa smaller donation options are but we do many events to try to on social by the impact of our were inspire bore arm and and and gained more support for this the work undo all right so now like to ask you how our ngos lie conservation international affected by the governments can the government obstacle for conservation international and implementing i thick climate change initiatives so i think the the most direct way that on the government impacts an ngo um it is for example in india billboard undoing were or or grounds around the world r e r for example yes eight enstey department have traditionally on supported a water capacitybuilding arm and implementation work that we've been aden she will implement and so the on the junction in the ability of youth grants are inhibits uh our girlie and and i and the opportunity to implement really important and necessary programs around the world of appropriations and the amount of budget that's given our two new uh uh assistant assistance accounts is also uh another way that that the government has a direct impact on ngos uh but i would say that generally a would i think we've reached a moment in tying where the jowled conflict is sylvie e r a convinced all the importance of acting climate change and that we seeing an uptick in the amount of our awareness and our motivation on the part of companies and subnational authorities withered nears cities governors of states uh have expressed nick or or billable me uh reaction of of support and engagement with would awesome with with environmental community ought to to act on climate change sosday then it's there's definitely then uh a a a negative impact from a reduced affandi or attention on or or cartons of acting in our climate change and its kaku.

climate change nick india
"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"As well so hammer to compare conservation international to the work of other large environmentallyfocussed ngos hottest competition international complement were of other ngos like wwf the nature conservancy or the wildlife conservation society i thought that our mission is so so ambitious that we can't do it alone but each abok each big ngo has it's all reached its own expertise its own approach on that worse contacts partnerships that are distinct and knee and and draw upon the experience of each a distant organization opt for conservation international i think our our presence uh are are bottle of a partnership and grant making on distinguishes loss odd end and gives us the opportunity to work on to have the flexibility to work on differently other large ngos by on i also think that are uh presence our country present on gives us the case steady the example the demonstrations and the knowledge to normal end end recommend how these programmes can be mainstreamed unskilled up around the world phil i'm sure conservation international has its own unique side of benefits in issues that come with being a large ngo by you've actually worked with small ngos in the past two could you described from perspective how a larger ngo functions differently from a smaller one a thinker come on large ngok respecting our at the week me have a lot of staff we have a lot of divisions in as an end at departments within the organisation so what can do a little bit challenging as is coordination an and on our our ensuring that were all and stuck with each other on to two to make sure that uh our work on science is linked to our work on policy arm is linked to our work with the corporate sector finance and ensuring that were all on a working towards the same goal and i think that's where having a bold like mine on i i sit within the strategy our team spirit ci arm and my job is will lead to to ensure that were uh as an institution working towards kirk coherent and uniform and consistent girl up on climate change particularly out and so i think that you need challenge on is just making sure that well coordinated.

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"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"John colombia combine odd which is is really quiet on on a are a massive impact that that we been able to have an institution off and so we do work on in in the she protected areas creating conservation incentives are but we also work on i'll sustainable finance for example so we have a an entire division that dedicated to create innovative instruments to sustain our a this project over time so that they don't on that don't on combo after the initial source of grant funding otto at runs out we have a division that works on corker partnership so he had our our work with companies at walmart and but starbucks quarter decades opt to help them to integrate sustainability into their their business model of their their supply chains i'll be we recently i reached the milestone of a one hundred percent campbell coffee but starbucks using standards that the i had a starbucks to develop on we we were uh through coalition needs and partnership with other out an ngo rosen and pure organizations on south our approach really on is about work empowering working when uh many different sectors net interdisciplinary and integrated gray on so that we can lead to a more sustainable and impactful conservation okay so why are protected area is a priority for conservation international protected areas of our our of million were wool um i would say that it that our approach to protected areas is simply chew on setaside or or or build the fence around an area uh or even just armed cpa implementation of a policy it will leave requires a lot of different types of programmes to support the law.

otto walmart starbucks John colombia corker one hundred percent
"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on Science for the People

"A arm weakness consideration of the value of nature or development or likelihood spry incomes uh across sectors hata's conservation international google hiring local staff is there some sort of training or educational crossed assets put in place mixture these staff members are qualify to work for an ngo right so we have our centralise headquarters the arlington's there's about three hundred of us based here uh added the bulk the the the rest of our staff of almost one thousand people were the eyes are are are dispersed across our fuel programs and the led by a country director ruled out in in most cases is bomb that and then a a big piece of the depending on the uh the the priorities of that crunchy they then will hire staff that have requisite skills that might be on a terrestrial protected area management skills or could be a warm marine opus program i'm in which case that they may on higher rain biologists uh in in some cases on this policy expertise is needed for a particular priority earn each vent so every need runs the gamut of of our different disciplines are depending on on the local priorities of our offices okay so can you tell me some examples of the kind of programmes conservation international has developed and implemented so i would say that that are are legacy when he started with the approaching the model of establishing protected areas op in conservation international has set up more than a one thousand protected areas round the world died on uh are are really large in size in cui added up as india sizes of india indonesia.

google arlington director indonesia arm weakness india
"ngo" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on WTMA

"Well our cards on the driveway i'll i'll go check her mirror our guard before you get in trouble okay well let me tell you i quit i quote watrin nfl when they started at dancing and the ngo and then another guy scores and it at a different dance so the next guy people ask match up you know if i wanna see dance and okay stayed with my bad and i'll watch these drugs trying to get out there and and dan you know and i'm not trying to profile all about but up uh i'll play in a band and i a fellow musician like you i don't get up there on a couple of songkla playing i don't get up there and tell people this is how you need to boat you know when trump's canadian already but one thing i don't i don't believe it you know and uh i'll tell you what i started to try to watch football this year enough all the melee and app out okay here we go again you know i'll i'll water oh no palumbo loading or something you know peter sellers and uh um i think what would get me back into it is it it would take pills four or five cameras that are pointing it those nailing and place those cameras on the cheerleaders and i don't want to sound like a dirty old man but and then play the game burner you better be rewrite fares no kidding okay but i i just wanna see him play football you know and like people in my banader on stage they don't want to hear what we think about politics they want to harass play well.

nfl ngo trump football peter sellers dan
"ngo" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"ngo" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Up listen to you more than i've listened to lot wipo 34 of you jesus way well her card in the driveway out august kicker mirror our guard before you get in trouble okay well let me tell you i quit a quote watrin nfl when they started at dancing and the ngo and then another get gortat got a different dance so the next guy people ask map out you know it i wanna see dance and stayed with my bad and i'll watch these drugs trying to get out there and and day and you know and i'm not trying to profile all about but uh uh i play at a band and i love fellow musician like you i don't get up there on a couple of felt it up playing i won't get up there and tell people this is how you need to vote you know when trump canadian but one thing i don't i don't believe it you know and i'll tell you what i started to try to watch football this year enough all the nearly and i thought okay here we go again you know i'll i'll water oh no palumbo loaded or something you know peter sellers and um i think what would get me back into it it it it would take those four or five cameras pointing at those nailing and place those cameras on a cheerleader and i don't want to sound like a dirty oh land but and.

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