35 Burst results for "NET"

How Jerome Corsi Helped Get Donald Trump Elected

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:30 min | 1 d ago

How Jerome Corsi Helped Get Donald Trump Elected

"Was it that you were working, you know, if you're an investigative journalist, you write books. How were you involved to help Trump get elected? In other words, in what capacity were you involved in that? I was reporting for world net daily. It was writing articles. I was following the campaign. I met Roger Stone early on in the process, like in February that year as I recall, 2016. And we just started working together. Roger would ask me what about this issue? What about that issue? Could you help me write this? And so I worked with him. I wanted Trump to be elected. So a sense I was in the FBI's. You always a political operative now because I'm helping. I'm just really figuring things out and reporting and telling Roger Stone what I figured out. And evidently, Rogers relaying them to Donald Trump. Yeah. Trump's followed me for a long time. I've known Trump since really the 80s when he owned the Plaza. I had a long career in financial services, and about lived in the Plaza hotels of VIP guests for several years. And he owned it and he knew me, but not well. But he knows who I am. We're not friends. We don't talk, but the FBI had this idea. That I had a source that gave me the information from Julian Assange to pass, and if they could get my source, they could prove the Russian collision. Collusion. When I refused to take their plea deal, Mueller's case fell apart. I broke Miller's back by refusing to lie. Now,

Roger Stone Donald Trump FBI Roger Rogers Julian Assange Mueller Miller
 Hong Kong population shrinks for 2nd year under virus curbs

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 d ago

Hong Kong population shrinks for 2nd year under virus curbs

"Hong Kong's government says its population has shrunk for a second year as antivirus controls hamper the inflow of new workers and births declined The territories census and statistics department has announced the population as of mid 2022 has declined by 1.6% from a year earlier to just over 7 million with the net outflow of just over 113,000 residents while less than a 5th of new residents arrived However the announcement gives no indication of how many thousands of people might have left due to the crackdown and a national security

Territories Census And Statist Hong Kong
The latest in sports news

AP News Radio

01:58 min | Last week

The latest in sports news

"8 piece sports time David Schuster a light schedule in Major League Baseball action on Monday but the first place mets in the national league east they were in action and our Mike man Q fills us in The mets continued their winning ways with a 5 to one victory over the reds with 13 wins in their last 15 games the 71 and 39 mets lead the braves by 7 games in the national league east Chris Bassett tossed 8 innings for his 9th win Starling Marte a two run first inning Homer for the mets against Cincinnati's Justin Dunn who took the loss Over in Baltimore the red hot Orioles made it 6 wins in 7 games with a 7 four victory over Toronto four home runs for the Orioles including one by Austin Hayes We're going out expecting to win every game so I think we've been in this mindset now for the last couple months and we're just continuing to play good baseball Meanwhile out in Seattle the Yankees got back in the win column they snapped their 5 game losing skid They defeated the mirror nurse 9 to four and Philip gon fills us in on San Diego and San Francisco Alex would allow just three hits over 6 and a third innings as the San Francisco Giants as the San Diego Padres one to nothing The giant starter would out dual padre started Blake snow who allowed a run on 6 hits in 5 and two thirds innings The Padres have now lost 5 straight games and saw their lead over Milwaukee for the final playoff spot cut to just one game Pro basketball news Kevin Durant reiterated to Brooklyn Nets ownership that he wants to be traded and let's changes are made in the organization College football news Alabama Ohio State and Georgia They are the top three teams in the preseason coaches poll Meanwhile at Oklahoma assistant coach kale Gundy resigned after he was found to use repeated racially charged language and antennas Serena Williams still coming back from injury she won her first match in over a year at a tournament in Toronto I'm David Shuster AP sports

Mets Chris Bassett Starling Marte Justin Dunn David Shuster Red Hot Orioles Austin Hayes National League East Baseball Philip Gon National League Braves San Diego Padres Reds Homer Orioles Cincinnati Mike Baltimore Brooklyn Nets
Why the Left Can't Have a 'Liberal CPAC'

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

02:16 min | Last week

Why the Left Can't Have a 'Liberal CPAC'

"Also think this goes to polling and elections is the executive director of net roots was quoted as saying progressives tend not to fund infrastructure. Hello. Yeah. If I could tell liberal college students, we're going to send a bus to the school to pay for you to come out there, got a dorm set up. Here's a food card. I can get my numbers up to 5000 tomorrow, but I can't raise that kind of money on the left. We always get accused of getting funded by George Soros. I'd kill to be funded by George Soros. We've been told that none of us we've asked George himself George and he said no. But yeah, media matters says there's no way to recreate the conservative convention circuit without a more muscular progressive media to support it. I mean, it's just they say, even if the media environment were completely different liberals still might not flock to a cpac counterpart. And here's the quote, the Democratic Party is a coalition party of 57 different single issue voters. It's so much easier for the Republican Party to stay on message because there's so monolithic. On the left, it's like herding cats. Right. And he was talking about our conventions. We don't have Joe Biden's face on our shirts. We don't have tattoos of Barack Obama on our arms, the hats, the putting on your cars, have you ever seen a build back better on a T-shirt? He thinks few on the left would go to a progressive version of cpac certainly he wouldn't absolutely not. And they was talking about at our events like net roots. The protesters are our protesters on our side. Protesting people. Liberal enough. So what do we do about that before the mentor? Because certainly we've proven we could get this done. We heard it enough cats to get this amazing Bill through the inflation, right? How do we keep our coalition together? Because I think we just have to, I mean, you know what's funny because we always hear from Republicans personal responsibility. But that's really what it's about. It's about personal responsibility. You have to do what you can. If you can go register voters, go register voters if you can phone bank, do that. If all you can do is vote for whatever reason, go do that. Talk to friends. But I mean, yeah, we have what she said is right. And we don't get behind hate and they do.

Net Roots George Soros George Democratic Party Joe Biden Republican Party Barack Obama
Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last week

Ship carrying grain from Ukraine arrives in Istanbul

"The captain of the first grain ship to arrive out of Ukraine under an international agreement spoke to reporters at the dock in turkey Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor is the man at the helm of the polar net of Turkish flagship that em loaded cargo at the Ukrainian port of chana Moors before the Russian invasion in February He says this sad incident happened war broke out in the port was under blockade by the Ukrainian military They were finally able to leave on Friday forming a convoy with two other ships in a harbor guide near Odessa then followed a predetermined 17 leg route through dangerous corridors that had been cleared and deemed The latitudes longitudes and positions were provided by the joint coordination center They arrived at the Turkish port of Dorinda today with the 12,000 ton load of grain The first of a dozen ships authorized to sail under the deal between Ukraine and Russia brokered by turkey and the United Nations I'm Jennifer King

Ahmet Eugene Ali Baylor Chana Moors Ukraine Turkey Joint Coordination Center Odessa Dorinda United Nations Jennifer King
Haaland nets twice on EPL debut as City beats West Ham 2-0

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Haaland nets twice on EPL debut as City beats West Ham 2-0

"Erling Holland scored twice in his Premier League debut as Manchester City opened its latest title defense with a two nil win over West Ham Holland put city ahead with a penalty kick in the 35th minute and tallied in the 65th City had difficulty breaking down the hammer's defense before Holland scored after being hauled down by goalkeeper alphonse areola He's the first city player since Sergio Agüero in 2011 to score twice in his EPL debut Areola entered the game following an injury to Lucas fabianski in the 29th minute I'm the fairy

Erling Holland West Ham Holland Manchester City Premier League Alphonse Areola Sergio Agüero Hammer Holland Areola Lucas Fabianski
Sen. Marsha Blackburn Discusses Widespread FBI Corruption

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:43 min | Last week

Sen. Marsha Blackburn Discusses Widespread FBI Corruption

"Few days, you've seen reports of more than one whistleblower from inside the FBI and the DoJ. I'm confessing to the fact that conservatives are being targeted inside the bureau and outside the bureau, how worried should the average citizen be that these agencies have now become enforcement arms of the Democrat party in the Biden administration? Well, what you have to look at is as I told him today when I opened my remarks, Tennessee has come to me all the time. And they feel like there's two systems of justice, two different tiers. And the FBI will go after parents who show up to the school board meeting. And if you listen to the testimony and the response he gave us today, you will notice he didn't always use the term investigate. They like to say they are not investigating parents. What he did use was to talk about auditing assessing and then investigating. So it appears that they are net can be cast wider if they're auditing or assessing an individual or a situation without opening a full investigation. So these are all things that we were supposed to have him for two grams of questioning. We ended up just having one round of questioning because he said he had a plane to catch. So we're having to submit for answers and get those answers in writing.

Biden Administration FBI DOJ Democrat Party Tennessee
Pelosi Trip to Taiwan Tests China’s Appetite for Confrontation

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Pelosi Trip to Taiwan Tests China’s Appetite for Confrontation

"By far the most powerful country in the world in military terms. Without any doubt. But with a home court advantage off China's coast, China has put massive resources into anti fit missiles interceptors and submarines precisely in order to be able to kill an American fleet in proximity to their coast. Their land army is terrible, peel of people's liberation armies, maybe the worst land army in the world. But their missile corps is excellent. And the studies from the air force and the Rand corporation and the office of net assessment, which I used to do some work for a Pentagon. Say that those missiles are extremely good. Now, you can argue about whether you contract moving the ship 800 miles off the coast if it's maneuvering. Can you really hit it well? The Ukrainians managed to sink the Russian flagship, the Moscow, hundred kilometers off their coast and at the Ukrainians can do it the Chinese who, after all, did put a space landing craft on The Dark Side of the Moon, probably could be able to do it. So the risk of a kinetic engagement against Chinese missiles and the possible loss of a carrier with 8000 American sailors and all of our prestige, as you say, is not a risk that we want to take. The

Office Of Net Assessment China Rand Corporation Air Force Pentagon Moscow
What's Happening to German Cities in the Wake of the Energy Crisis?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:02 min | 2 weeks ago

What's Happening to German Cities in the Wake of the Energy Crisis?

"The Germans are major smart asses. Now, I catch myself, of course, 'cause I'm making a generalization, but the point I want to make is that the German political class, by the way, no different here than the French political class. As a certain arrogance, both about itself and also about America. By the way, you see a little glimpse of this just a metaphor for it if you will is in the film Casablanca where of course the German officer who's in Casablanca is talks about the American goes, those bungling Americans. And the idea here is that the Americans are naive, they're unsophisticated, though fools, and then of course the French policeman goes well. If you remember the last time the Americans bungled into Berlin at the end of World War I. So the and of course that happened again at the end of World War II. The point being that the Germans are not quite as smart as they think. And yet they're always snickering at America. And of course, when Trump told the Germans, he said in effect of the Angela Merkel team, look, you know, the problem with the Nord stream isn't just that you're making a deal with the Russians, but what comes with the deal is a dependency on Russia. You're not going to be dependent on them at their permission, if you will to get your oil through the Nord stream pipeline. And the Germans were like, it has Trump. Such a fool, you know, all he knows is how to build a building. What does he know about geopolitics or the relations between Europe and Russia? And of course, what's happening now is exactly what Trump predicted. Namely, the Russians are squeezing the Germans. How are they doing it? Well, they basically decided to choke the Nord stream pipeline to send a tiny portion of the oil through the pipeline and the net effect of it is, and now reading from a headline, quote German cities are going dark.

Casablanca America Donald Trump Angela Merkel Berlin Russia Europe
The Schumer-Manchin Tax Increase on Everyone

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

The Schumer-Manchin Tax Increase on Everyone

"Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal this money has an editorial. The Schumer mansion tax increase on everyone. Majority leader Chuck Schumer wants a Senate vote on his partisan tax deal with Joe Manchin as early as this week. And no wonder he wants to rush it through. The more Americans learn about it and what's in this tax and spend behemoth, the more they will dislike it. Start with the author's central claim that the bill reduced the deficit and thus inflation. The pen Wharton budget model, which senator Manchin has been known to watch, examine the details of the shimmer and Manchin Bill and found it doesn't contain any net deficit reduction until 2027. Quote the impact on inflation is statistically indistinguishable from zero through 2031 says the Penn Wharton modelers. We don't agree with those who think deficit reduction leads in a straight line to lower inflation, but that's what the Democrats claim for their bill. If the first deficit reduction doesn't come for 5 years, where's the help on inflation today? The 200 and 327 billion in new taxes could slow inflation at the economy falls into recession. And that may be the quiet expectation the journal continues. The tax increases on business will discourage investment while the Federal Reserve is also raising business costs with higher interest rates. But tax policy should be working in the opposite direction to encourage investment when the fed is tightening in the economy as close to recession. Evidence is emerging that the new shimmer mansion 15% minimum tax on corporate book income is especially harmful to U.S. manufacturing firms. And analysis by Congress's joint committee on taxation, hardly a nest of supply ciders, found that 49.7% of the tax would hit U.S. manufacturers.

Senator Manchin Manchin Bill Joe Manchin Chuck Schumer Schumer The Wall Street Journal Senate FED Joint Committee On Taxation U.S. Congress
Sebastian Welcomes Captain Henry Hendrix (Ret.) to the Show

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Sebastian Welcomes Captain Henry Hendrix (Ret.) to the Show

"End studio captain Henry J Jerry Hendricks, U.S. Navy retired. Welcome in studio. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you for having me, doctor gorka. So we had a super fun discussion. I think we bought everybody around us because we got into the nitty Gritty of national defense, the navy personnel, very, very rapidly at this little soiree. Tell our audience, who you are, what's your background and what you have done in and out of uniform to serve this nation? Well, I joined the navy in 1988 out of an ROTC scholarship at Purdue. I served in the P three community doing maritime patrol and reconnaissance. I flew in Saudi Arabia during desert storm. I flew over Yugoslavia during the 1990s doing maritime surveillance over land doing ISR. And then 9 11 occurred. I was actually here in Washington, D.C. serving with the chief of naval operations staff when 9 11 occurred. I knew a number of shipmates who were killed in The Pentagon. My career sort of changed to strategy after that. So I went back and got a master's in diplomatic history, became a strategist largely worked for Andy Marshall in the office of net assessment. Yoda. Yes, and it's a great pleasure and honor to work for that man. Ended up working for the secretary of the navy as the director of his advisory panel and then finally, because no good deed goes unpunished, I served out my last three years as director of naval history since they figured out I had a PhD. And then I retired and I worked in a think tank as ahead of a defense program and now I work as a consultant and also with the sagamore institute of think tank in Indianapolis, Indiana. All right,

Navy Henry J Jerry Hendricks Gorka Washington, D.C. Rotc Andy Marshall Purdue Office Of Net Assessment Yugoslavia Saudi Arabia Pentagon Yoda Sagamore Institute Of Think Ta Indianapolis Indiana
Shame on You If You Vote for the Democratic Party

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:33 min | 2 weeks ago

Shame on You If You Vote for the Democratic Party

"On you if you vote for the Democratic Party, shame on you. You are supporting the left. Your intentions are irrelevant, the results are apparent every day, every single day. The left is ruining something else, the Democratic Party is the party of the left. It is not a Liberal Party, it is a left wing party. You can hate Trump all you like. That is no moral excuse for voting Democrat. If you deluded yourself by the lies that the man was a dictator when the closest we have to a dictator is Joe Biden, there's nothing I can do. You have opted to believe a lie. That's what you have done because you don't like Trump. That's it? And I understand why a lot of people don't like Trump. I don't have a feeling either way, because I don't give a damn if I like Trump. It's about as narcissistic a question as I can ask. Do I, Dennis prager, citizen of the U.S., like a politician? What the hell difference does that make? Does the politician do good or bad, net good or net bad for my country? That is the only question I ask. I never ask do I like a politician? It is of no consequence to the country or to me whether I like a politician. The preoccupation of the never trumpers with their dislike of Trump only speaks to the immaturity of their judgment.

Democratic Party Donald Trump Liberal Party Joe Biden Dennis Prager U.S.
Jim Hanson: 'Payback Is a Digital Medevac'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Jim Hanson: 'Payback Is a Digital Medevac'

"About information operations. You say we have to tell the story about these people who undermine the president and the root of the people. Do we have the infrastructure? Do we have the ecosystem? I remember having discussions with good bodies of ours like Dave re boy, omniscient, when I was in The White House. And we're trying to map out who are the good journalists on our side. I mean, not politically conservative. But good. And by the end of name number 12 on my napkin in the restaurant, we're kind of like, who else is there? Are we doing enough to build the external ecosystem? I am. I know you are. But we're helping. That's the nice thing. Everyone's paying attention now. We started a project using military grade artificial intelligence to map out all the people involved in censoring the hunter's laptop story. We're expanding on it. That was a test case to show how it works to start connecting the dots. And it does that spider web connected dots thing. Well, now we're going to move that to every other area where they are attacking us and where they are using their control of the information space to stop the American people from learning anything they should learn. And we're going to start figuring out whose sources belong to who, who's leaking to who, who's the money behind this group, which is attacking us over here. And we're going to net all that together and then start dropping that in public on a regular basis. So they're not used to having us look at them. They're used to the ones using the entire media and social media and permanent bureaucracy and abusing the state power to do it against us. Well, payback is a digital medevac, and we're coming for them. Payback is a digital medevac.

Dave White House American 12
Hobbled by chip, other shortages, GM profit slides 40% in Q2

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hobbled by chip, other shortages, GM profit slides 40% in Q2

"General Motors sees a dip in sales and earnings as a shortage of parts hobbles production The news from Detroit was not great GM's second quarter U.S. sales were down more than 15% and net income fell 40% from a year ago in part because the company couldn't deliver 95,000 vehicles due to a continuing global shortage of parts and computer chips Demand has been strong but production cuts continue to limit dealer inventory Last year GM made 2.79 billion from April to June this year it made 1.67 billion which beat revenue estimates but the per share earnings fell short of Wall Street expectations Nevertheless the company's annual income guidance is holding steady in a letter to shareholders CEO Mary Barra says the company's confidence comes from an expectation that global production and wholesale deliveries will be up sharply in the second half I'm Jennifer King

GM Detroit U.S. Ceo Mary Barra Jennifer King
What Will Come From Epoch Times' New Film About January 6?

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:20 min | 3 weeks ago

What Will Come From Epoch Times' New Film About January 6?

"Think can come out of this? I mean, it's just, it's hard for those of us who see this happening to know what to think or even how to hope. Well, I think what can come out of it is a real investigation. Because right now what we have with this committee, this January 6th committee, the net, they're not a real investigative committee. They're an aggrieved party first of all. They're the ones who claim themselves as the victims being members of Congress. How do you have an aggrieved party running the investigation into the thing that they themselves feel that they are victims of. You can't, in any normal sense of justice, you would never even allow that to happen. Nor would it be regarded as an official investigation. There needs to be a real investigation. And frankly, a lot of people who are not being charged right now should be charged. The suspicious actors, I think, should definitely be charged. And this is one of the big things I found even interviewing people who are there. People even convicted of crimes who were there. A lot of them had tried stopping people who were actually committing crimes. And I think a lot of Americans, the people who actually were committing crimes who were breaching the capitol while Trump was still speaking, those hundred plus suspicious actors who ironically, the FBI seems to have no interest in, I think a lot of Americans believe those people should be prosecuted and they want to know why they're not being prosecuted.

Congress Donald Trump FBI
Capitol Police Fire Back After Colbert Nine Released Without Charges

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Capitol Police Fire Back After Colbert Nine Released Without Charges

"Look at the corrupt United States department of injustice Look at the corrupt U.S. attorney graves Oh he's not corrupt then what is he What is he The blaze capitol police chief fires back If the U.S. attorney refuses to charge Stephen Colbert's staff arrested a capital office building rights Chris and low How come How come I mean they throw a very wide net on people they're charging old women who have cancer treatment What if you're from Hollywood and you work with Steven coper the U.S. attorney in Washington D.C. graves who has a Democrat hack just like his wife That's right pal And Garland the U.S. attorney general The United States Capitol police revealed new details today alleging Stephen Colbert's staffers repeatedly disobeyed instructions from capitol police officers prior to their arrest repeatedly The news came one day after the U.S. attorney's office declined to charge the staffords From the capitol police referred to as the Colbert 9 Capitol police chief J Thomas manger explained in a letter the production crew was arrested in the longworth House office building After a staffer for representative Jamal Bowman Democrat New York secured his office and called the United States Capitol police emergency phone number To report a disturbance outside the office next to Bowman's That office belonged to representative Lauren boebert Republican Colorado why were they there Because you're a bunch of cheap punks

United States Department Of In U.S. Stephen Colbert United States Capitol Police Steven Coper Washington D.C. J Thomas Manger Garland Longworth House Office Chris Hollywood Capitol Police Cancer Jamal Bowman Capitol Lauren Boebert New York Bowman Colorado
Ron Guidry Recalls the Bucky Dent Home Run

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | Last month

Ron Guidry Recalls the Bucky Dent Home Run

"Always got a big hit in the game And as the picture that started that game all I'm all I'm thinking about is all I need to do is keep this game close because I'm either going to win it or probably lose it So when I walk off the field as my team is going to be in a position to win and when I say that my goal was never to walk off the mound being one rundown That was all I wanted to do If I was one run down then my team was capable of score net one run So when Bucky stepped up in the top of the 7th inning and he popped that three run Homer of course it lifted us up and it just the heads dropped in the Boston dugout Because we had four games in a row before about three weeks before that and to have that happen when everything seemed to be going their way It was pretty pretty hard on them Now they fought back and made the game closer but we were able to win that game Yeah and then that was a one game playoff if I remember and that ironically gator That was your 25th win that season right You got the win in that game correct I did Yes I did Just how it turned out All of those wins wouldn't have mattered if we wouldn't have won that game because if we don't win that game we don't go anywhere Yeah that's right That's it We win that game We win the playoffs We win the World Series So it made that year much more special because of the outcome But

Bucky Boston
Hatred for America Has a Net Effect

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | Last month

Hatred for America Has a Net Effect

"We definitely saw the hatred for America on 4th of July You have things like for 43 or four 33 years rather You've got the NPR has read the Declaration of Independence on the 4th of July They didn't do it this year instead what they decided to do was talk about racism And in regard to racism and they're constantly focusing on our sins not our wins That has an effect You've got people like Kim Kardashian tweeting or Instagram story saying the 4th of July has been canceled due to a shortage of independence sincerely women I mean she had a sex tape And became a billionaire I think of all people she should be a little bit grateful also in a society that a woman like her could become a billionaire off of a sex tape But the point is look we see so much of this cultural reinforcement of hatred for America not patriotism in America and that does have a net effect I mean you are what you consume as a society and if what we are consuming is not patriotism but hatred for America that's going to have an impact And it already has You look at Gallup polling recently and only 38% of Americans are extremely proud to be American Now I'm one of those 38% I am proud to be an American I love this country Are there a foundation need fixed hang sure Are there things that we needed to do Sure But we can do that We can do that I mean think about it in life If you woke up every single day of your life and you said you know what It's going to be a crappy day Yep nope this day is going to suck Yep definitely going to suck It's probably going to suck right A lot of this is what you reinforce It's a conditioning It's a reinforcing and it's intentional because the whole point of the left is that they can get you to America They can get you to question it They can get you to see this country as not great Then it's a lot easier to burn it to the ground

America NPR Kim Kardashian
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Welcome back to dot net rocks this carl franklin and this is richard campbell and we're here respective coasts nice. I'm on the east coast. You're on the west coast. Let's call anything off our good friends. Julian steve or here with us and we'll introduce them in a bit of i want check in with you. Man how are you doing. I'm i will where i'm actually on the coast working on the history of dot net. Yeah it is an interesting kind of taking a bunch of stuff. Apart and reassembling it there is what histories complicated as i. Give me writing technical books any day of the week. This stuff is hard especially when you're writing history because you often include glimpses of current the state of current things. When you're talking about history. So i imagine oh yeah. History is history. But it's when you put it in context of what's current and what's current changes. Now you've got a lot of right and you're trying to make what's relevant in all of these different things plus it's very forensic three versions of from three different interviews of a meeting in two thousand six. They're all different. And so you you. You know you're not gonna pick any one of them. You have to kind of build a competent and say. What do you think happened here. That had a significant impact on behavior. Going forward And that happens over and over and over again. I got many versions of the history from something like i'm over. Forty people interview well and one hundred hours plus of interviewees. And it's just. It's a lot to assemble. An i keep layering in more pieces in finding problems and have not to reassemble. It feels like it feels like spaghetti code. Yeah you know where. Every time. I make an alteration all the stuff i just did. It's wrong have to go back and fix it. What are the unit tests for history book. I don't know the answer to that. Yeah i don't know either. Did you include stories of me. Having scotch with scott free in in scotland or was it england wherever we were he had in there. Yeah i think one of the things. I want to do with this book when i finally get the copy down is i'll i will voice the audiobook but then i'll also make like a director's commentary version of the audio level. After each chapter. I then tell you stories about that. Chapter came from and those kinds of tales. And some of the weirdness. It happened gathering this book like so they are three. And i were at the urinals and i said and he said you talk about this stuff at your all the time like no no not really. It's funny there's so many tales. Like that that i think would be fun to do later. And i've kept all of those notes. I gotta get the main book done. Its twentieth anniversary of dot. Net shipping is february of twenty twenty. Two yeah and got by down by that man. I got to be done by them. So it's just craig grinding away. I have also put a couple of new products on the music. To code by website people are asking for wave versions and flak versions interesting. I have both of those up at music to code by dot net. And you know what that means. Is there including you in their primary playing system. It's not just an aside thing. But it's like i want you as part of my overall audio system. It's a huge comp caring about format and especially because you know people know the difference between mp threes and you know loss. Luis codex like wave and flak. So that's good. Yeah that's good. I got something utterly fascinating for better. No framework sorolla crazy music awesome artists. Well.

Julian steve carl franklin richard campbell east coast west coast scotland scott england craig
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Which keeps you from shooting yourself in the foot when you're doing kind of a synchronous programming well easier now because you've got a sinking away. Which just completely revolutionized the the a availability of a synchronous programming when it came out and c. sharp but You know sometimes you need to lock stuff and there's still the lock word sharp and sometimes it works for things and not other things and sometimes you get the dreaded requirement. Lock this in this particular type of making a call like an api call or something. We can't lock that right. Some some some situations you need to go one step further like maybe a semaphore well. The full semaphore class uses windows kernel semi force in so they can be not only local to your application but system-wide so there's a version of the semaphore called semaphore slim in the in the dot net framework. And it's been there for you know before dot net core. But i hadn't used before. So it's a lightweight alternative to semaphore that is local only and it's also got a wait a sink on it. So essentially what happens is you initially is it with the current The initial number of threads going to allow and optionally the maximum number of threads that you can allow so if you just basically initialized it with one comma one year allowing one thread and that's it and so what you do is you just create that and then when you want to implement it you do your semaphore slim object dot wait or wait a sink now with the weight and then all the code that goes under that is locked basically until you do a semaphore slim. Object dot release so it's really easy. It's really easy to use. And it works in more places than just the lock which requires a separate object to lock right. And i found it really useful when doing the Remember i told you about making an api back. End that rights to a data manager that rights to azure blob like jason files in a blob storage container very fast. You know the criteria for that if you're gonna do it not a lot of data because you got to write the whole thing got. I told jason file so make sense to split it up as you have different tables like that kind of thing but you have to write the whole thing every time you want to save and you also have to allow for multiple people to use it so this turned out to be a really good thing to use on the service side when we're saving data are accessing data so that's it semaphore slim. No learning love it. It's i'm just surprised that i had never seen it before. And framer about part of the framework. Work right yeah very cool and it works like charm so levin who's talking to us richard grabbing common talk show fifteen fifty four about anti fragility Software parachute repair rile and You know roughly approximate stuff. We're talking about today. Lots of great comments on this show but there was a derivative comment about a talking point in that show. We were talking about the undersea data center that microsoft hills. Your should that time was still underwater. Today's on surface. And i've been trying to get a show with team to talk about. What did you find after being underwater. For three years what's happened. Yeah the only piece of data that come out so far is that the failure rate of the equipment was substantially lower on the surface or in in the water while it was submerged was actually a running data center. Small a little cylinder relatively speaking. It's got certain racks in it because the environment is so fixed right. We don't point with this. Other data centers the cooling related said the water doing the cooling You get to put it close to cities where you're low latency really matters in landis efforts free it's at the bottom of the sea near the city or wherever you i do it so there. There's reasons why they develop a good idea. Yeah it's interesting. And this was the biggest task one out in the arguing islands and yeah the the reliability really relied. Their argument was because people. Don't mess with it when it's under water you can't get it's you leave stuff. Alone is reliable. but mark. hodgkin's comment is a few years ago says that underwater day center narc must be close to a flow at. Yes yes it is must be closed. Location of the remains of german high seas fleet. So that was world war two with war. Ones Lind where a lot of german ships lost their their down there That data centre might make some interesting additional scuba diving. And i've heard that low background steel salvaged from a breeder nuclear testing shifts including these world. War battleships In any said citation needed unlike is some citation. Because they really do do that. that since nuclear testings happened you have a sort of background level of radio-activity most ores and so if you're in an environment light spacecraft he referenced voyager one where you want to be sure that the radiation you're measuring is in the environment not materials we using you actually have to go and steal that was protected from that testing and steel in the bottom of the ocean is one of the ways to do it. It's why did they bring it to the surface. The why did they bring the undersea data. Senator surface half. They were finished testing and they wanted to evaluate the these are all despair. Oh virtual product our okay accents will be. Someday it's getting ice. I wonder if they're they're now like this was such a good field test that i suspect they're they're they're gonna they're gonna put out a bunch of realize with cloud servers essentially they turned over every three four or five years anyway. Yeah so the whole point is the cylinder down the wired up and so forth run it four five years take it up and you have refurbished rather than building a bespoke buildings and things like just dropping heavy cylinders. Just come and go from the local waterways around us a pretty good way to solve the problem. Data delayed had lobster pots around him. Yeah what it always nagged on. And of course. The ocean is unstoppable as lots of lots of gunk on that that data center deserves. Somare thank you so much for your comedy to copy these biko by is on. Its way to you if you let copies to go by right. A comment on the website dot iraq's dot com or.

one year richard today three years microsoft five years Today world war two mark. hodgkin one thread fifteen one comma levin biko four five years windows kernel Somare few years ago net german
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Dot. Net rocks carl franklin and this is richard campbell. Polly initiative is here. And we're going to talk to her in just a minute. But i just wanna tell everybody you know. Hey look at this. I know they can't do this on radio vaccine badge. I got my second vaccine hours ago. And there's no side effects. Of course you had it in like february of last year. Yeah march april something like that. Yeah and then you know. I was really concerned that when you get your first dose like you'd have a strong reaction did you. Nothing i ask no no reaction but they told me to expect a little lethargy and maybe even flu like symptoms this time. Unfortunately we're doing a ban video tomorrow night. So i might just have to see how you are right but yeah you can go and listen back to some of the dot net rock shows that we did while i you know had covid pretty bad. Yeah all right. That's cool man. I'm is now my second one. But it's imminent. It feels great. You have to paula's. Well i had only one. I'm awaiting the second in like two weeks. Good good it's still enough for you to walk around smugly. So that's the best part that's important. I'm waiting for somebody say. Put your mask on. I'm kidding wear masks kids. it's good idea All right richard. Let's get things started with a little thing. We call better no framework awesome..

Polly richard campbell tomorrow night march april carl franklin richard first dose two weeks second vaccine paula second one second Dot one dot net rock february of last year Net
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"A little too long and Larry Mayer disgraced comment this is from two years ago. I really liked dance quote from the vir- Virginia Sattar about that. Everyone's trying to help no matter how talks behavior at some level. They believe they're trying to help understand them. We must be your worldviews sometimes act actively sabotaging meeting is helping this provides insights into how to reach them, for example, how they are defensive about losing their job. All I really didn't need to know about psychology. And Huma communications, I learned from dot net. Rocks. Really apparently for other sorry. He did. He did this spelled on Iraq's is not our UCK ks and then said it breath sees spelling not covered. Clearly, you weren't paying attention snowing. But yeah, I remember that conversation sort of our I think I've used those particular quotes and some of the stuff I've been doing work on the history of dot net. Where it's like, I'm pretty sure all parties involved here came to work each day believing. They were going to do great things for the company that day what they're working was essential and important, even if we disagree, and even if you know on the outside seems harmful and some of Microsoft's and Bryson extend extinguish kind of strategies over the decades, there's a bunch of executive somewhere in Seattle the old thing. This is exactly this is healthy way to behave or at least it was once upon a time and on the other in the world the mating of mines of that. I would have been IBM oracle and some coming up with enterprise Java rank thinking that was okay. Great thing you're making better industry back twenty years. You just get complicated on that. So Larry, thank you so much for your comment copies, by on its way to you. And if you'd like copies dako- by write a comment on the website dot net rocks dot com or via Facebook published every show there..

Larry Mayer vir- Virginia Sattar dot Facebook Iraq IBM Microsoft Seattle Bryson executive twenty years two years
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Buy commercial devices. You can cook it up yourself. Yeah. And what's really cool about this is it's totally open source. Everything is gone get hub, you can build it yourself or buy their device. So they have a device it's like one hundred fifty bucks. Preinstalled ready to go just plugging in. It's cold to the do have writ. Good to go products. You don't have to pull out a raspberry pi built by took out a raspberry pi through the software on it. I bought a little Omni directional microphone and speaker for it. It actually works pretty well. I was kind of skeptical at first I'm like, I hope I'm not dumping money into to determine the nothing. It's actually fairly reliable. So it's cool. It seems to be just getting better as they go on. And so besides just load this offer on a program Billy model in there. He can do tensions is there. The whole thing's written python? Okay. Make really simple editions in python. I think I have a demo. I think it's like four or five lines to just do a basic say something get a response back, right? Since sort of a Hello world of the online speaking. So. Sodas, Microsoft sort of. I'm not sure how this is its own thing. Or is it connect to Alexa, Google now Serey Cortana, although it is it's completely own product. So they have there's a organization that works with it. They have a service connect you their service, basically, all they'd use just going to centralize your account into say like you're located in whatever city. Okay. Do they do store settings kind of in the cloud? But they don't share this with anybody else. They do the speech to text in the cloud as well. Or is that on the device, it can do it on the device? They're starting to offer a Mozilla backed. I think it's called deep search. And so if you want to opt into that, you can actually send your stuff up to the cloud Mazzola processes it since ruthless backs and the process does the actual skill. Yeah. I've been I was using for the longest time the speech recognition stuff in the dot net framework on windows, but. There it sits, you know, in windows, and and it also didn't work as well as I thought it was going to wear some of the other stuff that I saw like Google's speech API is fantastic Amazons, of course. But how is the speech recognition accuracy? Some of it depends on your microphone if you have a crappy microphone it's not gonna pick up as well. All the time. But in general, I've had decent success with it. If mere skill set up to understand the right words, and if it's not something that can be easily mumbled through. Hey, my. That works. Sometimes. TV shows that have set it off. But but for the most part, it's been actually really accurate, and of course, obviously, the further away I get from it. It's harder to but it getting one of the upside of the building your own especially for someone Carl who knows a lot about microphones. There's some great microns up. We'll spend a little money on it. You should be able to get outstanding result. At least that's not the barrier. I got a cheap four dollar one. Because I'm like, I didn't want to invest much in to this thing. If so a lot of money because I think on the average small device, it's a two dollar microphone, but it well, it's a little. Conference. Call doodad. Pretty well for a forty dollars by off Amazon. Oh. ESP? Yeah. So I mean, that's that's the interesting part is being able to PC's different things together. Guess it's to be some Homebrew kits folks saying like I like one of these and one of those, and I got these kinds of results from install it. It has some I guess some optime settings for some microphones. But also says like easing default and can just kinda run from there since it's based on lenox, you can configure the system. However, we want this. Well, that's pretty cool. I'm poking around the site one of the first things I saw was talking about like doing grocery shopping and things with that's an Amazon echo thing..

Amazon Google cloud Mazzola Microsoft Alexa Billy Serey Cortana Mozilla Carl forty dollars four dollar two dollar
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"But we're not we're not quite at that stage yet, but just in general if there's a jobs KPI, you wanna call there's a good chance that someone's already tried it and written a new package with the jobs. Come and interrupt code already done for you. I'll shows a lot. But in interesting thought, I mean right now, you live you are sending I l down to the browser the browser. He's Jiting it effectively. So of Jessica is is running is getting the interpreter. And then it's running the Yoko through the. But we could get to a point where maybe that's a development mode, and then you you have a Finnish mode where compile it right down or we actually imagined no probably more like a mixed mode. Like there will be some L on your app. Still let me some hot pass that you have pre compiled down to web assembly because those pass need to be really really optimal. I mean, why wouldn't you want everything that way if it's just a button for us to push? That's a good question. We've been experimenting with that. We were wondering that same question ourselves. Right. You just compile everything down to web assembly, the mono guys have actually been experimenting with that a lot and building out the head of time compilation technologies right now what it looks like is you do get the performance. We're gonna go fast. But the size tends to blow like it gets bigger interesting that it would get bigger. Yeah. That's not that surprising. Look at like engine or across gen technologies in dot net. Like the engine images, I believe for the Donna framework are pretty big ugly. I think last night I heard they were like one of the biggest components if not the biggest component in. Uh-huh. So yeah, when you when you take the dot net code and pull it all the way down to native it does tend to expand in size. And it's probably did that with the whole apple probably too big than what you want. Download over the web. Right. So we think there's probably a off where you do that for the past and the rest of it, you leave his I l during development, I think you're right that you need everything. Probably as I Al size perspective that you don't care for the formats there, you could L because you trading time for size. There's also the Bill time tradeoff as well. Like mean, the full completion all the way down to web assembly. At least so far is what we seen it tends to take longer, but we're not taking date. No. But you don't want to wait like thirty seconds to wait see like a UI update and the bro through from a development perspective. Definitely. But this idea that I develop an I L mode get to a certain point. And then go, okay. Cast to native and I'll go get a coffee I have to. But not if Victorians into something that's ten megs. And you know, you're crippling the network every time you've guy grabs him trade-offs. There. We trust you guys to do the right? Thing. Do we do we? Okay, MBBS friendly. Are we absolutely I mean, we actually tried to be pretty non opinionated about which which pattern? You wanna do? Like if you want to be BBN, right? Like like, there are people that have built those patterns on top of the core blazer obstruction, and you wanna use a different pattern. You can you can do that. We've tried to keep it sort of agnostic at that layer much like react is kind of that way. We actually gives you a fairly simplistic view of the world and says, you know, whatever you want to do just do it on top of this laser is very similar. It's great. You guys aren't alone going to assembly now. Right. I mean, the go guys are there who else is come in like thirty see some other languages. Oh, yeah. Rest is probably the one who has made the biggest amount of noise about. And of course, most is also from Missoula who fiscally responsible for weather semblance as right? That's so that that's sort of makes sense I'm rust as said that they want to be the language for the web squad. Bold object. But you know, good book to them. So they pretty good intensive of having a good tool Chen full Russell also run on the servers..

Yoko Jessica Missoula dot apple Donna Chen Russell thirty seconds
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"I don't think they wanna keep making two versions of dot net. But as long as there's insignia number of customers in both they're going to keep doing both. They're just trying to get them together. Right. So rocky. You're you guys at majestic are busy doing this kind of thing. Trying to get people to dot net core via dot net standard right every day. And so what's the? Percentage of impossible projects that come to versus ones that are actually doable is any has anything been impossible up to this point. Well, if we define impossible as the economic costs the business costs of a direct lift and shift is higher than a rewrite than yes does happen from time to time. I guess that's the threshold the point where it's like we can start this over. And so what percentage would you say that would be? I still think it's a relative thus far. It's at least been a relatively low percentage. I would say probably maybe twenty percent or something. Wow. But it's I say it like it's a low, right. It's less than half. But again, if you're an organization that's got five hundred apps that's still adds up to quite a lot of apps, right Andres. Yeah. Sure. Yep. When as soon as you're confronted with the rewrite there's the whole re-think is this actually a SAS services. We could buy with a couple of changes like that whole kind of application architectural discussion. Do we want this anymore? Yup. Yup. Or can you and ultimately a lot of the conversation? And we've actually got an assessment tool that we use in these cases, where we sit down and go through the portfolio and evaluate each of those hand in hand with our customer, obviously. But trying to evaluate the at least big picture. What is the NGO? Is there a path forward? What's the path forward is that if if the path forward like you said is it to replace it is it to rewrite it from scratch as to lift and shift, and and then what are the both business and technical costs and benefits of doing that? And I think that analysis valuable no matter what you do going forward. Whether you do rewrite chunks of it or migrate chunks of it. Or move off into a third party tool of some kind. That analysis is essential. It is it is because. You're talking for the most part, we all we're talking ten twenty thirty or more years of legacy here. Right. That an end investment, right? Yeah. And so, yeah, it's it's this. These are not trivial things decisions that can be made just on somebody's kinda got check. You have to really put some thought into it and not quickly. Yeah. To do the time. Rocky. It's always great to talk to you and good catch up. And and it's great what you're working on. Thanks so much for spending the time. It's always a pleasure. Thank you guys so much that right? We'll see you next time on dot net. Rocks. Dot net. Rocks is brought to you by Franklin's net and produced by pop studios.

dot Andres Franklin twenty percent
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"To your solution. A shared project. Are. Yup. Shared shared class library project. I think is what it's called. But it's a shared project. And then you drag drop all of your existing CS files or V vials same deal from your current production Deol class library project, you drag those into this new empty shared project. So far, no risk, right? Because it's a copy operation, right? And then in in this next step is gonna make people's palms. Sweat in their part stutter in. Want to triple check that you actually have good source control practices that you've done a commit in a push in that you also have backups, but then you delete all of the files out of your original project, all the CS files. The scary. Yeah. No, I'm terrified. And here, this is a leap of faith. Right. And then you go into the original the dot net framework class library, and you add a reference to your shared project. Yeah. And then you re compile your dot net class library, and it's the same as it was before. It's just an. Yeah. Done this. Right. It should just work. It should just work. Right. And and no changes. No muss, no fuss. Literally, all we did was we put the code in essentially to put the class files into a different folder on your heart Brive, and they're still getting compiled just like they were before. And then you check delete that really freaked me out. I mean, I know. That's the scary part. That's yeah. But now you've got a build system to maintain the old project while working on the new project and. Yep. And once you get that far now, I can create a brand new dot net standard class library project. And I can add a reference from that project to the same shared project. Right. It's got to concrete projects my dot net framework project in my dot net. Standard project that are both pulling their code from that shared project. And so now when I compiled on that framework that production system, no change from what I had before. I, and it's a good bet that now when I try to compile the dominant standard project it will fail because I have even though it's trying to compile all the same code. I'm going to have to go back or go into this new project and add all of the new package dependencies. And and other that sort of thing that our equipment to that. I was using the dot net framework. And this is kind of the trick. Here. I said he quivalent too. I was using care carefully. Choosing my words right because some things like let's say Newton soft dot Jason have existed for a very long time. Most people are using. I think the last I cyber is using almost die the version nine of that library or something is the most common, but the current version, I think is like twelve and the current version supports the dot net framework and dot net core dot net. Standard nice. And so, but here's the fun part. You might be able to leave your production system running against version nine and in your new deal, Al that the dot net. Standard one you might reference version twelve and it might all continue to work because James did a. Good job with backward. Compatibility also. But the alternate of here, let's let's say entity framework. So you're using entity framework which a lot of people are and now you go to use. Of course, it won't compile because you haven't referenced entity framework in your dot net standard project. So you say a great I'll just go reference the entity framework, and then you find out that you can't because the entity the old entity framework doesn't exist for standard and Microsoft created a new one called entity framework core, which is not the same. But as similar and you say, oh, we'll all reference the new unaccounted the entity framework core and your code still won't build because Microsoft rewrote parts of the API. Right. Out as in. It's just one example..

Microsoft James Newton Jason
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Net. Core or your UI code is going to be Zaman or you WP, right? You're you. I code is probably going to be one of the four concrete platforms, but your business code and your data access code are the things that can be pulled out and made reusable across platforms. So I think and I'm just guessing here. I gotta think the majority of people that are wanting to move to dot net. Standard are web based apps and most likely as peanut maybe web forms, maybe even MVP see ASP net apps. Certainly those have a little bit of an advantage in that they're already web. Well, you would like to think so, but if you look at most windows or sorry web forms apps, they're written in the same kinda crappy non architectures as winning. I was thinking more. I agree with you. And yeah, there isn't a a way forward other than a rewrite in most cases for them. You is anyway, but I was really thinking of an MVP app or web API app. Well, certainly here. Let's tease those apart though, Karl because sadly most envy, see apps end up with all of their business logic. Written in the controller. Right. Right. And so that's the same crappy non architecture to write the controllers part of the UI part of the reason tation layer. And so they're still kind of a yeah, they're slightly better off. But it's still a poor implementation. People that were wrote web API apps now, they're in a much better spot because the there there is no real coupling between the U I of a service and people laugh when I say that. But when I mean, when I say, you I it's the XML or the J son contract, right? And so they really is kind of a, quote, unquote, you I or at least what we'd call an interface, and, but there's the concepts around data binding a lot of the interaction between view and controller and those things are much weaker in all of the web API. Technologies that have happened over the years. And so just because essentially, Microsoft, the frameworks tools, the tooling in visual studio has never helped us as much that also means that it never guided us down the wrong path as badly, right? So yeah, we're we're in better shape of and. He'll but really a lot of the driver. Here ends up being that the back end has to be moved into people on a close their data centers or or consolidate them. They're either moving to a public cloud or they're moving to private clouds and consolidating themselves into fewer data centers, or or at least if they're keeping the physical data centers opened their consolidating to use fewer servers because they're running everything in VM base model or or now days into a container based model that gets much higher density and rocky assorted interrupted this moment, we have this very important message. Hey, this is Carl recording from my hotel room in London. I'm here for the NBC this week. But I just wanted to give a shoutout to one of our one hundred dollars a month, silver, patrons, Elizabeth Schneider. Thank you, Elizabeth and thanks to all of our patrons. Even if you're only donating a buck a month. And if you'd like. To pay us back. So we can continue to keep the world informed about modern apt velopment, please make a pledge at patriot dot dot net. Rocks dot com..

MVP Zaman Karl Elizabeth Schneider Microsoft NBC Carl London one hundred dollars
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Flavor dot net app. It is even your home at one point one. I think you've got to be better off migrating to standard you can still make that work. Well, that's I wrote a blog post not that long ago about this. And. Because I put a lot of thought into it. And I've talked to a lot of folks in the Microsoft community thought leaders, and then also Microsoft folks at a tech technical level. There's a lot of techniques you can use around modernization. But I'm always looking at this from Abadia based out of my enterprise routes. I gas and saying, hey, suppose that you've got a couple two three four hundred apps, which is not unlikely. Right, right. Whole bunch of them written in in the dot net framework some of them running on dot net. One point something or two point something or three and in some of them are current. I'm sure. And so what what is your strategy because you can't most organizations can't do a big bang rewrite. No, these apps are enterprise they're being used today. And so yet at a high level the way I look at it is that you're you. I need to get all of your apps, and this may take time, but slowly, but surely get them at least two dot net. Four point six point one. Yeah. Because that's the first point at which you can be where dot net framework is also compatible with dot net. Standard. All right. So it's like the that's a minimum bar thing. Right. So you almost have to get there first, right? And these part, well, really shouldn't be that bad. Right. Right. Though, it can be there certainly have been some Microsoft is so good about avoiding breaking changes. But still there are some especially if you are are or were playing on the edge of different kinds of tack your or heavily, heavy use of dot net. Remolding you're probably gonna have to replace that with something more modern. Yes, there are cases where you're gonna have to change your code. But odds are pretty good that you can just re compile. He's folks got stuck at one point one because they were having trouble moving to. If I you know digging that's late two thousand five I'm trying to remember stuff from there. And that was a lot of it had to do with binary incompatibilities with the binary format or or or or dot net. Remoulding? If you weren't using those particular technologies, it was pretty easy to move forward. But. And stretch our memories here. But it wasn't until two thousand what seven probably the w CF finally stabilized. And so there is a yeah. Okay. W still optimistic. It was still a battle. Yeah. That's true. Well. I also w star Fs really got their act together by twenty ten. Well, that's that's probably fair, although point W CF was looking way too complicated. When a p I was doing his thing. And and. So. So you put yourself back in that timeframe, you think well in and I did this I myself, and I advised a lot of organizations and individuals that throughout those years as said w CF is the future. But right now, the only stable thing if you gotta get worked on his remote ING, right? And so there was at least five years if maybe to your point maybe more like eight years of of heavy use of remote ING to build client server n tier apps because there was no viable alternative. Yeah. And and that's the that's the part. I think that keeps most people kind of trapped or or they were using SP dot net yet web forms, and there were changes a web.

Microsoft Abadia eight years five years
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"The the the reach that dot net provides at least for in the foreseeable future for probably many years, we are all left as developers try to figure out. How can we write code that can run on dot net? Car dot net framework and Zaman and blazer, and maybe other web seventy frameworks to write blazer is just one of several that are being worked on. So then the question is, well, how do I write essentially if we boil it down? How do I write code that can run on the call it the legacy dot net framework? The N dot net. Chor and Mano those are really the three implementations of dot net that are out there widely used today, you consider you WPA its own hometown dot net. I do it really is until widely part. So true. So true. How did I get myself into that one? Yeah. Your words, not mine every go. Okay. Great. Thanks, leave that on the rocky. But it, but it's true. When I I have a slide when I'm talking about this PowerPoint slide that really talks about four different flavors of dot net. And and hopefully this puts it in context in that dot net. Core is not necessarily everyone's ultimate destination. It is just one of four different implementations of dot net. And it's a good one. And it probably is the future, but for most of us, especially at an enterprise level. We gotta figure out how to deal with all four for the foreseeable future and so- dot net. Standard is what really opens that door dot net. Standard is nothing more than an interface definition that you know, it's an interface just like a class interface or NC sharper v and you say, well, if I write my code against this interface. So if I write my code to target dot net standard, then my code can run on any dot net. Implementation that implements dot net. Standard right Saran worry about going to core per se get standard, and then it's this another stage of the conversation. That's exactly right. It's what we used to do with portable class, libraries, right? Yes, portable you can think I think at least a portable class libraries is like the prototype for it was flawed. And it was I'm bishops in pretty cool. But but it was a flaw at approach that than was refined. And I don't think we would get we would know. I don't think we would have dot net. Standard without the peace PCL's mayo. They think we that was there was a lot of learning that happened. A Ryan that those lessons were taken and applied and now we've gotten at standard. Yeah. It may be too part of it to to be fair to everybody at Microsoft PCL's, actually re trying to solve a tougher problem. Because at that time few years ago there were more than four targets involved. There was also windows phone and silver light and some of those especially the windows phone target was extremely restrictive, right? Right. And so PCL's if we really look at it. They had a harder problem to solve at at least. Now, you know, mono and dot net framework of always been pretty close to peers dot net. Core took until version two to become here and udub UP all similarly, basically took until windows ten within the last couple of years to become a peer. And so we've now have got four implementations of dot net. That can support dot net. Standard. And this is important because dot net. Standard really is the vast bulk of dot net. Yeah. Just take away all the UI stuff and any legacy, yo like system dot enterprise transactions. Yeah. The stuff from complex and. Take away all of the truly per platform per you. I things and dot net. Standard really covers be sensually. Everything you're going to encounter. I really appreciate that. But it is the stuff like Dunakor for me is really just for web, Dev, right?.

dot Chor Zaman Dunakor Microsoft Ryan
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"That's got a dot net or PHP place or or are some CMS engine that has to get executed every time someone request page. That's extra latency right there. While you think about like, Don Iraq's where put a two shows a week largely that does change. Right. Most of the time these pages could be served from cash. They exactly yeah. And even you know, I've been work. Working with some of the guys Orsi sharp corner. You know, you look at that and their content changes a lot during the day. It's not like constantly changing. And if we have a we have a five minute delay on the on the list of new articles show up on the homepage. Is that the end of the world, not really, you know, if we gotta find every five minutes that paid at home page updates and you'll even the comments on on those pages are being loaded a symmetric erasing Nestle after the after the actual article contents load. It's loaded later on with Java scrip-, so pretty much everything on the page. It can be pre-rendered. We don't have to use the engine to render the core content of the page. So let's not at demand time. Is there anything we haven't covered here? Chris is feel like you've got it to me. Whereas we just gotta think about it. This public facing in any way. How is coming up with us? You a have out is it worth getting consultant, the seems like a scummy business. You know, it is it's a it's a space kind of learning about in your right there are there are people out there that are just used car salesman. At this is the case with anything when it comes to the web. I see a lot of times. I can't tell you. How many crazy stories have heard about salesman? Tell him.

Chris salesman Don Iraq Nestle consultant five minutes five minute
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"This is very could use unmanaged memory. They're just bites does values, and you know, how big any given reads gonna be. So you're not worried there. Yes. But when it comes to the writ method, you have to specify the length reading tax tax, you have aided time or whatever makes you happy. Yeah. Interesting. Interesting. Interesting fast fast fast. I I'm thinking I'm gonna talk to Markeith about an audio. Oh, I see because he uses, you know, audio buffers ASIO, but they're managed buffers will in this particular what you were saying like folks that are building libraries for other developers consume can get these performance benefits and memory location benefits in their library. So xactly the salmon, actually, he's. Easing unsafe mode in some of those things, but what's the what's the difference between using on safe mode? Did you pointers in in the managed heap versus spans in the unmanaged? He spun gives you type and memory safety because it has all of the safety checks for K. So you don't need to go on safe. I say, and but prevents is on par. Yes. Okay. Exactly. And sometimes it's even faster. And moreover when you're using unsafe in sharp, you need to remember that CR has the fitter called, I L verification. Yeah. So to ensure safety it's validating the AL dot to produce. So for example to prevent from accessing an element in our that belongs to different. Alright. Yeah. But when you go on safe, we don't do that we cannot do that. Because you're using pointers, and we cannot validate the scout. Yeah. And some of the crowd providers can for example foot require mental new like you could run your dot net coat. But only one that can pass I over affiliation. Okay. And we've spun and all of the fitters from Europe seven point two and up seven point three you don't really need to go unsafe anymore. Is there anything else that we need to know about span that we haven't talked about might be one more Fink one ever. You're not sure what the tooth in terms of performance. You. Profile it, and if your friend as you said, he's using algae streams and he's using currently managed memory. He should have read benchmark against pool manatee memory and against a management alter. So we should always measure. We should never be guessing. Like, and surprisingly unmanageable isn't always the fastest. And we we need to measure that. Yeah. I did the you gotta benchmark and figure out if it's going to make a difference or not make sense because you're also making riskier code like, you have to be a lot more careful playing with a manage memory, Jessica. So he's not going to give you a big benefit. It's just not worth the risk for future. Maintainability this. This is why it's not our default recommendation. Sure, it's possibly if you know what you're doing. Can you know every advantage and disadvantages anew? Accept the risk wants like managing your own threads same thing. Most of the time. You're gonna do it wrong. Yeah. You know, it's like four people who know how to do it. Right. And you're not one of them. So what's next for you at him? What what's in your in box? Besides going Redmond. Oh, I'm cutting. The also looking into the release of the two point two to make sure we have noted aggressions. Yes. And we also have Bielsa plan for some new performance-related features. And we also Kentucky dating godly. So there is a lot of things going on with performance. Call exciting times love that it's across operating systems to. Yeah. So, you know, it feels like this system memory class is about being able to respect the variations and operating systems while using dot net's them. Yes, that's really powerful. And I love the fact that it's open source. I've been working at Microsoft for almost a year. And I so far. I haven't thought and I can quit wasn't open. So that's great. Yeah. You living get up for your. I'm not even using VPN. Wow. Just open source as up. Well, Adam thanks very much for being with us today. It was a pleasure talking to you. Thank you for having. All right. And we'll see you next time on dot net. Rocks. Dot net. Rocks is brought to you by Franklin's net and produced by plop studios.

dot net Markeith AL Redmond Europe Fink Microsoft Adam Jessica Kentucky Franklin
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"So he's going to prevent you from doing something that you shouldn't be doing. But you need to remember that the size of allocated stack memory shouldn't be for example, dependent on the input from the user. Yeah. This is not Santa isn't sanitizer? Inputs know what's coming in? Yes. And you're gonna explode. It could have be vector attacked like somebody could have created a web requests that will kill unite. Here's yeah. Metal work just fine to all you gotta do this fire you Meghan half. And you're done. This is why if you go to Carfax orca Sierra, and if you search for stack look you'll see that every politic was sweet is using the skewered goes through detailed security review. Right. We have security Tompkins in Microsoft, and they make sure that we are not accepting anything that could be. It is literally a buffer overflow exploit opportunity. I'm just delighted we're talking about stack overflow, and it's not the websites true. Plus, a you know, it's been a long time since we talked about, you know, real memory science anything, and you don't have to. We've had so many years of not thinking about memory now. Yeah. I think Chris sells might have been the last person thirty to sixty four bit versions of the OS, and how we did memory allocation around as p dot net and things is a little more reasonable even NATs years. Yeah. Right. We don't even think about it. Do you? Do you see any reason or on a thirty two bit MO for any of this stuff anymore? Just sixty four all the time. Now, that's the go sixty four you'll ever some other scenarios I o t and some more constrained sure, where we we're we're dealing with hardware that is still thirty to donate all the memory. We need speed and performance, and you have to develop a self toward that you just have to some dependency that Bill does to share share while used to be the biggest issue for me was often. The drivers we were depending on where the only they had sixty four bit once they just didn't work. The word signed properly they've used on rely. And if they didn't work they weren't fucking hard enough. So this is part of Donna car. Two point one NC sharp seven point two. How do you get those bits? So their system that memory packet, right? And this back to dozen support only at car it targets sixteen against frameworks, including the standard one point zero mono- Zamaran unique and few other things. So I could be directly writing to memory in a phone that could cause any problems at all. Wow. What was your involvement in span? Oh development. It's actually very special type to me because it was my first open source contribution back in two thousand fifteen kidding. We work for Microsoft. No. I read that blog posts from ARIN Stannard complaining about the state of the open source community. And I don't explain what he did in his most up to develop a single Alpin dot net. And he had to put ACA from dot dot net implement few aglet algorithms and at the end of the buck passed on ask what other Dutton developers are doing other dose writing award. This moment of time was like, no, I don't know. I'm writing softer for preventing blackouts, so serious Fink. And today's lighter Daffy has posted a message on Twitter that he created new product slice. It was called slice by then. Yeah. And my one of my favorite ways of learning is to read somebody else scout Joe is one of my guru. So nice. Clones, the repo and started reading the Cote NFL few places that could have been improved from the performance perspective. Yeah. And I did create my first Chris Lau. Oh, yeah. Slice dot net is still on get how law conclude link to it. That's great. And that became span. Yes..

ARIN Stannard Chris Lau Microsoft Fink Santa Bill Meghan Cote NFL Twitter NC Donna Joe sixty four bit thirty two bit
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"We mean John did a great job of like creating a newsletter this year getting everybody to like announce things to create some standard communications will help. Can we take that marketing, quote, unquote to the next level as you know, I'm in marketing. So I think a lot about how do we raise awareness and perception of foundation, but at the same time helper community do better. And I think that that's going to help goes of what I noted come to mind right in the early -solutely in. You know, there's a huge amount of positive staff. I mean, I net and Neta events and speakers, you know, hugely influenced me as I was starting out in dot net. And we'd love to see that sort of spirit continue. But what's great to have it like not directly tied to a marketing group in a marketing budget at Microsoft, what if that's, you know, supported by an industry wide thing where multiple companies are chipping in multiple, you know, and and are excited about it. So in like Beth said, there's opportunities for speaker grants for things like, you know, entire events like code camps, or or speaker tours, you know, and then also things like focus things on, you know, workshops by open source leaders, you know, teaching people here's how to contribute to open source, and you know, I mean the so and then we've talked about. Things to like where we've had dot net. Confidence an in or I mean as a virtual event, what if we actually had some like in person events in meet ups that are kind of larger than just, you know, meet up maybe it's a full day or a couple of days. Also, meet up dot com requires the annual fee or something doesn't it? I mean, just for some April wanna start meet ups in their area. It does we've been supporting a meet at pro group that we announced at dot net com. Twenty seventeen and it keeps getting bigger so we're currently at two hundred forty five groups fif, fifty one countries worldwide. And so that is already part of our budget is we pay all those fees, and we've created a meet up pro group so that we can organize and search through them, and and can send content out tall them, for instance, after dot net confidence here, we sent out all the slide decks, and we help them organize in person events. I forget thank actually. Wow. Step back and think okay? The foundation is clearly about governance. So make sure the right projects, and that the is dotting the TS across for legal and licensing and all that sort of thing. But I appreciate this education angle..

Neta Microsoft John Beth
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"It's dot net. Rocks. I'm Carl Franklin. That's Richard Campbell. That was John Galloway. And that other voice. There is Beth Massine. We're talking about the dot net foundation twenty five thousand contributors. Wow. Actually, we just updated that number. Yeah. It's this is one of those things we have to keep updating those. Connect actually, so we we have an open source programs office, just like most large companies do in in within Microsoft, and they do a lot of stuff for like, you know, code scanning not gonna suffer making sure we're like internally across Microsoft doing open source bright, quote, unquote. Well, they also collect they also have you'll get hub has like all the data. Right is open. Right. And so we take we mind a lot of that data. We took a look at the the projects that make up the platform just the platform, so like mono Donat core is net. We looked at those projects and were at like just community contributions where it's over sixty one thousand now since his since those started so that twenty five thousand number is a couple years old. Actually, we need to update that on the website. But it's incredible to see that. And you know, if you also include Microsoft employees, it's just it's just insane. So very. The active very, very active platform. No, I'm trying to get my head around. What you guys were talking about before the break with this whole, if we see a gap. So you see a gap something missing. What then what would you do about it? Yeah. Well, and again, this is something where I'm excited about having community community board members coming in because a lot of the time. There's there's discussions on Twitter where people will say, you know, what the dot net foundation should do this or should do that. And you know, also. Yeah, that sounds great. I'm kind of book through the next six months, but you know, so but on the other hand if we have like a lar- aboard if seven active community members, and we've got other people like that scales. A lot better and those people can also help involve other people. So that that's one thing. And then what could we do if we see a gap one is, you know, looking for maybe a small project or a project that's had limited contributors and trying to. You know, trying to catalyze that trying to get that, you know, moving faster bring in people bring in a, you know, with like marketing the project or that kind of thing it also raises awareness to Microsoft employees as well. There is a lot of research projects that are written in C sharp better coming into the foundation that are filling some gaps. So just just wanted to also not it's about the community. And when we talk when we say community, it's about like the engineers within Microsoft as well, it is part of the community. Wanna do preferred the sentiment that you see a gap, and you think somebody's already filled this just aren't as visible as they should be. Let's go fine rather than let's go make a new thing. Exactly. And a lot of the time. There are things also where it's like, you know, hey, maybe there's something that can company, you know, that's that's been built internal to an enterprise in its mature. And hey, why not open source, and we we have things like that. Where people us and say, hey, we've built this. Amazing XSL Parsa or whatever could could in. So that's also a thing. It's just kind of getting the word out. If you've built an amazing XL, just what's up. I'm just saying. Pivotal steel toe. Right. They came in and feeling like micro service patterns right on the dot net platform, they're basically spring for for that steel toe. So that that we saw a gap. They come on last year..

Microsoft dot net foundation Carl Franklin John Galloway Richard Campbell Beth Massine Twitter six months
"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"net" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Follow her on Twitter and get up at Beth Massey. That's MIS. Sl. Welcome beth. Welcome john. Hey. I watch out for that spider. It's just a field spider. I think it's gonna be okay. If I scream you'll know what's going on. I'm looking at all your old NBC books and they're down. They're like six bucks a box. I've seen one there's a Chinese version of one of them. And I'm like, yeah. Ben watching it on a few. I I may pick it up someday. Well is exempt it's fifty bucks. I'm gonna go along with fifteen bucks. What's that about? Oh, it's it's in Korean. I think there you go. Yeah. I try writing a book with a version of v in the title. So you see bucks were quite a grind because they were there's a new one out all the time. And now with AS peanut courts. Even accelerated, it's like forget it. It's pretty hard to write a actual printed book these days. Yeah. My my two books that I wrote for John Wiley and sons were V four zero internet programming followed by v six oh internet programming and the shelf. Life was abysmal. True. All textbooks. Are there? Well, I don't know. I mean, there are a lot of books where you can cover these general topics. But yeah, I suppose, you're right. I mean once it's in print. It's automatically kind of the time clock is ticking. What you know back in the eighties nineties. You know, you have a language in the compiler that lasted ten years, you know? But nowadays, it's not true technology moves too fast. I think stuff. I mean, I think you probably could write a book on like programming fundamentals that would last long time. But like if you're talking about higher level PEX, that's just it. Some wise man told me one, I don't know. I was probably in my twenties never ever write a book. Especially if you're thinking, you're gonna make money. The one trade off. Is it really does force you to learn something. Yeah. You do learn stuff by putting the other a book. I mean, you really when something is going off to the printers, and they're like, this is your Lhasa. And also the editors that editors like up to my writing level quite a bit. Because everything I like how this is good at I get it back and tones headlines, and you're like, oh boy. I'm really I'm really enjoying both of you making fun of writing books while I'm this is the year. I've spoken history of dot net. Right. So Thanks. store. Book. I was just gonna say that. I mean, there's going to be code complete. There's going to be the patterns books the gang of four in Richard's book on the history of dot net. Right. That's a story. It's not like training. You know, two story. It's gonna be awesome. I'm just trying to get it to the place where it doesn't suck. That's all I'm trying to do. All right. I guess we should talk about the dot net foundation. That's do it who's I oh, let me start again. And Beth look for acme as she does. So so the NFL nations been around since two thousand fourteen and Beth was actually involved with it a while before I was way back in the beginning. But the the goal of the dot net foundation is to support the dot net. Open-source ecosystem dot net was started by Microsoft, but it's it's open source in in now for a lot of our repos were seeing like seventy eighty percent of our contributions are external to Microsoft. It really is an open source. Not just you know project, but family of projects and also a lot of projects contributed completely by community that are supported by dot net foundation. So what we've announced connect is that we're doing two things one is we're expanding to an open membership system. And this is inspired by a lot of other foundation. We looked at tons of foundations. I've I've been the executive director for almost two years now. And this was actually something that Martin Woodward who is in the executive director role before me he had been working on this..

dot net foundation Beth Massey dot Twitter executive director Richard Microsoft Martin Woodward NBC Lhasa John Wiley NFL acme seventy eighty percent ten years two years