30 Burst results for "NCI"

"nci" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

Data Engineering Podcast

03:40 min | Last week

"nci" Discussed on Data Engineering Podcast

"Late in the data world. We see renaissance of almost ci where we see data teams investing in automated testing procedures so for example whenever someone checks in code that transforms the data or even controls the out of the dashboard. There is domestic process. That run tests may be builds a staging data set and then even maybe automatically merges this code and deploys to etl orchestrator so that really helps make sure that whatever the change management process it's not only available to people but it's also medically enforced strident is no change. That's by us a certain testing which is required as far as the the tooling in the platforms in these sort of impact that it can have on effective data quality issues. What are some of the ways that they can contribute to the occurrence of data quality issues as far as the systems that you're building the way that your data platform is architect added and some of the design considerations that teams should be thinking about as they're planning out their data platform or as they're starting to think about introducing new systems or new processes so as a big believer in great workflows. I think that the best way tools can supports reliable data n. help data teams ensure high data. Quality is to really facilitate those strong workflows and to give an example. We talked about version control. We talked to out testing. Nci so we see that certain tools that we now consider part of the modern data stock for example dbt for sequel transformations or tools. Like died sir. For general purpose data pipelines tasks. They come with those features and frameworks rated built so they already facilitate version control. They have built in testing frameworks. Make it really easy for developers to write tests. Run them as sort of the pipeline. And dictation frameworks. That helped both keep the combination close to the code which is always great but also serve that the communication in a nice you can be consumed by the -sarily the data develop response data users and very importantly they have separate production and staging developing environments. That also is very important concept for making sure that the change management process is reliable as far as the potential consequences. We have addressed some of that where you know if you have a wrong column or the data is old. It can potentially lead to costly decisions. That ended up being based on incorrect assumptions around the data. That's available and so how can organizations start to shift to being more proactive in the data quality management and start to still the understanding at the business level that it's worth the investment in the time and energy that it takes the engineering team to create these systems for proactive management and also how to instill the sort of level of care and diligence. That's necessary across engineering teams. Not just within the data organization that you know data quality is everybody's problem and anybody can have an impact on it so i think probably at first step. That's important. Inauguration is one on recognizing that there was a problem and getting a buy in to solve it. Fortunately we still see that some teams you live with as the status quo right and so we have to recognize that. There's a problem and we are able to improve it..

Nci
Interview With Author, Dan McCrory

The Radio Show

02:20 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Author, Dan McCrory

"Are so dan. Thank you for taking the time to come on the show and talk to us. We definitely appreciate thank you. I take an opportunity now. We definitely appreciate it. So so then your story. I mean you got many layers from unions to being a political candidates author. So let's kinda start at the beginning talk about a career in telecommunications how did that how did the split a ma bell like affect you directly and i was gonna say but some of our younger viewers and watch. Can you explain it in just what my bill was. Chair ma. bell was World for a lot of people that work for the phone company and it was the same place to work. You never have to worry about your job going to weigh. It was going to be there for life and a lot of diets. He's gonna started that way. A lot of people. There are grandmother work their their mother worked there and then they work their in in their expecting their their daughter to work there but a lot of things happen around nineteen eighties. When was mci world com was trying to get into long long distance business. Because that's where the money was done and We eight hundred block everywhere they could so finally they sued in federal court and the federal court said. Well you can either give them all this money or you can just break up the whole thing no longer a monopoly or whether they call it ought oligarchy. Company agreed to that. and in the meantime. Nci went belly up. They're no longer around enjoying the spoils of their Lawsuit so it was a scary time. We were used to having to gloves and compete in the open market and A lot of companies went by the wayside more were gobbled up by seven companies are created in the wake of the waco. Rageh up there we go sorry. And so let's created all new world and eventually sbc on texas of mine everybody else out and They changed their name day g again because everybody knew that

Chair Ma DAN Bell MCI Federal Court NCI Rageh Waco SBC Texas
"nci" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:42 min | 4 months ago

"nci" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

"You're so really. I think in. Nci has embarked along this pathway of being able to manage enormous data sits and to envisage an actually implement had hooked as data sits up effectively with lifestyle For large scale data analytics. We've brought along as pathway through our our substantial long-running collaborations with the the government agencies the bureau of meteorology and johnson strategy and so we had enormous status. It's coming in that we knew we had to figure out how to stand up and make them onto bullock sensible into into purple and reusable the called fair principles and we basically had to figure out how to make that work. So so in the nci we have two associate. Directors was on williams who essentially runs the big systems big machines And make sure that the entire facility is really running efficiently and the other assistant director has been evans. Dr been evans. Who works on the side of our organization which builds all these enormous data sets and data services and works on the bed data. That's needed in order. That the data sets can be found quickly and used analytics. Workflows and a lot of work is done with the international communities to agree on data standards because if the data sits in different countries and not using same data standards than you've already got big blocker four into operability right so huge amount of basic guys into data standards of the outset and then cure these data sets generating will the meta data fields and then in in shedding those data sits on really high performance parallel system architectures so it. Nci we is less to fall systems for this really performance. Data sets so. That's in a sense. An agenda that we had to build in order to deliver on our joint collaborative missions with the government agencies. You'll quite correct that there. There are ever increasing security requirements around the data. We didn't come into it at an angle from the get go. But you know geopolitical considerations of developing and evolving And so we are very very conscious that we need to have robust security around the data and fortunately we have been able to avoid any catastrophes in that regard. I i can't say a whole lot about exactly how we implemented a security. That wouldn't necessarily be the right thing to address in this context but safe to say that australia's very conscious that we need to scale up in continually cement security architecture around these labs sovereign data sense. And there's a lot of actually that just moving forwards in australia to ensure that critical infrastructure doesn't date have the ron security provisions around and we think. Nci will be in the frame for that kind of critical infrastructure legislation framework. Additionally this new fields were moving into which is going to put even greater demands on our ability to implement sophisticated lays off encryption software secure end data security. So we're currently in conversation with a number of a major stakeholders an genetics medicine. Here in australia..

evans two associate meteorology johnson australia williams Nci
"nci" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

03:31 min | 4 months ago

"nci" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

"But the carrots. Nci was put in place around about twenty eleven two thousand twelve and we build a new data center on campus and put in the previous supercomputing facility which was called ryan now when i was set up with financial input from the federal government. They then we're really looking for a degree of leverage of their investment And so the federal contributions to were helped to facilitate the standing up of the big facility and the big shane And the new data center per se and they contribute a certain amount of our national expenses. But i asked us dan to negotiate the larger part of operating expenses. With am i just stike holders. And in the case of nci. This was done by substantial collaboration with four major organizations. I was the australian national university. Which is our organizational host. It was the csi. Giovanni australia and the bureau of meteorology so the one university into three big government agencies collaborated in a way that allowed to build out and develop and the common thread across those three. Big agencies was really climate weather simulation and geospatial science earth sciences and so for example the the great majority of large-scale climate modeling research is done at nci. And it's done. In collaboration between the bureau of meteorology the csi and the university sector which has some substantial activity also in that mind so nci became if you will the collaborative sandpit that these organizations could actually work together on very large common data sets in degenerate very large data. It's through the simulation work and the the other component of that was with geoscience australia. They are the secretaries for the international agreements which bring labs scout satellite imaging data four alpine out of the globe down to australia and nci was tasked to work with Jason social strata. To figure out how to host is enormous data sets and make them there in available findable so forth and accessible and utilize -able and to have them sitting right next to lash compute. So that you could run reading under scale analytics and so those two big demands of s sciences geospatial science and climate weta Have been key drivers which have shaped the evolution of ncis of the past decade. A then looking out across to the police center in west australia. My colleague max nichols is director across there. Currently and and the policy center was set up also rather same sort of time nearly a decade ago and they also had a sort of a divine based big mandate and that was that they were tasked with delivering storage and compute requirements for the square kilometre orion. Which is an enormous international. Consortium don't building out radio astronomy capabilities and so australia together with a number of a lot. Well actually allowed consortium internationally have contributed to to the money that builds these enormous radio astronomy facilities and.

west australia a decade ago csi three about twenty eleven two thousa one university Jason social strata past decade australia bureau of meteorology max nichols four major organizations Giovanni nci Nci university government australian ryan
The Impact of Australian High Performance Computing in the Coming decade

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:01 min | 4 months ago

The Impact of Australian High Performance Computing in the Coming decade

"Joining us in the podcast. Today we have professor shawn smith that director of national computational infrastructure and see i and he's also a professor or computation of nanno matera science and technology at australian national university. Professor smith is also a fellow of the royal australian chemical institute a fellow american is association for the advancement of science a fellow of the institute of chemical engineers and he will be sharing with us the highlights of high performance computing at nci. Thank you professor for joining us in the podcast. Today i thought we kick off by taking a look at the evolution and development in australia. Research backed by high performance computing and data infrastructure which plays a pivotal role in national research. But also have wide ranging economic and social impacts. I'm so for example as you pointed out in your presentation at supercomputing asia Looking at the year two thousand twenty the events challenging for many with the pandemic but particularly so for australia with the bushfire which i thought i very salient. Examples of where policymakers and help provide as neat fayza reliable information to get a sense of what is yet to come to better manage the situation but beyond these examples is also cancer research. Physics et cetera. So for our listeners. Can you tell us more about you know audi australia. Research are backed. By high performance. Computing infrastructure have evolved over the decades. You certainly are one constructive way to approach that question. Jain may be. If if i summarize the way in which australia to tijuana one phones compute facilities have evolved over the past decade which gives a flavor of how that the sick to hebron australia has developed in the major demise signs that have been really key in driving it forwards so we have to tier one facilities in australia One is the australian at the australian national university campus. Here in canberra the other one is the posey supercomputing center in person west australia. So both of these centers were set up in their initial in the current model as it were nearly a decade ago and when nci was stood up in its current form. The australian national university has long long history of computing. But the carrots. Nci was put in place around about twenty eleven two thousand twelve and we build a new data center on campus and put in the previous supercomputing facility which was called ryan now when i was set up with financial input from the federal government. They then we're really looking for a degree of leverage of their investment And so the federal contributions to were helped to facilitate the standing up of the big facility and the big shane And the new data center per se and they contribute a certain amount of our national expenses. But i asked us dan to negotiate the larger part of operating expenses. With am i just stike holders. And in the case of nci. This was done by substantial collaboration with four major organizations. I was the australian national university. Which is our organizational host. It was the csi. Giovanni australia and the bureau of meteorology so the one university into three big government agencies collaborated in a way that allowed to build out and develop and the common thread across those three. Big agencies was really climate weather simulation and geospatial science earth sciences and so for example the the great majority of large-scale climate modeling research is done at nci. And it's done. In collaboration between the bureau of meteorology the csi and the university sector which has some substantial activity also in that mind so nci became if you will the collaborative sandpit that these organizations could actually work together on very large common data sets in degenerate very large data. It's through the simulation work and the the other component of that was with geoscience australia. They are the secretaries for the international agreements which bring labs scout satellite imaging data four alpine out of the globe down to australia and nci was tasked to work with Jason social strata. To figure out how to host is enormous data sets and make them there in available findable so forth and accessible and utilize -able

Australian National University Australia NCI Nanno Matera Royal Australian Chemical Inst Fellow American Is Association Institute Of Chemical Engineer Shawn Smith Professor Smith Posey Supercomputing Center West Australia Bureau Of Meteorology Tijuana Jain Hebron Audi Asia Giovanni Australia Canberra
FSC Mauritius' Loretta Joseph on Her Road Into Crypto Regulation

Bitcoin Radio

03:56 min | 6 months ago

FSC Mauritius' Loretta Joseph on Her Road Into Crypto Regulation

"Tell me about yourself your your background. And how did you get into crypto. i'm Really trade on a trading floor with the pace of paper and a Pixel in a three bond pitch in nineteen ninety one so school. I think students they alternatively asset class series. I got into crypto. After i tried to retire of was running as plug banks in india not decided to get back to australia and i decided to retire but then i had to come. Conversation on bats lowest getting into the city with the head of the astride securities and investment commission Equivalent of the. us Say is very different. The by and he said russia unitil to single blockchain. because it's going to change the world. At the time. I thought he was talking about monographs because we have daughters decide vij so i spend the weekend Confused that helped more process to change the world but when we met again i was time so i have baynes Said two thousand fourteen. I was riveted tried to. I didn't look at blockchain for to start with oprah counties. I actually not how the help may what i did. My house lot is attributed to china and one thing that we've always had pined about on me tried bach. it's exit. Classes was the time to clear and settle so clearance settlement system which took eight plus three take straight to clear equity in australia for a small stock exchange. I told the stock exchange to obtain. So that was my introduction to china and then i decided that i'd been have a look at what bitcoin was and i found it very two run stand on on. What is this thing. So i spent the next couple of us via las spaniels Systems faking to develop his. I'm offended. robert. Kahn will internet. He wrote the to particle. Nci pays all. I miss him one day. Because he was on. Google and i said bob my name's without a need to understand what she built. I don't think he got too many telephone calls like ask that. Bob has been mental. So i spent a lot of time. Now seems to Undestanding protocols In understanding what the what the incident did and and how that was built on the electrical engineering. Let's those bank shops. So then i looked did become wasn't always thinking we're calling these things wrong. The wrong terminology. As i said i was in marketing to structure to promise case giants looking at quebec howard was What did a crypto exchange wasn't. I'm thinking well no no talking the same language so then i helped set up. Something called starting digital chamber of commerce in ways said about washing the self-regulations bitcoin. Because i thought this doesn't understand what they're doing and nobody else understands. Said this little confusion Then seems of then became a regulator so then one regularises. The government started to come to me. What what what is this vice. And what is it. I'm so the first thing i did. Try to build this clearance settlement system in australia on stock exchange. The jockey shines we strive in stock exchange head. I had meant mandatory against monopoly and Day a software is written in the corporation. That strategy anais will. This is not good young. I remember when we moved from rainfall. Triggers today destroyed. We built outrace make systems because we had nothing else to do with the by about next sale but the chest. The clearest of strength shines inherently came into existence because we didn't have technology so the corporations act times mistrial. There is now room for other people to come into that space. So that was my those sort of against road into regulation and

Astride Securities And Investm VIJ Las Spaniels Systems Australia Baynes China BOB Oprah Russia NCI India Kahn Robert United States Quebec Google Giants Howard Confusion Anais
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Fuelling Change

PODSHIP EARTH

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Fuelling Change

"From the moment that I came out of college and I came out of college into the Black, power movement. I knew that I wanted to devote my life to try to advance racial justice. Achieve Racial Justice and I've had a lot of different opportunities to do that. So my whole adult life has been devoted to this, but it's only been in recent years that I have come to the conclusion that so many of the systems and attitudes that hold us back as a nation in terms of being able to be fully inclusive. We're never set up for that goal and reform efforts two years ago, policy link had one of its summits, and the theme was our power, our future, our nation. We were trying to make the point in two thousand eighteen. Really did have the power to try to achieve what we wanted. That the future will be determined by what happens to the very people who are being left behind and that we need to stop standing on the side of the nation. Mentally thinking about what it needs to do NCI. Selves as leaders to do it. And my opening talk was called radical imagination fueling change, and really was trying to set a tone that says. It is within our imaginations to visualize what it is. We need and we need to use that as our North Star. So that even if we're just doing reform efforts, we know that the reform is not winning. It has to be a step in the direction of annual star. and to turn things upside down in terms of how we think about change. Standing that we will not achieve health through the provision of healthcare. It's essential but insufficient. We need healthy communities. We need healthy environments. We need access to food. We need incomes that allow people to be able to live with dignity to understand. Providing healthcare doesn't achieve wellbeing. That, we can't solve our housing problems just by building more housing. We need to rethink housing because we have a Lotta. Empty housing around with the structure of how we think about housing allows for Empty Housing and homelessness to exist side by side. We need to begin to think of housing as a human right, and also lifted up the notion that we cannot arrest ourselves to safety that police are not what we need to build safe communities. We need to think about getting rid of police and asking ourselves. What do we need for the safety that we? We want. It takes trust it takes familiarity. It takes a whole lot of things that have nothing to do with policing in so back in two thousand eighteen I never expected this. Those ideas would now be and center so when we started the podcast a year ago, little less, we just picked up on those things that we were moving forward, and it has been really interesting to find the advocates all across the country, and to tell their stories, and to lift up their solutions, and now seeing them out there on the streets of the nation leading change. It's amazing to see. That transformation and maybe kind of recount. The the history of why do we have police I think we'll take? Police grinded just saying we're not GONNA arrest our way to safety. Why do we even have a police force? When I decided to do the podcast on police abolition? Educate myself and what I discovered. Is that police in the south started to catch runaway slaves? That's how they developed. Developed that police in the northeast started to hold down the demands and activities of labor in the southwest. It was the Texas Rangers Oh, and we know what they were doing. And yet we have taken these systems that were all about contain and control, and we tried to turn it into the mechanism, but community safety and wellbeing, and it's ridiculous. What we really need to ask is what. What do we want and then think about who can do it? We know that we have a mental health problem that keeps presenting itself to the police over half of the police killings in the nation or of people who have mental health problems, and yet we're not turn to mental health professionals to deal with that, which trained police how to respond when there's a mental health emergency and. And then not getting it obviously that we know that young people don't have enough to do, and we give police money for things like midnight, basketball and other kind of sports programs for young people, and yet we have neighborhood associations. We have boys and girls clubs. We have organizations that are there to engage young people who are strapped for resources and going out of business every day. When we think about domestic violence, a lot of domestic violence requires a number of mentions that have nothing to do with policing and so moving from understanding. Why did this institution develop in the first place to asking? Is this the institution for the goals that we now in modern day see that we need and thinking about using our budgets so that we are really as municipalities and other regions investing the resources where they really you're gonNA. Make the difference that lead to wellbeing that to safety,

Texas Rangers Basketball North Star NCI
First climate change, now COVID-19: Tips for managing the stress

Climate Cast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

First climate change, now COVID-19: Tips for managing the stress

"Of Choosing HOPE IN TIMES OF CRISIS. I'm NPR. Chief meteorologist Paul Hutler. Here with climate cast in the past few years many psychologists reports seeing patients with physical and emotional impacts from climate change. Now I had cove nineteen and it's easy for some of us to feel overwhelmed even hopeless at times but mental health professionals say hope can be an effective antidote to climate and Cova Nineteenth Stress Kristie white as a clinical psychologist practicing in the twin cities. Hi Christie welcome to climate cast. Hypothe- thank you for having me. You recently wrote about this for the nonprofit climate news website. Nci what kind of emotions are patients feeling with climate change? Many young people are expressing concern about whether to have children what their careers might even look like. I'll also talk with people who are experiencing a sense of loss so noticing. Some of the environmental changes in the places where they use to Spend time enjoy nature. Climate change is really a magnifying of health equity and health disparities. So those are some of the things that people of color are coming in expressing concerns about. Cristiano WANTS REMEMBER READING SOMEWHERE. That action cures fear can acting to face. Your climate fears have positive benefits. Yes absolutely I love that quote. A very common reaction to fear is avoidance. This is kind of a typical survival response but one of the problems with fat is does exacerbate our fear and our anxiety by teaching us at the only way we can cope with it is is running away from it one of the things that. I am frequently helping people with is developing some courage and the emotional stamina to face their fear so that they can turn something previously was may be experienced as a threat that needed to be avoided or escaped from into a challenge that is capable of being faced. I love that you talk about choosing hope. How can we do that and make it feel productive in real? So it's more than just a temporary attitude. One of the key pieces to being able to choose hope as I acknowledging and making space for those difficult emotional experiences viewing them as inherently valuable and useful data points that. Tell us that. There's something happening that matters to us. Kristie my job. I feel like at least I'm doing the work on climate. I think it helps me deal with my apprehensions. What other tools our advice? Can you give our listeners? For dealing with climate change or other emotions they might be feeling right now. Identify what is within your control acknowledged. What's within your control? And maybe even start thinking creatively about how you define. What's in your control? So for example if if you need to develop skills to manage something effectively think about how something might be able to come within your realm of control or influence by cultivating those skills or developing that resource capacity. Self-care is key which means getting good sleep getting physical activity eating healthy setting limits on the amount of information. That's coming in and being very self aware and adjusting your approach based on that awareness

Kristie White Cristiano Chief Meteorologist Cova Nineteenth NPR Hypothe Paul Hutler Christie
Katrina Adams on making tough decisions

The Tennis.com Podcast

06:41 min | 1 year ago

Katrina Adams on making tough decisions

"Hear from former pro and former US TA president Katrina Adams. Okay Katrina welcomes the tennis dot Com. Podcast it is an honor to have you joining us today thank you. I'm happy to be here kind of want to start with the biggest the biggest news these days which is the kernel virus and how it's affecting all of us in large scale form and everyday forman in nine. Oh you mentioned that you are on self isolation. What is life like for you right now? It's pretty boring right now Being by myself in my apartment or been since Sunday night You know it's it's pretty. It's pretty scary as to what's happened in America and across the world But I was In close contact with someone who contractor buyer at a and Doubt on Monday or Tuesday that they were actually contaminated or or a heck and track with it And I've been in isolation fence fortunately I had cancelled a trip to Switzerland for my ICS board meeting Chose to come to New York and just do it by phone. Prior to any knowledge of of what has what has transpired so actually. I've been home since Sunday. Night was up at three. Am on Monday on the call. You know to Switzerland and for the next two days and and so it's just been. It's been quiet around here. I know you have a bunch of different job roles especially when I was trying to figure out and research your life story but one that stands out to me in this time right now and how things have gone and tennis in the past week is a VP at the ITF. So were you involved in that. Big Decision to cancel tournaments. Well we did have just mentioned. We had a board meeting That was in Switzerland on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday of which I participated by phone and the world of tennis is is Kinda turned upside down as the world of sport has so you know following a Lotta. The statements Indian Wells was the first tournament too close and Miami and then both tours made statements of Stopping event We made the decision to postpone a Fed Cup finals which is To be played in Budapest for the first time the second week of April. That's postponed to a later date and from an ICS perspective with The other many other hundreds of events that they operate around the world all of those cease as well in conjunction with The ATP and the WPA towards so I know that Obviously Italy is in just a state of crisis We have to mention that and I know China's one of the first places to be affected by it but here in America. Did you ever feel like no chance? It can be that bad like. Were you ever thinking like no ways is really going to actually affect the sports world or were you in a sense of? Oh My Gosh. This is really about to happen. And a bunch of tournaments are about to be cancelled and a lot of people's lives are about to be affected. Well you know what I'm an optimist and always think for the pie you think for the best but I'm also a realist And I'm literal so when this really started to unfold you have to think that it was only a matter of time that the sports world was affected. I think initially you know what we were looking at was the upcoming March madness events when they started saying that people shouldn't be in you know bigger crowds excetera and then you started looking at the NBA and then you realize that it affected more than just those arenas that affected all arena and it wasn't so much Just about fans and attendance. But what about the athletes and the players? They're the ones that are breeding all over each other. You know every second of the game almost And you have to think about their health and their well being and not just them the other thing about families who they're going home to At night so you know it's a trickle or a ripple effect on everyone and I think you know the decisions that have been made in the sports world as drastic As they may be. I think it's the best thing that has happened to. At least protect those athletes and their families and to at least to be owners of slowing down the transmission of Kobe. Nineteen so the three of us have something in common. We all played college tennis. And I know that there's obviously bigger storylines and not even talking about sports way beyond that but NCAA has been hugely affected. All these seniors are are not gonNA get their chance to end their year. So you know. I think you guys are both phenomenal. College players arena. Nci AS Katrina. You want and say doubles titles. I mean can you guys imagine having your senior year taken away from you not because of injury but because of something that's so far beyond your control and it's something that we haven't really talked about. Well I mean listen. It's it's disappointing an athlete You know who was collegiate athlete and champion as you mentioned to not See these young athletes be able to fulfill their dreams or at least you know play in their national championships. No matter what sports they may be an you know. I was supposed to call the tennis. Men's and women's tendency AA Championships Alonside Sam Gore And of course disappointed that we won't be going to tell the Oklahoma state this year To call the championships. Hopefully it'll be back You know in session in twenty one back at the USC campus in Orlando Twenty one but you know I just feel for the athletes. I filter the Seniors. Even more so those that you know this is their last hands to go to the to the dance to say perhaps win a national title and and have that on their resume for the rest of their life I know what it feels. Like to be referred to as a champion and you know my heart goes out to not to see athletes but the coaches the institutions and the families. You know everyone who's pour their heart and soul into getting these athletes to the best position possible

Tennis Switzerland America Katrina Adams Katrina United States Forman TA NBA Oklahoma President Trump ITF Ncaa Italy Sam Gore Indian Wells USC China
Pants on Fire: Cheerleading

Pants On Fire

09:29 min | 1 year ago

Pants on Fire: Cheerleading

"Welcome to pants on. Fire that game show where kids choose between the cheerful and spirited truth and the bad sportsmanship of lies. I'm your host Deborah Gold. Cnn in the studio today is our sound effects about Lisa which stands for live in-studio audience too but not too but that is the question. Pardon me I poured in the lady. Thank you but what is it that you are doing? I'm practicing my lines. I have an audition tomorrow for the robot. Regional Theater production of Hamlet. How that's exciting to thrilling. Indeed but to be honest I am nervous. Oh I really want to be in this play and I've been setting all the lines for weeks. I think you're going to be great and remember this above all to thine own self be true. What is that some sort of fortune cookies saying? No it's a line from no forget it. Why don't you take your mind off your audition and tell us how our game works Shaw Melody? Every ways we bring onto grownups. One is an expert the other ally and it's the job of a human to help us figure out who is too because no one gets about Aligarh better than a kid. I mean we hope right. Otherwise Radha business. What are we lying about today Deborah? We are lying about cheerleading. An activity of organized cheering chanting dancing and sometimes competing with stumps Lisa. Do you know anything about cheerleading. I'm sure had mentioned my great uncle. The electronic scoreboard was installed at a basketball court. I used to go to games and watch him keep score the cheerleaders. Were pretty good but nothing is as exciting as watching your uncle. Flip those numbers. That's real spirit. I I can appreciate that but I think you're going to really feel the spirit when we learn more about cheerleading. Now whatever okay. I say we should find out about our contestants shall we? Who might that be? I know tell us are human child contestant as an eight year old who loves everything about baseball. I'm Talkin every billy leave of it lily are you. I'm good welcome to pass on. We're so happy that you're here. You love everything about baseball. You like watching it or playing it. That's cool duva favorite baseball team. Yes the New York mets. The New York mets and dealer favorite player on the team Noah syndergaard. Mister met. Yeah I was stuffy of him only and I went to high school together. I don't know about that and tells. I hear that there is a forbidden word in your house and it starts with the letter Z. And it is perhaps a vegetable and getting close to something you don't care for Sabre Broccoli might be Zucchini. This is something you do not like correct blab not in any which way not even Zucchini ice cream. Ill Zucchini no. It's kind of fun. So can all right. We'll we want to know some more fun facts about you lilly. But we're GONNA do it the way we do it on pants on fire playing two truths and a lie. Okay so you're gonNA tell us three facts about yourself. Two of those facts will be true. One will be ally and we have to figure out which one is the lie. Are you ready? Yeah Excellent. What are your three facts on so first one is my dreams go to West Point West Point? I know absolutely everything about Harry Potter. Threes my grandparents live in Spain Spain. No not space stain. That'd be fun. Okay what do you think Lisa? Which one of those things is a lie? She said earlier that she knew everything about baseball. Now trying to come back and say she knows everything about Harry Potter. That's like a lot of that. One is the law. That's fair. I think there's one things she doesn't know about. Maybe so lily. Which one of those things is a lie Is My grandparents live Spain? So you're saying you know everything about Harry Potter. Yes okay. Let's see. Do you know what Harry Potter does? Yeah he's a wizard. She does everything she does. Okay Lisa can we get some welcome music? For OUR CHEER EXPERTS. Two four six eight khurda appreciate. I want to hear about it if it's me otherwise I don't talk about it. I just appreciate me. Our first expert is Allison Williams. Allison introduce yourself to Palo Lily. I am a CO owner of an All Star cheerleading program in Brooklyn New York. Pay Thank you very much and our second expert is Gerry mccrae Jerry. Please introduce yourself to lily. Lilly how are you? I'm Cheri and competitive cheer choreographer at Various High Schools in New York and Connecticut and they used to cheerleader twenty Peac University. Two thousand five to two thousand nine go Queenie plus enough. Let's see those are some cheerful sounds? Lisa well I always feel cheerful. It's I'd say time toads. We are going to put our experts on the hot seat while they answered lillies questions Lisa. Who should we put on the hot seat? I Jerry Maguire. Because he's going to show us the money. His name is not Jerry Maguire. But I like your thinking anyway I fine. Blue Okay Lily. What question do you have for Jerry to start? Tell me about what you do. What does a typical day in your job? Look like sure so. I've been hired to come up with competitive cheer routines at various high schools. So I go. I work with the students. I kind of envisioned the whole routine. I teach it to them and we go through all the motions and until we're ready to go. Put it into competitions clue. Yeah that's my job to. That's basically what I do. I see. Allison how did cheerleading become a sport? That's an excellent question. So initially cheerleading began in the UK in the mid eighteen hundreds and then traveled over to the US and at first there were college students who were in the audience watching a football game and the athletes weren't doing well during the football game and so the audience decided that they were going to get together and they were going to encourage their fellow athletes from there the sport grew throughout the US and then officially became competitive sport in the nineteen eighties. It's also spread throughout the entire world since then cool. This is for you. Jerry what would you say is the worst injury seen on the Mat So one time I did see a basket. Toss gone wrong person. Just didn't catch the flyer so she fell down. Hit the person who was on the base that they both kind of hit their head on the ground and Yeah so just to head. Injuries is the worst I saw. Because you know you need your you need your brain to be intact or two. That are they okay. They're they're still with us. That's good yes where I don't see bring them. He said they were with us. It's just an expression that means they're non dead. Humans are obsessed with. Who's alive who is dead going? What are you robots obsessed with? Good question we have you ever had something called Zucchini tuition. So mean Okay Lily. Quick change the subject away from that. Vegeta- this one's for both of you. Can you tell me about the jump? The herkie Chanda Hurricane Joe. Okay who wants to take that question? I'll start okay. So there was a fellow named Lauren Turkey and he founded the NCI the national cheerleading association. And he also invented the pom pom so they named jump after him because everyone loves him and he big in the world of cheerleading. And it's just this fantasy cheerleading jumping with some nice arches in aerials well to add onto that Lawrence her car. The reason why the jump was specific named after him because he attempted to do a split jump and instead bent his leg and as a result he came up with this jump. That did not exist. Which is why was named after him the hurricane.

Lisa Gerry Mccrae Jerry Harry Potter Baseball New York Mets Deborah Gold Allison Williams Jerry Maguire Spain Various High Schools CNN Regional Theater Palo Lily Basketball Shaw Melody United States Chanda Hurricane Joe Aligarh Mister West Point
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

06:48 min | 1 year ago

The State of Indian Nations

"You're tuned into native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood from misled a Pueblo. We're listening to the State of Indian nations address today a day New National Congress of American Indians President fond sharp from the Cornell nation gave the speech earlier today in the first part of her speech. We heard her disgust threats to native nations including challenges to tribal decision making and the Indian Child Welfare. ACT WE PICK UP. We're sharp left off in addition to these existential threats. We have threats caused by federal inaction and indifference difference take severe chronic underfunding of the federal government's trust in treaty obligations to tribal nations powerfully illustrated in the recent broken promises MRS report. This report is a trebling. Glimpse into the pervasive impacts that federal budget shortfalls have on the health and vibrancy of tribal tribal communities. It comes fifteen years after another. Congressional report came to the exact same conclusion that the United States is failing to hold its end. The Grand Covenant is struck with tribal nations in exchange for hundreds of millions of acres of tribal lands invaluable resources they contain needless interruptions and delays in federal funding also pose a significant threat the two thousand nineteen government shutdown. The longest longest in history is the latest example of an incompetent federal budget process jeopardizing travel nations ability to provide vital services to our citizens from law enforcement to healthcare to emergency response and just once in the last twenty two years has congress passed a fiscal budget on time time an inexcusable sign of a broken system in addition tribal nations must compete with one another for federal grant programs a gross gross violation of the federal government's trust entreaty responsibilities to us. Meanwhile Congress left Indian country completely out of the two thousand seventeen seventeen tax cuts and jobs at despite years of hill advocacy by NCI and our partners in promoting Indian countries tax reform priorities priorities. That will clearly boost tribal efforts to build sustainable economies and grow local job opportunities. Congress has also neglected its responsibility sponsor ability by failing to pass legislation that reaffirms the inherent right of tribal governments to regulate Labor permanently reauthorized. The remarkably effective special diabetes program for Indians. reauthorize is the native American Housing and self determination act to curb Indian countries severe housing shortages. And take long overdue steps to curtail the missing and murdered indigenous women epidemic. That is ravaging so many of our communities and families but federal connection and indifference is perhaps no more destructive than with a current failure of the administration and some in Congress to address press the rapidly accelerating impacts of climate change or even acknowledged that it exists as chief. Seattle went said what we do to the earth we do to ourselves. The damage human beings have done and continue to do to this planet disrupts every facet of tribal life from our subsistence life. Ways to our ceremonies to our continued stewardship of the natural world. My nation of quilt is already feeling the brunt as ocean shen sea level rise are forcing us to permanently. Relocate are two main villages to higher ground when it comes to climate change and sustaining humanity humanity on this planet. We have no time left to lose and yet our government is nowhere to be found finally tribal nations face threats from an administration ministration that appears committed to obstructing the express will of Congress take the Indian Trust Asset Reform Act while ratified nearly four four years ago the administration has refused to implement key provisions notably the creation of an under secretary for Indian affairs to protect an advanced it's tribal interests within the Department of Interior and the establishment through a meaningful dialogue with Indian country of trust asset management. Plans eagerly. Disgraceful is the inner agency. Mo Way the administration develop to implement the new four seven seven tribal workforce development law that that law is specifically passed to expand the successful program and play self-determination squarely at the heart of Indian country workforce development yet the MOH was purposefully written to ignore the law by allowing federal agencies to veto individual programs that tribal nations have every right to include in their four four seven seven plans. A dynamic law is explicitly designed to stop despite these darkening storm clouds tribal nations continue to shine brightly. We do so much with so little because our people count on us to find a way no matter what we devise advise innovative solutions to the greatest challenges facing our communities. Because that's what governments do from the sled of the Pueblo of a sled. A WHO's innovative partnership with the State of New Mexico is reducing arrest in incarceration rates among Pueblo youth by providing them culturally appropriate diversionary generic services services designed to set them on the right path to the Miami tribe of Oklahoma. WHO's Miami Awakening Program is bringing back the tribes language wage from the brink of extinction and the strengthening of its people's cultural identity and kinship ties with one another in the process to the court? Elaine Elaine tribe. In Idaho whose education pipeline approach identifies and fill gaps in the systems of academic support for students which has dramatically atakli decrease the tribes highschool dropout rate and increase. The percentage of tribal members pursuing college degrees. Tribal nations are doing amazing things things and we could do so much more. If the federal government would finally once and for all abide by the timeless pack it made with a so long ago to create the country that we share today. We have upheld. Our end of this arrangement is long past time. The United States upheld its end of the agreement meant

Federal Government Congress Pueblo United States Indian Child Welfare New National Congress Of Ameri Miami Tara Gatewood America Cornell President Trump Seattle Elaine Elaine Idaho Department Of Interior New Mexico NCI Oklahoma
The State of Indian Nations

Native America Calling

08:21 min | 1 year ago

The State of Indian Nations

"This is native America calling. I'm Tara Gate. Would climate change the federal government's trust responsibility and congressional action on violence against women. Child Welfare and tribal sovereignty are among the issues tackled today in fond sharps first State of the Indian nations address. She is the president of the National Congress of American Indians. She didn't hold back in her address. Press criticizing federal elected leaders for what she called inaction and indifference. When it comes to native nations she also touted the gains tribes continue? We need to make in spite of challenges. In the congressional response to the address New Mexico Representative Deborah Holland a Democrat and a citizen of the Laguna Pueblo continued criticisms of the administration and issued a call to all need of nations to act in the best interests Anita values. We're going to hear both speeches beaches this hour. If you WANNA comment send us an email you can send it to comments at native America calling DOT COM or tweeted to us at one eight hundred nine nine native. Here's President von Sharp. Kyo which I'm just Jack. I wish Guy Good Morning. My name is fawn sharp. I consider it my life's greatest honor to have this opportunity to share with you today. I thank the Creator for gathering us together for this historic dialogue between Indian country and the United States on behalf of the five hundred and seventy four federally recognized tribal nations dozens of state recognized tribal nations and millions of native people across this country country. I welcome the distinguished. Guests assembled here today and those watching around the globe to the eighteenth annual State of Indian nations address. I stand before you today. As a humble servant of all tribal nations fulfilling my duty to share Indian countries story of perseverance and resurgence with the world to convey with absolute clarity Indian countries expectations of the United States government government and to cast a light on the immense power and proven wisdom of tribal nation's governing their own lands and affairs solving difficult challenges and forging brighter futures on their own terms. I embrace the enormity of this task for I have been groomed for decades aides to carry it out by transformative leaders in his footsteps I follow leaders like Beatrice Black Elizabeth Cole Tiny Kapoma. He's Rosanna in Ramona Bennett to name just a few these matriarchs kindled a great fire in me to give my life in leadership to my. Don't people in all of Indian country just as important. They showed me the way and for that I am forever grateful I also it draw great strength as they did from our Almighty creator. The advice of my fellow tribal leaders the spiritual nourishment in life lessons end of canoe journeys the inspiration passion in Ingenuity of our brilliant native youth and the ancestral teachings of our elders their wisdom encouragement and guidance have prepared me to meet this moment. So why do we gather here today. The purpose purpose of this annual address is to memorialize in affirm the enduring government to government relationship ship between tribal nations and the US government. It provides our assessment of the current health of that relationship and how it must be strengthened. This hallowed discourse not only speaks to elected officials political and judicial appointees in staff the federal government nor is it limited to tribal leaders employees in citizens it has meant for all Americans especially those who have been disenfranchised and rendered hopeless hopeless bi racial injustice economic inequality and the rapid decay of our American political system. They seek answers during these troubling times and they need to look no further than tribal nations to find them in that spirit. I stand before you today. Supported supported by more than six hundred tribal nations and governments across this land to share with you this undeniable truth. The state of Indian nations nations is strong across this land. Tribal nations are writing remarkable stories of cultural social political and Economic Mike Renewal. In the face of great obstacles we relentlessly plow forward in our eternal quest to create futures of hope Opportunity Eighty and cultural vibrancy for our youth in those generations yet. To come we do. So by invoking and practicing the greatest indigenous in his core values of all self-governance the crater gifted tribal nations with certain inalienable rights among them the right to steward word and draw nourishment from our traditional homelands cultivate extraordinary potential of our youth develop thriving economies that that provide opportunity for all of our people and manage our own affairs and control our own destinies as my mentor former Cornell leader in NCI CIO president Joe Delacruz so perfectly captured it. No right is more sacred to a nation to a people then the right to freely determine its social economic political and cultural future without external interferences the the fullest expression of this right is when a nation freely governs itself. We native peoples not only the inherent right but the sacred responsibility to live the way our creator intended speaking are indigenous languages living our traditional core values imparting them to the next generations practicing our life ways conducting our ceremonies and freely governing Orleans and Communities Tribal Nations are not nonprofit organizations. We are full fledged battle-tested governments guided by time honored cultural trope principles and recognized as such in the northwest ordinance the US Constitution and hundreds upon hundreds of treaties and Supreme Court precedents accidents however many Americans including many policymakers still don't understand the unique status status of tribal nations are unique political status. They don't recognize the indisputable fact that we are argh genuine governments with the right and more importantly the ability to govern our own lands and communities govern those in accordance with the values that make us who we are as native peoples but through mechanisms like this annual address address more and more Americans and others around the world are learning this truth and in doing so are turning to Indian country for inspiration shen direction and most importantly solutions to our common challenges in this great age of uncertainty acting with the next seven generations wins in mind our ancestors endured great hardships to forge our path to this day so that we would be able to be there answer to a prayer for thriving cultures healthy children in robust communities. We must and we will be worthy of the great sacrifices they made to who gives us this chance to sustain not only our way of life but our world for future generations.

Indian Nations Nations United States Communities Tribal Nations Federal Government America President Trump National Congress Of American Tara Gate President Von Sharp New Mexico Laguna Pueblo Joe Delacruz Supreme Court Orleans Jack Cornell Deborah Holland Mike Renewal Beatrice Black
Using Virtual Reality to Improve Healthcare Outcomes with Everett Crosland

Outcomes Rocket

09:51 min | 1 year ago

Using Virtual Reality to Improve Healthcare Outcomes with Everett Crosland

"Today I have the privilege of hosting Everett crossland. He's tenured healthcare executive with significant experience variance in developing and executing US and global commercialization and launch strategies. He's got proven expertise and leadership in launching and commercializing novel. Oh FARMACEUTICA L- and digital therapeutics as well as drug device combinations used to treat rare and common diseases Everett's most recent experience is as as the senior vice president of commercial at applied the are where he has successfully scaled the company's virtual reality based SAS offering across multiple optical channels within healthcare in today's age in healthcare the consumer experience matters more than ever and the use of technologies like virtual reality. Eddie are changing the way that the landscape looks and addresses things. So I'm excited to dive into these topics with with Everett today. And so ever just want to give you a warm welcome awesome. Thanks for joining us today. Much really appreciate the opportunity to chat with you today. And I'm looking forward to the discussion. I think given the audience that you've described ride in the people who download your podcast on a monthly basis. I think we'll have a fruitful conversation. I agree I agree. So tell me Everett what inspires inspires your work in healthcare. Sure I think mostly what gets me up every day and gives me that spark every morning is the potential that we have Specifically at applied. VR To provide an alternative solution for patients. Who are in pain or dealing with things? I we sell a lot of products into into the emergency department. Setting and I think we can all relate to anytime. You're you're going into the emergency department a lot of times. That might be the the worst day or night of your your year even your life and so being able to provide a product that we have confidence and we have clinical evidence that supports reports our ability to say that we're reducing pain and where we are reducing anxiety and helping patients cope with pain anxiety again at that point in their their life where they need it most and so. I think it's something that we think a lot about on a daily basis and it's definitely something that keeps me motivated more we we get the product addict out there that the more people were helping and of course building a business. I love the idea of being able to successfully start from zero and build and build something into a multimillion dollar enterprised. Yeah it's definitely exciting and so I looked to learn a little bit more about the technology the applications and exactly how you guys are are adding value to the ecosystem. Can you hone in on that for us. Yeah sure thing. So we offer a virtual reality therapeutic content. We currently are UH wellness product. Which means that we can't make medical claims because we have not put our products through FDA for you and clear and says medical devices but right well we are able to point to the clinical studies that we've done in the clinical studies that have been done on our products and that demonstrate the ability of virtual reality content to nets really relaxation exercises breathing exercises biofeedback etcetera a- all are designed to reduce anxiety and help patients cope with acute and chronic pain? Something that we you have a lot of anecdotal evidence on but also we've done the work to build a clinical body of evidence to support that use as well and so you think about the value proposition. Obviously there's there's a patient value here where patients more than a majority of patients prefer non opioid non pharmacologic logic pain management regimen virtual reality offering. Clearly we fit the bill. We also have a value prop for health systems and physicians in a variety have different settings and citing the emergency department. A lot of times. There's Qiyang's ID in that setting you can imagine that a patient with co Morbidity and who's on on average six to eleven different drugs and they come through the door adding another drugs. Such as been. Zo can complicate implicate your work stream and workflow. And so if you're able to introduce again a non pharmacologic solution that helps patients cope with their anxiety in pain in that setting and you're able to improve efficiencies as well so we can go through multiple different settings but that's just one example where we think through our value prop in terms of what we're offering the patient what we're offering dachshund in terms of their workflow efficiency and then what we're offering health systems uh-huh terms of their ability to provide value to to patients and improve cost structure that they obviously think about on a day to day basis. Nuts some some valuable pearls there ever at and and I mean we've discussed the challenges with the OPIOID epidemic and last year the NIH funded that they approved proved nine hundred and forty five million dollars toward research to more non opioid ways to reduce pain long-term and this is a critical equal. Time for technologies. Like this yeah so we we actually received some grant funding through the NFL. H There and we're number of. Yeah we we were part of that class clash with thanks. Yeah it was team effort. We've got a number of experts on staff here. That just did Yeoman's work and getting those Graham with Asians and then it and I think it's it's a real market credibility when h these promising you're in your product and you're offering. We're using that money. A to conduct clinical randomized controlled studies at Cleveland Clinic and Geissinger to study both pain reduction as well as opioid sparing airing. So we're matching this product up against standard of care that currently uses opioids and rightfully so in many cases. But there's also also room to improve and room to potentially reduce the need for opioids and a certain patient population and we're investigating that and we're kicking those. Those clinical studies off this year. And we're really grateful for the United Funding as well and it helps a company like ours which is a venture backed company. Upset oppose extended runway. I'll just bring in more experts and and again it just lends credibility. Yeah totally agree with you. I read in. It's exciting to hear you. You've got these outstanding partnerships partnerships with Some of the best in the provider space. And as you think about how your company the company that you guys are running there. What is it that differentiates is it? Wise it better than other. VR things that are out there. I think our approach is relatively unique and we have a a really broad base of data that we're pulling from so we sell into over two hundred and fifty hospitals across the country. We sell in the seven different countries. We've got an incredible amount of use that in data from that use that we are using to mind for four for clinical signals and uses just increasing with at thirty thousand patients that have used our our product today now this year. I think we'll probably hit at forty thousand and bag as a real competitive advantage in that were able to see where. VR Works and wear doesn't me think about treating pain for example in a lot of companies are looking at Vr as a solution for paying. We're not necessarily unique in that but the reason is is that there's a mechanism mechanism of action there and the cascade there that we believe that we all believe that we can tap into applied. VR Has the distinct advantage of being able to see across those thirty. Ideally say forty thousand usage over the course of a few years and and really mind for insights and signals. We're using that shape. Apr Clinical Studies and shape. Our Clinic put develop that program. I think what we're also differentiated is our intense focus on clinical winnick eleven. And we're doing that through strategic partnerships so our intense focus on evidence development. She added other company. Neither will but I'll tell you the way that we're doing I think is we do this through strategic partnerships and this partnership gratitude. Where are we are? co-developing are a chance to related products with NCI H. We're working with a couple of large judge health system and pears in co-development could ask there as well and even in our clinical study with ice very people into winnick. We had a strategic partnership elements those but that they're not just transactional clinical development program for we're software. So we're able to use the leverage the experts that he is sufficient during their fold in some elements of the product out of the clinical study. He it goes into FDA and ultimately that the market is something that has been shaped by the best practitioners. Were I think that that gives us a AH competitive advantage often. What is the issue clinical? Study one going back and forth with plentiful totally agree. But if you listening unique way you're able to refuse to produce a product that is better than just a transactional

Everett FDA Everett Crossland Chronic Pain United States Eddie Executive Senior Vice President NIH Co-Development Cleveland Clinic Mechanism Of Action NFL United Funding Yeoman Graham
Doctor's advice: Forget the climate change deniers, focus on the 'passive allies'

Climate Cast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Doctor's advice: Forget the climate change deniers, focus on the 'passive allies'

"The most effective way to talk about. Climate Change I'm NPR chief meteorologist. Paul Hunter here with climate cast University study shows seventy percent of Americans now except that climate change is happening and only nine percent dismiss. Climate Change mini climate communicators now bypass the time and energy it takes to convince climate deniers Lolita. Surra Panini is a doctor with the University of Minnesota. And she's with health professionals for a healthy climate she wrote on NCI about motivating passive allies. Highly Hi Pal. So that George Mason Zain Yale. Study says that seventy percent of Americans now believe climate change is real and about six and ten are either concerned or alarmed so since the vast majority already of people now accept climate science. Do we really need to spend time convincing those so-called dismissive to move forward on solutions. I M an internist and so the why of any action is central to my practice so I started thinking about why we would want to convince someone if the answer is because you want them to take action than we need a different strategy so you talk in your piece about passive allies. Who are they so the Yale study shows that thirty percent are concerned and seventeen. percent are cautious. But they are not taking action for us. The efficient use of our time right now is did move the forty seven percent into taking action when you think about where to Focus Carr's time and energy Who are the people. You're focused on. I think at our circles. We have a lot of people who already believe that. Climate change is a real and urgent the problem so if we can give them concrete immediate steps to take that will move the population that are actively engaged engaged in creating social change. I'm curious you know as a behavioral list. What are the dynamics of changing personal beliefs and behavior. One of the things that comes to mind is talking to patients about how Quitting smoking so even when we start in a shared reality the that smoking is bad for our health. It takes a long time for someone to go from what we call the pre contemplation stage where people are not even thinking about quitting smoking talking to the action phase. So when we translate this decline I we have to convince people. It's real then. We have to convince it's manmade then we have to convince them to take action which basically requires them to overhaul their lifestyle most of the analysts on climate change. Do you say that personal action matters but we also need bigger structural changes in the way we do transportation and the way we do energy and food. So is it really true. That people have to overhaul their lifestyle. Yeah absolutely I think they both go hand in hand In public health actually we have a framework that shows that that when you change the system to make the default behavior healthy or in this case green then. It's more likely that people will take that action and that it's more sustainable sustainable. We've seen in the past that you don't always need one hundred percent of the people to make a change. What are some historical examples of action on issues. That did not have a high I level of support. Yeah common misconception is that to create social change. Everyone needs to act but data tells us a different story so a couple of examples are a Gallup poll in one thousand nine hundred sixty one showed only twenty eight percent approved of the lunch counter. Sit Ins and freedom buses during the civil rights movement and a study. Dr Chenoweth from Harvard. Found that it takes only around two point. Five percent of the population actively participating in civil protested Claus Real Political Change University of Minnesota physician La Lethal Syrup Panini. Thanks so much for talking on climate cast

Climate Cast University Claus Real Political Change Un George Mason Zain Yale Chief Meteorologist Paul Hunter University Of Minnesota Yale NPR NCI Harvard Dr Chenoweth Carr Seventy Percent Twenty Eight Percent Forty Seven Percent One Hundred Percent
Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

60-Second Science

02:31 min | 1 year ago

Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata the Arctic because warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet meaning more and more sea ice is melting every year concerning the rapid loss of see I sat there for a lot of reasons. Tracy Z Goldstein. A researcher and conservationist at UC Davis she says one of those reasons is animals like ice seals. Need the ice to haul out on and give birth and other reason. As the Arctic warms the fish the seals eat maybe moving to deeper and colder waters so the seals have to travel further to hunt them for the combination of all of that over time is probably going to affect their health and their body condition and that will make them not just underweight but also more susceptible to diseases diseases may also be encroaching the upon Arctic marine mammals because spotting a trend here Arctic sea ice is melting coli unintended consequence of all of that but yes You know when they I used to be an ice bridge certain populations would remain separate from each other and so they couldn't come in contact and give each other they bacteria viruses etc but once those channels thought it to open animals were able to move further and came into contact with new species that they had not come in. Contact with in the Post Goldstein. In her colleagues documented the spread of a disease called called fo seen distemper virus from two thousand one through two thousand sixteen. It's related to the measles and causes skin lesions coughing pneumonia seizures and sometimes death in in marine mammals Goldstein's team scanned historical and Contemporary Marine Mammal blood samples for antibodies against the virus. They also hunted for evidence of live infections nasal swabs taken of mammals and they found that flare ups of the virus were linked to years with extreme losses. NCI's suggesting that open waters. Aided the spread of the pathogen perhaps along the melted coastline north of Siberia. Their analysis is in the journal scientific reports mammals that depend on ice to survive may already be slated for extinction and as the Arctic melts. Goldstein says in more frequent epidemics like this viral one could hastened the blow but humans may also be affected up in the Arctic. People subsist subsist on these species so they really rely on these animals for their livelihood and wellbeing and as those animals disappear as their habitat disappears. That's is also going to heavily affect humans in that area so overall I think overall health of the environment and the animals and the people up in the Arctic over time it's just going to continue to deteriorate

Tracy Z Goldstein Arctic Researcher Christopher Dodd Underweight Uc Davis NCI Sixty Seconds
"nci" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"nci" Discussed on 710 WOR

"NCI designated Georgetown liberty comprehensive cancer center W. O. R. news time eleven oh five taking W. O. R. sport the Celtics one nineteen one thirteen over Cleveland W. what war weather channel forecast we'll see a couple of raindrops into tonight much colder weather expected to by the time we get to the end of the week tonight's low eventually down forty two small chance of an evening shower dry overnight sunshine ahead for a wins a little cooler low to mid fifties and Thursday a chance for a few showers highs in the upper fifties I mean urologist marks a bit from the weather channel on seven ten W. O. R. fifty five degrees eleven oh six next news at twelve breaking these at once wake up at land for me that Michael real in the morning six until ten tomorrow morning I'm hearing pretty on seven ten W. O. R. N. B. C. news radio station the Dave Ramsey show is brought to you by rex real estate the team sitting you four percent buying or selling your home Hey Sean Hannity show weekdays at three on seven ten W. O. R. now the Dave Ramsey show from the headquarters of broadcasting from the dollar car rental studios Dave Ramsey show that is down taken the place of the BMW thank you for joining us open phones at triple eight eight two five five two two five that triple eight eight two five five two two five Sara is with this insurance in Pennsylvania hi Sir welcome to the Dave Ramsey show in order to mark you are you doing better than I deserve what's up in your world okay I really appreciate you and all you do is tell us and that's a short brief background on that the young canine we're getting married at about one third row we're very glad we like you college for free right now I am currently paying for your practitioner graduate or out of our get I'm not and if I were in here or on the phone about the past eight nine five band they did that one time thing and I yeah over twenty thousand and that which was my graduate or lying and on my car while I'm not yeah my.

"nci" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"nci" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Since nineteen o one tried indeed. We understand that when it comes to hiring, it's important to have a large talent pool that shoes from. But sometimes too many good options can be overwhelming. That's why the doesn't just get you access to a large pool of job seekers. We also offer screener tools that let you instantly narrow down your search hone in on hiring within indeed experience. Indeed for yourself today and get a free sponsor job of great on your first posting at indeed dot com slash promo terms and conditions apply. Hey guys is CLYDE. You know, I've always said, when you're healthy, you're happy, I'm trying to do my best to healthy every day. That's why I use all kinds of things including CD oil for life, oil dot com. It's a natural remedy made with nothing but the greatest ingredients in blended. In coconut oil, I'm telling you, it's a home run hitter for your health. I was a skeptic. But now I see why it's so popular right now I feel better than ever ancient. Life oil is non psychoactive meeting, it provides you with all the benefits. But without the high, I encourage you to do your own research, look up CBD oil benefits for yourself and you'll find out why thousands of people have made CD oil, a regular part of their healthy routine. If you live your best life, go to ancient life, oil dot com. That's ancient life, oil dot com now the trusted source for the highest quality CBD oil. That's a NCI EMT ancient life, oil dot com, ancient life, oil dot com. It's the Ferrari of CBD's eighty six burglars were asked, how they broke into homes, and they all said they knocked on the door. I that's why you need blink x t to cameras they detect motion, so you'll get an alert and you can see and talk to who's there..

NCI
"nci" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"nci" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Homes, and they can't work in Seattle. If there's that many people there, and it's a quarter mile around the light rail's, we're not destroying home. Like, I don't know. Why this is so difficult. I'm not disagreeing with you. Okay. I I think you're right density around the light rails is fine. But we're going to be pushing more and more people out into the city or out into the suburbs. We're already doing that with the cost of living. Right. But that's why we're building this light rail around every single light rail is going to have to be a significant amount of parking you for literally people in the neighborhoods like park and rides combined with really high density towers, the nice thing is you could maybe put the park and rides below the tower is what I think I'm trying to get at is. I think we need to be a little less wishy washy and why I'm even challenging you. Like, you could be somebody who both defends neighborhoods vehemently how you want to. And also say I am very much in favor for super high density growth within a quarter mile of our light rails. I think a lot of these nimbies took that stand. They would. Be so much more powerful on this conversation. Because this is my frustration in this way. I kind of get caught up is this perspective of defending my neighborhood at all costs. Well, also, I mean again, like we're not allowed to build towers over ten stories around the U dub light rail like they actually stopped the zoning there, that's a lack of leadership. I don't know from the forty five or we can just go fight against the light rail because it's a disaster and a waste of money. I'm sorry. We actually already lost that battle. It's going to be built at this point. It's about how can we steward this growth? Most effectively three six oh says is a quarter mile even enough space. It could be a mile it could be a quarter mile. I think I'm presenting the quarter mile because what I'm really trying to do. And if you listen as I pray every day that there are political leaders listening to this show. And I hope they hear how I think about this. How I kind of come up with the range, and now they have a basis to actually go into this debate. And maybe succeed what we're trying to do is give tools to the knights of the rational opposition out there. So that we can both make progress when we talked to our neighbors lake Darren who's who wants to preserve neighborhoods, and then we can make progress when you talk to individuals like me who maybe are too. About growth. And so the the agreement is going to be whether we do high density builds within a mile or is it maybe like seven stories within a mile. It's fifteen stories within a half a mile, and then it's thirty stories within a quarter mile. But now because we put it in these in these controlled radiuses, maybe the homeowners are willing to have this conversation and allow us to make some progress on building diverse and dense housing for individuals. That aren't just homeowners. What do you think? Darren did. I did I make my my case. No. Yeah. You have a good case. You do what I'm worried about is when we build the density of the population up to high NCI enforce a lot of people out. That's still not everybody in those towers is going to use light rail there. A lot of them are going to have cars. That's more cars on I five more. I don't disagree with you. You will have car. Look what happened with south lake union lake south lake union, and the massive growth there, a huge proportion of those Amazonian at work there don't own cars like this is where I think the future of the city is density around light rails. And then the engagement of private public partnerships. This is his word of the week. Private using Uber lift car to go reach now. There are other solutions like I get to work without a car right of the huge portion of them. Don't have cars some do. That's more cars on I five and. Hi, five cannot handle one more car right now. Not even one more. Can't well bad news staring in in summary..

south lake union lake lake Darren Seattle Darren NCI
"nci" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nci" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Woodard NCI and many more folly sling cast aluminum hand woven wicker, we've got it. All family leisure, also has a huge selection of chases umbrellas basis and more can't find what you're looking for. We'll help you custom order your dream collection. Stop in today factory-direct patio furniture sale going on now at family leisure. We've sold several homes, and it's always been a major hassle. I'm here with Tim talking about perch, the home buying company that gives you a fair market price offer for your home in twenty four hours. The thing that I attract me was how easy perch makes. Getting an offer you go online, enter your address and in twenty four hours to get an offer for your home. And when my wife, and I had questions perch connected us with rich one of their local experts who answered all our questions walked us through the process and stayed with us from. Offer to sail and their offer we got our price, but even better no open houses. No, costly upgrades or repairs. No contingencies are worries about the deal falling through last minute. And we got the twos are closing date. So you'd recommend perch. Oh, no question. They made selling a breeze, and we got our price to thanks to. If you're thinking about selling or just curious would perch would pay for your home. Get an cost no obligation offer at perch dot com. That's P E R C, H dot com, perch dot com. Hi, this is Danny Bowes from south west metal roofing systems. If you're listening to the news than you know, the stock market has been pretty wild. But that's not the case with a metal roof from south west metal roofing systems. You can't say it's a solid and stable investment. Our metal roofs will help your home sleep and increase its value. A metal roof will lower your energy bills and a metal roof can get you a discount with most insurance companies. Call us at eight to sixty eight sixty eight or visit our website at s w metal roofing dot com, south west metal roofing systems. Do it. Once do it for. Life..

Tim Woodard NCI Danny Bowes P E R C twenty four hours
"nci" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"nci" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Hannam Woodard NCI and many more Bali sling cast aluminum Hamble been weaker. We've got it all family leisure also has a huge selection of chases umbrellas basis. More can't find what you're looking for. We'll help you. Custom order your dream collection stopping today. Factory-direct patio furniture sale going on now family leisure. I this is Danny Bowes from south west metal roofing systems. If you're listening. To the news. Then you know, that the stock market has been pretty wild. But that's not the case with a metal roof from south west metal roofing systems. You can't say it's a solid and stable investment. Our metal roofs will help your home heap and increase its value a metal roof will lower your energy bills and metal roof can get you a discount with most insurance companies. Call us at eight two to sixty eight sixty eight or visit our website at s w metal roofing dot com, southwest metal roofing systems, do it once do it for life. Hi, this is John Wilson general manager Brown dodge, Chrysler Jeep ram and divine. We've been advertising on NewsRadio twelve hundred w since two thousand seven every year has been a major part of our marketing and advertising plans with iheartmedia helps us get qualified leads each month. If you need a new car truck, come visit us at Brown dodge Chrysler Jeep ram in divine. I thirty five south exit twenty two or online at Brown dodge dot com. And if you need to market your business, effectively, call NewsRadio one hundred WAI it works for Brown dodge. And it'll work for you to when I grow up. I wanna be a new pair of blue. When I grow up. I wanna be a kid's first computer. When I grow up. I don't wanna be piece of garbage. And if you recycle me, I won't be give your garbage another life. Recycle. Learn how at I want to be recycled dot org brought to you by keep America beautiful and the Ad Council. Newsradio.

Brown dodge Jeep Woodard NCI Danny Bowes Chrysler Ad Council iheartmedia America John Wilson general manager twelve hundred w
"nci" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"nci" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Day's check NCI when she was like, I got to get these results. Live twenty four hour coverage of the news. And I'm like, okay. It's the news actually going to like stay up twenty seven on election night for the congressman district. Smoking verner. He's not running for Senator. He's not running. He's never running for mayor. What they should have. Did they should've went VA and just had like Rachel Maddow, cover it. You know, really getting this. Let's by to it. So they end up going into the Toby's. I can't come and other real quick. She's I yeah. It was coming on Honey cake. So whatever it any walk into other room. And he has did you Did say. you say cakes? Yeah. They're always calling each other something you, you know, if you noticed they're always like saying this. Okay. Toby own or whatever it's like, you guys are so saccharine. Sweet. So yeah, he's built or had someone build a replica of the Pittsburgh football stadium toy that they had when they were kids for Kate known input bother with her and fan as a side. He's placed all of the GI Joes all of the Star Wars toys that she bought and put them on display like almost like players or whatever toys that were players, and she just looks at it immediately flashes back to her dad, and the toys they had as kids and all that stuff. And then she starts crying, and she cries like real heart wren- doesn't say nothing, and he and he. He he's like, okay. Did. I just fuck up. See why he's like I thought it would be a nice thing to. Oh, shady. Okay. I okay bad. Okay. Let me call. Kevin. He emergency calls Kevin who's going through his own thing. So Kevin's all light yet. Our our now, good luck. Hangs up of Eddie calls back. And of course, because classic this is us guys fake out. She's crying 'cause he's happy. And she's like this is so thoughtful probably because she had booked up. And so this beautiful, man toys. They realize he's gonna leave me day when I see. Good thing. She was just lie. She says no way. So when this mart and beautiful emotionally, intelligent can't stay my ass. L? Not she cried and she's beautiful, and they you know, hug or kiss or whatever. And then I think that's the end of their story. Then I miss anything for them. Now, it wouldn't matter date. Anyway, I think there's pretty simple, and it was the quote unquote cutest of the stories this week. You know, what I mean like everything else kinda felt heavy and their shit was like toys, you know, the babies come, oh, they take picture. She takes a picture of a bigger fruit. At the end what the fuck is a bigger food. Yeah. The tomato tomato because the child is going to be classy. Yeah. So. Yeah. Anyway, that was all right. That's all the things that happened. This week is I'm sorry goes downhill from here. Kevin. Is with Zoe. They just got back from Vietnam and Zoe like guessing apartments this on the couch. Oh, it's good to be home and Kevin's say home. And she's like what he's like you said, it's good to be home. And you our -partment as she is. I I met like back in America home. And he is like that that ain't what I think you wanna stay with me. Maybe you should move in and chills I don't know about that moving in kinda fast. And he was like, no, look, I got this key. I think it's time and she was like. The uncle John stay most on it. Because of Airlie. Randolph keys discovered of any test. Discover a full house at some point and started calling him a Jesse which is cute NO Dorrell. A real name because a whole like school is obsessed with full house because of fuller house, which is just frigging sacrilegious whatev-. Right. That's what it was. It was it was cutaway that a lot of times shows dated references for keys because odor people. All right. It always comes on like really like that's not how kids talk what they say. Oh, and that one if they'll real to me like, oh, yeah. Because I did the same calculations like that can happen. I watch his show. Bob BAAs, burgers, which I do love the show, but I watched byles burgers. But one of the jokes is that genes..

Kevin Kate Toby Rachel Maddow NCI congressman Senator VA Eddie Zoe Bob BAAs Pittsburgh football stadium Randolph Vietnam America John Jesse twenty four hour
"nci" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"nci" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The cutting edge treatments and participating in a clinical trial would mean traveling hundreds of miles from home to cancer center in another state which isn't possible for so many of our patients but i'd to shop was how is the national national cancer institute working to ensure that patients in states like mine which do not have an nci designated cancer center are able to participate in clinical trials and benefit from the newest discoveries thanks for the question i think you raise a really important issue which is that it's in some ways great news we're making all these there's progress against cancer and goes new therapies and new approaches but if we can't disseminate them into the broader community and implement those therapies in the real world then are we helping to be the extent that we could be could do so and so the national cancer she was very concerned about how we assure that are advances translate beyond just the nci designated cancer centers which are a great program but they're only seventy of them and their their their range is limited one program we have to address this is called the national committee on college research program or in core which is a fifty serene incor sites that didn't have each several satellite sites that are sort of nine hundred four sites across the country and they reach between the cancer centers an in core we reach virtually the entire country and these these sites in addition to being able to do clinical trials also so have catchment areas that have patients that are more likely to be rural patients was urban patients and more likely to be underserved minorities so it's a way that we can enroll demographic that looks more like the united states in general so it's it's a great program we've just decided to expand its scope somewhat so that we can it's successful and we want want to build on that and it's also important to note that we can do clinical trials in the core program for example the nci match trial enrolled six thousand patients at eleven hundred sites it was the fastest accruing trial.

cancer united states nci
"nci" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

KPRC 950 AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nci" Discussed on KPRC 950 AM

"And what did you think of these events yesterday wolfer one uh first shouted at home girl dana the money for the on that stage and not slap is some might be in distress not day because it's like if we if we go ahead it's dialogue you know what i'm saying they gotta be respectful in in if you if you objective in order to listen and let me be very clear tho those students however happen you don't know seventeen children if that's what they were you know what i mean uh state they have a trauma today lived experience that aid being a really emotional space right now you know what i'm saying so shelf itself will be a strong enough to even express some people folds right in you know what i mean however i think shame calls on you know big organizations like cnn lie you got soon instead of that were there that was saying like well i want to ask about armed guards and you're telling that child that student he can't talk about that in you handed him a scripted questions that's not that you plant in this th it's like this was the fake was the truman show like the fake reality show out here right nonstance so um i think i think it shame on them for that bomb but i also think that um you know we got to be in a space where if if if you're on the fence about knowing and be honest about how much you you don't know like a lot of things that they were saying it was like well there should be a back row check there in the background check everything on me go into a gun stores the forty four seventy two federal form nci editor ended up i mean some of those some of those things the fonet form you know even if some somewhat disrespectful to certain state right if a state says hey marijuana is lawful here you know a few fill that out which is the federal form if you could just to pay in marijuana now you can have a firearm psalms i'm saying was to say i think they will miss and a lot of information and nothing organizations like cnn in that particular scenario they exploited that and that's that's dislike vowed us not cool that all you know you're taking advantage of somebody's trauma that's real life trauma.

editor marijuana cnn truman nci
"nci" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"nci" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The institution there had some there's a mole was part of the business we have moles within the russian system within the chinese system i'm sure we have them and and have had for years and they have at at an hour's is finding those mohsen finding at how much damage they've done i was very familiar with the hanson and rick games cases in what was interesting initiative from the public domain that at the beginning when they started to lose slow uh the agency believes the beginning lose chinese assets that was well there must be bad tradecraft in china and then it was a must have been a communication it must a hacked into something that is very reminiscent of the hunt for a rick games that the beginning one could accept the fact that he had a trader in your meds who could do that who could be nci a b a member a traitor and uh and people should have said civil why do you think that others betray themselves in our work in the system but eventually became obvious that we got a the reserve a penetration and it's part of uh part of doing business but part of doing business is also being vigilant on this point and i think uh i think this is just another reminder to bed too so painful so i just want the follow up with this because i was wondering what your perspective is on the president's comments and attitude that seems to be that is sometimes put out in public on twitter characterizing other the fbi but also the cia and us security forces when feet the burden of the criticism has been directed more to the fbi in surrounding the correct investigation um i think it's worthwhile remembering the very first official government i uh and and visit was to the cia okay uh i think is a very good uh demonstrably good with the director of of cia of who won hang about as i reflect on what people in cia a military tend to light gives a strong decisive leadership and then from there flows it's less political after that half to people see i am sure sure a klein the believe democratic party and the other half of the republican party it's made up pretty much of what america's but there is a.

hanson china president fbi cia director klein democratic party republican party america mohsen rick twitter official
"nci" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"nci" Discussed on KKAT

"Memory do you because if you're going to lecture people about it you better damn well have the law committed to memory i don't need to google fu do you because if you do sit your ass down and quit misleading people about this i'm so tired of it i'm not no i'm not apologising for my tongue i have the same tone towards people who mislead as i do for gun grabbers intentions i question intentions of people who don't actually read the law eighteen us c section nineteen or no section nine 22 subsection g it list prohibited possessors if you have a protective order against you that is already an existing nci see classification in see i see meaning the national crime information center that is the fbi maintained entity through which through which knicks checks when you fill at your 44 73 now this is how in the reason why i get mad is because they see snakeoil salesmen masquerading as firearm law experts that are telling you that this is a brand new thing infix knicks so that's why you got a post fix knicks it's not that has that's not even mentioned in it this is existing law it is already codified the eight again i'll say it again goupillot 18 usc 920 to g google it illicit right therefore you see how the easy that is it is already in existing nc icy classification are ten classifications in nci see through which someone may be rendered as a prohibited possessor deck not new law.

fbi nci knicks
"nci" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

The WAN Show Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"nci" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

"And that never happened if i'd had the resources i think that could have been the way for me to never have to work again like if i could have built might like i even to go back like if i was the one who had the resources that i have today even that might have been a model that i would have pursued i really believed in it i thought that it was a great opportunity it's not worth it now ohno you'd never make it now no but i should by insects and do that i couldn't afford nci acts not because i i couldn't afford lakewood nci access net value is right now but i couldn't afford nci is overhead ludlow the monthly expenses even with all the layoffs that they've done restore the news are still want to buildings through stole one of in gattari so when we didn't do that and when we continued marching down the obviously no longer viable big box retail path i figured out that i had to get out so ultimately the reason that i ended up leaving nci acts and taking this guy with me and with me thanks for coming along grow i was thinking that fiveyear thing it's actually like seven or something or eight or something yeah it's can ridiculous so um and a bit of money list sorry i forget where i was going with that uh right so so what happened when i left was i had decided to leave and the reason that i was able to take the line is tech tips channel and so to be clear i take no pleasure whatsoever in nci axis demise.

gattari nci lakewood fiveyear
"nci" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"nci" Discussed on WSB-AM

"All accounts past the backgrounds yet i it's it's mindboggling it's unacceptable um when you have a conviction whether it's in a in a uniform code of criminal justice court whether it's a courtmartial whatever you have a conviction for spousal abuse and child abuse essentially in this and you are not reported so they too to federal authorities i mean you're all on the same side um and this person is then allowed to go get an assault rifle because you haven't reported this it's it's mind boggling how how this works they've i mean educators i mean if it was in the civilian courts would it have shown up more readily than if the jazz something like this gone through the military a code of justice would have been behalf not show up and why wouldn't it well each should show up there there are there are standard procedures for taking every court procedure and sending them to washington washington is the one who keeps the information on this and then national i've criminal information center the nc icy and or crime information center and that is the repository for all this information that is what atf checks the nci seen and if you have one entity that has decided they are not going to cooperate in this what they're doing is put every putting everybody at risk because anybody who they've dealt with his now got a free ticket tell tell me as as a as investigator a man who sort of looking do all sorts of a tara and other cases over the years what what is it the papal missed with this guy because it it always seems to be something up to the event michael i think you know it's it's hard to tell you know in advance weather somebody miss anything but from from what i've been finding out from people in new braun falls where kelly's from this guy had indications all the way back in the middle school that there was something going on with him a motion early and then you get him into the military and he beats his wife and child goes to prison essentially for a year and then comes out and then he's on facebook bragging about the.

washington nci tara michael braun assault nc investigator kelly facebook
"nci" Discussed on Kevin Pollaks Chat Show

Kevin Pollaks Chat Show

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"nci" Discussed on Kevin Pollaks Chat Show

"That's what i found out i actually believe she really liked me so i asked her out at the break and she goes on no no black hole but we were just yeah we were just and you were you were all over million but he didn't nci boyfriend oh that doesn't compute at so two things one my job in this class was to convincingly kiss this girl and really take your in at that never happened in any police science scores no no did the second thing was i actually absolutely believe she liked me and she didn't write she was acting so i was dizzy from this experience like oh my god this is power and this is really powerful and so that's when i went okay i don't think i'm going to be a policeman i i don't know what i'm going to be but i need to go find myself and i hopped on a motorcycle and he took off for two years we accept attributed with your brother around the country two years we were on the road i would love it there's any moment in the book so maybe from that section where you there's l tiny piece you might wanna read or regale you out from that from that particular from that time the app because when i saw that you and your brother went out a twoyear jumped on motorcycles yet see the world that's so fantis fantasy at the literature films.

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"nci" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"nci" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Thanks very much greg jarrett art it's time now to bring in dave wilson bloomberg stocks columnist and blogger at mlive go on the bloomberg and of course in dave in email at dav wilson at bloomberg dot net to sign up for his daily free email newsletter dave what are you watching for small and me catch stocks right now well watson fall for one thing which puts them at odds with their large appears the russell 2000 index down half a percent while the s p 500's basically little changed the russel steep was trampled to navigate consulting who's ticker is nci extent about fourteen and a half percent earnings show the savage adjustment a bloomberg survey for the first time in three years hurts global holdings ticker h t e z has lost about thirteen percent the car rental company was cut the equipment cell from hold the barclays which expects second quarter results to be disappointing it clovis oncology ticker c l v s has fallen about ten per sent after reaching a drug development deal with bristolmyers squibb summit analysts said the accord reduced the chances that clo this will be acquired the russel's biggest gain by far belongs to a stock could be talking about later this hour diamondbacks technologies ticker devi a x its jumped seventy two and a half percent the drug maker's propose vaccine perhaps the tightest v gained the support of the us advisory committee and animal health company has got ticker h s k a has getting about six and a half percent secondquarter profit providence sales top projections thank you so much dave wilson bloomberg stocks editor communist and blogger at mlive go and as dave said we are going to be speaking more about dina vat coming up but before we do that we want to take a little bit into the ramifications of a potential collapse of obama care president trump has raised the possibility it he wouldn't pay into the insurance system day with the way people by individual insurance policies that would effectively caused obamacare to collapse but with this 'cause it possible boon for the pharmaceutical industry i wanna bring in steve yubo he's president and chief executive officer of the pharmaceutical research manufacturers of america pharma which is based in washington d c in as a lobbying organization for the pharmaceutical industry and steve there there is this speculation that if the if obamacare dis and if nothing were places at the us has even less of.

greg jarrett obamacare president and chief executive insurance system president obama editor bristolmyers squibb nci russell dave wilson bloomberg us steve yubo pharmaceutical industry insurance policies trump russel barclays russel steep dav wilson thirteen percent three years