36 Burst results for "NATO"

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on Chad Benson

Chad Benson

00:57 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nato" discussed on Chad Benson

"You are. You're welcome. Listen, follow subscribe. You said that you were going to press China. You signed onto the G seven communique. That said you G seven. We're calling on China to open up to let the investigators in. But China basically says they don't want to be interfered with anymore. So what happens now? The impact the world's attitude toward China. As it develops China's trying very hard to project itself as a responsible And very, very forthcoming nation. They are find very hard to talk about how they're taking and helping the world in terms of Covid 19 vaccines. They're trying very hard. Look certain things you don't have to explain. To the people of the world, and they see the results. Is China. Really, actually trying to get to the bottom is one thing we did discuss, as I told you and the EU and at the G seven and with NATO What we should be doing What I'm going to make an effort to do is rallying the world to work on what is going to be that physical mechanism available. To detect early on the next pandemic. And have a mechanism by which we can respond to.

Nato EU G Seven ONE China Covid 19 Vaccines
Biden Arrives in Geneva for Summit With Putin

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 d ago

Biden Arrives in Geneva for Summit With Putin

"President Biden has arrived in Geneva before tomorrow's meeting with Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin it's the final stop on the president's first overseas trip after days of meetings with the G. seven NATO and the European Union allies tomorrow is perhaps the main event the president plans to confront Putin on everything from Moscow cyber attacks to election interference while also looking for areas of potential cooperation Texas congressman Michael McCaul the house foreign affairs committee's top Republican says the president must stand strong I think he should stay in no more we're not gonna take this anymore and made clear the US will hit back if Putin continues his attacks Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden Vladimir Putin Geneva Michael Mccaul House Foreign Affairs Committe Nato Putin European Union Moscow Texas United States Sager Ani Washington
Biden Says NATO ‘Stands Together’ as Russia, China Seek to Divide

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 6 d ago

Biden Says NATO ‘Stands Together’ as Russia, China Seek to Divide

Los Angeles Dentist Charged With Sexual Assault on Multiple Patients

Tim Conway Jr.

00:21 sec | Last week

Los Angeles Dentist Charged With Sexual Assault on Multiple Patients

"Nine patients. Prosecutors say the assaults happened between 2013 and 2018 at the dentist's office on Beverly Boulevard. De A. George Gascon says the case is especially concerning because those abused are low income people and immigrants who are less likely to report those crimes. He says investigators would like to hear from anyone else who may have been abused by Imad Maude. NATO stands

De A. George Gascon Imad Maude Nato
Biden Calls Putin Smart and Tough Ahead of Wednesday Summit

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

Biden Calls Putin Smart and Tough Ahead of Wednesday Summit

"President Biden won't say how you'll measure the success of his upcoming meeting with Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin at a news conference at NATO's Brussels headquarters the president described Putin as bright and tough as they say we used to play ball a worthy adversary and he won't necessarily trust what Putin sets I'd verify first and then trust earlier in an NBC news interview Putin denied allegations that Moscow was conducted cyber attacks on the US and the meddled in elections not not that there is the evidence is because there is proof but it it it's just a quickie coming farcical the president says when they meet Wednesday in Geneva he'll make clear there are areas where the U. S. and Russia can cooperate if Putin so chooses if not we're responding crime Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden Putin Vladimir Putin Nato Brussels NBC Moscow Geneva United States U. Russia Sager Mag Ani Washington
President Trump's 2017 Travel Restrictions Were on Countries Listed by Obama; Not a Muslims Ban

The Dan Bongino Show

01:47 min | Last week

President Trump's 2017 Travel Restrictions Were on Countries Listed by Obama; Not a Muslims Ban

"The reason they were banned. During those travel restrictions were because they were from a list of seven countries. Seven countries that were put on that list because of terrorism problems by one who wait for it, Wait for it. Barack Obama. If it was a Muslim ban and not a banned from certain terror supporting countries. We're having a problem vetting people in Than any Muslim would have been allowed in the United States again to the Liberals. This thing I'm just asking you to do an exercise and logic here. If Trump's travel restrictions targeted Muslims and they said, you are banned that if you are Muslim, you would not be allowed in. That is not true. You're Muslim. You were allowed into the United States. It was not a Muslim bed. It was a travel restriction from seven countries that the Obama the Obama administration had categorized as having issues with their vetting process because of their problems with terrorism. You doubt me? I always come at the receipts, folks, I'm not gonna waste your time. Here's an observer article. Michael, say NATO January 30th 2017. Headline Obama administration helped make Trump's Muslim travel ban possible quote as opposed to being an anomaly induced by Trump's presidency. The band was set in motion by Obama's administration. In December of 22 US 15 Obama signed into law the Visa Waiver Improvement and Terrorists Travel Prevention Act. Which designated Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia as areas of concern. One of those countries have in common with the Trump travel ban. Or a Muslim ban, according to leftist lunatics. It's the exact same countries he used to restrict travel from the ones the Obama administration had designated as having problems with terrorism.

Obama Administration Donald Trump Barack Obama United States Liberals Nato Michael Yemen Syria Libya Sudan Somalia Iran Iraq
Biden Heads Into NATO Summit Aiming to Reassure Allies

Texas Standard

00:32 sec | Last week

Biden Heads Into NATO Summit Aiming to Reassure Allies

President Biden arrives in Belgium ahead of NATO summit

Brian Mudd

00:24 sec | Last week

President Biden arrives in Belgium ahead of NATO summit

"He's with 29 world leaders to discuss things like Russia, China global terrorism, cyber threats and climate change. After that, the president's next stop is Geneva first sit down with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday. They're meeting comes as both Biden and Putin have agreed that relations between their two countries have reached an all time low. Coming up on 11 03. It looks

Russia Geneva China Vladimir Putin Biden Putin
At NATO, Biden Says Defense of Europe a “Sacred Obligation”

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:41 sec | Last week

At NATO, Biden Says Defense of Europe a “Sacred Obligation”

"Wrapping up the G seven summit in England and meeting with the Queen President Biden is now in Brussels for a one day summit with the leaders of NATO President Biden began his day at NATO by declaring the mutual defense commitment of the military alliance is a quote sacred obligation. Article five says that an attack on one NATO member is an attack on all in the alliance constantly remind America When America was attacked for the first time and ensure since what happened back and began to World War two NATO stepped up in a pivot from the position of former president Trump, who declared NATO quote obsolete. President Biden today calling the military alliance critically important for American interests.

Nato Biden Military Alliance Brussels England America President Trump President Biden
Biden Administration to Hold Russia Accountable for Cyberattacks

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

01:07 min | Last week

Biden Administration to Hold Russia Accountable for Cyberattacks

"Summit of the leaders of the world's most top Democratic economies wrapped up in the UK Sunday President Biden, speaking about the G seven's approach to dealing with the economic competition presented by China. As I've told, she's been playing myself. I'm not looking for conflict where we cooperate will cooperate. When we disagree on the state is frankly and we are going to respond to actions that are inconsistent and is now in Brussels for the NATO summit Monday it will then meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Switzerland Wednesday. This as the Biden administration is looking to hold Russia accountable for recent cyber attacks in the US, the issue of cyber security resurfaced at the G seven meeting of industrial nations. Here's what President Biden said about it. We've agreed they're going to work together to address cyber threats from state and non state actors like criminal ransomware networks. Russian President Vladimir Putin said his country would agree to hand over cyber criminals to the U. S. If America agreed to do the same with Russia, but many are Skeptical, pointing to Putin's denial of Russian links to recent ransomware attacks on JBs, the world's largest meat processing company, and colonial pipeline, which delivers the majority of fuel to the East Coast Foxes

President Biden Biden Administration Vladimir Putin Brussels Nato Russian President Vladimir Put UK Russia China Switzerland United States U. Putin JBS East Coast
Biden Arrives in Belgium Ahead of NATO Summit

The Oil Patch

00:13 sec | Last week

Biden Arrives in Belgium Ahead of NATO Summit

"The G seven summit spoke about their approach to dealing with cyber attacks. Another big questions, including investigating the origin of the coronavirus. President Biden today is in Belgium for a meeting with

President Biden Belgium
Biden Takes Subtle Jabs at Trump at End of G7

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Biden Takes Subtle Jabs at Trump at End of G7

"President Joe Biden is taking a series of subtle jabs at Donald Trump at the end of the G. seven summit after four years of America first America is back in the business of leading the world alongside nations who share our most deeply held values at a news conference president Joe Biden also highlighted very fundamental differences with his predecessor on climate change some of my colleague said to me when I was there as well the United States is simply that they should recognize there is global warming and I know that sounds silly but you know we had a president who last two basically said it's not a problem for more it is the existential problem facing humanity next stop provided is the NATO summit Monday in Brussels followed by a meeting with Russia's president Wednesday in Geneva Shelley Adler Washington

President Joe Biden America Donald Trump Joe Biden Nato Brussels Russia Shelley Adler Geneva Washington
The Latest: Biden takes subtle jabs at Trump at end of G7

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last week

The Latest: Biden takes subtle jabs at Trump at end of G7

"President Joe Biden is taking a series of subtle jabs at Donald Trump at the end of the G. seven summit after four years of America first America is back in the business of leading the world alongside nations who share our most deeply held values at a news conference president Joe Biden also highlighted very fundamental differences with his predecessor on climate change some of my colleague said to me when I was there as well the United States is simply that they should recognize there is global warming and I know that sounds silly but you know we had a president who last two basically said it's not a problem for more it is the existential problem facing humanity next stop provided is the NATO summit Monday in Brussels followed by a meeting with Russia's president Wednesday in Geneva Shelley

President Joe Biden America Donald Trump Joe Biden Nato Brussels Russia Geneva Shelley
G7 Leaders Pledge a Billion COVID-19 Vaccines to Poorer Countries

My Car Geek Show

00:50 sec | Last week

G7 Leaders Pledge a Billion COVID-19 Vaccines to Poorer Countries

"Leaders are wrapping up the G seven. I'm Pam Couso Fox news and they're making some big promises. According to a draft communique, the group of seven is pledging to vaccinate the world against the coronavirus leaders will also invest in a massive infrastructure plan for the developing world to rival China and will increase climate contributions to help poorer nations. From Britain. President Biden will head to Brussels for a NATO summit on Wednesday, he'll be in Geneva for a face to face with Russian leader Vladimir Putin. In an interview with NBC, Putin described Biden as stable. He called former president Trump colorful. It has been announced that Biden will not do a joint presser with Putin as president Trump Had done. They're going to try to control the message, Fox says Greg Palkot at Britain's Windsor Castle, where the president will have tea with the

Pam Couso President Biden President Trump Fox News Biden Putin Britain Brussels Nato Vladimir Putin Geneva China NBC Greg Palkot FOX Windsor Castle
What to Expect From Biden's First Foreign Trip as President

First Light

02:13 min | Last week

What to Expect From Biden's First Foreign Trip as President

"Biden already well into his second day, now his first full day of activities of his first overseas trip as chief executive. Clayton Neville reports on the first round of activities. Michael the president and first lady were greeted by American troops and their families at Royal Air Force milled in home. The first lady assured the troops that supporting them is her top priority. You are heroes, and that's why supporting you is so personal to US President Biden embarking on an eight day trip with the purpose of reasserting the US on the world stage at every point along the way. We're gonna make it clear that the United States is back. And democracies of the world are standing together to tackle the toughest challenges and the issues that matter most to our future. That we're committed to, leading with strength. Defending our values. And delivering for our people. The trip started with some good news from the White House. The Biden administration announced an agreement with Visor to purchase 500 million covid vaccine doses to be donated to more than 90 lower income countries over the next year. Busy week for the president to laid out his agenda. I'm heading to the G seven, then to the NATO ministerial and then Meet with Mr Putin to let him know. What I want him to know. That meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin will come in Geneva next weekend, of course, is one of the more high profile meetings on the trip with a rising number of cyberattacks linked to groups in Russia. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan said the president's discussion with Putin will be significant. It's about a relationship of clarifying What our expectations are and laying out that if certain kinds of harmful activities continue to occur, there will be responses from the United States. White House press secretary Jen Psaki was asked if the president was ready for the Putin meeting and others He's been getting ready for 50 years, he has been on the world stage. He's known a number of these leaders for decades, including President Putin and including a number of the leaders, he'll see it NATO and he'll see at the G seven in the days ahead. The U. S expected to re engage in the

Clayton Neville President Biden Biden Administration United States Royal Air Force Biden Mr Putin Russian President Vladimir Put National Security Advisor Jake White House Michael Nato Putin Jen Psaki Geneva Russia President Putin
US ‘Is Back’: Biden Touts Democracy on First Overseas Trip

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | Last week

US ‘Is Back’: Biden Touts Democracy on First Overseas Trip

"Says the United States is back and that world democracies are standing together against the toughest challenges Biden telling US troops at Royal Air Force Base in Mindo Hall, England. Hell. He recognizes the difficulties they faced over the past year and a half and that democracy doesn't happen by accident at every point along the way. We're gonna make it clear that the United States is back. And democracies of the world are standing together to tackle the toughest challenges and the issues that matter most to our future. That were committed to leading with trends defending our values. And delivering for our people. Biden is on an eight day European trip that includes a G seven meeting, a NATO summit and a meeting with Russia's President Vladimir Putin.

Royal Air Force Base Mindo Hall United States Biden England Nato President Vladimir Putin Russia
Biden Arrives in U.K., Declares 'the United States Is Back'

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:56 min | Last week

Biden Arrives in U.K., Declares 'the United States Is Back'

"Today. President biden arrived in europe for the first foreign trip of his presidency in his first remarks upon landing speaking. Us troops after we landed in the uk. In fact talked about saving democracy. I believe inflection point in world history the moment where it falls to us to prove the democracy's not just endure but they will excel as we rise to seize the enormous opportunities the new age we have to discredit those who believed that the age of democracy is over as some of our fellow nations. Believe have to expose false. The narrative decrees of dictators can match the speed and scale. The twenty-first challenges. You know. And i know the wrong but it doesn't mean we don't have to work harder than ever to prove the democracy can still deliver for our people. The many think things are changing so rapidly. Democracies cannot get together and form a consensus to respond like autocrats. Can you know better than anyone. Democracy doesn't happen by accident we have to defend it. We have to strengthen renew it. We're gonna make it clear that the united states is back and democracies of the world are standing together to tackle the toughest challenges and the issues that matter most to our future that were committed to leading strand defending our values and delivering for our people. This my overseas trip as the united states. I'm heading to the g seven then to the nato ministerial and then to meet with mr putin to let him know what i want him to know.

President Biden Europe United States UK Mr Putin Nato
Biden Opens Overseas Trip Declaring 'United States Is Back'

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Biden Opens Overseas Trip Declaring 'United States Is Back'

"President Biden is making the first move to reassert the country on the world stage the president was greeted by American troops at a Royal Air Force base in Britain his message the United States is back this is the president's first overseas trip in office submitted to the G. seven then to the NATO ministerial and then to meet with Mr Putin to let him know what I want him to know that summit with Russia's Vladimir Putin is next week in Geneva the president teared up when speaking to the troops so proud in dire only wish my major is here to thank you as well he was talking about his son beau the president also said Colbert needs to end not just at home but everywhere I'm at Donahue

President Biden Mr Putin Royal Air Force Britain Nato Vladimir Putin United States Geneva Russia Beau Colbert Donahue
What's on the Agenda for Biden's First Foreign Trip in Office

Seattle's Morning News

01:33 min | Last week

What's on the Agenda for Biden's First Foreign Trip in Office

"The president's first international trip since taking office, hoping to show the world the U. S is different with him in charge. President Biden's schedule includes meetings with allies from the G Seven Nations visit with Queen Elizabeth and have face to face meeting with Russian President Putin, CBS News correspondent We, Zhejiang has more from the White House. His press secretary says that President Biden has been preparing for 50 years for this trip, and in many ways he has first is the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and then as vice president, But Now it is his turn to set the agenda. The president will kick off his trip by meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Thursday before attending the G seven summit in Cornwall, England. It will be the first time the leaders of the world's largest economies will meet face to face since the pandemic began. Mr Biden has stressed he wants to renew America's commitment to allies after his predecessor sparred openly with them. His goal to rally the world's democracies on issues like the pandemic climate change and countering China. He and the first lady will then visit Queen Elizabeth at Windsor Castle on Sunday before heading to Brussels for the NATO summit. The agenda there is expected to include defense spending, cybersecurity and Russian aggression. Mr Biden will cap off the trip Wednesday with his first in person meeting with Putin since becoming president. His advisors say that is not about delivering deals, but Rather setting boundaries with Russia on everything from those cyber attacks we've been seeing to its nuclear program. We did

President Biden Russian President Putin Senate Foreign Relations Commi Mr Biden British Prime Minister Boris J Queen Elizabeth Cbs News Zhejiang White House Cornwall England Windsor Castle America Brussels Nato China Putin Russia
"nato" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today. Nato defense ministers will conclude their meetings in Brussels ahead of a security summit that starts in Eunuch tomorrow. The two day summit comes as the defense alliance is increasingly under the spotlight president. Donald Trump has long complained that European governments aren't pulling their weight. When it comes to spending and troop deployments they are really sort of letting down in that one respect and we don't want people taking advantage of the United States he wants NATO to take a more leading role in the Middle East and Response Ministers have agreed in principle to take over some of the training in Iraq. That's currently being carried out by a US led coalition against Islamic state. It's not clear whether more NATO troops will be deployed or whether more NATO partners will be drafted into Iraq. What is clear is that the alliance is bending to international pressure. Nato in the past two three years. It's pretty difficult time of it partly because of Donald Trump's pressures on us in the from the White House He's been pushing very hard harder than perhaps any previous president for NATO members to be spending more money to carry their fair share of the burden as he would put. Daniel Franklin is the economists diplomatic editor but also there have been other criticisms not recently president macro France and interview with the Economist. Talk to NATO experiencing brain death so there's been a lot of questions about NATO's future so NATO came in for this kind of criticism. Even before the trump era the before donald trump came to the White House. Nato was under pressure because of external reasons more than internal ones it was under pressure because of Russia's actions in Ukraine in particular so there was always a bit of a disconnect between the level of activity of NATO in response to the increased pressure felt from Russia and the criticism. It was getting from the White House in particular when Donald Trump came to power. Broadly the perception is of of a NATO. His struggling yes. I think that's right. But the have been changes of late which I think are more encouraging for NATO first of all Donald Trump himself has been changing his tone somewhat. He's been keen to trumpet. Nato's increase spending promises as a as a triumph for for his pressure saying that no other president has achieved what he's achieved he's turned into something of a NATO booster or booster Rodman the NATO Bashar and a new big survey of attitudes to NATO countries by Pew Research Center is reasonably encouraging. I think for the organization in in what way well The Pew survey suggests that support for NATO among populations in among the NATO members states is reasonably strong. Fifty three percent say they have a favorable attitude towards NATO only twenty seven percent. Have an unfavorable Ju- if it was an organization that was struggling with a perception problem. Now it doesn't seem to be what's different when I think there are still perception problems. If you delve deeper into the piece of there are some also some less good signs Vanessa. In certain countries support over a ten year horizon has dropped quite sharply and France for example. There's been a twenty one point a drop over that over that period in Germany to quite a sizeable drop even in the United States Although the level of support for NATO favorability rating of just over half is about the average over the period from two thousand and nine to two thousand sixteen. It's quite a sharp drop from the past couple of years where support had spite and there are a couple of NATO member states where unfavorable attitudes to the to the alliance remain very strong and that's Greece and Turkey. So it's it's very much of a mixed picture but I do think there has been a revival in NATO's fortunes partly because the political sense of pressures from America have eased somewhat in recent times. So how much do you think these troop deployment promises and spending changes are down to pressure from the likes of President Trump and macron? Well NATO was going to be increasing. Its spending anyway but the problem was that it was not living up to the promises that itself had made the pledge that a NATO members had had made back off to the Russian move into Ukraine and The annexation of Crimea was to spend the minimum two percent of GDP on defense and only a few countries. We're doing that. The promise was to do this by two thousand twenty four. Some countries in particular Germany were not going to achieve that America was complaining as indeed. American presidents have done repeatedly down the decades. But the difference this time was Donald. Trump did it with a vehemence assistance. And I think a sense of threat even to the point of threatening to pull out of NATO allies didn't shape that was a degree of pressure that NATO would not face before and I think perhaps to some extent has accounted for at least some of the increase spending. Mr Trump's complaints seems wholly focused on everyone paying their own fair. Share about about money concerns. If there are more than that yes I think there is more than this I think. President trump has also started to see that. Nato can be useful to him in a number of ways. One way is by spending more. It's something that he can chalk up as a success for him and he mentioned it in his State of the Union Address. We're also getting our allies. Finally to help pay their fair share. I have raised contributions from other NATO by more than four hundred billion dollars. So it's not. Just what's fair and equitable. He's looking for NATO members to relieve pressure on America's forces in the wake of the killing in January of Casino Damani talk rainy in general He actually asked. Nato said that he wanted NATO to do more in the Middle East. So far fron NATO being something that was the the the whose existence was under threat. He wanted to step up. And come and do more says Edison's then NATO itself has been busily looking at what it could do in Iraq in particular But now defense ministers are meeting this week and they're going to be looking at proposals to increase the NATO training operation In Iran pass quite substantially and as those defense ministers meet today. What else will they be trying to hammer out? Well there's a lot on the agenda for defense ministers as the question of Afghanistan the intention the trump administration's intention is to draw down America's presence in Afghanistan. President trump would like to get those those troops home and that affects NATO which also has a mission in Afghanistan. There's the broader question of how to respond to Russia's buildup of new weaponry ninety nine Putin has been busily investing in his arsenal and in particular with with the ending the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty the treaty There are lingering constraints about what he can put into place of really come off and NATO's having to think not just about the IMF implications but also the broader response to to the Russian buildup. So there's plenty for defense types to get their heads around not only at the meeting of ministers in Brussels now but also when the broader gathering at the Munich security conference starts on Friday. Daniel thank you very much for joining us. Thank you in Japan. Many forms of gambling are illegal. There are exceptions among them. The Arcade Game Kinko and in two thousand eighteen casinos were legalized. The decision hasn't gone down well with many Japanese people who worry about gambling addiction and the influence of organized crime that unease worsened in December. When a cabinet minister was arrested over allegations of taking bribes from companies. I in casino projects in the country in spite of growing public concern. The Japanese government still seems to think it's worth a roll.

NATO President trump donald trump president America United States Iraq Middle East Brussels White House Germany Daniel Franklin Russia president macro France Ukraine Vanessa France Japanese government Afghanistan
"nato" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on Worldly

"The only time article five was ever invoked was in the United States is case after the nine eleven attacks. NATO allies came to America's defense. So it's kind of messed up for the even at this point right like waiver on that and this is why this kind of lack of faith that us that the US would defend fended. These countries part of that is why countries like Poland are actively trying to get more and more. US troops literally in the country. So you have Poland trying to basically basically entice trump to send even more. US troops by say we'll build you a base and we'll even call it for trump now. Most people I talked to think that this is never going to happen. That it's rhetoric on both besides but the point is that you know by having US troops physically in these countries that the US if they were attacked the US would therefore not only one beat. They're ready but would be on the front lines right. So if you accidentally hit Americans there now in the war regardless of whether NATO you know they're holding onto article five or not. So that's why you see you know this desire to have more NATO troops more. US troops in these countries. which again to me is fascinating going from the Middle East for like everyone's like Americans get the hell out? We don't want your troops. Everyone there is like please give us more American troops in. That's why because even if article five is fake and it fails then you know. At least we'll have troops still here. No it's it's a problem that is not just limits. The United States this issue of NATO credibility we talk about the US because it's the most important country the The largest contributor terms of military firepower but neto is also dealing with serious internal divisions starting with A contradiction with something. Something I said earlier actually about countries in NATO focusing on their democratic transitions from former authoritarian rule. Well now you actually have at least three member states going in the wrong counteraction. We're talking about Poland which we've been which has been discussed as this really friendly pro. US aid but also is GonNa need serious authoritarian direction. In the past few years with a major major democratic go Russians and then Hungary and Turkey both of which are now thoroughly described. I think most unbiased observers as Teheran states not Russia style authoritarian but but a kind of soft at least sliding towards authoritarianism pretty heavily. Yeah and when you have that that kind of change inside of alliance that's supposed to be founded on the defensive democracy and shared values then you have countries inside the alliances that start to have different interests stress different senses of what is important to preserve about their country and what they can do or should do as members of the alliance to protect protect themselves. Some of this geostrategic has nothing to do with democracy. Turkey is a special case because it's really a Middle Eastern country in its strategic orientation and so it cares cares a lot about Syria for example and that causes a type of different relationship with Russia than basically everybody else in NATO but hungry polander creating different kinds of challenges. Even even as Poland's tells every American who's listening we want NATO. We Love America. Please please please please. They're moving the direction opposite. From what every American except for maybe trump wants it. We should send you to Hungary's act in order to do some reporting on this and this is actually a problem with you. Know when we talked about NATO expansion. This is an issue that I'm I'm worried about out quite a bit. There are twenty nine members of NATO. Now and a lot of what you what NATO can accomplish as an alliance requires unanimity right unanimity in decision-making and the morale as as you're adding the harder it's going to make that happen like you're going to need you know the US and Poland and Hungary and Turkey and all these countries to agree on stuff and now they're hoping to add a thirtieth and thirty first the thirty second and with each expansion. Yes you can make the case that it's good for those individual countries it might strengthen the alliance in on the margins but you're also making the political critical aspect of this alliance much harder to manage and we've seen this already. The the more allies NATO brings in the heart of the decision making process has been which again goes back to my clearly love affair that I didn't know I had with Jens Stoltenberg which is like the fact that he's kept this alliance sort of running smoothly despite more allies despite trump's disturbance the that they're able leaving. Come up with these platitudes. I actually find to be quite remarkable. It's why he's GonNa. He seems to. He was probably going to be in the position for the longest amount of any secretary-general. I will say that I think just to wrap about that. It was pretty promising to see that trump. Even if it's mostly from flattery like you said we are again stands Stoltenberg stands. I don't know You know even if it is mostly flattery and even if you know these NATO countries did start spending more Before trump actually came into office he has a I think. Nobody can quibble with the fact that he has been very vocal and very clear about wanting these countries to spend more of their the defense budget and pushing very hard and so I think seeing him this week at this NATO summit actually saying like NATO's doing great NATO stronger like NATO's Oh you know what are the most important in the lions is is actually really positive in the sense of you know when he first came into office in the campaign trail like people were very concerned that this could be the end of NATO and I think you know we're now three plus I guess three years into his exactly three years into his term most and it seems like things are kind of going. Okay Okay like their challenges that we just enumerated but it seems like at least as of right now. Things are kind of going in a pretty positive direction which like all things considered at. That's pretty good sign. I'd say which you know this show. We don't tend to leave you with a lot of. Hey welcome everyone can destroy. I can't believe it. Enjoy the happiness wall. Okay for now. I want to thank our engineer or producer Jackson Beerfeltz. And I want to encourage all of you folks to rate and subscribe and review worldly wherever your podcasts.

NATO United States Poland trump Hungary Turkey America Middle East Teheran Russia Stoltenberg Jens Stoltenberg Syria neto Jackson Beerfeltz lions
"nato" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:42 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on The Current

"I think it may be a number of things. I think. There's a sense that a lot of people have is that the world organizations and they're on political organizations haven't serve them well and that helped feel populism. I mean there are people who feel they've been marginalized or left out and it's not just economic. What I think seems to becoming increasingly clear is the people who support populist parties? Many of the people supported Brexit in a continuing to support Brexit in the. UK really felt that they won't listen to they felt there was. They lead snob somewhere doing in what they wanted and they were being told to shut up and do what they were told. And it's a question of dignity I think but I think what is also happening is the number of the multilateral institutions is an out quite old I mean the UN they show the World Bank the IMF International Monetary Fund. All of these organizations was set up at the end of the Second World War. And I think what's happening with the passage of time is we are forgetting why we needed them. You know we knew we needed them after. Nineteen forty-five because we could look around the world. People could look around the world and see the devastation that a major major state to state conflict had had created state to state conflicts and created. And I think we've forgotten just how important it is to have ways of working together multilaterally literally and I think that's dangerous because Florida's these organizations are and you know we can certainly all criticize them. We need them particularly now when we are facing not just strategic problems competition between states who are also facing the major challenge of climate change more than ever. We need to work together. So the let's bring it back to NATO. How does that alliance seem relevant? How does it make itself seem relevant? Well my own prescription. But I'm you know who knows I mean there's so many arguments about what NATO my own view is it should go back to focusing on what it does. It should stop trying to out of Europe out of North Atlantic ventures. I think I mean there are all sorts of arguments for that but I don't think the good ones and I think the Europeans and Canada the partners in NATO partner states are really going to have to step up and do more and that's very difficult in peace time because public don't I don't see the point in paying for expensive military equipment and expensive military's but I think we really need to think seriously and I think this question for our political leadership. Can they explain lane to the rest of his life. Tax Dollars need to go on this stuff and I think they've really got to make a start on that and it was a historian. You're you're more accustomed. I'm to looking backwards but allow me to put a crystal ball in front of you and say as these leaders meet now. Do you think ten years from now they will be meeting at something called the NATO. Oh I think they will A lot depends on what happens. I mean a lot depends on how permanent defective of president trump and his policies are going to be on American American politics. I mean what is interesting at the moment is it in Congress in the. US is still very strong. Support for NATO and whether that will outlast president trump whether he has has one or two terms is a big question I think for the European powers they really I think a beginning to realize what it would mean not to have a nasal not to have some form of military every corporation in some form of of military planning and so perhaps they will try and come together. I'M GONNA be an optimist and say ten years NATO will steal still be here. Maybe maybe we'll have it self and be refocused and really know what it's about you know one thing that's curious and just to shift gears here slightly when you look at the the photo of all of those leaders in that room. Of course Turkey's president is there and this comes at a time that Turkey has unilaterally Gone in to Syria And created created even more emotion in that region. What what are the challenges that Turkey's incursion into Syria its relationship with Russia? What are the challenges that that poses for the Alliance of course being a NATO combination? Yeah it's a major challenge to I mean if you look at the original NATO treaty it is about bringing together countries who have common values who care about democracy who care about a world in which people cooperate who actually want to make. According to treat. He wanted to make a world free from MM conflict. I mean NATO is very much a defensive alliance. It's not about going out and taking over other countries and I think the behavior of Turkey is extremely worrying and the question of the NATO is. How much can it let you get away with it? tacky is buying military equipment for Russia which NATO is going to compromise NATO security and I think this is a real problem. And how far Kentucky go and doing things like this. And how far can it go in an intervention though Syria. Now I think it's a huge problem for Asia and I think they're going they have to come to terms with it. But how do you do that. I mean Turkey keeps pushing the envelope in pushing the envelope and more and more and more and there has been no no apparent censure. Yeah Yeah No. I've been wondering about this. I mean in the Cold War Turkey was was very important for the NATO alliance and I think people tend to overlook some of some of the Lestat that democratic things Tokyo was doing because of Turkey's proximity across the Black Sea to the Soviet Union. But I think you could argue now that Russia's much weaker that Turkey is less important than I think. Perhaps this needs to be brought home to take that. It's not as important as it was that it's causing trouble for NATO and quite frankly NATO may reach a point where it says is it just doesn't need Turkey and Turkey may need to think about where it is in the world. It doesn't live in a good neighbourhood. That may not at the moment it's on friendly terms with Russia but Turkish Russian relations have gone up and down on over the last century and they've often been at odds with each other. It doesn't have a good relationship with Iran. There's a lot of resentment in in Middle Eastern countries about what Turkey's being doing. Toki doesn't have a good relationship with Greece. And so maybe maybe just took he needs to think about where it's going to be kicked out of NATO. What what are the odds of that happening? I don't know I think it will depend very much. On what sort of leadership. I think macron has been very critical and he's also very critical of the United States role role in suddenly pulling out of Syria so whether macron will be able to bring his NATO partners with partners along with him whether Toki we'll be censured and whether it will be given some sort of ultimatum. You don't know I mean it really depends on. The internal dynamics of trouble is of course at the moment the United States although it's concerned about Turkey buying Russian equipment President Putin president trump seems to think he has a good relationship with president. I hadn't really recently to the White House so very difficult to tell again. The United States is going to be so important because it is is the big partner in NATO to let me finish off with that thought then what does Donald Trump and his presence and his presidency mean for NATO right now I think ain't nothing much good. I mean the the tar was Donald Trump is. Sometimes I think he he hits on things that are important to American policy I think is confrontation with China. Probably was overdue. You in a way. I think I think the Chinese had been pushing the bounds of what was reasonable behavior in for example intellectual property theft. But I think he's a rash IQ and that's very worrying. I mean if you're trying to develop alliance fuel trying to do planning if you're trying to think of where the future is if you don't think you can count on the leader of the main power in that relationship. Then I think it makes you very uneasy and I and I think what I what strikes me most about president trump is it. His foreign policy is very erratic and worryingly. I think he has fewer advises around him whom he's prepared to listen to and that's concerning whereas the continuity in American foreign strategic policy. It's certainly not in the president's office Margaret McMillan. Thank you very much for sharing these thoughts with us. Thank you very nice conversation. Margaret Macmillan is professor of history at the University of Toronto and Professor America of International History at the University of Oxford. You may well know her from her books including Paris. Nineteen nineteen and the the uses and abuses of history we reached Margaret Macmillan in Oxford England..

NATO Turkey Russia Syria Donald Trump UK Margaret Macmillan Brexit UN Toki Florida President Putin Margaret McMillan Europe World Bank
"nato" Discussed on AP News

AP News

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on AP News

"The strength of NATO is that despite these differences we have always been able to unite the wrong court costs to protect and defend the shoulder and it is the responsibility of all of us to make sure that we do this also today because we live in the more unpredictable I'm uncertain rolled

NATO
"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

And Now The Hard Part

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

"But particularly after the Berlin Wall fell a lot of countries that have been maintaining two percent of their national budgets for defense began to cut down to one point seven one point five one point four one point three in the case of of Germany at one point and that just means that the US is carrying an outsized burden and you don't have that sense of family all contributing to the shared budget if you will so that gave President trump talking horse but frankly President Obama and all five presidents that I worked for also routinely beat the drum to get NATO allies to pay more they began paying more after the invasion of Crimea because all of a sudden there was a physical security threat coming towards NATO territory. the question I think when president trump comes in is whether you do better as the United States trying to encourage more spending with sugar or with vinegar and we I've had a lot of vinegar in this conversation so that's one set of issues the other set of issues is the value set where I think we began to see with Viktor ORB on in Hungary first and then in Poland and then in Turkey throughout the period from two thousand twelve onward increasing autocratic behaviour increasing populace behavior using democratic majority ladies to make judiciaries less independent to make media more state run and less truly the fourth estate watched logging checking and balancing government power to squeeze out opponents to harass them and this goes to the fundamental compact values among allies I think we were speaking out quite a strongly about these things in the Obama Administration we were working with the European Union Commission I don't think that president trump cares about this and in fact he holds up a mirror and sees a lot of similarities with a guy like or bonner guy like and Shannon has been very welcoming them Victoria has done a tremendous job in so many different ways highly respect that just else for further fraying of the fundamental platform on which this is built so that's what's happening within the Western community but what about the threat side the external threat side the dangers coming from Russia do you think that this current escalation if it's fair to call it that started with Ukraine or does it go even further back in and I should say by the way you were on the front lines as assistant secretary of State for European Eurasian Affairs from two thousand thirteen to twenty seventeen I think that Russia made its first serious military probes into new space with the Georgia in war in two thousand in new and scary that we haven't seen before you know I think in the in the Georgian context they stopped short of pudding oh military power the Russians did but I do think it was a learning experience for Putin and his military in terms of how they do it next time including with more deniability they were extremely well rehearsed when they went into Crimea so you get the feeling that they had been practicing and that's so we we're fast forwarding from two thousand eight to what in two thousand and fourteen in the winter is when they go into Crimea and then they go into the eastern parts of Ukraine the Donbas columns of suspected Russian Allah have been reported moving through east Ukraine mid phase of a new Russian Galatian unverified video you're seeing a much more sophisticated Russian operation this time sophisticated as a complicated word let's say deniable stealthy well rehearsed with these bizarre overlays of democratic veneer you know you remember that after the Russian forces supported the Crimean independence they felt the need to have a national referendum among the population tat about ten minutes to think about it and many of whom had left and the rest of whom owed their pensions and their livelihood to the aggressor and now you are arguably a victim of this newly subtle and we won't say sophisticated but more deniable but in some ways more Texas Louis and tactically adept Russian approach when in what has become I think we have to admit one of the most famous comments of your career has said the comments were totally unacceptable David Sanger the New York Times reporter has called you patient zero in this new era of weaponising surveillance information not disinformation in this case but actual information can you tell us about that experience and and what you learn from it so we were in the middle of the my don protests in Ukraine in the winter of two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen.

Berlin Wall ten minutes two percent
"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

And Now The Hard Part

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"nato" Discussed on And Now The Hard Part

"From foreign policy and the Brookings Institution we bring you and now the hard part I'm Jonathan temperament on each episode we examined one vexing mm-hmm trace its origin and offer a way forward today what to do about the framing of the NATO alliance should never happen again and they will also determined to stand up to the expansion of the Soviet Union in the Cold War it was routine Russian means buzzing the airspace of NATO members in Western Europe the report details the extent to which Moscow has revived the tactic member ship in NATO obligates the members to defend any other member that's tacked why should my son go to Montenegro to defend it from attack in which you say I've asked the same question in his joint address to Congress on Tuesday president trump took credit for getting NATO allies spend more money on defense NATO's obsolete it's old it's fat it's loppy NATO has been good for Europe but NATO has also been good for the United States our guest is Victoria newland Tori the nonresident senior fellow at Brookings and former assistant secretary of state she's also served as US ambassador to NATO and a quick note this episode includes some explicitly winch Toria welcome let's start with the problem does it work to frame it this way the eight alliances fraying for variety of reasons at the very moment that the threat posed by outside forces especially Russia is surging how do you feel about that I would say in every generation of NATO's life and NATO now older than seventy there have been problems that challenged the resilience and applicability of the alliance but there's only one reason that the NATO alliance is in difficulty right now which is that the current president of the United States continues to cast into doubt whether our founding promise to each other mutual self defense will be honored you know the United States was the founding member of the NATO alliance we wrote and signed the treaty in in Washington so the problem is this underlying seed of doubt that's been sown and the fact that we could be reinventing NATO yet again for some of the challenges it's not yet dealing with and is it fair to say that the threat is growing because of course as you were pointing out with the possible exception of the period after the end of the Cold War NATO has always faced grave and existential threats and yet there does seem to be something particular about this moment in terms of the danger here's that are looming on virtually all sides you know having studied NATO I and then worked at NATO through various iterations I think when you're in it it always feels like the existential moment certainly felt existential when we invoked Article Five on September Twelfth Two Thousand and one of the mutual off defense language in NATO's article right correct the day after the twin towers went down in New York all NATO members committed to help the United States defend itself against whomever had hit us and at that time we didn't even know who it was that on attack against one or more of the allies in Europe or in North America shall be considered an attack against them all so that moment certainly felt existential particularly when we went to vote in NATO and if everybody had not agreed would have wrecked the alliance right there but to be back in the place of NATO's founding which is that we we have to worry about territorial incursions onto NATO landmasses in countries is a little bit back to the future and it does is feel scary I think that there are plenty of other threats that or also GonNa Challenge our kids and next generations at NATO format provides a great place for the great nations of the transatlantic space to talk about these things and to set some policies together and we're just not it using NATO for that and when we talk about NATO or the transatlantic alliance when we talk about it fraying what are you most worried about so I think that there are a number of things here the first thing is is our security commitment to each other still solid as we discussed the second thing was the economic commitment that we have to each other in the transatlantic space that begins to break down when the United States puts tariffs on its own allies and uses tariffs as as a weapon of coercion equally against its allies and its competitor still France did that I told them I said don't do it because if you do it I'm going to tax your wine we tarum in the third pieces all of this is based on commitment to free societies democracies that include elections alternation of power free media independent judiciaries transparency of public finance all these things and again you have a United States that is not only not preaching those values and extending and expanding them the way we always have were not necessarily always practicing in them at home either trump has raised a lot of questions and made people very anxious with some of the things that he said his reluctance to embrace article five for example before eventually doing it but beyond the rhetoric had things actually gotten worse in a more sort of concrete material way in NATO I think NATO is performing the fundamental security tasks said it needs to perform including keeping lots of forces of many nations out on the eastern edge to deter the Russians continuing to train in Afghanistan continuing to modernize the way the alliance works and frankly continuing to get more money in the Bank for defense from all these countries which by the way started in two thousand fourteen after the Crimea threat my concern is simply that if we ever had a catastrophic moment or a security crisis do the rest of the members of NATO feel secure enough in the way the United States supports them that they would support us if we needed them and what do you think the answer to that question is I think it depends on what the circumstances were ends on how long this seating of doubt about our own reliability continues is that really what you're most worried about the danger of a massive attack for example or is the real threat today from these forms of asymmetric warfare that Russia has gotten so good at waging all of these things it does short of actual major war whether it's election interference or air incursions through NATO airspace Britain's scrambled jets to except Russian aircraft on twenty one I don't think any of these threats posed by Russia right now are insurmountable or even the most dangerous security threats that we face my concern is that we're doing so little to coordinate our effort against them that we're providing an open greenfield for rush to run roughshod and in particular vis-a-vis Russia it's always been the case ever since the founding that the United States generally leads alliance policy towards Russia so when you have an America that with a president that has one view of Russia and the cabinet and Congressman have a different view it's very hard to provide coherent leadership particularly on New Challenges Congress pass legislation it believed that Russia should be sanctioned and the president signed it signed electon late last summer and then hasn't decided not to implement bright so we have an America that seems less committed to the alliance itself as well as to the shared values the core of the transatlantic community for so long that the same time that all of these old threats are raising their heads again and new threat Sir appearing. Now that we've we've talked about with the problem is let's step back and talk for a few minutes about how we got here is it twenty thirteen two thousand fourteen I think part of it if you WanNa look at the origins of president trump's prejudices about NATO Goto the fact that we all took too big a peace dividend after the Cold War ended the war once divided east from West now on its way to becoming an artifact of history you know we did pretty well although it was always an issue in NATO to ensure burden-sharing you know sufficient budgeting for security sufficient contributions military contributions to NATO a NATO mission.

NATO Brookings Institution president Jonathan trump
"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"But because of the existence of red telephones between the Soviet Union and the United States because of arms control agreements because. Because of successive disarmament efforts in the seventies at least leading up to nineteen Eighty-nine and events of that year. There was a feeling in Europe. And indeed in Germany, the this might somehow be defined right now, we're looking at an environment that has become darker that has become more tense. And where if anything are something has to be the things are going the other way round you want to comment on that. And I have after that question for each you before we sort of broaden the periscope to the future. I think concerns is really put this. Well, my worry about the environment today with regard to NATO, isn't that we won't fighter can't fight. It is if you will the vertical connectivity between the liberal democracies. The North Atlantic Council the capacity for rapid decision making their that decision making being tied to. Relevant credible NATO nuclear deterrent, then to the conventional capability, I worry about firebreaks in their exactly. And as we find ourselves potentially more politically fragmented within the context of the members of NATO, which also the members of the EU in many respects, I worry once again as I said before the the capacity for an alliance to truly deter is its credibility and the demonstrated capacity to fight. But also, it's the appearance of its willingness to be determined to make the right decision with the rate speed to defend ourselves. And I worry that there has been as Constanza has properly said and used the right word a degradation in the continuity from the moment of the need to make the decision to our capacity to implement at the speeds necessary for those speeds in an. Of themselves to be the deterrent factor, not counting tanks, counting aircraft. But the speed of our capacity to react as an alliance is a deterring dimension in and of itself, and where we have become disconnected or where we have become a bit rusty because we haven't had to think in those terms we should put a lot of effort at the seventy th birthday of NATO into thinking about in every way possible. How we increase the connectivity between our democracies as a group our commitment to the alliance as a whole and our capacity to decide with the kinds of speed necessary to create the credibility and the deterrence necessary to defend NATO secretary general has said many times, many secretaries general have said this NATO isn't against anyone but NATO is for the defense of Europe. And we need to think in those terms, and when you think in those terms the absolute imperative and the necessity for interoperability. To sustain that. And every possible way we can but to create that vertical tempo of decision. Making and force commitment is absolutely essential to the future. We don't see the Russian the Soviet hordes lined up on the border again. But there are threats in the aggregate, which I think can break down the political unity of NATO, and 'cause the president of the United States to wonder whether NATO's even worth it anymore. And that I think is in some respects the existential threat to NATO, it's not a thermonuclear threat. It's the incapacity of the members to show sufficient unity to justify the reason for the alliance. And thank you, you set up a question, I'm gonna post to Constanza in just a minute about how NATO is doing halfway through this term of President Donald Trump in the United States, but I would ask to sort of more almost casual question, but you know, it's a serious topic. When you commanded NATO forces in the field. What was it like, what's the sort of striking takeaway at a personal level? Obviously..

NATO United States Europe Soviet Union Constanza Donald Trump North Atlantic Council EU Germany president
"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"And hypersonic defense. But as a body that can work together at twenty nine members. How do you find strength today? Well, I think in some respects Constanza said what NATO has done for us as it's provided us a level of stability in an environment. Where ill liberalism is creeping into some of the democratic states of NATO. And at regard the commonality that we all enjoy when the ambassadors of NATO said at the North Atlantic Council, the commonality that we enjoy as result of the leadership of the supreme allied commander of Europe with all of our Twenty-nine partners. That is a stabilising factor in a world that has become very unstable in many respects NATO faces. I think the challenge that it has today NATO faces a challenge of app tation? And where before the threat was generally known to us, the threat was generally planned for and the resources were accumulated to deal with that threat, particularly. During Soviet era. The challenges that we face today is the challenge of a revanche just Russia with multiple capabilities both conventional modernized capabilities plus operations in the cyber domain not just targeted upon the edge of the NATO frontier. But of course, targeted in many respects through Strategic Influence campaign. Deep into the democracies of Dato it self NATO has to adapt to the challenge of modernized. Russia NATO has to adapt to climate change, for example, which is coming. I think with a real vengeance. And in particular, how NATO deals with the far north in conjunction with the potential for competition with Russia and China, actually as the northeast passage may. Well, in fact, the opening up within the generation NATO has to deal I think with a continued presence of unstable Middle East and the potential for a destabilized North Africa. Which can of course, produce the kinds of either. Economic or conflict migration into Europe that can fundamentally change not just the demographics of the European population..

NATO Europe Russia supreme allied commander Middle East Constanza North Africa North Atlantic Council China
"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Seventeen years that nato has been and the international community has been involved in afghanistan so which one of those is better one meets the two percent target the other one doesn't but if you look at the output the pictures quite different another good example is france france spends one point eight percent of its gdp on defense francis a nuclear power it is it has a global presence including in the asia pacific it is active in the suhel and in north africa and in the middle east and is a close partner of the united states it's pretty hard for washington to say france isn't pulling its weight for transatlantic security but that's the conclusion you have to reach if you if you adopt two percent as your as your principal criterion and so i think that part of it is that two percents a good metric like you said it's a good talking point so as nato kind of just failing to sell itself well there's there's a little bit more behind that two percent also because in two thousand fourteen when nato agreed on that guideline they also agreed that countries should be spending twenty percent of their defense budgets on a major and on research and development now that's a pretty that's that's a better measure of whether you're actually contributing military capabilities than just the raw two percent because you can spend two percent and have most of it go to personnel costs but if you're spending twenty percent on equipment then that is an indicator of the capabilities you'll have in the future that you can put at the service of of our shared security interests and so we also think that that twenty percent needs to get a whole lot more attention then then this this two percent and that would be a lot more constructive i wanna talk about something that i think maybe prenine eleven or or maybe even even more recent than that was a more common topic conversation but it was more about the future of nato like what does nato do or what should nato do are we closer on on a kind of a universal agreement on on what is well over the last few years the european members of nato and the members of the european union have come back to this idea of stronger european defense and and so what they've been doing lately is agreeing to to coordinate among themselves in the european union through what they call permanent struck cooperation mainly focused on acquiring capabilities and doing that jointly so that there's less duplication more efficiency europe spends about two hundred billion dollars on defense per year that's a lot of money they get less for it than than they should so so this is an effort to do that but there's a there's a deeper question that you started with a does does europe need to develop greater autonomy and and i think the conclusion many allies have been drawing in the last few months and especially this week is yes the question is whether they can they can put in place the political structures to create and use european forces and can they do that in a way that hedges against an uncertain future and uncertain future us orientation toward european security without rejecting the atlantic alliance because let's face it europe is dependent on.

nato afghanistan two percent twenty percent two hundred billion dollars Seventeen years eight percent
"nato" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"That i was worried about yesterday and he has a series of inaccurate or semi accurate comments but suddenly we got the best relationship with nato we've ever had they love me and our relationship with germany is terrific and it was it was absolutely a classic example of how he operates come in turn up all the furniture over and then both about has been in you know people picking up the mess that you created i do think that when he talks about going to meet with vladimir putin from a stamp a strengthened nato he is not listening to the voices of nato leaders they are genuinely anxious about america's one term commitment to their security no matter what he said this morning and i think that's the biggest takeaway from this very fractious summit that it's not the press conference at the end all the things he said along the way which which bird which people will will will remember as one german newspaper said this is not a crisis this is a catastrophe that was their reaction to to what was being being said yeah yesterday i think another important point in news was one sector state mike pompeo talked about the status of negotiations with the koreans who reporting the kim drug on any he said that they're on the road toward working out a denuclearization of formula language that the us was a little bit vague he said they intend to do nuclear rise they're going to accomplish it i didn't hear any specific time line i didn't hear the kind of hard commitments that we've been looking for and so it's obvious that pump peyot is in a process of exploring how overtime north korea's gonna meet this what sounded like such a firm commitment at the singapore summit yeah actually say firm commitment which this past week when it was repeated made the north koreans call us gangsters so david i think it's very interesting you underline the disunity there the president said quote we are more unified than ever before i know you make it your practice it is your job to talk to ambassadors leaders across not only europe but the globe give us give us their reactions to what they've seen over the past several days and whether this whether nato was as the president said quote more unified than ever before well i think the reactions to the initial drop the bomb phase yesterday reactions were very negative people used sharp language and responding to to president trump the reaction to the to the nato summit is a whole may be okay this is how he doesn't he is very disruptive beginning and then we pretty much go by the script and he claims credit for a win so what the sum total of this is is going to be as is hard to predict and i think it'll depend in large part on whether he does things in his summit meeting with putin that that european leaders find threatening to their security interests president president trump has to be very careful he's bargaining there securities he talks about ukraine he's bargaining the security of the whole of the middle east wing talks about syria so we'll we'll all be watching very carefully for the commitments he makes he he wants these things to be successes so he can claim a win brussels to be a success that he just told us how wonderful it was square the language with what he said before he'll want the helsinki summit with putin to be a win but we'll have to look very carefully what did he give up to get that aura of success the president also it's worth noting beka ignored to questions about the kurds who have done the marketable work in iraq and syria in helping us in our efforts to push back into feed isis he also noted question on whether georgia could a country that fled putin invaded back in two thousand eight whether georgia could expect to receive nato membership and also ignored a question on whether he would recognize the invasion of crimea and the annexation that definitely sidestep dad and brought mike pompeo to the microphone to talk about north korea and that was fascinating there were a few times also it was kind of clear the president really didn't know the answer to the question or didn't understand the terminology being us about hard brexit he says i just want everyone to be happy joining us now pulitzer prize winning author and presidential historian doris kearns goodwin she's the author of the.

nato
"nato" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Daily

"To russian so we started by talking about these three countries the us russia and germany as being the three countries that explain the beginnings of nato and i'm struck that the news out of the nato summit today was that trump was going after germany saying that it was under the control of russia germany is totally controlled russian because they will get it from sixty to seventy percent of their energy from russia at a new pipeline even what was that about that seems like the ultimate insult to deliver at a nato summit it was the old insult and it may have had more to do with his differences with angela merkel the chancellor germany than it did with any true belief but the core of the argument was germany gets an overwhelming amount of its natural gas the fuel that keeps it warm in the winter from russia and it's now building a new pipeline that will bring it in directly from russia and his basic argument is how can you argue that you're standing up against russia when you are funding russia because russia's overly dependent on its energy exports and when you're vulnerable to the russians who can simply turn off the valve and what was the reaction from germany it led many to question whether or not president trump fundamentally believes in the nato mission and that's a big question and i was at a conference of europeans last weekend where i'd never before heard people question whether or not they should go full forward thinking that the united states would be the core of a future nato and for the first time i heard them debating could we continue with a nato that didn't have the us at the center and one in which the united states wasn't the dominant voice in defence policy putin and trump artem meet in helsinki finland on july sixteen just days after the president attends the nato summit with america's closest allies the president for dictum that meeting putin quote maybe the easiest of all the down he has scheduled on his trip david i want to ask you about what's happening right after this nato meeting ends which seems particularly curious given the history that you've just outlined for us right after this meeting ends in brussels president trump is going to russia to meet with putin what do you make of this timing the problem isn't the meeting michael the problem their mind is donald trump's message if he was leaving nato to stand up to putin and say we're not going to tolerate the meddling elections and we're not going to tolerate the continued occupation of crimea and the harassment of ukraine if that was his message i think they'd be fine with the meeting happening right entered nato their problem is they don't actually believe that donald trump is going to stand up to putin and they're somewhat horrified at the imagery of him beating up publicly on television against his allies and then embracing an autocrat who has put distances and reporters to death and is increasingly cracking down on his own country so it seems like we find ourselves in a really interesting place where the country that nato was formed to protect against is at its most aggressive in decades and the country that created nato is seemingly the least committed it's ever been it's a pretty rich ironing that at the moment that we weren't that the cold war may not be over that it may just be entering different kind of face that the united states is questioning the very premise on which it created nato and that the russians have been successful in sewing more and more discord throughout europe and helping exaggerate each of these schisms but no one's exaggerated those schisms more than president trump himself not by questioning whether the nato nations are contributing enough that's a perfectly legitimate question to raise but questioning whether or not he would even stick with the alliance and that's the central issue david thank you very much thank you.

us russia germany seventy percent
"nato" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"nato" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"nato" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"A time and always until now the america was the anchor of nato right i mean and now we he's the outlier he's standing outside i'd of everybody and everybody there is thinking that he is this to use the phrase we've used a lot this morning this kind of wrecking ball for for nato actually can i ask the secretary question go back to your book and since they're all standing still i mean one of the things that you worried about one of the things that we worried about where domestic attacks on the us and the rise in isis messaging which is something i dealt with what happens when you have a president of the united states who people around the world think doesn't like muslims who wants to exclude muslims from america does that increase the likelihood of a possible attack by an extreme islamic group absolutely happy rick feed into the narrative that these groups have that somehow muslims are oppressed and therefore they've got to defend themselves by striking back it does something us by the way we're going to see i'm afraid to rise in extreme right wing and left wing violence because again as you as you dial up the rhetoric and use violent imagery and language that's aggressive and hateful that empowers certain segment of society to act out so just as we get in the late sixties where we saw both extreme right and extreme left violence i'm afraid we're going to start to begin to see an uptick of things we've seen for example i can charlottesville well we're watching the family picture and some families as joe pointed out are quite dysfunctional and what time it is we'll watch president trump now at the nato summit and we have an interesting dynamic where the president is insulting in bold faced way our allies but ninety seven members of the us senate passing a resolution to support nato with only two novotes and of course senator mccain not able to vote it is the top of the hour with us we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle pose the prize winning historian jon meacham columnist in associate editor at the washington post david ignatius former under secretary of state for public diplomacy rick stengel and former department of homeland security secretary michael chertoff is still with us thank you all david ignatius the resolution passed by the senate how meaningful how symbolic is that as telegraph to the world and or does it not have a lot of weight given the gravity of the situation i think it is a reminder that donald trump is not the only voice in america but he's certainly the strongest it's embolic looking at those at the class picture of all those leaders standing together i kept thinking you've got to put a caption underneath donald trump it would say does not play well with others that's problem this is a president who in collective alliance that's all about interdependence shared security doesn't play well with others he gets angry at them he's jealousy if one is making too much money and trade he wants to beat them down if if they're not contributing enough to this or that he insists on harangue them the spirit of nato collective action is still very much alive in our congress so many senators and congressmen tended nato meetings in europe the people signed that that resolution i think have have a personal intimate sense of what this alliance means senator reid who was one of the principal authors senator mccain the so ill perfect example and i should say john mccain goes to europe many times every year and if there's a symbol for europeans of what the durable american commitment to their security is eat is senator john mccain ailing now with his with his very serious rain cancer but boy there's a person who kept this alliance going and symbolized personally what it meant for several generations of europeans actually by john mccain i i was lucky enough to know him not only when i was in office to work with him but also to travel with him to the munich security conference a few times and he was really a beacon to europeans into the world working us meant and he also tutored educated a lot of other members of congress and got them involved at engaged and that's very strong part of the enduring relationship between our allies in europe and the united states when he went when he was in munich or anyplace else in the.

america nato
"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"It is not like nato has struggled to find anything to do since the soviet union collapsed in the early nineteen ninety s and nato found itself absorbing almost all of the nations of the hitherto hostile warsaw pact in the mid to late nineteen ninety s nato intervened in the wars of the former yugoslavia three former parts of which are now members of the alliance in two thousand and one it invoked article five it's famous collective defense clause for the first time after al qaeda attacked the united states nato took charge of intervention forces in afghanistan in two thousand and three in two thousand and eleven nato oversaw an intervention in libya it has also run other operations around the world in response to piracy migration and natural disasters among many other things we'll joining me now to discuss the day to day management of a busy agenda is breeze puffier now chief strategic officer at rest modern global but before that between ten and twenty sixteen head of policy planning for to nato secretary general and as aggressive muslim and the incumbent jens stoltenberg first of all i just wanted to get a sense of what actually goes on at nato you ahead of policy planning in the office of the secretarygeneral added sort of day in day out level what did that actually involve well it involves thinking about what's next so thinking about the next big summit about where the alliance but especially the secretary on need to push the policy nido so it's kind of forward thinking work but it needs to be grounded in the day to the reality of an alliance of twenty nine nations well that lines up nicely the next question i wanted to ask which is how easy it is to maintain a consistency of strategy among those twentynine members of nato are there twenty nine different ideas of what nato supposed to be four yes i would say twenty nine different angles of what nato should be doing the key is whether all these species kind of adopt together and that he can form kind of consistent whole or as we see now as we have seen in the past you do have problems of the peace is not fitting together and having such tensions of visions between the different members of nato that it becomes hard to reconsider so i think that's the consent work of the secretary general is to try to find the the point of balance between all these views that's why often the secretarygeneral speeches can be pretty boring because they are about kind of trying to touch on everybody's interest but in terms of crisis i think the real question is what's the leadership inside the alliance and the leadership is not just secretary journal it's the main members by main members i say those were spending most on defense and on the nato's patrick's so it's what we call traditionally the quad so it's the uk us france and germany but among those members and among those different ideas that the secretarygeneral has cape on track is there a commonly understood hierarchy of importance based on relative power especially military power that individual members have menu mentioned there the quality who four of the key members of nato iset understood that what the us the uk and france in particular one two three nuclear armed powers is going to matter more than what say stonier or greece might want i would say yes for the us when the us does want something a one to take the alliance the certain direction this will become kind of at least central point of discussion among the alliance's members that doesn't mean the us is going to get its way but often it's what shapes the edge and the other is different because france is in a particular place with nato francis you know as we join nato military structure but francis never been fully into nato at least into the nato thinking i think france still has conflicted feelings towards the alliance that are historic and that are also part of the inertia of some of its diplomats and frontal so wants to see a stronger european capacity that is not always synonymous with a stronger nato germany is interesting because they are very committed to nato this is really in their constitutional is core to their security but germany's not prone to want to send troops abroad and to go into a difficult operations so germany's usually key but not necessarily leading from the front is there any concern within nights has got two big the twentynine members is too many especially to respond with what might be the.

nato soviet union
"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"This week nato's heads of state and government will convene in brussels though this is supposed to be a meeting of twenty nine countries which all on the same side it may not be straightforwardly convivial the alliance's most powerful member the united states is now led by president unconvinced of the benefits of cooperation its second largest military turkeys is now commanded by a president who would be acting little differently if he were an adverse serie nato's original antagonised and still primary reason for being russia has evolved into an amorphous fo not merely playing by different rules but playing an entirely different game what in two thousand eighteen is nato four how might our postwar world have been different without it and would we miss it if it wasn't there this is the foreign desk every country has a certain amount of national pride become from small country like i do it's not such a huge deal because you know you're not important in the world but if you are important involved like the soviet union and now russia you do feel that you have to respond somehow whether that threats or active aggression is imagined or real that's what we're seeing now and have seen throughout post world war two european history the notion that because there are too many you allies than the allies becomes politically and militarily too complicated to manoeuver is actually not validated by facts it's the other way wrong is the big member states because they have big interest strong opinions who sometimes break consensus or want to take the direction with the other stall onto follow they did consider wrapping up nato and the reason why didn't it is the awful owed maximum why does naito exist to keep the germans style the russians and the american still in europe funny enough the wiki as part of that is keeping americans hello and welcome to the foreign desk i'm andrew mullet my guest today are elizabeth bro and robert fox elizabeth bra is a nonresident senior fellow at the atlantic council robert fox is defence editor at the evening standard both join me here in the studio in london welcome both in the first part of the discussion i wanted to talk about an imaginary world in which nato as we know it had not been constituted back when it was constituted and robert l ask you i if we go back to the late nineteen forties when nato was i put together was inevitable i think yes for two reasons the way the war ended in berlin and the paranoia about the soviet hoards it wasn't enormous ministry effort at nobody knew quite what they choose from very effective german propaganda that this was the real element had to be fought and it was known that particularly the european army such that they were but particularly the brits were exhausted also vents in the un as the budgeting european community struggled with the military arm that had to be a military arm and particularly given the posture of style and it would be a defensive hard pa military lights nato i mean elizabeth is it you'll sense that when it was founded they was the idea that it would gradually expand or or is that just being one of those things that there is that inevitable momentum of most bureaucracies very few organizations in human history of door point where someone in charges go and actually i think this will do that's right and that's what we've seen with the u it started something in that we have something completely different but going back to nato i think the expansion over the years shows the extraordinary agility of geopolitics started as as one thing then when the cold war ended it became something different and now it's going back to that initial mission the territorial defence of europe but when it started as robert pointed out earlier it was really just a very pragmatic response to realities on the ground and the fact that there was no way of emerging allies keeping together in an informal alliance which really will were to had been and so they needed proper framework to work together and especially to keep the german border safe rubber the soviet union of course begins collapsing in the late eighties finally does away with it self in the early nineteen nineties and there's a certain amount of conversation around that time as to what nato is now actually four because it had been constituted as elizabeth pointed out earlier for the territorial defensive europe and really there was only one entity from which it was seeking to defend europe's territory had nato plans at all.

nato brussels
"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

The CSIS Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"nato" Discussed on The CSIS Podcast

"Part of that mobility is to make sure that nato works very closely with the european union because this is using highways and civilian structure and getting parliament to approve when troops have to go across borders so i actually i know it sounds very very nitty gritty and detailed if you can't move forces rapidly to get to an emergency you can't adequately assure collective defense so they're working on that nato is also going to talk a bit about the east but also about the south so nato will offer an iraqi training mission seminar what it did actually about a decade ago but obviously with the when isis came out of you know out of nowhere then took such significant portions of iraq and syria how do we retrain those forces to be able to handle these types of counter insurgency efforts and there will be a focus on sort of thinking about the south you know the baltic states poland central europe they're very concerned about the russia challenge as northern europe for those nato countries in the south spain italy turkey they're worried about the threats that opposed from the south so it's making sure we have that balance so it's been very carefully to it is a successful summit clearly burdensharing which is nato nato members spending more money will be what the president we'll talk about non stop there is a lot of good news europe europe nato allies have substantially increased their defense spending but what's got into the president's mind is two percent is everything and now it's being turned into a battering ram against allies there was reportedly a letter sent by president trump to the nato leaders who are not at two percent only five members currently spend two percent or above of their gross domestic product on defense spending again you have to be a place where you're pushing because we need to push your to do more in europe needs to do more or you overdo it and then you start developing antibodies that now governments are resisting because of the way you are asking them to increase their spending so this is what's the most controversial about the president's behavior if he really goes off on a public and private rant on the two percent if he links that in some way which he has in his twitter feed to the tariff so if you want tariff relief you better give me two percent those start being linked this could be very difficult summit so we don't know it could be perfectly successful it's poised for success it just depends if at the president will take the victory lap and he should because some of this is at his urging of the direction of the agenda or if he'll just walk all over it on this two percent beat and then we'll have a nato summit that will look an awfully like the conclusion of the seven summit earlier this month and part of the nato someone is is to figure this this readiness ready for what i suppose the question what is the state of tensions with russia so you know right now i think nato has addressed certainly the land component with these four nato battalions making sure they're rotating and exercising but what we've seen over the last few days and i think this is in part grows from the uncertainty of the us russia summit we've seen a very big spike in deaths in ukraine on the line of contact in the done boss that is not a subdued conflict that is a hot conflict there are you know per week perhaps two to three killed in action and that problem hasn't been resolved so the tensions are there the hybrid challenges are still there influence operations against a nato member states we just saw snap exercise last week in the arctic that russia did not notify tell anybody about that leads to sort of misunderstandings potentially so we do need to talk we need to get better transparency and deconflict militarily but it's it's very uncertain as i said you will not know if the nato summit is successful until after the russia us summit in helsinki because nato the gender may be fine but if president trump suggests that you know ukraine that's yours russia or georgia or he makes these spear of influence he seeds that you have really destroyed or undercut.

european union nato two percent