40 Burst results for "NASA"

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:39 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

"That'll hopefully lead to a way out of this. WCBS reporter Steve Burns Way, get a check of traffic and weather together now on the AIDS. It's sponsored by Generation Yonkers here some Kaminsky lots of volume in Queens on the L I e in the Grand Central through Queens and into Nassau County and seeing the volume there, too, in NASA on the naive the northern and the Southern state right out through the Secret Oyster Bay Expressway. It's also still pretty heavy on the southern state out toward Deer Park Avenue. We had a crash there. We've had delays on the westbound side of the aisle. I eat the Cross Island. One lane is closed and South bound on the Cross island That's pretty heavy as well from the Throgs Neck right on down toward Belmont Park that entire stretch very slow. Van Wyck, South bound Rockaway Boulevard still over Crash and police investigation. So those delays right back from Jewel Avenue and the North bound side, we still have emergency repair work in the center lane. Just past the L I E on Tom Kaminsky in that WCBS traffic center. Let's.

Tom Kaminsky Cross Island Queens Secret Oyster Bay Expressway Steve Burns Van Wyck Belmont Park Deer Park Reporter Nassau County Throgs Neck Aids Nasa
Newly discovered Comet Neowise visible in evening sky

KYW 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 5 hrs ago

Newly discovered Comet Neowise visible in evening sky

"Treat tonight COMMENT. NEA Y's is shooting by tonight for the first time in 6800 years, NASA says it's the brightest in more than two decades, the space agency says it's one of the few comets visible to the naked eye and could become known as the great comet of 2020 to catch a glimpse of Sky and telescope recommends a check of the Northwest horizon. As the last of twilight fades into darkness go about three fists below the bull of the Big Dipper and It'll to the right. Debra

Debra Nasa
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on WBBM Afternoon News Update

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:46 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on WBBM Afternoon News Update

"The Kane County Chronicle says the project includes new eateries as well as hotel suites and additional bathrooms. The building has been closed in smart because of the pandemic. The renovation is expected to be finished by September. Common name, Newel wise, visible to the sky this evening, and we'll soon be at its closest to Earth. The comment named for the NASA mission that discovered it in March, is visible after sunset, according to Michelle Nichols, the director of public observing at the Adler Planetarium, So start going out, maybe about 1/2 hour after sunset in your location, it's going to be toward the Northwest. It'll start off relatively low in the sky and then get progressively a little higher. If you can see the Big Dipper, you'll be able to spot the car. It'll be below into the left of the Big Dipper in the sky. So look for that first and then hopefully you'll be able to see a think everything on Biff. You've got a pair of binoculars you may be able to see part of its tail of the comet will be closest to Earth on July 23rd Mike Krauser NewsRadio one or 5.9 FM Working moms are battling a double whammy as they try to provide for their families in this pandemic. More likely to lead the caregiving in their home while being less likely to lose their jobs in the world to Lopez has been an entertainment for 20 years as a singer, TV host and now podcaster. But when the Corona virus hit and schools closed, the mother of two at a teacher to her duties off we've just got to survive, and that's what I feel like It's been. It's been survival mode. Her husband also has a full time job, and they're expecting another child. Keeping up with her own job during the pandemic got a lot harder. There were times when I would wait until they went to sleep. But then I'm exhausted. Trying to work, a USC study finds she's not alone, One in three working moms reported being the main caregiver in a two parent household. That's compared to one in 10 working father's Scar's mount It Nischelle Medina. News time for 22 market news coming up right.

It Nischelle Medina Kane County Chronicle Newel Wise Adler Planetarium Michelle Nichols Mike Krauser Nasa USC Lopez Director
Our Place in Space

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:32 min | 13 hrs ago

Our Place in Space

"Hello and welcome to misinformation, a Trivia podcasts for ladies and gents who have cooled Trivia and sticking it to join teams at pub quiz where your hosts I'm Lauren in I'm Julia Hey Schule hi, Laurin. We are just were like cranking through some episodes lately. We've been like recording a bunch of Italian. This is our. This is our finishing episode for this recording. And I figured you know what? We haven't touched on space in a while you know. I did that long series about dads and space. Aged MOMS Mason to the mission to Mars like I'm going to go back. To back to the beginning, WE'RE GONNA go back to the beginning, and even though you fear it, even though I fear it. It's like you know like that's why they why women love stories about serial killers, because ultimately we are the ones who will probably be murdered by a serial killer, just like statistically, so you have to face that fear and somehow love it. Together hair your brain. Get to know your enemy. Know your enemy exactly you gotTa. Know your enemy, so my enemy is space. I am at a constant battle with space and I know I'll lose on. Aren't we all time and space so today? I've decided to go back to the beginning. Go get like some elementary level info and today. We're GONNA. Talk about the solar system. Did you build a model for this sir, Oh, no, I should have model. Scrap. Is Episode Comeback When you alcon back? Steve has a model. He'll make a full like. One of those rotating. Oh, yeah, own. An oratory. Ory himself. He's GonNa. He's GonNa. WanNa. Make an ordinary, so you're welcome. Yeah, thanks! It's going to be my whole upstairs anyway. So just as an FYI, I I will not be touching on earth because we live here. You know what earth is A. And also I've already done an episode on Mars. So we'll just be doing the rest of the solar system to. Be going in order. To begin with. What is the solar system? The planetary system we call home is located in outer spiral arm of the Milky Way Galaxy. That's our neighborhood. Our solar system consists of our star. The Sun and everything bound to it by gravity. The planets mercury Venus, Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune as well as dwarf planets, such as Pluto dozens of moons and millions of asteroids, comets and meteoroid. The solar system also includes the Kuyper belt that lies past Neptune's orbit, which way back there. This is a sparsely occupied ring of bodies, almost all smaller than the most popular Kuyper. Bell Object, which is Dorf Planet Pluto and we will talk about him in a minute. The most popular, the most popular of the Kuyper belt objects. So beyond the fringes of the Kuyper belt is the or cloud. This junk, yes, the worked cloud over RT cloud. This giant spherical shell surrounds our solar system like a big old bubble. And it has never been directly observed, but its existence is predicted based on mathematical models and observations comments that likely originate from there. So. The or cloud is made of icy pieces of space debris, the sizes of mountains and sometimes larger orbiting our son as far as one point six light years away. This shell of material is thick extending from five thousand astronomical units to one hundred thousand astronomical units, so an astronomical unit just for Reference One Astronomical Unit or AU is the distance from the sun to the earth. And that is about ninety three million miles or one hundred and fifty million kilometers. So one astronomical unit is ninety three million miles so. The ORT cloud is anywhere from five thousand, two hundred thousand astronomical units, so it's enormous. God I. Don't think about okay. The ordered cloud is also the boundary of the Sun's Gravitational influence where orbiting objects can turn around and return closer to our son. So that's that's the extent of how far the sun's gravity pull. Goes, to. The Sun's helium fear doesn't extend quite as far so that's like how far the light can travel from the sun. healers the bubble created by the solar wind, which is a stream of electrically charged gas, blowing outward from the sun in all directions, so it's like the soup that the sun is like floating that creates. The boundary where the solar wind is abruptly slowed by pressure from interstellar gases is called the termination shock, so it's like the edge of the bubble. Okay where it crosses into it. this edge occurs between eighty one hundred astronomical units, so that's the outer boundary of the Helius fear. And I've mentioned this before, but to NASA, spacecraft launched in seventy seven have crossed the termination shock, voyager, one and two thousand four in Voyager, two in two thousand seven. for more on that checkout episodes thirty five moms and space for the voyager program. It's good.

ORY Reference One Astronomical Uni Kuyper Laurin Nasa Steve Wanna Mason
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:36 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

"Staff wanted to be there. There was nobody taking days off people. We're in different departments helping out even if they weren't familiar with what was happening there, But they didn't care. They just wanted to help. NASA County Legislator Arnold Drunker pushed for heroes way. Espinola, however, says She's not a hero. I do not consider myself a hero. Absolutely not. But there are a lot of heroes, I think, as as a group where where a hero together Sophia hold a. B. C. B s NEWS Radio 8 80 Florida has surpassed its one day record for Corona virus deaths and has the second highest average deaths per day in the U. S. Behind Texas in Florida. More than 8000 people are hospitalized with the virus. Miami is now the Epi Center off the pandemic. What we were seeing in Wuhan six months ago, five months ago. Now we are there. And in Arizona, went out of every four people tested is positive. Can't blow out the candle on CBS this morning, Bill Nye, the science guy demonstrated the effectiveness of different mask and stopping the spread of the virus. A mask keeps particles from in you from getting in the air to infect other people. And, he says, if the nose is exposed is the same is not wearing a mask. CBS's Daniel Bacchus reporting WCBS.

Espinola CBS Legislator Arnold Drunker Bill Nye Daniel Bacchus Epi Center Wuhan Nasa County Florida Sophia Arizona Miami Texas
3 missions to Mars launch in late July, from NASA, China, and UAE

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:25 sec | 1 d ago

3 missions to Mars launch in late July, from NASA, China, and UAE

"The United Arab Emirates will launch its robotic mission from Japan on Wednesday. A Celeste feel weather station of sorts. China's mission is scheduled for launch July 23rd and the U. S launches its new Mars Rover perseverance July 30th from Cape Canaveral. Timing of all three is not a coincidence. The planets are aligned perfectly for minimal travel time and to save fuel. All three spacecraft should get to Mars in

United Arab Emirates Cape Canaveral Japan China U. S
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

01:17 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Liftoff

"Agree. I've got a preflight checklist item for you about NASA redefining and sort of saying that it will continue to explore how it defines planetary protection. Yeah I. Read some about this. What's going on here? Yeah, so the story here is that. We talked about in our Apollo. Episodes we've talked about how they all got quarantined. In case, there were like moon, germs or something, and obviously our our conception of what's on the moon, and what's on Mars and all that has come a long way We spent a lot of pros probes tomorrow. We have a much better idea what's going on. NASA is refining its planetary protection. Protocol so. This determines what steps they have to take to prevent contamination when they send various missions, two locations in the solar system, so they've redefined this for the moon and Mars, for the moon. What they've done basically reclassify most of the moon is what's called category one, which basically means that there's no expectation of finding life in any form there and so very little concern about protection needs to be made, which is good because you know all of the Apollo. Missions left like bags full of of human excrement. Stuff! We, we've already left a lot of bacteria on the moon. I'm sorry to say don't go. Your part of the tranquillity anyway. So category one. They're just saying like we know there no moon germs. It's GonNa. Be Fine, and then they're. They're leaving a certain portion. The moon categorized as category two, and this is basically places where water rice might be including at the South Pole and the idea there is you need to take stricter safeguards when there might be water ice present, because one water is is a possibility because any place there's water there could be life I think to the idea that the water might be used by for human consumption and things like that potentially so the idea there is that as that you've got like. Don't worry too much about pollution in category one, but in category to behave using a different protocol. So you know mess up the ice. Yeah, I think that makes a ton of sense and I would imagine it's more about that is being available for different uses as opposed to thinking. There could be life there. Now Mars is a little bit more Kinda Hazy What they've done is made commitment to come up with new guidelines based on what we need to do. If we send humans to Mars, but it's really almost like A. Sort of like a declaration that we will re conceive what the planetary production guidelines should be from ours right now. Mars is category four, which is like super strict. Don't we try to a very hard not to contaminate anything? We decontaminate spacecraft. We send now the truth is. Are we able to completely decontaminate anything that we're putting on a rocket and sending into space. No, but we do our very best to get it as close to completely sterile as possible. Because what you don't want to do, is introduce earth bacteria into a Martian environment where you could then later say hey, we found bacteria. There is life on Mars, and it turns out well. No, it's the stuff you brought with you and you WANNA. You don't WanNa do that. It's the same kind of idea about why we send. Our. Planetary Spacecraft in plunging into Jupiter and Saturn instead of letting them kind of float out there is we want them to basically incinerate and not contaminate even potentially contaminated any part of that system, so so humans are walking contaminants. We are gross is what I'm saying so? We will have to. We will have to come up with some procedures if we send people. Tomorrow's about like what level of concern or we're going to take. And what steps are we going to take? What are the guidelines going to be in order to? Have a level of non-contamination of what is now probably a completely pristine planet, so it's all working progress, but it's a from a space law standpoint. I should have you know. We really need some space law music here. This is sort of a space law kind of thing a little bit space. It's more of a space guideline than a space law, but I think that I think it's interesting so. We're it is worth considering. I think right like smart about. Let's talk about what our rules are about what people can do and not do in terms of junking up the surface of other and bodies well, and now's the time to do it before artists and more private spacecraft end up places like. I didn't even mention that one spacecraft, the the the put a tardy grades all of the surface moon. Try to rein that in, and I mean these rules were put in place for decades ago, and they haven't really been revisited sense and forty years ago. The idea that you would have. A private space company put a human land or download. That was right ridiculous, and and yes, it's a different world now, and they should be reimagined and reclassifying most of the moon is category. One may sound extreme to some people, but it means that we can do this cheaper and more quickly, and that's not necessarily that thing so I'm very curious what they end up doing with Mars I. Would guess that it is something like the moon where instead of being a blanket statement, there's different regions with different categories and different criteria, but. We'll see how that unfolds. I guess. Yup Yup definitely space law. Law Yeah. You take a break. I do because in space. There are two kinds of justice, their space, law and space guidelines. This is their story. I'm working on it. I'm working on it. Let's do an ad. Let's do. Episode of lift-off is brought to you by squarespace. Make your next move squarespace. It lets you easily create a website for your next idea..

Nasa Apollo South Pole
Three space missions heading to Mars, from NASA, China and UAE

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:35 sec | 1 d ago

Three space missions heading to Mars, from NASA, China and UAE

"Shaping up to be a busy month for interplanetary exploration. Three countries three missions to Mars. They all happened this month. The United Arab ever hits will launch its robotic mission from Japan on Wednesday. A celestial weather station of sorts. China's mission is scheduled for launch July 23rd. China is not saying much about it and the U. S. Launches its new Mars Rover perseverance July 30th from Cape Canaveral. The timing of all three is not a coincidence. The planets are aligned perfectly for minimal travel time and to save fuel. All three spacecraft should get to Mars in February. Peter

China Cape Canaveral Japan Peter
Fresh "NASA" from WBBM Early Afternoon News

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:43 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "NASA" from WBBM Early Afternoon News

"A week, all the test free no appointments and no symptoms. Are necessary. Chris Robert Mobile, 7 86 Traffic aboard 2 48 news Radio 7 80 In one of five point out, I found you baby. A vacuum weather studied fr the quality of the rest of the Santa and breezy and very warm by 88 partly to mostly cloudy and warm tonight who's 72 tomorrow? Very warm, also fairly habit. Cloud subside. A couple of strong thunderstorms that the answer doing today evening high Tomorrow 88. The lakefront temperature 80 midway 85 Here 84 a no park. It's 80 for wacky weather meteorologist Larson on Chicago's Weather Station News Radio, 7 80 Water 5.9 FM. Right now we have 84 degrees. It O'Hare, 83 Midway Idiot. The lakefront and a newly discovered comet is creating excitement among skywatchers Thie, three mile wide space body for CNN March has been visible in the pre dawn hours of the day and shortly after sunset. Astronomers first noticed the comment as a glowing fuzzy dot moving across the sky. NASA scientists describe comet says Kama cosmic snowballs of frozen gases rock and dust that orbit the sun. Credit where credit is due at the editor's desk. Leon Cold in our writer Susan Glick are assistant producer. Serene Mohammed at the Web desks. Shannon Bloom, Our traffic producer Anton Peters, assignment editor. Jeff Tankard, business news coordinator, Andy Grocer and managing editor, Julie Man. Coming up top trending stories and sports W BBM NEWS Time to 42. Staying on top of the news is more important than ever. This just in to the W B b m newsroom, listen to news radio W B. M for breaking news and the information.

Producer Chris Robert Mobile Managing Editor Jeff Tankard Skywatchers Thie Editor Assignment Editor Andy Grocer Anton Peters CNN Nasa Shannon Bloom Chicago Larson Susan Glick Leon Cold Mohammed Julie Man W B Coordinator
Comet streaking past Earth, providing spectacular show

WBZ Afternoon News

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Comet streaking past Earth, providing spectacular show

"A newly discovered comment, apparently a streaking past Planet Earth, providing a stunning nighttime show after buzzing the sun and expanding his tail. Comment. Neil Wise, the brightest comet, visible from the Northern Hemisphere in 1/4 century, slept with in Mercury's orbit about a week ago. That comet is headed our way with close is approach in about two weeks or so. NASA discovered the comet back in March of the comet is about three miles across its nucleus is cover with sooty material dating back to the origin of our solar system. 4.6 billion years ago. Don't you feel old? The comet will be visible across the Northern Hemisphere until about mid August, when heads back toward the outer solar system now well, it's visible with the naked eye and dark skies with little or no light pollution. But in ocular czar needed to see the long tail that, according

Northern Hemisphere Neil Wise Nasa Mercury
Travel to Alabama

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:45 min | 3 d ago

Travel to Alabama

"Welcome traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen just see if we don't deliver on that word epic that I put in the intro. We've got lots to talk about as we talk about Alabama. I'd like to welcome the show. Larry Beiber who is a freelance travel, writer and editor also has his own website at Larry Bloomberg. Dot Com, and also at civil rights travel dot com, and he's come to talk to us about Alabama Larry Welcome to the show. Let's great to be here, Chris. This is a show that is about a year and a half in the making at least not with Larry. We just got him involved recently, but I've done three trips to Alabama last year and a half and had been really wanting to do a show about it. But I really wanted to do it with somebody who knew more about Alabama than I did and Larry. You've lived in Alabama for eleven years. I, think. We say that's right over a decade. And you came there to work a job in the travel magazine industry at. At coastal living, which was based here as is southern living in cooking, light and a lot of other magazines. Why should somebody go to Alabama? There's lots of reasons and I think the place to start is that most people don't know about Alabama? They they know. Their stereotypes there's. There's what they've heard over the years, but the truth is the south remains one of the most colorful and least understood parts of the country and the best way to learn about. It is to go there, and it's easy. It's easy to do and this I. Think will turn People's view under head. It's the center of Civil Rights History which I think. A lot of people know in the best way to understand that as visit the sites where these famed events happened. But it's also got incredible food. One of the most vibrant food scenes in the country right now mountains in some of the best beaches in the country, if not the world, which again does not fit that stereotype that people have the deep south well. I'm going to be one of those people that admits that I Alabama was something like my forty seventh state to go to or something like that, and it was kept to the last somewhat because I grew up in the sixties, and my picture of Alabama was what I saw on the nightly news. It was that troubled. Civil Rights history that we talk about which we can. Celebrate what happened now and and what went on, but it was kind of tough to watch it all going on at the time, and that colored my views of Alabama for pope. And I have fallen in love with the state here in the last trips that I've gone through and a little surprised to say that because I didn't really expect to. But what would you recommend for an itinerary for Alabama? Alabama literally goes from the mountains to the seas in I I would start just for simplicity's sake in the north. In Huntsville and in the Florence area where you will see incredible NASA rocket history because I was intrical part of the NASA system, the NASA development and then. Some a rock and roll shrine in the muscle shoals hall of fame, and then down to Birmingham where you do find that civil rights history where a lot of those disturbing images happen half a century ago. Frankly and now it's one of the most vibrant food scenes in the country and a place. That really has a buzz to it. There's a lot of new parks architecture. There's a lot of people they may be. Decades ago would have left to go off to find their fortune in New York or Los Angeles. And now they're staying there and creating some wonderful things and then I. go down to Montgomery with the state capital. Eight incredible new memorial is just open. I don't know if you've seen that. The equal justice just there. The Lynching Memorial, which I was told by an architecture critic, maybe the most important memorial in this country in the decade. Right up there with the Vietnam war memorial to the victims of lynching very sobering in your face, challenging kind of place, then go out to places I don't think are as much on the radar for people as far as Alabama mobile is a surprise mobile I call the little easy, because it's a lot like New Orleans, but it's tiny. It's much easier to navigate in. It's a lot of fun and then down to this beautiful beautiful Gulf. Shore beaches, the white sands, sugar sand beaches that I literally I been in Borussia of all places in the Indian Ocean on the beaches, and I came to the Gulf coast the next month. For some reason, it just worked out in the Gulf coast. Beaches were better than what I had seen in the Indian. Ocean Sept-. Beautiful I will back you up on that end in both a surprise part and the beautiful part. That will give you a good week from north the sound that

Alabama Chris Christensen Larry Bloomberg Larry Beiber Larry Gulf Coast Writer And Editor Center Of Civil Rights Indian Ocean Nasa Muscle Shoals Hall Of Fame New Orleans Montgomery New York Los Angeles Birmingham Huntsville Florence
NASA balloon mission may help improve weather forecasting

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 5 d ago

NASA balloon mission may help improve weather forecasting

"Four five days. The balloon floated through the stratosphere, giving scientists their first three d look at these electric blue clouds. Innovation now not to loosen. Clouds are a unique atmospheric phenomenon hovering fifty miles above the polls in summer. These thin brilliant blue clouds are only visible just after the sun sets in the polar regions NASA's. Turbo. Part of the agency's scientific balloon flight. Program managed by Wallops flight facility recently carried especially designed payload to study these clouds, high resolution cameras were arranged to create a mosaic of both wide and narrow views for the first time, a laser radar was included to measure the precise altitudes of the clouds and the temperature fluctuations of the gravity waves above and below them, the six million pictures captured combined with light measurements will help. Scientists visualize the flow of energy in the atmosphere and a better understanding of atmospheric turbulence will ultimately help improve weather forecast models anywhere on the globe

Wallops Nasa Turbo
Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students that would prevent many from staying in the US

Morning Edition

02:39 min | 6 d ago

Harvard, MIT sue to block ICE rule on international students that would prevent many from staying in the US

"New rules from the U. S immigration and Customs Enforcement or ice. They say international students cannot stay in this country if their schools go entirely online in the fall, And I mean this could potentially impact hundreds of thousands of students who are here. That includes Victor Troll. See from Venezuela. He is an incoming master's student at the University of North Texas, and he talked with one of our producers. Let's listen. When I first heard the news. I honestly thought that it was fake news. It doesn't seem fair that we're being asked to leave the country on the technicalities in our immigration status. Because of something that we cannot control. So, Elissa explain what's in this new federal room. So if your school has come out and said, due to the pandemic, we're going to all be virtual in the fall. The federal rules says. You cannot remain in the U. S. To stay. You have to transfer to a school that's offering in person classes. Here's Rachel Banks from NASA Association of International Educators. It really removed the decision making power from higher education institutions. Basically, this guidance has said. Well, if you're going to pursue a fully online model You can't have international students on your campus. So I says the dinos is to minimize the risk of transmission of Koven, 19 by not admitting students into the country who don't need to be here. The State Department issued a statement saying the guidance will help with social distancing on campus. The timing is really significant because colleges have spent all summer figuring out their plans for the fall, and many have already told students what they're going to do, including moving up the school start date to avoid a possible second wave, which doesn't leave a lot of time for schools to rearrange their plans or for students to transfer to another program. I mean, this is all so complicated for students, but also I mean for schools. Isn't this going to be a financial hit? Don't Don't colleges and universities get a lot of money from foreign students? Absolutely. International students tend to be a big moneymaker for college. According to one economic analysis. International students contribute $41 billion to American High red in just a recent academic year. Some schools have already announced that they will be online in the phone. That's including Harvard in the California State University system. As cases have started to rise. Other schools like the University of Southern California have scaled back initial plans to be all in person. Now they're planning a hybrid approach meeting there some face to face instruction in some online, the experts I talked to say they expect more schools to take this hybrid approach. It's actually one way that colleges might be able to help their international students navigate this guidance because students will have at least one class in person. All right,

Victor Troll Nasa Association Of Internatio Venezuela University Of Southern Califor Elissa State Department U. S Customs Enforcement Rachel Banks Koven University Of North Texas California State University Harvard
Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beams

Innovation Now

01:04 min | Last week

Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beams

"It started out as an experiment and cutting edge technologies, and the first test has passed with flying colors. NASA communicates with all its deep space. Explorers through radio signals radio over interplanetary distances isn't just slow. It can only carry a limited amount of data at about the speed of an old telephone modem Internet connection, but using lasers NASA was able to show that it could reliably move massive amounts of data in real time from a probe orbiting the. The moon to the earth and back the glitch free connection is important because you don't want to miss any data from deep space or lose important instructions headed out to your probes future communications lasers could lead to live three D video from Mars in high definition, currently probes have to store large data files and trickled back to Earth over days using large heavy antennas together weak radio signals, but lasers could make these probes smaller and cheaper to use. Eventually we could be using space lasers commercially in the satellite that bring you. Your phone calls entertainment and Internet connections, all with enhanced data, rates and capacity

Nasa Edge Technologies
A violent holiday weekend in Philadelphia; 31 total shot since Friday, at least 7 dead

KYW 24 Hour News

01:07 min | Last week

A violent holiday weekend in Philadelphia; 31 total shot since Friday, at least 7 dead

"30 people were shot yesterday was the deadliest day this year with seven people killed as K Y W is crime and Justice reporter Christian Joe Hansen explains a six six year year old old at at a a 15 15 year year old old are are among among the the dead dead in in the the Northeast. Northeast. Just Just before before one one o'clock, o'clock, a a six six year year old old boy boy was was inside inside the the home home along along Kendrick Kendrick Street Street near near tourist tourist Dell Dell Avenue Avenue with with two two other other Children Children when when a a gun gun went went off off a a bullet bullet flying flying into into the the child's child's chest, chest, police police say. say. Now Now authorities authorities are are trying trying to to sort sort out out Who Who shot shot the the child. child. One One of of the the adults adults rushed rushed the boy, the hospital where he later died across town of west Philadelphia. Around 8:30 p.m. A 15 year old was among three people gunned down along NASA road near 61st. The teens, now identified as Angela Walker was shot in the head and killed a pair of men in their mid thirties were also shot for midnight Saturday morning Toe Last night, 30 people were gunned down around the city, including an 11 year old girl who suffered a graze wound to the hip. John Bartram High School in South West Philadelphia around five in the afternoon. The homicide rate in Philadelphia now stands at 210 victims. Kristen Joe Hansen, K

South West Philadelphia Kristen Joe Hansen Joe Hansen John Bartram High School Reporter Angela Walker TOE
NASA's Juno Spacecraft At Jupiter Reveals New Info, Rocket Lab declares Electron launch failure

NPR News Now

01:13 min | Last week

NASA's Juno Spacecraft At Jupiter Reveals New Info, Rocket Lab declares Electron launch failure

"Nastase Juno spacecraft is heading for its twenty eighth close encounter with the planet Jupiter later this month. As NPR's Joe PALCA reports, the probe continues to explore new feature is on the giant Gas Planet Juno arrived at Jupiter four years ago, it went into an elongated orbit, plunging fairly close to the planet's cloud tops for a few hours before swinging far out into space for weeks. Keeping the close encounters short is essential because of the harsh radiation environment close to the planet. Recently has been exploring an enormous storm that just appeared on Jupiter. An amateur astronomer here on earth was the first to spot the storm. The probe has also been making in-depth studies of the famous red spot, and even bigger storm Juneau's main mission is to map Jupiter's gravity field something that will take another year to complete Joe Palca and news. The private satellite launch firm rocket lab is trying to figure out what went wrong with the mission. Yesterday it's rocket successfully lifted off from New Zealand but was unable to reach orbit and lost its payload of seven small satellites rocket had planned to make monthly launches for the rest of the year, and into two thousand, twenty one

Joe Palca Rocket Lab Juno NPR New Zealand
NASA Designed Perfume Captures Smell Of Outer Space

KYW 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last week

NASA Designed Perfume Captures Smell Of Outer Space

"Well, What does the smell of outer space really smell? Like now? There's a new perfume out. It'll let you know. It's called the spirits of old the space and its ascent meant to capture the smell of outer space. It was originally concocted by NASA to help train astronauts but a limited supplies on sale right now. Odor space sells for 29 bucks be AH Starter campaign and the fragrance Will it mimics astronauts accounts of spaces, Smokey and bitter essence with smells of seared steak raspberries in rum. NASA has reportedly been working on this scent for over a decade.

Nasa
Reinventing the Wheel: NASA's Spring Tires

Innovation Now

01:14 min | Last week

Reinventing the Wheel: NASA's Spring Tires

"NASA engineers are reinventing the wheel. This is innovation now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas, emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future during the mid two thousand. NASA worked with industry partners to develop the spring tire, an airless tire made of several hundred coiled steel wires woven into a flexible mash. When the Mars Curiosity rover experienced significant wheel damage, engineers thought spring tires might be a better solution, but the steel tires deformed as well. A moment of serendipity helped researchers spring into action. Here's Colin. Krieger a mechanical engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center. We have integrated a very unique material shape memory alloy, which are center is one of the world's leading experts then shape memory alloy as specific class of metals that can undergo a fully reversible solid to solid phase transformation. So you think of like water can go from a liquid. Liquid to solid and back and forth as essentially what this material does and with Spring tires made from this nickel titanium alloy NASA engineers are reinventing wheels that could roll across the moon and

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Krieger Colin
Bolton slams Trump's approach to world leaders as "naive and foolish"

Chad Hartman

03:33 min | Last week

Bolton slams Trump's approach to world leaders as "naive and foolish"

"John Bolton and a man who was NASA security visor to President Trump is with us. I'm holding his book in my Hand Right now book that just sold 100,000 copies in its first week, the room where it happened. John. Thank you so much for your time, and our time is short. So I want to try to go as quick as we can, but also give you the opportunity to give thorough answers and again. Thanks for coming on me right in the book extensively. Absolutely. Thank you, sir. You're accessing the book, and you just make the point that the president is incapable of this job that he isn't willing To put in the work, and it's all about himself. I'm sure you are aware of some of that belief before you came to the White House. I'm sure you saw it fairly quickly. Why not leave right away? Once you realize the president is Curious. Well, I have certainly heard the criticisms before I joined the White House on. But I'd also had a number of conversations with Trump before the election during the transition during the first year, I recount some of them in in the book. And he knew what my views were. He knew my approach to the major crises that I thought we were going to face. So hey, gave me the offer, so I assumed he had paid attention to what I said, and I felt Despite all the criticism that we could make it work, I felt the United States was facing ah, number of very severe threats and challenges around the world. I thought after eight years of the Obama administration, we were In jeopardy and a number of places and I thought I could make a contribution. The book really is the story of whether I turned out to be right or wrong about that. But You know, it's Ah Ah, What when you're in when you're trying to do the right thing, trying to give advice to the president. Ah, and work on policy matters. You continually hope. For the best outcome and you know, you understand a lot of your recommendations are going to be rejected. That's the way it works. I used to say I was the national security advisor. I was not the national security decision maker. Everything's jump in just because just because our time is short of it once you realise that he wasn't paying attention to the briefings and and the way he was talking Two fellow leaders in his deference to Putin and Erdogan. Others wasn't there a party, they said. I just shouldn't be a part of this. He's never going to change and I want to get out of here. Sure that's the point out is coming to everybody's got to make that decision for himself. I've been criticized sort of on both ends of this by people who said you should have resigned after the 1st 30 days of the 1st 60 days or, you know, pick pick a number. And I've been criticized by people who have said you had a duty not to resign. You had a duty to stay in until the very end. I suppose there's a big alumni Association of former senior advisors and office holders in the Trump administration. I know a lot of them went through the same kind of decision that I had two. It's a very personal thing. How How long do you put up with the sorts of things you've asked about? I don't think there's a perfect answer. I considered resigning several times before I ultimately did. I don't. I don't think you ought to resign in a fit of pique. I think you ought to make the best effort you can hit history will judge that That's what I can say. But I think people made these decisions in good faith.

President Trump White House Putin John Bolton Nasa Obama Administration United States Advisor Association Of Erdogan
Astronauts perform 2nd spacewalk to swap station batteries

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | Last week

Astronauts perform 2nd spacewalk to swap station batteries

"Their second spacewalk in under a week to replace old batteries outside the international space station. Commander Chris Cassidy and Bob Banchan ventured out today to tackle the cumbersome job. NASA plans to send the astronauts out twice more this month to complete the battery swap outs that began in 2017. The new lithium ion batteries should last the rest of the space station's life. K

Chris Cassidy Commander Bob Banchan Nasa
A NASA astronaut's tips for social distancing

Innovation Now

01:17 min | Last week

A NASA astronaut's tips for social distancing

"It can be really difficult to adjust to social distancing in quarantine. Fortunately, we can turn to some experts for advice. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. No one understands isolation better than the astronauts who have successfully lived on the International Space Station for days weeks and months over the past twenty years. They've shared some tips to keep us emotionally healthy. During this trying time on earth, self care is critical whether you're going out in. In public or not personal hygiene, getting enough rest and balancing, work and personal time are all important. Get organized and establish a teen to reduce stress. If you're stuck in the house with other people, it's important to be good communicators talk when something isn't right. Actively listen and offer solutions, not just problems. If you're by yourself, find ways to be social while still following social distancing guidelines. This is a great time to make phone calls US video apps or write letters. Most importantly remember we are not in this alone and together we will be earth strong.

International Space Station
NASA's 'smell of space' is available as a perfume - Engadget

Atlanta's Morning News

00:29 sec | Last week

NASA's 'smell of space' is available as a perfume - Engadget

"NASA designed perfume that brings the smell of space travel to Earth. You know any rocket scientists who might think that sexy it smells like outer space. It may soon be made available to the general public, according to CNN Notice. Space was developed by chemist in the founder of Omega Ingredients to help astronaut Get used to the smell of space travel. What's in it, But it smells like a mix of gunpowder seared steak, raspberries, rum.

Omega Ingredients Nasa CNN Founder
NASA Needs A Toilet That Works In Microgravity And Lunar Gravity

Woody & Wilcox

02:28 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA Needs A Toilet That Works In Microgravity And Lunar Gravity

"I. Don't think we actually ended up talking about this yet. Even though it's been something that I think it was on several of our radars for quite some time now we always are getting into some of the unexpected ramifications from the Covid, nineteen situation and I don't know that these are related, but maybe the fact that we're focused on it now more than we would be if we weren't all under this pandemic situation, the fact that NASA is offering people a little side money, a little side Gig. I know you've seen this what he I think. They would like you to Come up with a toilet. NASA. The NASA by the way. The whatever it stands for North American space guys. Matt Sustain. National Aeronautical. Agency came very high and mighty when I didn't get mine anyway. We all know what NASA is. They have the lunar. Lou Challenge sees me. It's administration. I don't WanNa. Leave the people wrong. Lunar Lou Challenge I. Don't think we even said what it was so i. don't think we let anybody wrong the only way they. Yes, they would like to create A. For Space, specifically, it has to do with the moon and the base that they would like to build their. That's why they're calling it the lunar Lou. Qualified for that here's somebody from well. You may not be, but that doesn't mean everybody's not. Here's a dude from NASA explaining a little bit. Hollow it just was not animal tail. Astronauts do not take. The Apollo bad scenario again there's suction involved or any good seal, but. On for going number two, so it's not just sitting on a toilet and going. STRAPS and harnesses. So I you know I'm sure what he has all the answers because he studied how astronauts go to the bathroom for years now, but the headline and I've tweeted out the link by the way you could win thirty five thousand dollars. Maybe I should mention that right upfront which I gotta be honest doesn't sound like enough to me. You create a toilet that they use with NASA. Seems like there ought to be a little bit more donut for you, but thing says help astronauts go back to the moon and twenty twenty four NASA seeks new designs for a toilet that will work both in microgravity and in lunar gravity,

Nasa Lou Challenge Matt Sustain Wanna National Aeronautical
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hey everybody welcome back act to nasa in silicon valley live. I'm your host abby taber and if this is your first time joining us nasa in silicon valley live is a conversational show out of nasa's ames this research center where we talk about all the nerdiness news you need to know so right now we are simultaneously live on twitch youtube facebook and periscope but but if you want to join in the chat and ask our guests questions you need to do that on twitch so join us at w._w._w. Dot twit dot.

nasa abby taber Dot
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I think something that's really beautiful here with having all the women that we've had on the show. It's you know, there's there's we were talking about running when show Suni Williams earlier, and she famously ran the Boston marathon in space, but there's another marathon runner Chalene Flanagan and she wanted to New York City marathon last year, and she had this great article talking about her bring other women into this running club. And she said it's not so lonely at the top. If you bring others along, you know, and and that passion, you know, talking to one another making room for more women in science technology, engineering and math like we we have a responsibility to pull each other in and say, look what she's doing. Well. She's amazing. Yeah. Get a chance to highlight. Other wonder woman in your life. Absolutely. Okay. We'll be wrapping official run out of time. Thank you for joining us. And also, thank you at home for joining us. You can learn more about women at NASA by going to women dot NASA dot gov, and this has been massive Silicon Valley live a conversational show out of Nasr's Ames research center with the various scientists researchers and engineers and all all the room. Cool folks here at NASA where we get to talk about all the nerdy. Nasa news that you need to know about. And if you like that, you can find us on twitch, she YouTube Facebook and NASA TV, and if you can't catch us live that is no big deal. We will have the video on demand after the show is over and you can also catch the audio version of this podcast through services throughout these submitted beyond and huge. Thank you to our guests, and everyone that joined us on the twitch chat. We'll be back next week on Thursday November fifteenth where we'll talk about heat shields in how they help spe. Crafts by atmospheric entry and tell that until next. Thank you for watching..

NASA Chalene Flanagan Suni Williams NASA TV New York City Boston Ames research center YouTube official Nasr
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So this is like, that's that's my like technologies on on the forefront are really about. How do we how do we go to deep space? I mean, it's it really is exciting. It is cool. It was just what about the question. We wanted to ask do you guys have a favorite bass craft or air draft. Could you choose out of terrible choice to force you to make? A terrible choice for me to have to make. 'cause I love well, I like aircraft and spacecraft. So the x fifty nine low, boom. Fly demonstrator is one of my favorite aircraft right now. Just because it is exactly what NASA does does the work to create the next industry in our country, which is really amazing. And that's the plan is to playing. Create a supersonic plane that reduces the noise of the boom and and can fly over land and open to civilian so just open centers. Thirty minutes. I love I love spacecraft and right now, my favorite is deployable entry vehicle. I guess I have to say these TV having working so. So I don't think we have picture for it. But it's side by side aircraft took on sip. These like looks like a helicopter, but I said of one Mingo three two rotors and these wrote of overlap, but they're synchronized so like the blaze. Yeah. Kasich until they're on these overlapping, we were still working the need. But ah looks like a improve deficiency by twenty percent in cruise flight. Oh, so cool. That's really. Yeah. That's cool. Yeah. That might be soon. What about you? I I'm Sarah. We all lift, Lloyd. So anything that flies through the air or just in love with. So I'm worth seeing actually air is a fluid. We said that up in the beginning. Yeah. As fluid amasis aerospace engineers, we consider anything that's gas or liquid anything. That's deform -able. My hands. Yeah. Yeah. My favorite's happened to be the ones I've worked on. Yeah. The really exciting piece of that is like, you know, in my career, so far I've gotten to work on the Ryan space vehicle. We've applied the PSP there. SOS at trespassing swing is one of the experimental aircraft that we are testing and collecting a lot of date on assessing. And I think the really interesting part. I remember when we did EM one of the Orion spacecraft and woke up early because you know, it was launching at Kennedy. So it was like three o'clock in the morning here woke up early, and I've been here maybe four years at that point. So you're just shy and and excited. But yeah, it was like magical in my heart because you know, my fingerprint was on that. Yeah. And it's really cool. And like each one of us here have our fingerprints on something like that. And I think it's a wonderful example about NASA that it's like not any one of us creates an Esa less or an a dead or drone. But it's like this community of experts across many fields, including the two of all that like it's important to get the PR out there and do shows like this show. This is what now is doing. So we have our fingerprints on the knife. Because we all have a little piece of the story. Yeah. And it's all about telling her story. Yeah. We have some questions about your careers. But a quick technical question for Sarah. How is it going to reduce the super sonic, boom? So that would be the xfinity nine experimental plane. So the way it reduces the boom is by virtue of its geometry. So you can design the the vehicles geometry to create a pressure wave does that does not have as much of allowed boom when it reaches will when it when it creates that shockwave. The geometry of the plane. Yeah. And if we can think of that, it was like that pressure wave that we hear the sonic, boom. That's energy coming from the airplane and hitting our ear. So if we can distribute that energy over like a longer nose, which will look at the hill, get pictures of the x fifty nine see how long the nose is. Then we're not decreasing the energy. That's coming to us to our ears. We yeah. So that's why it's called a low, boom. There's still a boom we changed. Visit. We have tried. Cool. Okay. Well, I do have a comment from the chat. They said these women are such inspiration..

NASA Kasich Orion Lloyd Sarah Kennedy Thirty minutes twenty percent four years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"All right. Teams that we have again run out of time. And while we would love to spend the rest of our show with you guys. We, unfortunately have to think you and sake. Thanks, guys. So remember, you guys are watching us in Silicon Valley live today. We're celebrating national stem day by talking to some of the amazing wonder women of NASA. And if you have any questions for our guests, fill free to write them in the chat. And if you wanna learn more about women at NASA, you can go to women dot NASA dot gov. All right. So let's go now to our fabulous 'aeronautics crew. Let's bring out Nettie Patricia and Sarah come on out. Share having way too much fun. So I think I can you ladies introduce yourselves. And I know you guys are all aerospace engineers, but what exactly do you do? Okay. I'll start. My name's Nettie route. Airspace engineer, and I lead our pressure sensitive paint technology here at NASA Ames. Okay. Three seven through two. I'm gonna space in euro. So. Supercomputing supercomputing awesome. My name Sarah Sousa, and I designed guidance and control systems for spacecraft. All right. Should we find out where you go from? Origin stories have how did you know you wanted to do this? So I will claim that I knew when I was eight months, eight months. Kid when I was why kid is because when I was a freshman in college are sorry sophomore in college. I was able to get a internship at Johnson Space Center and work alongside astronauts who were on the space shuttle and many years later. My sister was going through our photo album. And she she sent me a picture as a picture of my mom, holding me when I was a baby and with a picture of the space shuttle in the back room, and I just I just think everything I've done throughout my life has been influenced by my family, and what we did as kids. I've always space, and it's always been something. I love your parents did. Copy of the day. My dad took the picture. Dad is very much a space enthusiast and a dreamer. And I definitely get that for my dad too. Pretty cool. So what about you Patricia? I remember took me to the planet Tanya when I was like four years old. And then so surprised but all stars you could see. And so I thought that Boeing that I wanted to something space today to and then when you know, when they always ask it's what do you wanna do when you're like a grownup? I was always saying, but then when I was in high school, I was pretty good in math physics. So I decided to go for engineering well like with space outerspace space engineering. Okay. So we have a photo of a young you can we get that front. Well, he's not old voting. Yeah. That's two years old. He's a was thinking, I think one moment after I started my internship here names on the first time, I visited this computer on. I was so surprised he was so big unload. Super Peter happened to have a name that we may know about. Yes. So this super computer. But yet anes we have another supercomputer that he's called Electra. We're actually building a third one Lewis cool those platies and electro rate. So what about unity like, what's what's your origin story? Yeah. I grew up in Tennessee. Remember going to see a see the Saint Louis arch. And I remember driving across the bridge and going to the Saint Louis arch. And I just you know. Lifted both of these things that are studying drafting in high school, and how these are extremely impressive. I wanna do whatever it is that can produce something like this. So I went into college started studying mechanical engineering, and then found fluid dynamics thermodynamics. Wow. You're speaking, my love language, the world made sense at that moment and just kept. We're going my way that had an internship as well here at NASA. Ames we go my way over to the Winton divisions. Wow. This is really cool. Yeah. These giant compressors radiators and all the things that you had studied there in your in your textbooks. We here in life and huge. Yeah. And then I found my way over to pressure sensitive paint, which which was just a a great melody like hardware-software wind tunnel. So really my happy place. A photo of young Nettie..

Nettie Patricia NASA Sarah Sousa Johnson Space Center NASA Ames Saint Louis arch Silicon Valley Boeing Peter engineer Ames Tennessee Lewis eight months four years two years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So the bay focus that we do is billing planning scheduling tools is so I get to actually learn about everybody else's job in order to create these offer tools. So and then I get to test field them in different places. So I get to learn about how trainers might be teaching astronauts how to do their job. I get to go to mission control. Learn how they control robots how they manage the international space station, how they schedule astronauts time, and all we take all that information in order to build and design our tools, and then we get to test them in different environments. We've gone to test them everywhere from underwater in the extreme environments of analogues. We also work in analogs, but these analogues Dona -sarily have to. To simulate a planetary environment. It is simulating some aspect of mission control. So they have a slightly different or they're trying to push some aspect of human spaceflight, maybe 'isolation. So we give them our tools, and we get feedback. I've gotten to go to places like volcanoes and the mission under the water in underwater. The Arctic mission control of Johnson Space Center. I'm sorry tool has been up in space station. So that was also very exciting. Pretty cool mission control is the the brain of the space missions, right where they're controlling. How would you describe it? Yeah. So mission control. So we have astronauts up in space ation, and they're super busy and the whole entire space station is manage by a huge team of controllers back on ground. And so they're located physically in Johnson Space Center, but there's also different smaller mission controls. I'm in Europe in Japan, and we have another one in Alabama. We also actually have one here. Nasa Ames, and they all coordinate to make sure that the space station is healthy that all the science payloads are working and that we're keeping the science the sorry. The astronauts working if they have any questions, we keep them healthy. So did you bring a photo? I think she did. And this one has a really cool background story. Yes. So this is a picture of me in at NASA Johnson Space Center in mission control. So this is when we did our first appointment of our tool up in space station. So I got to sit down in mission control. And I got to talk on the loops, which is just the the way they talk that the the communication loops that they have and. Yeah, it was very excited. We got to talk to the astronauts and work with them that whole week that we were there through your voice is forever like down in the NASA record. So I was actually very hesitant to talk during during the mission and one of my colleagues was sitting in the front room. So there's actually multiple not only are there thousands of people that multiple rooms so sitting in one of the back rooms and someone in the front room calls over, and it's like, please give me a status on playbook. That's our tool and so forced me to actually talk on the loop. So that might Boyce was forever. Tempted to say Houston, we have a problem. I actually very hesitant about talking because it is they are listening to so many conversations that I didn't want to like add to that problem or add to that workload. So I was actually very much like I'm gonna just be here. Unless I have to talk them only gonna talk, but he called me out..

Johnson Space Center Nasa Ames NASA Johnson Space Center Boyce NASA Europe Arctic Houston Japan Alabama
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I ever got. It was absolutely true. Right. That's simple comment. Relies on that kind of person engineering. Awesome. Pretty cool. Cool. What about you, Jessica? So I have always been interested in science and love learning and math and ever since. I was a little kid. And I remember my dad taking me to see the Haley's comet when it was passing. And so I would always had this interest in science, but it wasn't until I got to undergraduate, and I was sitting engineering at that point that I really understood how I can contribute to NASA in how I can contribute to the space program. So it was actually through an internship here. Nasa Ames, and I learned about how NASA work what kind of careers are involved in engineering or the different aspects that I could work on in order to contribute to human spaceflight. And then that let me to apply to grad school, and that's where I really started focusing on the intersection of humans, and engineering so understanding how we can develop and create tools. That support people in a very complex aerospace system. So my focus is always how do I make this tool better for people? And that's how I I. That's what I do. Now here in nessa aims. Okay. Well, let's bring up Jessica's origin photo. Because this is also a cool one. Yeah. So this is a picture of me back in nineteen ninety eight I did my, internship and this cohort of class. We had a research project. We got to visit different NASA centers. This is a picture of visiting the space shuttle, Atlantis when it was being refurbished, and it just got me really excited about working with people in human spaceflight, and there several people in there that also already now still work at NASA. So it was a pretty great sett- teams. Not only at NASA. But didn't you mention that a lot of them are here at Ames as well. Yeah. Like, our whole little cohort was really titan. And we all got the space, bug and. Yeah, some of us work here. Some of us work at Jan Johnson. Space center. Yeah. And then our mentor for that program. Also helped me get my job. So it was quite a life changing, internships or agree. We to get started. Awesome. About you. Cathy, I had to a hominid. I think I one was when I knew I wanted to be a biologist. So my background my educational background's a little unconventional I completed sixth grade, and then my father moved my sister and I over seas. So that was pretty much the end of my education. Until I moved back to the states, and I started at community college, and I took a biology class because I had no idea what it was really about. And I remember just sitting learning about the inner workings of Sal, and it's like a whole nother world whole universe inside of of us that I had no idea even existed. So that's when I was fascinated with biology, and I was sold how to do biology, and then for when I decide I really wanted to be an Astro biologist was I.

Nasa Ames NASA Jessica Jan Johnson Sal Cathy
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And and so when it's going to reenter, it's going to come in into shell shallower angle and it's not shallow shallow, just kinda grazes skipping a rock. And and it's a small spacecraft as he saw, it's only about one hundred thirty kilograms hundred pounds. And so again, if you wanna make a splash through a bigger rock, right? The rocket better and and it was going relatively slow because it was in orbit it it's top speed was only about one point, eight kilometers per second, which is slow. It doesn't flow. He's a slow. So all those things lead to probably very small splash. So not a lot of material got up if hardly any. It didn't just have to splash splash enough of it to get into sunlight so that the Hubble space telescope could see because it can see in the dark. So that's where, again, the next NASA impact emission. The next NASA Ames mission to the moon, comes in three out of the five lunar missions manage her aims. This, this. First one, man, it aims is actually quite a leader in Linda research. I just want to mention that my questions are not looting at the moment, so I don't have any questions from the chat for you just yet, but hopefully we'll get those up and running before the end. So we can through a lot of questions. So we can put you hot. Questions. Now l. cross just mentioned is a special mission for the to view, right? Yes. Tell us how you were involves. Tony's Tony's ideas. I held it. Crazy idea. Nine told him about and she said, yeah, that's crazy enough. It could work. So what does that stand for cross? No. Lunar crater observation sensing satellite. That's part of the quiz. Not the the sport. L. crow..

Tony NASA Linda research L. crow one hundred thirty kilograms eight kilometers hundred pounds
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I'm your host Abby Taber, and today we're going to be talking all about robotic exploration of the moon, and we have some really fascinating guests with us. But first let me introduce my co host, Cassandra bell. Hey, hi. So this is NASA in Silicon Valley. Live a conversational, talk show out of NASA Ames research center with various scientists, engineers, and researchers, and all around cool people at NASA to talk about all the nerdy NASA news. You need to know about if you like that we're simultaneously live on twitch. That is twitch. Dot TV, slash NASA, and we're also on Facebook and YouTube. And if you wanted to live in our chat, gotta catch us on twitch. But if you want, if you miss a live show, we will be on demand after the fact on. NASA TV, and we also have the podcast for an audio version if you like that better. So today we have with us, our guest Tony cola preach and Kimberly Eneco Smith. Thank you both for being here and can tell us a little bit about what you both do. Thanks. I'm a planetary scientist here at NASA. Ames have been here by fifteen years, almost exactly fifteen years and as a planetary scientist and mostly study planetary atmospheres, and surfaces really focusing on ISIS and and other volatile 's at freeze out. I also design and build instruments that go to different worlds and make measurements of the atmosphere is in surfaces and things like that. And can really thanks for having me. I'm a research astrophysicists here at NAS aims, and I've been here a little bit longer than Tony. I study the universe and I also build payloads or instruments, cameras, traumas that help us understand the universe around us both near and far. So I have dabbled a little bit in some of Tony's planets as well. Very cool. Most speaking of nerdy NASA news, NASA just turned sixty. Birthday now. Should sing. Oh, there last week we had cake. I had a lunchtime meeting. Cake, won't NASA turned one in October. First, that would six years would be Tober. I nineteen fifty eight. She doesn't know what actually happened to that point because like picture the president signed thing and then NASA suddenly existed or birth certificate. Must have been built on earlier research labs that existed at the time. It was 'aeronautics was the focus of what the laboratories did. They want doing space research yet, but they were very heavily into understanding arrow dynamics, aerospace engineering, and what not to help really the fledgling airline industry and aviation industry. You know doing the things that they couldn't do helping them do the research. They couldn't do pushing the envelope, you know, you know, see what else you could do, you know, by different designs. Yeah. And that was the NAC, right? Yeah, yeah, knack. Okay. Don't call it that. No national advisory committee for 'aeronautics is preceded NASA, right? And I've been scolded for calling it Neka we are NASA sow his NA. That's right. There are three centers time, right? It was one out of Langley Virginia, east coast, these coast. Now that's Langley. What's it called now. Langley laboratory to the Langley research center, one in Ohio. Was he has, no, I always forget this one was Vincent. What was it. Louis Louis, Louis, close movies. Now, of course, the Glenn research center, I know that. Yeah, and then our favorite, very favorite. I can't remember the third. Out here in California. Oh, the aims. You might have been there. The aims. So now known as Ames research center where we are right now. Yeah. And now we have ten field centers doing all kinds of amazing work. So to learn about the last six years of innovation, go to NASA dot gov, slash sixty. Yeah. So in this episode that we're going to focus on the moon research, the lunar research that aims has worked on over those years since NASA was founded. And if you have questions, be sure to leave them in the chat, and I'll be checking for those and trying to throw some those in leader. For example, already, we have questions from Zaza lavender is asking what things will you be exploring on the moon? We're gonna come to that. That's at the heart of today's episode. So to kick things off, we're going to go to our first segment. Let's play. Let's rule that..

NASA NASA Ames research center NASA TV Tony cola Langley research center Abby Taber Glenn research center Ames research center Dot TV Ames Cassandra bell Langley Virginia Silicon Valley Langley scientist Facebook Langley laboratory Louis Louis YouTube
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Follow the sun. Presented by science at NASA. The sun, it inspire songs warms us and grows our food life on land in the oceans, the daily weather and long-term climate patterns happened primarily because of the energy we received from our closest star. Even tiny variations in that energy can affect the workings of our planet's atmosphere. NASA uses instruments to follow the sun and monitor the amount of solar energy coming to us the latest instrument to do. So the total and spectral solar radiant, censor Tesis one makes those measurements with unprecedented accuracy. Tesis gathers information from its perch aboard, the international space station or the ISS flying on the platform that the orbiting laboratory provides has allowed teases to continue Nasr's forty year record of tracking the sun's radiant energy. One of the longest and most important climate data records gathered from space. Over the past several decades. Earth's ice mass has diminished, sea levels have risen drought, and precipitation patterns have changed, and growing seasons have shifted to understand the causes, including human influences of these changes and refine the models used to simulate earth's climate researchers must know the amount of incoming solar energy. Peter Paluska Tesis lead mission. Scientists explains when there's a balance between incoming energy from the sun and the infrared radiation earth emits climate remained steady. An imbalance means energy is either being stored in the system causing temperature increases or lost causing temperature decreases energy from the sun makes up half of the balance equation. Even though the measurement record shows at the sun solar energy output has not had a major influence in recent climate change that output needs to be monitored continuously. It is arguably the most important variable we need to know to understand climate says Paluska trying to understand climate without measuring. The sun's input is like trying to balance your checkbook without knowing your income climate is measured over longtime, spans decades to centuries and longer. Unlike weather that changes over small timescales to be able to connect measurements over longtime periods. Continuity and accuracy are key teases has to sensors the total radiance monitor as its name suggests measures all of the radiant energy from the sun and the spectral radiance monitor measures. How that energy is distributed over ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths. The latter helped scientists understand where in the atmosphere, solar energy is being absorbed. For example, teases spectral radiance measurements of the sun's ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet light. This heats the stratosphere and drives changes in atmosphere, wind flow that can propagate down to the lower atmosphere and impact climate. So many factors influence. Earth's climate says police key. We need to continue learning how they all interact teases is helping us characterize the son's behavior and how earth's atmosphere response to the sun for more science when the international space station go to WWW dot NASA dot gov, slash I s dash science to continue following our closest star, visit science, dot, NASA dot gov.

NASA Peter Paluska Tesis Tesis ISS Nasr forty year
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Your shoulders well i certainly go to sleep at night feeling lucky that i get to work on such an interesting problem but you know i think as donovan was saying the more you work on this the more you appreciate how infrequent these are how well are are atmosphere has protected us from from these events so i sti sleep pretty well it has been a great project has been a real a real gift to be able to work on the i i think think so so too too that community engagement we we find a lot of people that like this problem so much that they do it as a hobby because there isn't a lot of funding i would say that through other means and so i i would say that they tend to be happy that nasa is investing in this and to have a a project which is continually working on the problem well you guys have been amazing and i'm still looking forward to understanding a little bit more so is there anything that you would add to this conversation to let our listeners know not to be afraid or maybe not that but any advice or any encouragement to what you're working on so that it's not something they have to worry about right now a lot of and information stories out so there are ways that anyone interested can find out more about the specific work the simulations we do and they're wondering now so resources for that but one thing that was told to me early on in the project is this is a natural disaster that we could potentially know about an advance and do something about and arguably the only natural disaster that we could mitigate so put the infrequency on top of the potential to actually do something about it it is a threat that we want to be aware of and the ability to mitigate depends on knowing these this can happen and then having some predetermined strategies for dealing with it and so that's really part of the the effort of this project in the global us strategy go nasa that's awesome you've been listening to the nasa and silicon valley podcast if you have any questions on twitter we're at nasa ames and we're using the hashtag nasa silicon valley remember we are nasa podcast.

donovan nasa twitter nasa ames
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"New science from jupiter presented by science at nasa when nasa juno spacecraft recently flew over the polls of jupiter researchers were astonished as if eight never seen a giant planet before and innocence they hadn't the pictures were unlike anything in the history of planetary exploration junot entered orbit on the fourth of july twenty sixteen and later found jupiter's polls covered in merely continent size storms that are densely class tiered and rubbing together in a mind blowing swirl it's like a whole new jupiter says scott bolton juneau's principal investigator from the southwest research institute the clouds were amazing what's striking about jupiter's polar storms is that there are actually multiple cyclones at each pole so instead of having one polar vortex earth jupiter was observed to have as many as eight giants world's moving simultaneously on its north pole and as many as five on its south pole even more mazing things are lurking below researchers have long wondered about the giant planets hidden interior how far down do jupiter's continentsized storms descend and what is the exotic material near the planet's core deep inside jupiter high temperatures and crushing pressures transformed you leaders copious supplies of gaseous molecular hydrogen into an exotic form of matter known as liquid metallic hydrogen think of it as a mass up of tomic nuclei in a sea of electrons freely moving about jupiter's powerful magnetic field almost certainly springs from dynamo action in jupiter's interior the process by which the motion of this electrically conducting fluid is converted into magnetic energy the exact location within the interior is a mystery that researchers are still working to solve.

scott bolton juneau principal investigator southwest research institute nasa
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Earth's magnetic fear. Presented by science at NASA. Invalid or planet and protecting us from the fury of the sun is a giant bubble of magnetism called the Magna spear. It deflects most of the solar material sweeping towards us from our star at one million miles per hour or more without the magnetosphere. The relentless action of these solar particles could strip the earth of its protective layers, which shield us from the sun's ultraviolet radiation. It's clear that this magnetic bubble was key to helping earth develop into a habitable planet. Compare earth to Mars a planet that lost its magnetosphere about four point. Two billion years ago. The solar wind is thought to have stripped away most of Mars atmosphere possibly after the red planet's magnetic field dissipated. This is left Mars as the stark barren world. We see today through the eyes of NASA orbiters Rovers by contrast, earth's Magnus fear seemed to have kept our atmosphere protected. After he is S two of the juice base physics laboratory at NASA Goddard Space, Flight center notes. If there were no magnetic field, we might have very different atmosphere left without life. As we know it. Understanding our magnetosphere is a key element, helping scientists someday forecast space weather that can affect earth's technology. Extreme space weather events can disrupt communications networks, GPS navigation and electrical Power grits. The magnetosphere is permeable shield. The solar wind will periodically connect to the magnetosphere forcing it to reconfigure. This can create a rift allowing energy to pour into our safe haven. These rifts open and close many times daily, or even many times hourly. Most of them are small and short lived. Others are vast and sustained with the sun's magnetic field connecting to earth. In this way. The fireworks start. Zest, says the earth need fear absorbs the incoming energy from the solar wind and explosively releases that energy in the form of ju- magnetic storms and sub storms. How does this happen? Magnetic lines of force converge and reconfigure resulting in magnetic energy and charged particles flying off at intense speeds. Scientists have been trying to learn why this crisscrossing magnetic field lines called magnetic reconnection triggers such a violent explosion, opening the rifts into the magnetosphere Nasr's Magnus Feerick multi scale mission or MS was launched in March twenty fifteen to observe the electron physics of magnetic reconnection for the first time bristling with energetic particle detectors and magnetic sensors. The four MS spacecraft flew in close formation to on the front side of the earth's Magnus fear where magnetic reconnection occurs. MS has since been conducting similar hunt. In the Magnus fears tail MS compliments missions from NASA and partner agencies such as thymus cluster and geo tail contributing critical new details to the ongoing study of earth's magnetosphere together data from these investigations, not only help unravel the fundamental physics of space, but also help improve space, weather forecasting for more on the active space around the earth. Stay tuned to science, NASA dot gov.

NASA Magnus Feerick NASA Goddard Space partner Two billion years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Really long time ago so um and i'll i'll do a quick fastforward because when i was already add at nasa uh i was over at my mom's house one day and she she says greg i want to show you something she shows me this little thing drawn by a six year old who turned out to be a really long time ago and it was a drying of of a few space ships and and it said when i grow up i wanna work for nasa and this one is this miss during the gemena program and i remember the mercury program to although is really really young than so i kinda i i guess it was probably and the 31st chromosome somewhere somewhere in here you know kind of destined to be my my dad also was here my parents met here at nasa ames research centers my wife and i met here at nasa ames research center it's kind of the family business buried here we didn't well is a big fan of you the other would have had to convince my wife i think so my dad was the was the guy that proved that it was possible to navigate to the moon during the apollo era and this was rain around 19 sixty yeah yeah and and so fast for it a little bit to my teen years uh you know like like jim i was good in science and math and what not on my built my own observatory we have a family ranch about an hour and a half from here in and i built and observatory ground my own mirror in it and everything and use that for uh for a few years and so uh and then when i was out of graduate school i just was talking with someone and who happened to work here and and she said i need to combine meets and people and that was uh thirty three and a half years ago now why.

nasa nasa ames research center greg gemena jim i six year one day
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And thus one way but deal that aspect of janabi is to really work actively with a investigator and collaborators to generate new data and so we we work with pi to have their funding from nasa twos fly of animal models plant microbes in its best issue and we we help them maybe get more information from their samples and make sure that all or makes gone to that abbas at the end who this is the side that i know a little bit about from working at aims hour by science department they work with researchers that other institutions right right who want to fly an experiment the space to do their science that's what you're talking about satan will help them carry out that experiment and then also we get to use the data absolutely so there is that aspect of a nasa aims were investigator will work with a principal investigator from uh that got funding to actually fly on the isis mission and and speaks week experiment so part of our work he's also there and i think do you do something new abidjan lab that as the new project manager i'm trying to push for he's ready i really think that ginned up should be serving three different communities so that that i repository by itself rudy that data really tux to the specialist the by information that can going there and donald did that i and work with man interpreted that specialists yes very very specialized people scientist but then you have another group which is the scientists in general which they don't know how to do the bioinformatic but did no ought to ask the right question and so we want to provide tools for them to be able to access to information without having to do all these very tedious and slow work so some of the repository did are being used to be processed to generate a new level of data that we would call higher order did add that can be interpreted and from their front since the idea would be he's dare a signature of cancer in some liver samples that i got from the space station so a specialist on cancer burden.

investigator principal investigator project manager scientist nasa abbas abidjan donald
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Which is i think very good is that nasa should be the custodian of the the knowledge of how live gets impacted in space and so there's a lot of studies that have been going on for twenty thirty years under the sponsorship of nasa and uh definitely we've got a big biosciences division here absolutely end so there's enough scattered for mission here and there and i think uh we're lucky to leaving though in a in a time where now we have these new technological or makes and so the you'll make sr you you hear about them every day it's actually looking at uh are you know specific changes in your in your gene oncall variance and the trying to interpret the slight different changes in eugenics in in your gene sequencing with respect to some risk to your health out that's one on meeks that so that's exploiting right now in the in the world about this although mix to have been going on for why one of them school transcript of meat which is ninety percent of the did i engine up our transcript to me data and their it's the idea of looking at the arne expression in tissues our in uh in microbes are any anything we looking at any specific will coming from the space station or from the space shuttle and up if they have been on ice for or make stat up into our reports he tori so jannati's that big riposted tori of information okay right gene gene loves the database is a it's a database but it's going to be more than a database this was the original thought for it basically let store all this information to one local place and so we've been very active in either identifying legacy that i said that should be in gin left from the get go from the past and we also very active with any new or meeks being produced on the isis of to make sure that those that comes into our repository and and we nani looking at one type of a meeks would looking out of many different oh makes this something else go proteome which is putting profile epigenetics which is how your dna gets degraded by a specific molecules that changes the.

nasa meeks jannati nani tori twenty thirty years ninety percent
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"You're listening to nasa in silicon valley episode seventy in for the intro abby here with me again hello hello if this is a slightly interesting episode just for the sake that when we planned on recording this i got horrifically ill abby jumped into the last minute to go ahead and do the recorded that authorites ari tell us about your the conversation i had i rate road turned out to be very interesting i met with silvio cost he is the manager of the gene lab project here at aintree so you know how nasa does a lot of biosciences we do biology experiments up on space station so when those experiments end it does the science doesn't end because all that data goes into a repository which is open to the public it's open access for any researchers to use and right now they're developing tools and really building a system around it where people can come analyze this space biology data that nasa helped produce and looking for discoveries that they can make within it them so what else is for researchers if that's it that's your research or for citizens scientists who may be interested they'll be able to explore as well and get more out of the data than ever though it what sylviane describes it as is nasa as the custodian of knowledge about how life is affected in space which i think is sound super exciting hata before we jump on into a reminder for folks listening we have a phone number that six five zero 604 one four zero zero give us a call and leave a message and will try to add that into the future episodes um if you want to be digital we are on all the social media platforms reason the hashtag nasa silicon valley we are a nasa podcast but we are not the only mess a podcast so as a give a quick little shatah as to some of our friends over headquarters do gravity assist there's also another a weekly podcast called this week at massa and then of course our friends over in a jsc over the johnson space center that houston we have a podcast so that's where you could find all of our.

abby nasa sylviane massa johnson space center houston ari silvio social media
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Sheriff about twice each year of full moon winds up perfectly with the earth and sun such that the earth's shadow totally blocks the sons light which would normally reflect off the moon the literry clips on january thirty first will be visible daring moon set folks in the eastern united states where the eclipse will be partial we'll have to get up in the morning to see it notes petro but it's another great chance to watch the moon the moon will lose its brightness and take on an eerie fainter than normal glow from the scant sunlight that makes its way through earth's atmosphere often cast in a reddish hugh because of the way the atmosphere benz the light totally eclipsed moons are sometimes called blood wounds we're seeing all the earth sunrises and sunsets at that moment reflected from the surface of the moon says sarah noble a program scientist at nasa headquarters the january 31st superman will also be the second full moon of the month some people call the second former in a month a blue moon that makes it a super blue moon blue moons happen every two and a half years on average with a totally clips it will be a royal spectacle indeed a super blue blood moon sometimes the celestial rhythm sink up gest right to wow us he'd your calendar reminders on the three dates mark step out into the moon sent or moon rise and look up for a trilogy of sky watching treats to learn more about the many wonders of to moonnasagov for more of the many sky watching events to be found rally visit sciencenasagov.

united states petro scientist sciencenasagov sarah noble nasa moonnasagov