36 Burst results for "NASA"

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Chutando a Escada

Chutando a Escada

01:16 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Chutando a Escada

"Ether cloud relationship. Massaging. The discourse is my second. Term. Echoes, so key printing this movement. Are quite some elementos novels, elemental values, whose limits are some of the convenience songs entry entry format for the somewhat Democrat. Nor am I mesmerizing of control those positions. On contain only meet the entry data you say, democratic commands for that, they should just say Lizzie. Yeah, I said thank you for answering the analysis of the first. Order. Even now this gives us a. Little set logic cloud. I mean. Quite concerned. No source control is based on the same. AIG financial analytics will say by far the main window. Holiday sunshine and then this. Time being holiday having a good month. Falafel bank. Today, in tandoori press I have played some assistance. I mean, the band in contact your holidays are you doing? It then I got a ultra former GCP position now. This is a new building during the early. Peron Tokyo strategic. As an assist society, it should feel naji during the attack. It's more American nahu it's such a vision police and given to this movement aide and I do want to get more data. As I'm. Phenomenal. My suggestion is this too many data said this movement. I fit down to all two squares today. So be honestly their answers when they are in another. Figure. Item banks are different to do in bed. And obviously the small metal movement. Financier and easy to pesky is thinking, see movements police et cetera the Atlas network acquisition. Nice start there. It does. It's a lot of my issues channel. Cloud importance coming. And then they cocaine. Okay. I felt the UK fit that and being this. Type of launch kundu going to pencil that is privileged, usually paying off it does sound concrete at one dose as a day as people say my aim for each couple because I was head coaches nor some in quantum would say a boya after a civil said in no discussion that there is no geisha. Normally, for my normal G, assistance. Yeah, I want the story to be in kumu ten auto tripod is down NASA's hedges. He has to do movement to go anywhere. My insurance movement was the ending data being. And simply by doing so in school, the authors think tank is institutional in politics. It took them a. Fish saga. I think they moved those backstage. It didn't fluxus can not sometimes simply know now, but my pesky now stand up for my pesky pesky supper simple suzu do a song in 8 K so at times, which is more industry achieves. And what did you feel? It was a thing. Thank them being former GG doer. So now I don't see this. My.

Falafel Bank Peron Tokyo Naji Atlas Network Acquisition Lizzie AIG UK Nasa
Good Days (MM #3864)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Good Days (MM #3864)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Throughout our lives, we have good days. We have bad days. There are a lot of internal influences and external influences that affect that. Of course, as we get older, tend to have more bad days than good, just the way the body is. The body starts breaking down. I've always acquitted it to being like a car. The more miles you got in the car, the more possible problems are going to have. But one day I always try to make sure is a good day is October 20th. It's my father's birthday, and today he turns 86 years old. Now what's amazing is I lost all of my grandparents by the time they were 65, and that's kind of sad. I didn't have grandparents, so having my parents around both in their 80s is truly remarkable. I'm very thankful though to have my father here for 86 years and I count my lucky stars every day that he's here and I take every day as a blessing. Do we see each other enough? No. Do we talk to each other enough? No. But I'll tell you what. I'm one of the lucky ones, and I never take that for granted, because I have so many friends, including my spouse who've lost parents so early on, and it's just not fair and it's not right, but I'll take it as a win.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa
Good Days (MM #3864)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Good Days (MM #3864)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Throughout our lives, we have good days. We have bad days. There are a lot of internal influences and external influences that affect that. Of course, as we get older, tend to have more bad days than good, just the way the body is. The body starts breaking down. I've always acquitted it to being like a car. The more miles you got in the car, the more possible problems are going to have. But one day I always try to make sure is a good day is October 20th. It's my father's birthday, and today he turns 86 years old. Now what's amazing is I lost all of my grandparents by the time they were 65, and that's kind of sad. I didn't have grandparents, so having my parents around both in their 80s is truly remarkable. I'm very thankful though to have my father here for 86 years and I count my lucky stars every day that he's here and I take every day as a blessing. Do we see each other enough? No. Do we talk to each other enough? No. But I'll tell you what. I'm one of the lucky ones, and I never take that for granted, because I have so many friends, including my spouse who've lost parents so early on, and it's just not fair and it's not right, but I'll take it as a win.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa
NASA's asteroid hunter Lucy soars into sky with diamonds

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 6 d ago

NASA's asteroid hunter Lucy soars into sky with diamonds

"NASA launches its Lucy spacecraft on a twelve year quest to explore some of Jupiter's Trojan asteroids one of the atlas five rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Saturday morning submission is the first to aim for the thousands of not millions of asteroids that share Jupiter's expansive orbit around the sun scientists believe the Trojan asteroids may hold clues about the formation of our solar system they named Lucy after the three point two million year old skeletal remains of a human ancestor found in Ethiopia which was in turn named after the Beatles song Lucy in the sky with diamonds in a pre recorded video for NASA Ringo Starr paid tribute to John Lennon Johnny will love that I'm Julie Walker

Nasa Cape Canaveral Lucy Ethiopia Ringo Starr John Lennon Johnny Julie Walker
Lucy in the sky: Spacecraft will visit record 8 asteroids

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | Last week

Lucy in the sky: Spacecraft will visit record 8 asteroids

"NASA is set to launch a series of spacecraft to visit and even bash some of the solar system's most enticing space rocks the first Gadgil launches early Saturday a robotic spacecraft named Lucy is up first Lucy will set the record for the further solar powered mission traveling five times further from the sun than the earth systems engineer Jessica Lounsbury says it will go on a twelve year cruise to swarms of asteroids out near Jupiter Cathy open with the south western research institute says there are a lot of missions for Lucy one of them is to map the craters across our services the service of the Trojan asteroids we're gonna look for craters smaller than a football field about seventy yards across barely a month later and impactor spacecraft named dart will give chase to a double asteroid closer to home the mission will end with dark ramming the main asteroids mon let to change its orbit a test that could one day save earth from

Gadgil Lucy Jessica Lounsbury Jupiter Cathy South Western Research Institu Nasa Football
Get The Shot (MM #3858)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Get The Shot (MM #3858)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, I find it interesting how simple words can get appropriated to something else. When I say the phrase get the shot, you know, I'm going to talk about COVID-19, right? In this case, wrong. I'm actually thinking about shingles. Reason being I've reached the age of past the age where I should have gotten the shingles vaccine. So I've been talking to my doctor, I've been talking to my pharmacist has been trying to find out, do I really need to get the shingles vaccine? I've been doing a lot of research online. You see the commercial shore, but because I once got chickenpox and by the way, I had a severe case of chickenpox at 12. I've still got the scars even on my forehead to this day. I wonder if I need to get the vaccine. Now of course I have a history in my family with shingles. My father got it bad about ten 15 years ago, and has periodic flare ups. So I fear, if I don't get the shot, what am I going to do? I think about it all the time, and I've talked to the doctor and I think want to finally get the shingles vaccine. Of course, it's not just one shot, has to be two, two to 5 months apart. When you tell people to get the shot, we're not just talking about COVID anymore, especially when you reach a certain age. That's the rough part.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Chickenpox Nasa
Get The Shot (MM #3858)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Get The Shot (MM #3858)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, I find it interesting how simple words can get appropriated to something else. When I say the phrase get the shot, you know, I'm going to talk about COVID-19, right? In this case, wrong. I'm actually thinking about shingles. Reason being I've reached the age of past the age where I should have gotten the shingles vaccine. So I've been talking to my doctor, I've been talking to my pharmacist has been trying to find out, do I really need to get the shingles vaccine? I've been doing a lot of research online. You see the commercial shore, but because I once got chickenpox and by the way, I had a severe case of chickenpox at 12. I've still got the scars even on my forehead to this day. I wonder if I need to get the vaccine. Now of course I have a history in my family with shingles. My father got it bad about ten 15 years ago, and has periodic flare ups. So I fear, if I don't get the shot, what am I going to do? I think about it all the time, and I've talked to the doctor and I think want to finally get the shingles vaccine. Of course, it's not just one shot, has to be two, two to 5 months apart. When you tell people to get the shot, we're not just talking about COVID anymore, especially when you reach a certain age. That's the rough part.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Chickenpox Nasa
Bozo The Clown (MM #3853)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Bozo The Clown (MM #3853)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, if you grew up a child of the 70s and 80s, Bozo the Clown is likely a part of your life. Bozo is one of those characters like the lady from romper room, whichever your teacher was in route room. That was different in every market. But most people remember Bozo from the Chicago WGN Bozo gun by Larry Harmon, who ended up branding Bozo and taking it nationwide and owning it up until just this week. Larry Harmon actually passed away a few years ago, but his family's company owned the rights to both of the clown, and now it's going to make a comeback. Actor David Arquette is a part of what's called the open empire circus in New York City and is going to make Bozo a part of that. It's strange to think that a character we once loved on television for many, many years. Bozo ran on WGN until the early 2000s if I'm not mistaken. Maybe Bozo is going to make a comeback with David Arquette and we'll find out how that's going to happen. Will it come back on television? Will you be throwing beanbags into buckets and winning prizes? Will I doubt that will happen? But it's interesting to see an icon of our lifetime coming back thanks to David Arquette.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Larry Harmon Bozo David Arquette Open Empire Circus Nasa Chicago WGN New York City
Hot Stuff (MM #3852)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Hot Stuff (MM #3852)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Hot and spicy things constantly go in and out of favor. Remember a couple of years ago when everything was sriracha based and then well, do you even have any in your refrigerator anymore? I think I have a bottle, but I haven't used it in a while. I still like my Cajun based hot sauces if you will. Tabasco, Louisiana crystal. All those kinds because I like a lot of Cajun food. But those are all passe right now. They've all come and gone because the latest trend in hot stuff is the ghost pepper. I can't keep track of how hot on the Scoville ratings, all these peppers are. But I know the ghost pepper is well not the hottest, definitely close to one of the hottest. Now you can get ghost pepper food at Burger King. They're going to have ghost pepper, chicken nuggets. So I guess you know when your favorite hot stuff hits the mainstream, hits the fast food places. It's about to come crashing to a halt. I just don't understand the desire to have everything be so hot. Everybody just a slight bit difference and some like it hot, some like it sweet or something like it spicier or whatever it is, but ghost peppers, whether it's in chicken nuggets or not, I'll pass.

Kevin Mason Nasa Tabasco Louisiana Nuggets
Hot Stuff (MM #3852)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Hot Stuff (MM #3852)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Hot and spicy things constantly go in and out of favor. Remember a couple of years ago when everything was sriracha based and then well, do you even have any in your refrigerator anymore? I think I have a bottle, but I haven't used it in a while. I still like my Cajun based hot sauces if you will. Tabasco, Louisiana crystal. All those kinds because I like a lot of Cajun food. But those are all passe right now. They've all come and gone because the latest trend in hot stuff is the ghost pepper. I can't keep track of how hot on the Scoville ratings, all these peppers are. But I know the ghost pepper is well not the hottest, definitely close to one of the hottest. Now you can get ghost pepper food at Burger King. They're going to have ghost pepper, chicken nuggets. So I guess you know when your favorite hot stuff hits the mainstream, hits the fast food places. It's about to come crashing to a halt. I just don't understand the desire to have everything be so hot. Everybody just a slight bit difference and some like it hot, some like it sweet or something like it spicier or whatever it is, but ghost peppers, whether it's in chicken nuggets or not, I'll pass.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Tabasco Louisiana Nuggets
Time To Upgrade (MM #3851)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Time To Upgrade (MM #3851)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. We live in a world where everything becomes obsolete, usually in pretty short time. Specifically, our smartphones. I'm still carrying around an ancient iPhone 7, and of course everything I read now says it's time to unload it. Time to get rid of it. It actually has no value. Apple and AT&T and Verizon and T mobile and all those folks are doing trade ins right now to upgrade to the new iPhone 13. Only problem they don't want mine anymore. It's so old. It's about 6 years old now. I guess or something like that. I was looking back and seeing ever talked about this before. And the last time I talked about, upgrading was when I upgraded from an iPhone four to my iPhone 7. I'll be honest with you, I can't keep track of the upgrades anymore. My phone still works. Everything's still fine, but I guess the camera's not good enough. And the speed of the iPhone isn't good enough. And well, I don't know what the problem is. It's still working for me, and I like the size of the phone and I don't want to upgrade. I realize I'm going to have to. I'm still rocking the iPhone 7 and I love it. I don't want to upgrade yet. I don't want to spend the money.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Verizon Apple AT
Time To Upgrade (MM #3851)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Time To Upgrade (MM #3851)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. We live in a world where everything becomes obsolete, usually in pretty short time. Specifically, our smartphones. I'm still carrying around an ancient iPhone 7, and of course everything I read now says it's time to unload it. Time to get rid of it. It actually has no value. Apple and AT&T and Verizon and T mobile and all those folks are doing trade ins right now to upgrade to the new iPhone 13. Only problem they don't want mine anymore. It's so old. It's about 6 years old now. I guess or something like that. I was looking back and seeing ever talked about this before. And the last time I talked about, upgrading was when I upgraded from an iPhone four to my iPhone 7. I'll be honest with you, I can't keep track of the upgrades anymore. My phone still works. Everything's still fine, but I guess the camera's not good enough. And the speed of the iPhone isn't good enough. And well, I don't know what the problem is. It's still working for me, and I like the size of the phone and I don't want to upgrade. I realize I'm going to have to. I'm still rocking the iPhone 7 and I love it. I don't want to upgrade yet. I don't want to spend the money.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Verizon Apple AT
The Big Screen (MM #3849)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

The Big Screen (MM #3849)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason as everyone tries to get back to the way life used to be pre-pandemic, I've noticed a recent trend when it comes to movie advertising. And I don't know if you've seen it because it's pretty subtle. But as they talk about some of the movies that are available both on an app or on your cable box, and available in the theater at the same time, you'll always see an ad talking about you need to see this on the big screen because the movie companies want you to go back to the movie theater. They want you to watch it in the big screen because more people make money that way. I really noticed it over the weekend as my wife and I watched the many saints of Newark on our HBO Max app. Now of course we could have gone to the theater, but in all honesty, neither of us are still ready to go back to the theater, because I don't necessarily trust all the folks around me in Tennessee to wear a mask and do the right thing. So while I could have seen it on the big screen, it may have been cooler. I enjoyed it just as well in my 70 inch television set. And I know it's not quite the same thing as on a big screen movie, but it's kind of funny how we're trying to get people to go back to the theater when many of us aren't quite ready yet. I feel bad for the movie studios, but not that bad.

Newark HBO Tennessee Kevin Mason Nasa
The Big Screen (MM #3849)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

The Big Screen (MM #3849)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason as everyone tries to get back to the way life used to be pre-pandemic, I've noticed a recent trend when it comes to movie advertising. And I don't know if you've seen it because it's pretty subtle. But as they talk about some of the movies that are available both on an app or on your cable box, and available in the theater at the same time, you'll always see an ad talking about you need to see this on the big screen because the movie companies want you to go back to the movie theater. They want you to watch it in the big screen because more people make money that way. I really noticed it over the weekend as my wife and I watched the many saints of Newark on our HBO Max app. Now of course we could have gone to the theater, but in all honesty, neither of us are still ready to go back to the theater, because I don't necessarily trust all the folks around me in Tennessee to wear a mask and do the right thing. So while I could have seen it on the big screen, it may have been cooler. I enjoyed it just as well in my 70 inch television set. And I know it's not quite the same thing as on a big screen movie, but it's kind of funny how we're trying to get people to go back to the theater when many of us aren't quite ready yet. I feel bad for the movie studios, but not that bad.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Newark HBO Tennessee
Charging Stations (MM #3848)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Charging Stations (MM #3848)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason with gas prices rising and a lot of people starting to talk about electric vehicles. I've often wondered the one part of the problem that nobody seems to be talking about. And that's availability of charging stations. I just saw where some Midwestern governors have got together to create a regional charging station network that they'll all be responsible for. Because the big problem with any electric vehicle right now is how long you can drive it. As I've always said, I'm interested in electric vehicles, but I'll never be able to take it on a trip to Indiana because you've got to stop for charging for a half an hour or an hour or however long it takes, and that's inconvenient. Sure, gas prices are going to keep going up and while electric vehicles are becoming more and more prevalent. We've got to start worrying about the infrastructure to the electric vehicle market. I hear there's one company that can do a charging station a rapid charge in 15 minutes to fully charge your electric vehicle. If we're really serious about getting rid of the gas guzzlers and going electric, they've got to fix this problem first before anybody even myself starts considering going electric. Somebody will figure it out, but what it's going to cost me? Well, that's what concerns me most.

Kevin Mason Nasa Indiana
Charging Stations (MM #3848)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Charging Stations (MM #3848)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason with gas prices rising and a lot of people starting to talk about electric vehicles. I've often wondered the one part of the problem that nobody seems to be talking about. And that's availability of charging stations. I just saw where some Midwestern governors have got together to create a regional charging station network that they'll all be responsible for. Because the big problem with any electric vehicle right now is how long you can drive it. As I've always said, I'm interested in electric vehicles, but I'll never be able to take it on a trip to Indiana because you've got to stop for charging for a half an hour or an hour or however long it takes, and that's inconvenient. Sure, gas prices are going to keep going up and while electric vehicles are becoming more and more prevalent. We've got to start worrying about the infrastructure to the electric vehicle market. I hear there's one company that can do a charging station a rapid charge in 15 minutes to fully charge your electric vehicle. If we're really serious about getting rid of the gas guzzlers and going electric, they've got to fix this problem first before anybody even myself starts considering going electric. Somebody will figure it out, but what it's going to cost me? Well, that's what concerns me most.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Indiana
Rocktober (MM #3846)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Rocktober (MM #3846)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Even though I've worked in and around country music for what 40 years, something like that, it's hard to believe. It's not the only type of music I enjoy. I'm a rock and pop kid from way back when, love some hip hop, love all sorts of things. But what always makes me smile as we turn the calendar to October is when I hear the first radio station announced that it's rock October. I often wondered where the term rock October came from. I remember hearing it probably in the early 80s listening to one of my favorite rock and roll stations back in the day. And to this day, most rock stations usually in the classic rock variety announced that it's rock October. Now what I don't know is what that means, I used to joke back when I lived in Akron that our sister station when they celebrated October should get ready for Aldo November, a very veiled reference in an old Aldo nova song called fantasy, a one hit wonder if you will. It's something that always made me chuckle and it still does to this day and I don't know why, because if you like rock music, you're listening all the time. 365 days a year, at least 12 months of the year. It's October for some and I heard the first announcement the other day, and I just smiled.

Kevin Mason Nasa Akron
Rocktober (MM #3846)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Rocktober (MM #3846)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Even though I've worked in and around country music for what 40 years, something like that, it's hard to believe. It's not the only type of music I enjoy. I'm a rock and pop kid from way back when, love some hip hop, love all sorts of things. But what always makes me smile as we turn the calendar to October is when I hear the first radio station announced that it's rock October. I often wondered where the term rock October came from. I remember hearing it probably in the early 80s listening to one of my favorite rock and roll stations back in the day. And to this day, most rock stations usually in the classic rock variety announced that it's rock October. Now what I don't know is what that means, I used to joke back when I lived in Akron that our sister station when they celebrated October should get ready for Aldo November, a very veiled reference in an old Aldo nova song called fantasy, a one hit wonder if you will. It's something that always made me chuckle and it still does to this day and I don't know why, because if you like rock music, you're listening all the time. 365 days a year, at least 12 months of the year. It's October for some and I heard the first announcement the other day, and I just smiled.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Akron
Fall Flavors (MM #3845)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Fall Flavors (MM #3845)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, the calendars turned to October and I've actually seen a couple of people in separate posts on Facebook, not arguing but positioning for the fact that pumpkin spice shouldn't even be thought of that something apple based should be more fall like. Yes, they're arguing over fall flavors. One taking on that Apple is more important to fall than as pumpkin. I like a bow, so I really don't care. I've always liked apple cider and apple pie and anything apple based. I'll even eat an apple, pumpkin, well, can't go wrong with pumpkin Spicer pumpkin pie or pumpkin, anything to me. It's all good. We sit here and argue all the time about people and all their politics and views trying to get us to think one thing or the other, and then people being, well, somewhat serious, but yet somewhat sarcastic and thinking we should be arguing about Apple versus pumpkins. I'd rather live in a world where we're arguing about apples versus pumpkins. But it puts up an interesting thought. What is the most important fall flavor? Is it pumpkin? Is it Apple? Of course, I'm going to stay totally neutral in the middle of this one because you can't go wrong with either apple or pumpkin to me.

Apple Kevin Mason Nasa Facebook
"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:52 min | 3 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"But we believe that that has happened and in fact some scientists think even the neptune and uranus used to be the other way round. The neptune was was closer to the some so if there was another planet that is the probably the the origin of why iranians titova if there was some kind of gravitational interaction between the two and the most extreme gravitational interaction is a collision. So what happened to the other planet while always question is a great one. It almost certainly has been injected from the solar system We would probably never be able to identify. There are rogue planets out there that have been discovered but one of the theories for their origin is that they've been knocked out of a solar system somewhere but deciding whether one of the ones that's been found is anything to do with us is. It is a different matter. One of the issues is so so only raise the question of whether it was on the other side of our galaxy or even in different galaxy. I think he's what he said. Yeah the other side of the galaxy or even in other galaxies and the answer to that is almost certainly know comes about because the scale of the galaxy a so much bigger than the sky love our solar system when we think of planets. We're always thinking in millions or billions of killa maces and that is nothing on the scale of a galaxy a and they. They log all the analogy. Iowa's draw on it's just so mind-blowing is if you imagine a diagram of all galaxy map of the galaxy but instead of being on a piece of paper or something it is the size of the earth. Okay you've got a map of our galaxy. The size of the earth on that scale. The separation of the earth and the sun is one millimeter. So that just tells you so. Think of one millimetre on this Compared with the size of the earth. That's telling you just how much bigger galaxies than solar systems. So even if you know four point six billion years ago This planet got kicked out of the solar system. It won't be that far away on on the scale of a galaxy. It's still around somewhere announced or he comes to curve ball. Could it be planet nine. Who knows that's a really good question. planet nine still hypothesized as being this very distant objects that is in a curiously long gated obeys. Yes it's possible And that's underlining what. I've just said it's not gone very far. Still a now someone system i think Planet nine is proving extremely elusive. We really don't know whether it's there or not Some scientists have come to the party and said there's no need to theorize that there's a planet nine because it's these allegations of of the orbits of distant icy asteroids. Basically illusory is just because we're not saying all of them so it's still in the melting pot italian and i'm sure you will revisit pundit nine at sometime in the future whether it's through mentioned it for long times so i thought i'd better. It came to mind with respect to always question..

Iowa
"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

04:12 min | 3 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts

"Of hawaii of raised an alert not not to be alarmist but to make the point that what this has practically fact is that coastal low lying coastal areas will have more of these things that are sometimes called nuisance floods floods where you've got a high really high tide and it floods the straits of the of the you know the coastal areas There will be more of those. That's the point that they're making a in particular. This is likely to be the case from the mid twenties thirties for a few years until what they're saying is not. Oh this is a terrible situation where we're gonna die. It's not that it's about It's about a advising city planners and a local authorities that look after the flood protection on coastlines and things of that sort all of these people who need to know that will likely to see more of these events in the in the twenty thirties. What about low-lying places like the maldives. That are only like one or two maters about sale level. What sort of an impact would have places like yes exactly so that you know there's also places that are risk because you might not get it won't be dramatically that much higher than it is now but it will be more often you know might be is probably still a fraction of a major that we're talking about the difference but it will happen more often so we've heard him fat king todd's happening. Yeah yeah yup right so good. Maybe biegel king. Todd is what trump dumps. That's exactly it so technically a king So a spring tide is when the moon and the sun basically in the same direction so you get higher and lower tides. A king tied usually. Is that combined with meteorologically fats..

hawaii biegel king todd Todd
"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:11 min | 3 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"My name's andrew dunkley your host and today on the program a warning from nasa that the moon is approaching sokoll that When combined with climate change not say some high tides exceeding flood thresholds and not talking the distant future. Either it's pretty soon. And the insight mission on mars has revealed clues about mas quakes and the core of the red planet. They think they've got that figured out and it's quite astounding plus audience questions. We'll hear from ali in south australia. He wants to know what not. Uranus flat on its back and with at seeing is now and matt from chattanooga is asking questions about that Recent virgin galactic flight and how they attend zero j and was it a free full or something to that effect and the whys and way for the trip so we will revisit that as usual joining me is astronomer lodge professor fred. What's hullo fred. i andrew. Good morning this morning as we record this considerable yes now. I'm going to different location today. Idea love might tell wool. It looks like it looks like a green screen for figure getting a good background. Don't tv there. Yeah it's very nice. Yeah it does doesn't it. it's yeah it's just. Somebody painted the entire office that i work in tale. It's a main. If i turn the camera showed you every wall in the place that will be that cala rather dreadful anyway. We carry on regardless now out. Fred di hey going with Look down and oscillation yet with still in isolation here thanks to going to buy a milk in the wrong show at the wrong time week. Last saturday it turned out that That particular was was a a contact point. Ten spots which means that we got ping by newsouth services new south wales and said yet. You're in isolation now may get tested twice more in fact. We've been tested three times altogether. The final wants tomorrow but out of lockdown at the weekend sorry out of isolation at the weekend however with the the the sydney is still in lockdown..

andrew dunkley nasa south australia chattanooga ali Fred di matt fred andrew new south wales sydney
"nasa" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"The story of nasr's birth in its evolution is tremendously profoundly inspiring right now there are so many people listening who wanted to be astronauts right when they were kids and then there are other people who chose a career a lifelong stem career. Science technology engineering math based on their early fascination with nasa star trek all the hits really quickly. it'd be like the propagandistic side of that. You know that. I talked by the. I don't want to overstate. I mean these are all very aspirational american goals. That did inspire young minds and get people into stem. when maybe it wouldn't have otherwise gotten into it. So i don't wanna like cheap in the whole thing because i mean it really is an absolutely massive undertaking and the fact that we've been able to do this stuff But the kind of propaganda. We're gonna talk about i. Think a little more insidious than what. I mentioned No still hasn't been to space camp and we remember that remember is good as the movie. It is as remains leading. Somebody sent me a shirt but was way too small. I story the people from the good folks at book and at one point both sent me the shirts. Those great amazing book. It's a fantastic program. Got buddy cousins. Yeah because reading is a way to travel to your final frontier. Oh wow more you know. So we're accurately painting the emotive side of this. You know what i mean. And it is a truly noble endeavor but there is another side to the story of nasa. Its version that you won't hear as often at space camp or at the gift shop at the kennedy space center other agencies working for uncle..

nasr nasa kennedy space center
"nasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NASA with one thousand start they're trying it out in classrooms like Mary Burke Mara's in Lincoln Nebraska she helped the teens in her earth science class work with a web based interface called easy G. C. M. S. stands for global climate modelling Chandler built it so anyone could operate and understands the complicated modeling process what do you think money is right with the snow and ice cover and you know it's more than a thousand Lincoln public schools students have used the program over the last three years Mara says there's no agenda other than asking students to reach their own conclusions it's more of a geo inquiry process were rather than just kind of being given the information they notice wonder and start driving the wrong questions Morrow who's been teaching climate change for the past decade previously had to develop our own lessons as she went along she says her students respond much better to hands on projects like easy G. CM allows the students to do things that are like way above the capacity of like a normal classroom so it's really exciting the team developing the climate modelling curriculum is recruiting more Nebraska teachers for summer workshops on how to use it in their own classrooms next school year I'm so excited that you all Nebraska doing this this is so exciting Andres Enriquez is an education researcher who helped the national Research Council develop next generation science standards now being used in twenty states and I think teachers are hungry for this kind of work they're really hungry for this kind of curriculum there's just not a whole lot models out there it when the National Science Foundation grant ends next year the climate modelling curriculum being developed in Nebraska will be available for sale to classrooms anywhere in the world for NPR news I'm Becca Costello it's All Things Considered on WNYC former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein was sentenced to twenty three years in prison today his lawyer called that obscene I am overcome with anger at that number I think that number is a Howard lead number together Weinstein was convicted last month of rape and sexual assault we will have the details coming up after news headlines it's a fifty five degrees right now in New York City expecting mostly cloudy skies overnight and said I will drop down to a lower right around forty degrees WNYC it's five thirty coronavirus and inequality were most worried at the moment about workers who are struggling to pay their bills people who maybe can't make friends are can't make their car payments if they lose a paycheck or two in the coming weeks look at the resources available for people who don't have much money during this pandemic unto our teacher of the know and that's next time on the take we do afternoons at three a ninety three point nine FM WNYC supporters include Kripalu center for yoga and health a retreat center in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts that offers tools for mind body wellness information at K. R. I. P. A. L. U. dot org W. NYC independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM ten AM eight twenty NPR news and The New York conversation live from NPR news in Culver city California nine to Wayne brown New York governor Andrew Cuomo says he will send in the National Guard to help stem the outbreak of corona virus in a suburb of New York City from member station WNYC Jake often hearts reports from.

NASA Mary Burke Mara Lincoln
"nasa" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on AP News

"To NASA the St Louis post dispatch says experts use hundreds of eyewitness accounts from as far away as South Dakota and Minnesota along with two videos to calculate the information about the meteor they determine the approximately two hundred twenty pound rock travel through the sky Monday night at nearly thirty four thousand miles an hour causing a sonic boom NASA weather satellite help the agency confirm it was brighter than Venus in the sky making it a fireball the national media right environments office in Huntsville Alabama through the broken to pieces twelve miles above the ground Kentucky principal who once made headlines for trying to ban books with what he deemed inappropriate content has been indicted on child **** charges news out let's say a grand jury charged fifty four year old Phillip Todd Wilson principle of the Clark County area technical center with seventeen child **** possession and distribution charges WKYT TV reports the education department no longer employees Wilson the Lexington Herald leader says when Wilson was the principle of Montgomery County high school in two thousand nine he fought to ban books with what he labelled homosexual or otherwise inappropriate material including sex abuse and drugs the latest college football playoff committee rankings are out A. P.'s at that a cap reports the big win by Ellis you push the Tigers to the top Alice you Ohio state Clemson in Georgia make up the top four in the second edition of this season's college football playoff rankings Alice you took the top spot with the big when it Alabama will the Buckeyes led to number two Clemson in Georgia make their top four debuts after the Crimson Tide dropped to number five and Penn state fell all the way to nine that hit the lions were upset by the undefeated Minnesota golden gophers to improve nine spots and check in at number eight Oregon and Utah come in sixth and seventh well Oklahoma rounds out the top ten I'm Deni count impeachment hearing I'm to McGuire with an A. P. news minute William Taylor top U. S. diplomat to Ukraine says one of his aides heard president trump asking about Ukraine investigations well on a phone call with the US ambassador to the European Union Gordon someone trump when asked by a reporter at the White House about the call said but never heard this in any event it's more second hand information but I've never heard Taylor also told the house intelligence committee someone told him the president was pressuring Ukraine's president to order investigations of an already disprove Ukraine interference in the twenty sixteen election and Joe Biden's son hunter Biden you said the president trump wanted presents a Lynskey in a public box by making a public statement about ordering such investigations in Oakland retiree Paul Sanford says what he wants to see and what is likely to happen are two different things our bills what about our office I hope so impeach him and the victim in the Senate but I don't expect it I'm Tim McGraw AP digital news back in a moment L..

NASA St Louis two hundred twenty pound fifty four year
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"<music> shedding light on black holes presented by i science at nasa black holes is one of the most highly searched terms about our universe. There's a fascination with the idea of a region of space having a gravitational pull so strong nothing can escape. It's deadly grasp not <hes> even a sliver of light. Well not quite in fact much of what we think we know about black holes turns out to be myths myth one all black holes or black as this photograph from the event horizon telescope demonstrated light can be detected -tective near a black hole event horizon. This is the boundary between normal space and the space affected by the black holes gravity from which no escape is.

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"<music> cutting edge bio manufacturing aboard the international space station presented by science at nasa most likely you're aware of three d. printing which allows you to design and produce one of a kind pieces uses for a variety of purposes but what if you could use that same technology to manufacture logical materials like new tissue or blood vessels welcome to the world of three d bio manufacturing a cutting edge practice on earth that is being tested aboard the international space station or i._s._s. Dr mike roberts deputy chief scientist at the u._s. National laboratory explains why the space station is critical to bio manufacturing's future. We've been able to grow cells in a lab for well over a century but gravity limits that growth to two dimensions cells can grow <unk> outward but not up and down like they do in the human body also lab cells are often in contact with the glass or plastic that contains them but aboard aboard the space station are experiments will be conducted in microgravity that allows you to build your cell models in three dimensions without being confined to the bottom of a dish or are unable to grow in contact with lots of other cells bio manufacturing imagines the ability to someday grow viable human organ organs composed of specific tissue intersected by blood vessels most organs and thicker tissues in the body have a rich complex network of blood vessels that provide nutrients treatments and remove wastes from the living cells that make up the tissue we currently lack the ability and the tools to engineer these highly branched living networks of vessels inside inside layers of tissues on earth. Another medical advantage to manufacturing biological parts in space is the potential to bypass the body's immune system today organ transplants from donors are prone to rejection because the patient's body perceives the new organ as a foreign object and their immune system tries to attack ticket but with the ability to grow tissue in space a person could conceivably have their own cells used to make their new organ which might avoid the body's rejection.

nasa Dr mike roberts deputy chief scientist engineer
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"The main thing are placed in space presented by science at nasa as you're done drugs you around the block for his morning book you're probably not thinking about the wonders of the neighborhoods sidewalk but that concrete is pretty great next to water it's the most widely used material on earth in the future concrete may be equally useful off the planet when humans construct a permanent base on the moon they'll need sturdy stuff the weather bombardments from solar radiation and media right no one wants a crack in their moon days the key to making out of this world concrete maybe just study it out of this world to experiments have taken place aboard the international space station or i s s to do just that the microgravity investigation of cement slid vacation or mix and multi used variable jeep processing facility or mvp sell five researchers from pennsylvania state university end nassar's marshall space flight center are analyzing the study's results concrete is a mixture of sand gravel and rocks glued together by cement paved made of water in summit powder and it's not as mundane is it looks under the surface it's quite complex what goes on there is key to strengthen durability yet scientists still don't understand all the details of concrete's chemistry in microscopic structure processing methods aren't cast in stone there's plenty of room for improvement alexandro berlin scott principal investigator for both experiments says or experiments are focused on the pace that holds the concrete mixture together we want to know what grows inside summit based concrete when there is no gravity driven phenomenon such is sedimentation it all begins when water is added to the cement to put it very simply the cement molecular structure changes when the summit grains dissolve residents get explains as be old molecules dissolve calcium silicate hydrate end calcium hydroxide start to crystallize myriad of these tiny crystals for all through the mixture interlocking with one another and with each other concrete ingredients such as gravel iss experiments are researching how this all plays out in space ribbons says it could could change the distribution of the crystalline micro structure and ultimately the material properties the ratio of the water cement powder is critical to making the concrete components combined effectively in determining the strength and durability of the final concrete well this ratio need to be different on the moon where gravity is about one sixth of earth that's the kind of question you experiment will shed light on for the mix experiment astronauts added water to a series of package containing dry cement powder then added alcohol to some of the packets just stop the hydration process at specified times for mvp so five astronaut also hydrated dry cement but for this experiment they used a centrifuge on board the iss test to stimulate gravity at a number of strength including lunar gravity and martian gravity for both experiments the samples were returned to earth for analysis were already seeing an documenting unexpected results says marshall's richard google co principal investigator for mvp sell five ribbons get ads what we find could leave to improvements in concrete both in space end on earth since summit is used extensively around the world even a small improvement could have a tremendous impact we might even end up with better sidewalks for walking her dog for more from the international space station go to www dot nasa dot gov slash iss tash science for

nasa
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Training laser light on earth sports presented by science at nasa the international national space station or i assess is sporting a new light fixture the global ecosystem dynamics investigation or djeddai will being down laser light on earth from orbiting laboratory to reveal more about our environment in men in how it is changing nasa's jet i sense laser pulses and a tree canopies imprecise only measures the light reflected back the timing it intensity of light bounces back to jeopardize telescope will reveal the height in density of trees and vegetation and the vertical arrangement of the leaves and branches with any overall canopy doctoroff the bio jetta principal investigator at the university of maryland says this instrument will map forests in high resolution in three dimensions revolutionizing the way researchers monitor them forested areas are an important part of our planet not only do forests provided a habitat for many species end a source of raw materials heels for human news such as paper and lumber they also play a key role in earth's carbon cycle deforestation enforced degradation in addition to other types of forests disturbances such fires in insect outbreaks leader increases in atmosphere carbon dioxide forestry growth sucks that carmen back down into trees and soils knowing how forests grow and change over time can allow us to better understand the contribution and that forced me to earth carbon cycle and help people better manage this important resource djeddai is the first base born instrument designed specifically to perform sustained mapping of the spatial distribution of the carbon content content a forest the buying notes one of the most portly quantified components of the carbon cycle is the net balance between force disturbance in regrowth jet i will help scientists fill in those missing piece by revealing the vertical structure of the forest information we really can't get with sufficient accuracy any other way djeddai will provide scientists with insights into the amount of carbon stored in forest when combined current in historical record's of changes captured by earth orbiting satellites such as lance at this information will enhance the ability of researchers to identify changes happening across our planet researchers also will incorporate jeopardize his observations along with those of the eagles stress instrument on the station with daddy from other current and future earth observing sensors these data will address important questions about relationships between for structure function composition opposition in changes in carbon content combining all of these datta will allow researchers to gain an unprecedented understanding of ecosystem dynamics in the role plants and trees play in earth's global carbon cycle these

nasa principal investigator lance eagles university of maryland
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"But you must be old block presented by science at nasa expression chip off the old block has taken on new meaning scientists are using cells in tissue from the human body to create living three d versions of human organs within seethrough structures these innovative tissue chips about the size of a thumb drive holds great promise for improving drug testing researching diseases personalizing medical treatment and more of you will soon be headed to the international space station or iss through a collaboration between the national institutes of health or an i h envy iss national laboratory in partnership with nasa tissue chips can host different cell tissue types admittedly intricate biological functions and responses is a full sized human organs such as the lungs liver and heart cells grown in tissue chips behave more like cells of a real oregon is induced cells grown in static sell culture dishes that's partly because of the chips can be interwoven with miniscule channels lined with thousands of living human cells through which air blood nutrients medications and the light inflow researchers can even introduce a diseases like cancer into to a tissue chip studied disease progression the space station is a specially well suited to advance research in this technology lucy low is the scientific program manager for the national center for advancing translational sciences or in cats at an early age microgravity cool just changes in human physiology the directly translate disease pathology hey ron us in a couple of weeks in microgravity weaken modal something that might take ten or fifteen years here on us to become even clinically relevant so we could start understanding and uncovering disease pathologies much faster other to chip in space study areas include respiratory system immune response kidney function blood brain barrier muscular skeletal diseases such as osteoperosis an immune system aging insights from these studies could help researchers understand diseases better design treatments and streamline testing of new canada drugs in the future tissue chips could also advanced precision medicine customized healthcare with disease treatment and prevention the takes into account a patient's jeans environment in body every individual reacts differently cancers genetic disorders and infections using tissue chips is a way to understand in a tightly controllable modal system exactly what's happening to a specific person we could use tissue chips to pinpoint what it about a particular group that's making that kansas act in a particular way to the particular drug oh what kind of drug might be more useful for one populations and another scientists are even working on a human on a chip in which tissue chips for various oregon's will be linked together to mimic whole body physiology researchers could then tests potential effects of substance like a drug across the entire body before testing in humans essentially you through all these cells together and provide him with the nutrients they need to do that thing it's literally like taking a little bits of you puts it into a home away from home letting the cells chat with each other and looking at how they respond to different stresses and different drugs

fifteen years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"The. The superstar to twenty nineteen. Presented by science at NASA. Twenty nineteen will be an excellent year to look to the sky and enjoy the spectacular view of earth's nearest neighbor. The moon fifty years ago, we witnessed one of humankind's most, remarkable achievements. When we first step foot on the dusty surface of the moon. All for. Bleep. Nasa continue celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo program. The year is opening with a number of opportunities to marvel at earth's original satellite, three super moons, and a total lunar eclipse in the span of three months. So what is it that makes a super moon super start with size? The moon orbits around the earth in a slightly oval shape at its furthest point away from us known as the apogee it's about two hundred fifty thousand miles or four hundred thousand kilometers from earth when it's closest to us. It's parody. The moon is about two hundred twenty thousand miles or three hundred fifty thousand kilometers away when the moon is full at or near its parody. It is considered a super moon and can appear up to fourteen percent larger and thirty percent brighter than it apogee. Those distances however are change. Ching as the moon is slowly drifting away from earth how slowly approximately two inches or five centimeters annually a billion years from now the moon will take about thirty one and a half days to orbit the earth. Instead of today's twenty seven point three days. In the meantime, this year's first superman of the year occurred on January twenty first and also featured a total reclaims the second occurred on February nineteenth and sky watchers will have another chance to see this beautiful large orb as it rises above the horizon on March twenty first while super moons. Total lunar eclipses are marvels to behold. A question rises fifty years after humankind's first steps on the moon. Does it hold anymore secrets for NASA? Scientists Noah petro project, scientists for the lunar reconnaissance orbiter or L arro- at nestles guttered space Flight Center says there are many. Answered questions about the moon. For example, we are still attempting to understand how the Mooney volved to its current state. The moon has occupied space near earth for its entire four and a half billion year history keeping record of the impacts that have scarred on its surface over time. This record of anxious impacts is largely erased from the earth due to win water in plate tectonics analysis of Apollo samples shows that there was a period of intense impact cratering on the moon early in the history of the solar system and therefore on the earlier as well observations from L A row now in its ninth year of orbiting the moon are helping us piece together this history as twenty nineteen unfolds with a third super moon on March twenty I enjoy the wonderful view and the history that the moon continues to reveal for more eliminating facts about super moons lunar eclipses and other marvels of the night sky. Visit science dot NASA dot gov.

NASA Noah petro guttered space Flight Center fifty years three hundred fifty thousand k four hundred thousand kilomete five centimeters fourteen percent thirty percent billion years billion year three months three days two inches
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Big questions about small worlds. Presented by science at Manson. Scientists who studied the solar system tend to ask big questions. How was our solar system formed where did the building blocks of life come from what hazards from above threaten life on our planet to find answers? They're looking more and more at small worlds, what are small worlds asteroids for sure comets to also the many small satellites or moons that orbit large planets as well as the icy world at the distance of Pluto and beyond some have combined only to be broken apart later by collisions and tidal forces others have gone largely untouched since the dawn of the solar system, some carry water and organic compounds others are almost entirely composed of metal and all hold keys to questions about our solar system and the origin of life on earth. Doctor Adriana oh compo program executive for Nasr's new horizons. Mission says water is key to life as we know it learning where water is found in our solar system provides pieces to the puzzle of understanding the origins of life new horizons. Recently surprised us by discovering a large abundance of water ice at Pluto. More surprises are in store as new horizons transmits the data from its January first twenty nineteen fly by of the Kuyper belt object, twenty fourteen m you sixty nine back to earth small world can be found in a wide range of locations across the solar system from the inner Ciller system all the way out to the Kuyper belt when they are studied together these remnants of the early solar system can help tell the story of solar system formation. Dawn recently completed a mission to the main asteroid belt visiting the doors planet series and the belt's largest asteroid Vesta. Cyrus? Rex has arrived at Benue a near earth asteroid about sixteen hundred fifty feet or five hundred meters across and will return to earth in twenty twenty three with a sample. So scientists can begin to understand been whose origin and history. The Lucy mission will be traveling to six Trojan asteroids trapped in the orbit of Jupiter. These objects are the only remaining unexplored population of small worlds in the solar system. The psyche mission will be visiting a metal object in the main asteroid belt that could be the remnant core of a proto planet similar in size to Vesta. While Villa's missions traveled to their individual targets. Neil wise. A re purpose space telescope in lieu earth orbit has made infrared measurements of hundreds of near earth objects, and tens of thousands of other small worlds in the solar system. These diverse worlds offer insights into how our solar system formed and evolved. Doctor Tom statler planetary science program. Scientists at NASA headquarters notes, this is not your grandparents solar system and things are not as orderly as we once believed the data we've gleaned from these objects. So far have changed the way we think about the origin of the planets, for example, the small world in the Khyber built are leading us to think that you're in and Neptune formed much closer to the sun than where they reside. Now, then gradually moved to their current orbits the biggest misperception about small worlds their distance to each. Other statler explains in the movies. They always show an asteroid belt with millions of rocks almost touching each other. Whereas in reality there is much more empty space. You have to travel hundreds of thousands of miles to get from one asteroid to another yet. Scientists are also looking closer to home determining the orbits and physical characteristics of objects that might impact earth is critical to understanding the consequences of any such impact and responding to an actual impact threat. If one is ever discovered NASA knows of no asteroid or comet currently on a collision course with earth. But to prepare for that scenario NASA is developing the double asteroid redirection tests or dark mission as the first demonstration of the Connecticut impact technique that could be used to change the motion of a hazardous asteroid away from earth. For more big stories about our solar system and how small worlds are yielding big answers. Visit science dot NASA dot gov.

NASA Dawn Manson Tom statler statler Doctor Adriana Cyrus Neil wise Nasr Benue executive Rex Villa Connecticut sixteen hundred fifty feet five hundred meters twenty fourteen m
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"It's just one of many examples of how Nastase program the breadth of it is really not only exploring and understanding, but also has practical benefit for citizens, and I'm gonna come back to more of that. But I want to just reflect on you for a while. Because when your name was put in its renomination as an acid ministration as you well know because you lived it. There is a lot of back and forth about the qualified. He's the right person, by the way, I wrote in Forbes, I and I very much thought you with the right person. So I was very supportive of that nomination. And I appreciate it. You were a navy fighter pilot for ten years flying over nineteen hundred hours more than three hundred aircraft landings, flew combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. You also flew f eighteen Hornets, you know, trying to fight the drug war. How is all of that prepared you to, you know, be a congressman and also lead the nascent space space agency. And I thank you for your service as well. Well, thank you. I I appreciate you saying that. So you know, when you when you think about what NASA is and whatnot. So does the first a and NASA is 'aeronautics a lot of people forget about that. And aeronautics is is critically important. Not just for national security and defense. It's important for our economy. We we, you know, a lot of people don't realize when you go flying on an airliner, you are flying with NASA technology and capabilities and wing designs, and you know, the the engine designs all of those things are developed by NASA in an open. In an open source kind of way. So that industry can take advantage of it and all two million helps the United States maintain its edge technologically. And then maintain it's it's, you know, a base of exports aviation for the United States of America is an expert. In fact, it's a net. Export. In other words, we export more than we import. And so when you think about the trade imbalance and a lot of people hear the president talk about the trade imbalance. A lot aviation is just the opposite. We have a trade surplus, and and so it's an offset to that trade imbalance, although it's not big enough to offset it entirely obvious. Right. But but the all that is possible because NASA and the US government has made investments into aviation, so and 'aeronautics. So that's I think of a big a big piece of it. The other thing is a member of congress. What I found is that when you start talking about things like the architecture for communications in space, and as a member of congress being a a former warfighter myself. Self. I would I would bring up things like, you know, we need. We need commercial satellite communications to be encrypted. So that the warfighter can take advantage of it. We need those satellites to be able to frequency hop. So that so that those signals can't be jammed by the enemy in other words, we the warfighter can take advantage of commercial satellite communications for a whole host of different capabilities. And what you find is that, you know, there's not a lot of members of congress that that speak in those terms. And so it kind of put me in a position where I could be the leader on these on these space issues and over the course of time it kind of turned out that I was leading on space issues quite frequently. And then the the day came when when President Trump got elected, and I got nominated to be the NASA administrator, and so you know, you never know how these things turn out. But I do think that whether it's my military pilot experience or my time in congress it all adds up to to prepare me for this for this. Particular position. Sure sharing. You also have a triple major in business administration economics and psychology from Rice University, an MBA from Cornell. And there were critics out there that said, well, you know, he's a he's a former politician. He's a former congressman he's not a fi intas. Should he be running nasty? You know, as you mentioned earlier before we came on. I spent many years twelve years at NASA. And I remember ministers like, Sean O'Keefe and Michael Griffin and others as well. So you know, I didn't have as much of a problem with the background because we've had a variety of backgrounds. We had Charlie Bolden and astronaut the most recent..

NASA congress congressman United States President Trump NASA administrator Forbes Sean O'Keefe Charlie Bolden Hornets president Iraq Rice University America Cornell Afghanistan Michael Griffin nineteen hundred hours twelve years ten years
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"It's just one of many examples of how Nastase program the breadth of it is really not only exploring and understanding, but also has practical benefit for citizens, and I'm gonna come back to more of that. But I want to just reflect on you for a while. Because when your name was put in its renomination as an acid ministration as you well know because you lived it. There is a lot of back and forth about the qualified. He's the right person, by the way, I wrote in Forbes, I and I very much thought you with the right person. So I was very supportive of that nomination. And I appreciate it. You were a navy fighter pilot for ten years flying over nineteen hundred hours more than three hundred aircraft landings, flew combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. You also flew f eighteen Hornets, you know, trying to fight the drug war. How is all of that prepared you to, you know, be a congressman and also lead the nascent space space agency. And I thank you for your service as well. Well, thank you. I I appreciate you saying that. So you know, when you when you think about what NASA is and whatnot. So does the first a and NASA is 'aeronautics a lot of people forget about that. And aeronautics is is critically important. Not just for national security and defense. It's important for our economy. We we, you know, a lot of people don't realize when you go flying on an airliner, you are flying with NASA technology and capabilities and wing designs, and you know, the the engine designs all of those things are developed by NASA in an open. In an open source kind of way. So that industry can take advantage of it and all two million helps the United States maintain its edge technologically. And then maintain it's it's, you know, a base of exports aviation for the United States of America is an expert. In fact, it's a net. Export. In other words, we export more than we import. And so when you think about the trade imbalance and a lot of people hear the president talk about the trade imbalance. A lot aviation is just the opposite. We have a trade surplus, and and so it's an offset to that trade imbalance, although it's not big enough to offset it entirely obvious. Right. But but the all that is possible because NASA and the US government has made investments into aviation, so and 'aeronautics. So that's I think of a big a big piece of it. The other thing is a member of congress. What I found is that when you start talking about things like the architecture for communications in space, and as a member of congress being a a former warfighter myself. Self. I would I would bring up things like, you know, we need. We need commercial satellite communications to be encrypted. So that the warfighter can take advantage of it. We need those satellites to be able to frequency hop. So that so that those signals can't be jammed by the enemy in other words, we the warfighter can take advantage of commercial satellite communications for a whole host of different capabilities. And what you find is that, you know, there's not a lot of members of congress that that speak in those terms. And so it kind of put me in a position where I could be the leader on these on these space issues and over the course of time it kind of turned out that I was leading on space issues quite frequently. And then the the day came when when President Trump got elected, and I got nominated to be the NASA administrator, and so you know, you never know how these things turn out. But I do think that whether it's my military pilot experience or my time in congress it all adds up to to prepare me for this for this. Particular position. Sure sharing. You also have a triple major in business administration economics and psychology from Rice University, an MBA from Cornell. And there were critics out there that said, well, you know, he's a he's a former politician. He's a former congressman he's not a fi intas. Should he be running nasty? You know, as you mentioned earlier before we came on. I spent many years twelve years at NASA. And I remember ministers like, Sean O'Keefe and Michael Griffin and others as well. So you know, I didn't have as much of a problem with the background because we've had a variety of backgrounds. We had Charlie Bolden and astronaut the most recent..

NASA congress congressman United States President Trump NASA administrator Forbes Sean O'Keefe Charlie Bolden Hornets president Iraq Rice University America Cornell Afghanistan Michael Griffin nineteen hundred hours twelve years ten years