35 Burst results for "N._p._r."

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin visits Israel

Bullseye

00:53 sec | 14 hrs ago

Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin visits Israel

"Lloyd Austin is in Israel, where officials are concerned about a possible US return to the Iran nuclear deal. As NPR's Daniel Estrin reports. The visit comes as Iran claims a terrorist act sabotage their nuclear facility. Iran reported a suspicious power outage that they're Natanz nuclear facility shortly after they started operating advanced centrifuges. Israeli Public Broadcasting quotes an unnamed intelligence official as saying it was an Israeli cyber attack. This comes as defense secretary Austin became the first senior Biden administration official to visit Israel officials are discussing the Iran nuclear deal, which the Trump Administration left and which President Biden is considering rejoining. That concerns Israel, which has been accused of disruptions to Iranian nuclear activities. Israel and Iran have also recently reported a string of attacks on their ships at sea.

Iran Lloyd Austin Daniel Estrin Israel Secretary Austin NPR Biden Administration Trump Administration President Biden United States
Leader of Merkel's party seeks backing in bid for chancellor

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 19 hrs ago

Leader of Merkel's party seeks backing in bid for chancellor

"In germany. Chancellor angela miracles conservatives are a step closer to choosing their lead candidate ahead of the september election as may nicholson reports. Miracle is not seeking another term in office with the leader of merkel's christian democrats on shut in the leader of its bavarian. Sister party marcus. How efficiently announced that they are willing to stand as the conservative candidate in the bundestag election now shared is a centrist. Like merckel to him. He's always been very loyal although he has clashed with over corona virus restrictions which he is eager to ease as quickly as possible. Certa is more conservative and was against michaels open door refugee policy but during the pandemic he has supported her calls for stricter regulations the cdc s. You block is under pressure to decide on who's running ahead of the green party's own announcement sheduled for next week. The green party is doing well. In the polls unlike markle's conservatives which have plummeted in recent weeks following revelations about lawmakers profiting from pandemic p p deals

Chancellor Angela Merckel Certa Nicholson Merkel Germany Marcus Green Party Michaels CDC Markle
Iran Says Natanz Nuclear Site Hit By Terrorism

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 19 hrs ago

Iran Says Natanz Nuclear Site Hit By Terrorism

"Chief says an act of nuclear terrorism has struck the country's natanz facility in tehran reserves the right to take action against the perpetrators. The site lost power above and below ground. This morning. The incident comes says defense secretary. Lloyd austin arrived in israel today on his first visit. There is a member of the biden administration austin spoke after meeting with his israeli counterpart. We address the broad range of defence issues to include. Israel's long-term planning for defense acquisitions and regional security challenges and us support for efforts to normalize relations between israel and arab and muslim majority nations biden. Administration is working to revive the two thousand fifteen nuclear chord with iran which israel strongly opposes. The

Natanz Facility Lloyd Austin Biden Administration Tehran Israel Austin Biden United States Iran
COVID-19 Cases Are On The Rise In Nearly Two Dozen States

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:55 sec | 20 hrs ago

COVID-19 Cases Are On The Rise In Nearly Two Dozen States

"The pace of coronavirus vaccinations is rising nationwide, more than 35% of the population has received at least one dose. But the average number of infections and hospitalizations are also on the rise. NPR's Joel Rose reports, The numbers are climbing in more than two dozen states. The average number of cases is climbing especially fast. In Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer blames the more infectious variant of the Corona virus that was first seen in the U. Okay. She's urging her state's residents to voluntarily take a two week pause on indoor dining and other gatherings. Here's Whitmer, speaking on CBS What's happening in Michigan today? Could be what's happening in other states tomorrow, and so it's on all of us to recognize we can squash where we're seeing hot spots. Wittmer is asking the Biden administration to surge additional vaccine doses to Michigan and other virus hot spots. So far, the White House is offering help but no extra

Joel Rose Governor Gretchen Whitmer Michigan NPR Whitmer U. Wittmer CBS Biden Administration White House
Preparations Underway for Prince Philip's Funeral

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:59 min | 1 d ago

Preparations Underway for Prince Philip's Funeral

"As detailed plans for the funeral of Prince Philip emerge. A remembrance service at Canterbury Cathedral this morning gave the British public a chance to mourn his death and remember his life. Willem Marx. Reports from London. Choral music and Prayers were presided over by Britain's most senior clergyman, the archbishop of Canterbury Sunday morning, who described the Duke of Edinburgh remarkable willingness to take the hand. He was dealt in life and straightforwardly to follow its call. Philip Ceremonial funeral next weekend will be televised with his body carried in a procession from Windsor Castle to send George's chapel in a modified Land Rover vehicle. He himself designed alongside a military gun salutes in line with government covert restrictions to 30. Mourners will end to the chapel and Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he will not participate to alarm or the Duke's close family members to attend. For NPR news. I'm gonna marks in London.

Willem Marx Prince Philip Canterbury Cathedral Philip Ceremonial George's Chapel Duke Of Edinburgh Canterbury Britain London Windsor Castle Prime Minister Boris Johnson Npr News Duke
Macron Moves Right As Next French Presidential Election Looms

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:35 min | 1 d ago

Macron Moves Right As Next French Presidential Election Looms

"Facing no threat from the left in next year's election, French President Emmanuel Macron is moving sharply to the right. His principal opponent is likely to be the far right populist million. The pen. When they faced off in 2017 voters rallied to Mac want to keep the pen out of office. But as NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports that may not happen in next year's vote. Parliamentarians from France's mainstream conservative party have been proposing a flurry of controversial amendments aimed at restricting the muslin veil quality control. A totalitarian Islamic for combat was John. We can't let Islamist totalitarianism impose its symbols on minors, said Senator Valeri Boy, Hey as she introduced a measure to ban girls under 18 from wearing the job. The amendments have no chance of becoming law. But they show how desperate the conservative party is to win back voters. It lost to the far right, says Rim, Sarah Ah, Juan, who studies religious freedom and civil liberties at the University of to lose capital. With the election coming off course it's who is going to Pender the most of the far right. I mean or political party are adopting the rhetoric of the far right. It's like a dream come true. They're running the campaign for them. Many look, it doesn't have anything to do with. To be honest. The amendments were to a larger bill to fight extremism proposed by Macron centrist government. It will give broad powers to shut down religious and other organizations. Sena's promoting ideas incompatible with French

Emmanuel Macron Eleanor Beardsley Mainstream Conservative Party Senator Valeri Boy Sarah Ah NPR University Of To Lose Capital France Conservative Party RIM Juan Pender John Macron Centrist Government Sena
South Korean Battery Makers Reach Settlement in US Trade Dispute

WBUR Programming

01:01 min | 1 d ago

South Korean Battery Makers Reach Settlement in US Trade Dispute

"South Korean battery makers say they've reached an agreement to settle a trade secrets dispute over electric vehicle battery technologies. Johnny Kauffman from member station W. A. B reports. The announcement comes just hours before President Biden's deadline today to decide whether to reverse a U. S. International Trade Commission decision. The South Korean company SK Innovation is building an electric vehicle battery factory in northeast Georgia. But the U. S International Trade Commission ruled against SK Innovation in a trade secrets case, blocking the company from doing new battery business for a decade, although President Biden could overturn that ruling. That Wilson is Georgia's economic development commissioner were absolutely excited about what s K is going to bring to Northeast Georgia, and we are hopeful that the bite administration is going to recognize that an overturned the NTC decision. The Biden administration has said Little about the case publicly for NPR news. I'm Johnny Kauffman in Atlanta.

President Biden Sk Innovation Johnny Kauffman W. A. B U. S. International Trade Comm U. S International Trade Commi Georgia Northeast Georgia Wilson Biden Administration NTC Npr News Atlanta
Kemp: Moving All-Star game will hurt business owners of color

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 1 d ago

Kemp: Moving All-Star game will hurt business owners of color

"Republican governor is continuing to criticize major league baseball after the league moved. It's all star game to denver over the state's controversial voting laws from member station w. a. b. e. roxanne scott reports at a press conference. This weekend governor. Brian kemp said the move politicized baseball. An hurts businesses owned by people of color who have already been affected by covid but critics of the law which places ide- requirements on absentee voting and limits the use of ballot drop boxes say disproportionately affects people of color. The mlb said it moved the game from the atlanta area. After having discussions with players the law which was signed last month also expands weaken early voting and criminalizes handing out food and water to voters waiting in line to cast a ballot. Several groups have filed lawsuits about the state's new voting law

Roxanne Scott Baseball Brian Kemp Denver Atlanta
India Reports More Than 145,000 New Covid Cases in One Day

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:05 min | 1 d ago

India Reports More Than 145,000 New Covid Cases in One Day

"Among those countries seeing a surge confirming a record number of new Corona virus infections more than 145,000 new cases in one day. Mumbai has been put under lockdown as NPR's Lauren Frayer reports here in Mumbai where cases are among the highest. A curfew is in place and you're only allowed to go out for essentials, food and medicine. But factories are still open and Busses and trains are still running. In other parts of India state elections are underway and voters are crowding into polling stations. India is now where the corona virus is spreading. Fastest hospital ICUs are filling up. But authorities are trying to avoid the economic pain and even starvation. That happened under total lockdown last spring, India's the world's biggest vaccine producer, But even it has shortages now, and some vaccination centers have closed. India has administered nearly 100 million shots so far. But that's still a tiny fraction of the country's 1.4 billion people. Lauren Frayer NPR news Mumbai The

Lauren Frayer Mumbai India NPR
Iran Says Nuclear Program Testing Newest Advanced Centrifuge

TED Radio Hour

01:01 min | 1 d ago

Iran Says Nuclear Program Testing Newest Advanced Centrifuge

"Iran's President Hassan Rouhani today reiterated Tehran's commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. At the same time, he oversaw the launch of new advanced centrifuges at the country's Natanz underground nuclear plant. As NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. Today's developments come as the U. S and Iran hold indirect talks on returning to full compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal. This week, European, Russian and Chinese diplomat shuttled between U. S and Iranian delegations in Vienna. A senior Biden administration official describes the meetings as constructive. It says it would be better to talk directly with Iran. The official who briefed reporters on the condition of anonymity, says the U. S. Is ready to let Iran do business again if Iran curbs its nuclear program. But the official also warns that the talks will head to an impasse if Iran sticks to its position that the U. S must lift every sanction imposed by the Trump administration since Trump pulled out of

Iran President Hassan Rouhani Michele Kelemen U. Biden Administration Tehran NPR Vienna Trump Administration Donald Trump
Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

Snap Judgment

00:39 sec | 1 d ago

Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

"Tech giant Alibaba's being fined $2.8 billion for what Beijing calls monopolistic behavior, NPR's Emily Fang says the fine comes is Chinese leaders reportedly are investigating how the company and its charismatic founder Became so powerful Alibaba's troubles really began after its founder, Jack Ma, I'll give a speech criticizing Chinese financial regulators from Muslim on Turner's like him. The I. P O of a second company of financial technology firm called Aunt Group was then abruptly canceled, and his executives called into meetings with regulators. Ma has now not been seen in the public eye since last October.

Alibaba Emily Fang Jack Ma NPR Beijing Aunt Group Turner MA
Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:15 sec | 2 d ago

Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

"Alibaba has been slapped with a nearly $3 billion fine for anticompetitive behavior. Chinese regulators say the company violated anti monopoly rules and abused its dominant market position. Windsor Johnston. NPR

Alibaba Windsor Johnston NPR
Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:39 sec | 2 d ago

Alibaba Faces $2.8 Billion Fine From Chinese Regulators

"Tech giant Alibaba has been slapped with a nearly $3 billion fine. Chinese regulators say the company has engaged in anticompetitive behavior. NPR's Emily Fang reports. The fine comes as Chinese leaders are reportedly investigating how Alibaba and its founder became so powerful Alibaba's troubles really began after its founder, Jack Ma, give a speech criticizing Chinese financial regulators from Muslim entrepreneurs like him. Hypo of a second company financial technology firm called Aunt Group was then abruptly canceled, and his executives called into meetings with regulators. Ma has now not been seen in the public eye since last October.

Alibaba Emily Fang Jack Ma NPR Aunt Group Hypo MA
Australia and Greece Recommend Alternative Vaccines for Young People

Up First

01:55 min | 2 d ago

Australia and Greece Recommend Alternative Vaccines for Young People

"Australia and greece are the latest countries to recommend alternatives to the astra zeneca cova vaccine for young people after researchers found more rare but potentially fatal blood clots linked to the vaccine. European officials have identified roughly two hundred clots among a million people who shaved astra zeneca shots in europe in the uk. Npr's jason bogosian has been following the story and he joins us now for an update. Good morning good morning jason Some of the new research was published. Just yesterday what does it say what. We still don't know exactly what's happening in these patients. The papers in the new england journal of medicine. They look at sixteen cases in norway. Germany and austria. And here's what they found. The symptoms begin about a week to fourteen days. After the immune ization patients started out with these really severe headaches. Muscle aches swelling. Nine of the sixteen died and most of them were young women in their twenties and thirties. Yikes do you know why. At this point it's too early to tell why predominance among women it may be due to the fact that norway was using astrazeneca for healthcare workers who lean towards predominantly women and using pfizer to vaccinate. It's older populations that might have things bit. Initially european regulators said the rates of this calling disorder. Were no higher than what you'd see in the general population. But they've changed that now they're saying yes it does appear that in roughly one in a hundred thousand people vaccinated with astra zeneca. This serious side. Effect could occur. We should note that the astra zeneca vaccine is not authorized yet here in the united states correct but our other countries with this new information. Still gonna use it. Well some are switching. How they're using it. They're offering alternatives to the younger people and trying to use astrazeneca more with older groups up but many countries really don't have a choice. Astra zeneca is the vaccine. Much of the world is banking on

Astra Fatal Blood Clots Jason Bogosian Astra Zeneca Norway Greece NPR New England Journal Of Medicin Australia Jason Austria Europe Headaches UK Germany Pfizer United States
Airlines pull Boeing Max jets to inspect electrical systems

Fresh Air

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Airlines pull Boeing Max jets to inspect electrical systems

"Boeing 7 37 Max Airplanes is prompting several carriers to pull dozens of the Jets out of service. NPR's David Schaper reports. Boeing says it's electrical problem yet they A says Boeing notified the regulatory agency about the electrical problem late Thursday that it could affect the operation of a backup power unit. Alaska American Southwestern United are among the airlines pulling close to 70 of their 7 37 max planes temporarily out of service to address the problem. It appears to be related to a change in the production process and effects only some recently manufactured 7 37 Max jets. The problem is not related to the M cast flight control system. Which is blamed in part for causing to 7 37 Max crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that killed 346 people. David Schaper.

Boeing Max Airplanes David Schaper Alaska American Southwestern U NPR Jets Max Jets Indonesia Ethiopia
Amazon Union Vote: Labor Loss May Bring Shift in Strategy

All Things Considered

01:44 min | 2 d ago

Amazon Union Vote: Labor Loss May Bring Shift in Strategy

"Amazon workers there voted not to unionize. That means Amazon has withstood the largest labor campaign ever among its workers in the U. S. NPR's Alina Cell Yuk has been following this union drive and joins us now. Hey, Lena. Hello. Hello. We should first note that Amazon is among NPR sponsors. So why did the warehouse workers vote against forming a union? Well, it depends on who you ask. We know that across the country, Lots of Amazon workers have been raising concerns about warehouse conditions. Grueling pace rules that seemed to constantly change. But I also talked to loving that Stokes, who works at the best of our warehouse, voted against unionizing. We talked two weeks ago, and she said She found the pay at Amazon. Fitting for the work. Amazon pays more than double the local minimum. She spoke highly of her benefits and on top of it all, she doesn't trust the union. This particular union can't give us anything at Amazon that is not being offered. We already have due process We have what's called employee relations. HR walks the floor. They're on your every single floor. Workers like her delivered a really decisive defeat to the union drive votes against unionizing outnumbered votes in favor of a union by more than 2 to 1. Wow. So what did the union and the workers who supported it say about this loss? They are gearing up for a legal battle. The retail wholesale in department store union, which was trying to represent best more workers, is filing charges against Amazon. The union is now accusing the company of confusing, misleading, scaring workers into voting against the union. The legal case is likely to take weeks, if not months. One of the organizers told reporters today that he's been getting calls

Amazon Alina Cell Yuk NPR Lena U. Stokes Department Store Union
Across Political Lines, Opinions On Vaccine Passports Are Divided

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:44 min | 3 d ago

Across Political Lines, Opinions On Vaccine Passports Are Divided

"Dot com slash smb. Now let's ask a little something to the debate over vaccine passports people keep asking. Should we have them. Should we not the reality. Is that in many places we already do. Here's npr's tovia smith too many. It's a no brainer. Just like passengers are screened before boarding planes for the safety of everyone so too. Should everyone entering a crowded space be checked to ensure their low risk for spreading. Covid if we're going to end this nightmare what we need is information. And if people are making unsafe choices the rest of us to know. Peter wilson musician from phoenix seized vaccine passports as ticket back to normal life. You know you have to vaccinate children to go to school for other things. Were just extending that to adults to keep everybody safe. This is your ticket to freedom san at the union pharmacy just outside boston. A pharmacist intern. Hands a proof of vaccination card to linda samantha Thank you so much. It's a low tech version of the digital vaccine passport that could become ubiquitous new york state's. Excelsior pass already allows residents to flash code from their phones to earn their way into anything from a broadway show or a gym to a private wedding. Samantha says she would be more apt to go places that are making sure everyone's vaccinated. I know it's awkward. But they're not asking for their life story just trying to keep people safe and trying to also keep their business so think. It's a win win indeed. Many businesses are already

Tovia Smith Peter Wilson NPR Linda Samantha Phoenix Boston SAN New York Samantha
EU regulator finds link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

All Things Considered

01:22 min | 4 d ago

EU regulator finds link between AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

"Today said there's a possible link between AstraZeneca's covert vaccine and rare but sometimes fatal blood clots. The AstraZeneca vaccine has already been administered to tens of millions of people. It's on track to be the most widely used vaccine in the world this year. NPR's Jason Beaubien joins us with more. Hi, Jason. Hi, Ari. What exactly did the European Medicines agency say today? So there had been. Some concerns raised that some people appear to be getting hit with a very rare blood clotting condition. In the days following vaccination and initially, the European drug regulators, they said, this rate of a few dozen blood clots was nothing out of the ordinary when you're vaccinating 25 million people. But today, the E M. A safety committee came out and said yes, there does appear to be a link. Dr. Sabin Strauss was the head of that committee, She says they looked at all the available data on 86 events. These clotting cases that occurred in the days after vaccination by AstraZeneca on we have concluded that there is indeed a possibility. Of a very rare event that might occur. They're still saying they don't completely understand what's happening. But this appears to be an immune reaction that they've seen also with a drug called heparin, which is a blood thinner. But the key point here is that they've switched their position now to saying that they think it is plausible that the AstraZeneca vaccine is what's causing these clots. So these clouds are

Fatal Blood Clots Jason Beaubien Astrazeneca European Medicines Agency Dr. Sabin Strauss ARI NPR Jason
"n._p._r." Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

09:44 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Thanks again way about climate change. I feel that way about guns. I feel that way about politics kicks in general in this country and it has made me really change the way that i make small talk with people in the last few years in a way that i have not done done before really yeah i used to all the time we talk about politics. You need to announce like everybody shut up. Anyways it is time for a break when we come back. We're going to lighten the mood with my favorite game. Who said that i'm sam sanders. You are listening to its benham it from n._p._r. Support for this podcast comes from the john s. and james l. knight foundation helping n._p._r. Advanced journalistic excellence in the digital age. There's more to watch and read these days than any one person can gap too. That's why we make pop culture happy hour from n._p._r. Twice a week we sort through the nonsense sherry actions and give you the lowdown on what's worth your precious time nine. Listen and subscribe to n._p._r.'s pop culture happy. We are in <hes> you can send in your best thing at any point throughout any week just record yourself on your phone an email that voice file to me at sam sanders at n._p._r. Dot org sam sanders at n._p._r. Dot org <hes>.

sam sanders sherry james l. knight john s. n._p._r.
"n._p._r." Discussed on 1A

1A

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on 1A

"Every background. Has that fear that they got in here by accident. That's scary. N._p._r.'s kit is here to help. Make your freshman year a little easier. Listen to n._p._r. Life kids new guide on college subscribe to light kit all guides for all the episodes all in one place. We're sharing highlights from our conversation last week with somali americans in minneapolis. We heard a lot about why they feel. Welcome or don't feel welcome in the u._s. Right now reasons that may resonate with immigrants from other countries as well we talked about about what's somali americans have to do and change and get used to and pick up and let go to fit in here first of all introduce yourself jailani soon executive director of the council on american islamic relations cair minnesota and this is a question that a lot of people ask you know <hes> assimilation integration. What does that look like for for the somali community whether you came in one thousand nine hundred three or earlier or you came two thousand seventeen and it's a little different i i i would share very similar experience that i also was wondering why when i walked lake street which is one of our corridors here in the twin cities when i see african american gentlemen walk in front of me saying hello brother her how you doing brother and i was like what's going on here like and they're welcome was completely much different than the other folks that i interacted with or you know <hes> who also welcomed us by opening their church to us and giving us a items and help is being refugees and in minnesota we do have a very gentle all passive aggressive but also very gentle very welcoming community. That's norwegians who who who say thank you and hello. We opened the doors for each other. We say soups before we excuse me and but at the same time i would say that they're still struggles. There are communities in saint cloud and in rural minnesota that <hes> the interactions sometimes feels like you are in the deep south in the maybe the seventies or eighties <hes> <hes> <hes> to some extent where people are treated very differently given the harsh looking especially for our community. We hear a lot from the women who get both the micro aggression microaggressions of the the looks. I saw a woman here on a summer hot day a few years ago wearing a winter coat and i was like what in the world world is going on here and i asked.

minnesota minneapolis executive director saint cloud N._p._r.
"n._p._r." Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"Assembling vehicles and maintaining roads and bridges and airports all they look out is the exhaust emitted by zachary's the trucks the trains and the planes and not the greenhouse gas produced by the actual production of of those so that that's another issue when you say like transportation <hes> up produces far less greenhouse gases than say like livestock productions. It's simply an inaccurate an accurate comparison and they delve into this in this article that a linked to the show notes the the other issue is that a lot of people will say if we give up meet we could save the climate but there there's some issues with that as well so if if all americans eliminated all animal all proteins from their diets we would reduce u._s. Greenhouse gas emissions by about two and a half percent and i it's really not that significant in when when you look at population growth worldwide and the projected need for meat and per capita meat consumption consumption that there's going to be a huge shortage of food if we decide to tax meet heavily or or somehow how make meat production lower due to the potential for greenhouse gas emission and i'll i'll get into shortly at a different article that kind of goes late to grass-fed versus feed lot beef but what's interesting is that meat is far more nutrient dense per serving than any vegetarian or plant based option when you all meet is far more nutrient dense so we can actually get you know per whatever you wanna call it acre of of grass-fed or grazing land far more calories far more nutrients to feed far more people than we can from plants period and you know pulse melody known i discuss discussed this quite a bit you know when i when i did kind of carnivore podcast episode with him about this idea that you plant food is is you know it's essentially poor food that requires far more land far more acreage to grow enough nutrients and calories to feed as many people as the equivalent amount of livestock especially if that livestock is raised in a manner that takes into consideration in <hes> the soil and the planet and a lot of other considerations that come to how we actually raised those animals which gets into this other article that was actually appeared on n._p._r.'s website and it went into the difference between grass fed beef and feed lot beef and this was also really really interesting because when you look at the environmental argument for grass fed beef you know they they actually do produce a little bit more methane which incidentally if if you feed you know any anything like cow or goat or chicken a little bit of seaweed along along with their feed you you can actually reduce methane production significantly same thing can be said orillia for humans humans activated charcoal or or spiraling lorella like the amount of of muthanna genyk bacteria activity decreases significantly which is a good trick for you know hopping on a plane concerned about gas awesome awesome activated charcoal. He takes them spiralling some clara or you know you do that. After you have a meal that's heavy and beans or cruciferous vegetables making control that quite a bit but can do so in in anna cattle or really any animal as well but <hes> it's interesting because even though a grass-fed cal for example sample is going to produce more methane the actual carbon that sequestered <hes> through through the process of things is like what the what the savory institute teaches which is <hes> you know rotating the areas where animals are grazing and using more sustainable extendable agricultural practices and doing a lot of things that lower the environmental footprint and then when you look at the fact that the grass fed beef is healthier. It's more concentrated nutrients etc. You actually see <hes> lower carbon emissions overall <hes> when you look at grass-fed verses feed lot beef you see better landscape help you.

zachary clara n._p._r.
"n._p._r." Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on World Cafe

"Come you didn't lead with more than two hundred and fifty years later. It's important to the people at handle andraos to keep the musicians memory alive and to make sure space is filled with sound. They let students and artists use the rooms to practise own instruments are played regularly so we're not like replace that keeps everything under lock in case you know everything is from the nineteen th century but can still be played as a matter of fact just as we were leaving the handle and hendrix south three talented guys were warming up filling the room with the purple haze <music> there you have it if you are in london. Go checkout handle handle and hendrix in london really cool. Thanks so much to sean dougherty for being a wonderful and generous tour guide. Thanks also to clear the volunteer whose voice you heard in the segment. Thanks for senior producer. Kimberly do nod for amazing work on putting this all together and organizing our sense of place trip to london and thanks to the wind coat foundation for making it possible. I'm talia slinger and i will catch you next time on the world cafe so much to sean dougherty for being a wonderful and generous tour guide. Thanks also to clear the volunteer whose voice you heard in the segment. Thanks for senior producer. Kimberly do nod for amazing work on putting this all together and organizing our sense of place trip to london and thanks to the wind coat foundation for making it possible. I'm talia slinger and i will catch you next time on the world cafe from n._p._r.

london talia slinger wind coat foundation sean dougherty hendrix Kimberly producer n._p._r fifty years
"n._p._r." Discussed on The MMA Beat

The MMA Beat

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on The MMA Beat

"Of. I think he's bathing d._c. A little bit to come down to a five has its. I think is even israel israilov. Sonya waited in where he's like. It's weird john. Jones's answer is very odd saying he won't jump up to heavyweight to fight daniel <unk> but he's trying to get me to jump up to fight him at light heavyweight in i had not thought about that until israel zionist said it and i think jones understand the ass five is thing yeah. He's the the greatest. He's the most talented fighter i've ever seen the side of octagon. He's there's no question he's the greatest heavyweight of all time i think i put him right behind george n._p._r. N._p._r.'s greatest fighter period if goes out there beats and he's very much into his legacy he told a shoddy our co worker at u._s._c. 235 his goals throughout the four zero five and now in twenty nine hundred and in his mind cement himself as the greatest fighter ever or most dominant vehicles out there and beat <unk> heavyweight because let's not forget forget then informed is undefeated heavyweight eastern corner heavyweight. He's the grace period and i think that would mean something to yeah yeah. I i agree with that too but i think the way also i think i think he knows he understands that d._c. Is is very legit in he doesn't want to give them. You know that mini <unk> as far as far as the competition goes but i i don't know if you agree with me on this but i think daniel has has no per hand here <hes> if you did an interview with ariel and he was saying he's like i don't have to fight john joe. Don jones has to fight merely wants something funny if he wants to make money <unk>. I'm good like they're still a lot of big. Interesting fights the heavy reform like would you be down a c._d. Gone through hell sign me up like there are several contenders that i'm like yeah. This would be a big fight that people be intrigued whereas there's john jones in this is i'm not trying to disrespect anybody here but do be excited for john. Jones coriander send in all those type of contenders. Maybe joining walker would cost them interests especially if he gets his book to fight right coriander fire. I assume the winner would get john's. Yeah i think so but even then it still doesn't have like the same pop is like d._c. In some of their matches so i think i think john jones most exciting fights <unk> but korda's most exciting fight is not it's. It's also joined jones but he also has other options. I agree and we're gonna use this question to transition to the next question on twitter from our friend kay monte muto. I'm sorry miss brown.

john jones israel john kay monte muto george n._p._r twitter john joe Sonya miss brown korda daniel N._p._r. walker ariel
"n._p._r." Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

Almost 30 Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Almost 30 Podcast

"Therapy. He had a lot of friends who went to therapy but to be honest. It wasn't something that my parents would turn to as a solution to things and hey that's how they grew up so that's what they know so i was always curious and of course <music> moving to l._a. Everyone has a therapist. I was just thinking. I would like to hop on that train but i didn't do so for <hes> like four years. I waited for long years and before that i was in new york didn't have a therapist probably needed it then more than ever but it's interesting what i am now unwrapping in therapy that happen during those really chaotic at least what they felt chaotic nick both emotionally physical physically those years were to meet him so timing is always perfect and i am so i'm grateful that i found a therapist that shoots me straight. She is what i feel really intuitive live. I haven't gone to another therapist. I hit the jackpot on the first. The first one i pointed to in the phone book didn't do that but i i asked community actually said thank you guys for recommending but the first to one that i had a phone call with i i have stuck with and and i feel so lucky because i do feel like she is super in tune on on a different plane with with what's going going on with her clients and how a relate to the world and so sometimes it it's uncomfortable 'cause i know she she is feeling and observing and understanding more about what is is going on then perhaps i do even though i haven't intuitive feeling of what's going on i just i know she knows and she's able to guide me to go deeper and she does so through a few different forms of therapy formally normally. She is a trauma therapist. I full disclosure have not had what most people would think of as trauma in my life so no specific event that perhaps broke me shook me to my core was violent was super traumatic. I don't know how else to explain it but what society thinks is traumatic check. I did not experience however trauma doesn't have to look like thought is what i've learned and i really have of learn to acknowledge and honor bows moments of what my body and heart and soul experience experience as trauma as real as true and as impactful as they really have been. I have a tendency. I didn't see to make the things that have happened to me smaller than they are because i know a lot of people have experienced much more traumatic things in their lives. So why should i be complaining or blaming an issue that i have on my small traumas right so using a._m._d. Are we've been able to and from a very from very early on working with my therapist. The past i have been able to tap into those specific moments those memories the scenes i i see them very clearly. I feel them in my body. Feel them specifically in parts of my body. I feel them as shapes and textures and and colors in my body and she has guided me through that not only was this my first time and therapy but this was my first time with m._d._r. Therapy e._m. d._r. Let me just give you a little bit of information about amdi are m._d._r. Is eye movement desensitization desensitization and reprocessing therapy. It's an interactive psychotherapy. Technique used to relieve psychological stress. It's an effective treatment meant for trauma and post traumatic stress disorder and during museum d._r. Therapy sessions i was able to relive live traumatic or triggering experiences in very brief doses while my therapist directed my movement so she would use a <music> a basically what looked like a pam but that turned into a wand it was magic and n._p._r.'s thought to be affected because recalling distressing events as often less emotionally emotionally upsetting when your attention is diverted and this allows you to be exposed to the memories or thoughts without having strong psychological response and over time the technique is believed to lessen the impact that the memories or thoughts have on you so for me my experience with a._m._d..

psychological stress n._p._r. new york four years
"n._p._r." Discussed on Car Talk

Car Talk

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Car Talk

"And all that stuff you may have to spend a few thousand bucks and buy some stuff and try eight out. I was thinking of doing it himself. He's gonna sell high and he's gonna bar. He's got to buy mufflers and pipes and whatever yeah you're not. You're not gonna die. Don't drill any holes. They would take my brother seriously. No no no no. You've got to buy some of these aftermarket systems and i'm sure you'll find something that you can adapt to this thing very cool day all right. It's a heck of a good question. Jim enjoy enjoy your rolling cruiser in your retirement right. Thanks guys bye bye all right bye bye. Hey it's time for us to take a short break. I hope i have time to jot down my highlights from this week's show so far you know from my memoirs okay and then what are you going to do what the other fifty we'll be back with more of your calls in just an engine rava. Don't ought to know your motor sound real even though the fastest car that i seen same motor wasn't built force b but that's okay. The persona were that gasoline scream even though sumo wrestlers run full speed into their radios whatever they hear us say at this is n._p._r. Everyone it's fear eisenberg and here. I'm chatting with one of clear is fab five and leaper ascii. What's a culinary deal breaker acre for you. Catch up on hotdogs makes me really uncomfortable. Listen to n._p._r.'s asked me another the answer to life's funnier questions <music>..

eisenberg n._p._r. Jim
"n._p._r." Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"What's going to happen is parliament will reassert itself and parliament will block a no deal brexit. What will happen then. Though is that boris johnson will say that parliament is blocking the will of the people and it's very comforting to see juliet nodding her head across the studio and what will happen is we're going to have elections in november. There is one thing that you are assuming here perhaps charles which is parliament can get its act together to block this and we have seen juliette in the last few days <hes> the ragtag gathering of those against the no deal brexit who seemed to be more hell bent on in-fighting then and actually getting their act together and getting something sorted which is arguably what number ten is banking on and the number may be banking on this but let's be clear they are what the impression that i get is that even amongst leavers there are a few leaders who did not want to crash out without a deal so yes boris johnson may will be joined. The confusion in opposition ranks at the moment but it doesn't necessarily mean that if an election were called in november or whenever never that he's going to be an automatic shuman. I personally think they're going to be back to square one. We can a hatbox hung parliament scenario and by virtue of that it may will force us to have some sort the government of national unity and agree with you about the fragmentation in the opposition because isn't it funny. How it's it's all happening now because certainly at the beginning they was much talk about this government of national unity how it would work but nobody looked at the specifics in other words who's going to lead it. You've got a labor position which yes logically it would be the the the group that should lead it but you've got a leader who nobody likes even in his own party. He cannot support across the house and even if he were not lead it. There's no guarantee that his strategy is going to be acceptable to other players. He may well dislike. Well okay then. Let's extend article fifty and that's pursue the negotiations not to actually <hes> crash out but certainly to have some sort of a compromise but on the other hand you have the lib dem position and indeed other n._p._r.'s who say well look. There's no need to have an extension of all school fifty. Let's just call a referendum again. If you quit look at the at loans today the lamont lemonde is covering the fact that jeremy corbyn the leader of the opposition in is proposing a union against boris johnson and and a hard brexit but highlights the fact of of of all these divisions <hes> chelsea do you think is is the leading voice in this is going to be <hes>. Perhaps a light that everybody can follow many people who said that the father of the house kenneth clarke is in the mount. He's he's. He's a longer-standing n. p. Unarguably he's one of the few grownups in the building what a fantastic opportunity for somebody like clem ken clarke to come in as the caped crusader and sort of save parliament and save the nation and here's somebody who is in spite of the fact that <hes> a conservative m._p. Took a stab at him on on live radio yesterday for his age which was extremely unfair and discriminatory today think for somebody who's obviously got all his marbles still oh quite a few other people's as well as very clever guy. What if somebody who really doesn't have a dog in this hunt anymore and who isn't a sort of dogmatic dogmatics raving <hes> you know ideolog to sort of sort out to force everybody to take a pause and say let's get our you know what together and move forward in a coordinated fashion. He's less controversial than corbin. <hes> he is less controversial than anybody the else in the tory party <hes> he yeah. I think that can clark could very well be our last wants to pick pick you up as well about the point about his age because i totally agree with you. That is discriminatory especially the time when we're talking about him. Including more people not political life in our economic life the fact but realistically people are being told..

boris johnson kenneth clarke corbin lamont lemonde juliet jeremy corbyn charles juliette clark n._p._r.
"n._p._r." Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So astonishing a. and fascinating episodes inside trader joe's wherever you get your podcasts more at traderjoes dot com and a trader joe's on instagram the world is complicated but knowing the past can help us understand it so much better. That's where we come in. I'm run that at that meeting at a bluey and we're the host of through line n._p._r.'s history podcast every week. We'll dig into forgotten stories from the moments that shaped our world through you line from n._p._r. Listen and subscribe now..

joe n._p._r.
"n._p._r." Discussed on Racing Post

Racing Post

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Racing Post

"How many you put not glen for four says four h. Isn't it right glenn. I what main selection guys the jolly boat scott carr mr. My job has nine at that sees guy. He's gonna be on the the s._i._m. Peninsula fast night to seventy <unk> hills said he bullied the track year lights. We defend date become the first by those e as a compete against the track of when his goal was one. I if in skill set required that <unk> in the page as a coach. Is it now one hundred dollars afraid of our show. Does it bother everybody else like home. So that aid we chose but these are the one <hes> primarily before we get the draw at beth is too shy that at all to guide as well <hes> we now that's the midas b._g. Into a say on the phone dial see when we roll rate roy was not to toss cage at blowing annoying me a show lights. It's title to his list of honours will win this way widow size securing top spot in the rankings. Are you show cushion into championship. I'll tell you what glenn the change of a schedule issue pretty suits cook it doesn't it 'cause mitzi doesn't really excited for for anything bother my just but he can kind of come off the back of the british open and then stay on the boil just to the end of this and then gone fishing every night. It's funny so he's liable able not to beat the motivated when you think that's the thing i mean savo see mention that nocentini put him out. The paper was suggesting he wouldn't be outside of the majors j._c. The event is the jostle for that <hes> bible and the weight gap in between is gonna so n._p._r.'s. He likes awake. All night said he likes to fight a week before my agent but he didn't before the the u._s. I still played well. He's coming off of a win with a guy today. We also again. I think he's about to show have consistently candidate and he could have had a night for me. A friday germany pies fight well-rounded. Nice shot of the rise is a._k. Events we should've kept a candidate long. Say grainger regulation pot well behind on your list for any owner vows. Mostly figures very highly stats this year. The.

glenn nocentini hills roy mitzi germany n._p._r. one hundred dollars
"n._p._r." Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Environment: NPR

"From American pest open your doors who a healthy pest free home with American past offering safe environmentally friendly pest control solutions throughout the D._m._v. for over ninety years learn more at American American past dot net Mongolia is undergoing dramatic change and some of that change is driven by extreme weather. The country is tucked between China and Russia. It is a largely rural nation and in Mongolia harsh winter storms combined aligned with a decade of drought of tens of thousands of herders to abandon their livelihoods. N._p._R.'s above the fray fellow. Emily Kwong begins a three part series on Mongolia's changing environment in the grassland step with a natural disaster. The the steps of Mongolia are a vast yellow green grasp home to millions of grazing animals but nineteen years ago Mongolian hurt are often Gonchig saw up very different scene. He rose at first light to check on his animals. After a harsh winter storm. Do everything was covered by white snowball. There was no way to establish the sheep trails month good and everywhere corpses of animals. The herder lost his.

Mongolia Emily Kwong Gonchig Russia China N._p._R. nineteen years ninety years
"n._p._r." Discussed on Your Travel Checklist For A Great Trip

Your Travel Checklist For A Great Trip

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Your Travel Checklist For A Great Trip

"Just go outside and walk around. Walk aimlessly like Jenny Odell. Does you go. I don't even know what I'm looking for. I'm looking for anything. Then then you will see anything like you'll see all of these things outside of the categories of what you're usually looking for. What kind of value have you derived from? Just observing having your surroundings whether you're far away or close to home. I think that it's just enlarged my capacity to be surprised. I think that's almost like a faculty that you exercise and It can be narrower can be wide and I think you can widen it on purpose. Curiosity can open up new worlds needs to us. It just becomes very quickly evident that I I will never really get to the bottom of things that I'm observing and that is such a delightful feeling And and it's so different from consuming a product. It's also different from looking things up online. Where the answer is yes or no? It's kind of the opposite of that. It's like a a seemingly seemingly simple point that opens onto kind of infinity as long as you're willing to go down that path I'm sort of addicted to the feeling of curiosity and so It's been been really wonderful for me to find out that I can have that anywhere. This was a hetty episode packed with meaning. So let's review the takeaways from Tori who sailed around the world for a few years and Jenny who gets the sole boosting benefits of travel without without leaving home. Take away one meaning is what you make it a meaningful time isn't necessarily a good time or a bad time. You bring the context to your experiences experiences and that might not be the postcard version of a place. It doesn't have to be anything apart. From what you make it tip number two to finding fulfillment never stopped being being slightly afraid. You realized the world isn't as scary as maybe you come to believe. And and that just enriches my life in my experience of life. So engineer travel so that you're doing things scare you a little three remember the why being open to perspective and surprise is a good frame takeaway for travel as an experience not as a product to simply snap some pictures up leaving enough unplanned space to acknowledge that the the meaning is going to come from the place. Not from you ahead of time. Planning your trip take away five. Seek out what makes the the place you're in truly different from the last place you were in someone has to do with observations do more than just see a place be there and finally. You don't have to leave home to be transformed ends. Formed bring the open perspective. You have on a trip to your daily experiences. That's it for this life. Kit On meaningful will travel for more. NPR Life Kit. Check out other episodes in this guy. There's one on navigating group travel without ruining your relationships and another on logistics planning and packing like a pro. If you like what you hear make sure to check out our other life kit guides at NPR dot org slash life. Get and while you're there subscribe to our newsletter so you don't Miss Anything. We've got more guides coming every every month on all sorts of topics in the meantime. Here's our random tip get outside nature it's full of surprises. Yeah we have a yard work weed in West. I just saw Santa Cruz Guard. I'm Elise you thanks for listening. Aw Americans kinda recycling to the Mafia and a huge mistake by this guy garbage. In New York that was slack controlled substance. There was a cartel control the flow of garbage. Why we started recycling on N._p._R.'s? Planet Money podcast..

Jenny Odell NPR New York engineer Tori Mafia Santa Cruz Guard N._p._R.
"n._p._r." Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"It's been a very disturbing week for the United States. Certainly if you've been watching the news waiting the news tweeting the news this has been a very uncomfortable week with president trump bringing issues of race and xenophobia right to the front of the National News radar where frankly it cannot be ignored and I think too often journalists do try to ignore some of these issues so let's have some blunt talk about how the press approaches one of the most important subjects of all when the president is posting racist tweets when he's allowing hateful chance at rallies. What is our role? How do we stay reliable sources? My guest today is award winning journalist and author Farai today. She's covered every presidential election since nineteen ninety-six. She's hosted N._p._R.'s news notes. She's been a political analyst here at C._N._N.. An entire sixteen she published the book the episode of Career to thrive at work in the age of disruption fry. Thanks for joining me Brian. I'm so glad to be here. One of the many reasons I wanted to speak with you is because you wrote an essay in two thousand sixteen <hes> the call to whiteness that that I think <hes> showed us where we were going in some cases in this in this trump age. There's a lot to talk about but I want to start with your tweet and I quote at the very beginning is the political press better prepared to cover this in two thousand twenty then it wasn't twenty sixteen. Do you have a sense of the answer yet. I think the answer is yes but only somewhat <hes> I was a field reporter who also used data journalism during the two thousand sixteen election working for five thirty eight and my beat was voter demographics but for years I've been going into places where people are active white supremacists like I staked out and went into a church where the deacons and preacher threatened to dig up the body body of mixed race black baby sp because it was defiling. They're all white cemetery so very often what I found during the two thousand sixteen election was that as a black woman who was a veteran reporter I was still viewed as basically thinking with my blackness when I brought up race when I was thinking with all of myself years of field reporting and a lot of white reporters for some very obvious reasons don't know how nasty things can get in this country you know from the time I was a kid growing up in Baltimore there were times where I would walk into a store with my mother and sister and you would just immediately be bombarded with the negativity of you. Don't belong here and I think that's really important. I know this is backing into today. It's really important for us to we know that an integrated political press provides better intelligence gathering. You don't just need black women. You don't just need white men you need people from a variety of backgrounds who can do reality checks and so that's part of it is that we need to really check who we have in the political process but there are some signs that people are beginning to do more historical analysis which I think is really important so Jack Shafer wrote a piece <hes> in politico how trump changed after Charlottesville just came out on July eighteenth and it was. Is Basically saying after Charlottesville he you know the the president seemed much more kind of he he seemed to feel like he had overstepped the line with his racial <hes> pandering but but now he's just in it to win it you know he's he basically is like <hes>. This is a winning strategy and I will take a breath and let you continue but I think that we should realize that racial resentment has been a winning political strategy energy. We need to stop thinking about this. As a case of hurt feelings. This is a political strategy are white journalists too often afraid to go there. I think some white journalists don't want to go there because there's the idea of journalistic objectivity but objectivity means..

president political analyst white cemetery reporter United States Charlottesville Jack Shafer N._p._R. Brian Baltimore
"n._p._r." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:29 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Online at melvilletrust dot org and on twitter at melvilletrust from n._p._r. news this is all things considered i'm ari shapiro audie cornish new york city is draped in rainbows and some neighborhoods it seems like they're everywhere on socks dog leashes t-shirts world pride is happening there this weekend it's a historic celebration of l._g._b._t. visibility n._p._r.'s netted ulaby takes us on a tour you've got to start at the stonewall inn it's not an in its bar dark grimy old dating back to the days when gay people were not allowed to dense together in public or even serve alcohol in the nineteen sixties gay bars like the spoon will in used to be raided by police i stole will i was fifteen years old this former teenager now cuts a resplendent figure in a shiny scarlet gown and a towering red wig i view football stars now look at it i'm sixty old and to let it divine is a drag queen this die far she says it's a spiritual home for her lt community and it's gotten fancier since her youth everything was beer was mixed drinks red money for mixed drinks beer for fifty years ago drag queens like tallit divine revolted when police harassed them at the stonewall one of the few places they felt safe the riots helped bring l._g._b._t. civil rights into the spotlight anniversary celebrations here included a commemoration of transgender women murdered in the year twenty nineteen javelin wear ashanti carmen claire maganga and a speech by transgender child chase i just turned twelve yesterday and i've been living my true self for the last four years i have the ability to be because of the deck again right here at the stonewall inn l._g._b._t. pride is all over the city from caribbean pride in brooklyn to a leather street fair and chelsea to the message preyed on sunday with more than one hundred flights from huge corporations like comcast and macy's rainbow capital of the quick buck mariah davis has identified as lesbian for half her life she's twenty eight and grew up in harlem she and her fiance petro vega say they do not plan to attend any parades not even the dyke march or the reclaimed pride event that rejects corporate and police presence you don't leave the house inside people crowds too much socially diety israel pride is more for straight people these days she says prides mainstreaming is less of an issue for the gay republicans parting on the roof of an upper west side hotel supporter of donald trump i was his l._g._b._t. surrogate on the last campaign charles moran president of log cabin republicans as thirty eight he says he feels more political kinship with ronald reagan than the stonewall rioters yet he acknowledges world pride exists in part because of them stonewall seems extremely relevant to the experience of royalty from india men veteran single hill is an openly gay prince america's just beating me so riley prince month veterans in new york continue his l._g._b._t. activism he says he can't come to world pride without stopping at the stonewall storm is a temple as a hindu spiritually inclined person i belong to a very old dynasty which is going back to the thirteenth century and for me stonewall it's a place of for ship a temple from me where i would go and i would stand in front of it and for my hands and say stone on in the stonewall inn has been a holy site for generations acquire people this weekend for million are expected to make the pilgrimage for world pride netto n._p._r. news new york the stonewall riots fifty years ago sparked a wave of gay activism at a time when many l._g._b._t. people were afraid to show their faces publicly just over a decade after stonewall a plague would begin to wipe out gay men this was an a._b._c. news report from nineteen eighty two it's mysterious it's deadly and it's baffling medical science acquired immune deficiency syndrome as we mark the fiftieth anniversary of stonewall this week we're going to look now at how the activism of stonewall transformed into the fight against aids david france is an investigative journalist he created the book and documentary how to survive a plague welcome to the program thanks for having me to start with the big picture did stonewall change the mindset of gay people in a way that allowed them to publicly protest in the face of aids they might not have if stonewall hadn't happened what we learned from stonewall was that the community no longer felt comfortable being as isolated and disenfranchised as it had been the we had carved out these little pockets of semi-freedom and stonewall said that's not enough and all the organizations that grew from that time said you know we have a right to citizenship we have a right to kind of all the responsibilities but all the benefits of being human being an american and when aids hit what became really clear very early on was that we were being denied really basic fundamental things that sense of entitlement is what carried through when we started to realize that hospitals were routinely not taking aids patients that nobody in the public health firmament was doing anything effective in response to the disease so we started taking care of ourselves by creating organizations like games health crisis in the shanty project in san francisco that took on the caregiving challenges that the community needed let's talk about one specific group that sprang up to respond to aids act up new york which staged protests and actions like diane's that were deliberately intentionally in your face obviously the group act up was a response to aids but did you see that as an outgrowth of what had happened install people who were really on the frontlines of the formation of act up we're new generation six years into the nineteen eighty-seven there still was no medication online to treat the disease there was no public health response on the federal level or the academic level nobody was responding to this at all in this new generation of l._g._b._t. folks were outraged and that's what act up was active was a responsive outrage different cities responded in different ways to the democ how would you compare what happened in new york to san francisco the san francisco model of responding to really care based it was kind of a famille response to the disease people were can help ing ease as aids patients in to death in the most comfortable way possible the activism of anger and of politics was really an east coast response it was an effort finally to break down those walls around the ghettos that we had built and and to say that we are not going to be able to do this ourselves we've done so much else ourselves but we are not gonna find a cure to this mysterious retrovirus it so we started going to the doors of big pharma and the halls of scientific research in demanding action from the people who had the training in the background and really the the ethical obligation to respond and so when you take a step back and look at this arc from stonewall fifty years ago to aids activism what lessons do you take away for for today for twenty nineteen what we learned from aids activism is that really street action and st organizing can be incredibly effective that even the most disenfranchised populations and certainly the queer population was disenfranchised in the eighties as any other can seize power can find a way to make positive change to end the disenfranchisement and the fact of that being a possibility i think is really the lasting message from that time journalist and filmmaker david france thanks very much thanks Sorry. you're listening to w._n._y._c. coming up next it's marketplace cubicles route the.

twitter n._p._r. new york fifty years fifteen years four years six years
"n._p._r." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Foundation supports veterans and military families voting rights truth in journalism and women in tech on the next all of it linda holmes host of n._p._r.'s pop culture happy hour podcast joins us to talk about her debut novel leaving drake starts over about the unlikely relationship between young woman lost her husband a yankees pitcher game plus journalist joe nocera stops by to talk about his new podcast the straight next door i'm alison stewart don't miss all of it is it knee on my it's morning edition from n._p._r. news i'm rachel martin and i'm steve inskeep good morning what does the united states maine to do to iran given that it's not opening fire at least for the moment president trump called off air strikes after iran shot down a u._s. drone but the president now says the u._s. will impose new economic sanctions and vice president pence alluded to further actions on c._n._n. a ranch should not mistake restraint for lack of resolve all options remain on the table the united states going to defend our troops in america's interests in the region now an n._b._c. the president said he is willing to discuss the central dispute iran's nuclear program he can't have nuclear weapons and if you wanna talk about it good otherwise you can live in a shattered economy for a long time to the u._s. withdrew last year from a nuclear agreement with iran and has increased economic pressure on iran ever since n._p._r. white house correspondent franko donas has been covering the stories in our studios good morning good morning this certainly isn't over is it it is not over look the president's team came out this weekend united trying to bat down any concerns that there may be that iran may be in bold and by the presence you know quote unquote lack of action that some concerned the president is promising strong more crushing sanctions and look bulletin national security adviser john bolton is also talking about military option is still a possibility so there's a lot to go here look some have said that pressure does work on iran it has in the past arguably but that was international pressure this in this case is more as unilateral leifer i guess we should be clear i on what we think the white house means by saying military option is a possibility it would seem the president has ruled out a military option in response for this drone shootdown right because he said that would not be proportionate what we're hearing from the white house's if there are more actions by iran that military options would be on the tape table is that correct yes that is correct okay and then there's the question of economic sanctions given that the united states has already put so many economic sanctions what more is there left to do yeah it's it's a great question it's very intense the president promised major additional sanctions but what can you do that isn't really clear the president has often talked about major things happening and they turn out not so major at least not as major as we expect one thing though that the president and his team want to do is they do want to give some time for the existing sanctions to take effect there are several sanctions that were put back in place when the united states backed out of the nuclear deal those target energy shipping and the financial sector they have had a dramatic impact on the iranian comedy and really strangled their ability to get resources so i want to try to understand what the president's longer term goal is here frank we did hear him just say he's willing to talk about a new nuclear deal but Based on your reporting. is that the president's goal i mean there are several possible goals here one is a new nuclear agreement another is regime change in iran another is some kind of pretext for war with iran there may be other options that i could imagine do you feel you understand what the president's true goal is i mean it's always really difficult to say what is in the president's mind but from our reporting certainly he is looking for a new deal a stronger deal a deal that was better than the one worked out by his predecessor predecessor president barack obama and he has been pushing back on some of his advisors top advisors who have wanted stronger measures including regime change the president very clearly not want to end up in another war and i guess we should note from this incident last week at least based on what we were told about it we have an example of that there appear to have been consensus to go ahead and launch strikes against iran and it was the president who pulled back at the last moment absolutely i spoke with senior administration of fficials on after that may told me that their decision that that all advisors security advisers and defense advisors were in support of the decision the response decision and it was president trump who backed out of the deal who made the final decision to to take action is the president worded all about looking weak that is an issue certainly all his advisers are saying that particularly on the political stunt people like lindsey graham are saying you need to take step some type of action or you or you will look like you're all talk okay frank thanks so much thank you this n._p._r.'s franko donas we're gonna look now at the problem some communities face after a natural disaster an n._p._r. investigation earlier this year found that money from federal program that helps people move after disaster strikes goes disproportionately to wider communities charles lane of member station w. s. h. you visited.

n._p._r. linda holmes
"n._p._r." Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on KQED Radio

"Commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments And from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. from n._p._r. news this is all things considered ari shapiro audie cornish the house plans hold a series of hearings on big tech and the threat of monopoly power meanwhile regulators plan to probe four tech giants in particular the drumbeat to crack down on facebook amazon google and apple is growing louder here in the u._s. n._p._r.'s shahani has been following the latest developments in arthur to begin it's been a long time right where the american political establishment has been criticized for basically giving tech giants pass that doesn't seem to be the case now what's going on yeah that's right the house judiciary committee announced yesterday they're going to hold multiple hearings on antitrust issues so much like we saw lots of investigation and testimony on russian interference in u._s. elections in the role of facebook and that lawmakers are turning to look at the economics of silicon valley and equity fairness i'd say the shift got a real jump start with the presidential candidates earlier this year especially elizabeth warren calling for the break-up the largest companies what's interesting with the house move is that it is by partisan in a statement congressman doug collins republican from georgia he said lawmakers have have got to take a look at whether the market remains competitive i don't think that means he's going to echo warrants call anytime soon though and it's not just congress according to multiple news reports the justice department and federal trade commission going to probe specific companies and struck a deal to divide up the work justice may take apple and alphabet that's the parent company of google and the f._d._a. facebook at amazon what's the thinking behind that division of labor so anti-trust if it quickly but label for a long list of conferrence one concern is merger at the company way too big the f._t._c. formed a task force a few months back to look at that thank facebook acquiring whatsapp instagram amazon buying whole foods and audible so that could be why the f._t._c. is focusing on those two companies meanwhile critics have raised questions about what's happening inside the big app stores are developers of apps getting a fair deal consumers so it could be that's why justice would take google apple or the how does this compared to the developments in the european union they've been at the forefront of the so-called tech lash it is absolutely the case that europe has acted quicker they've drafted and pass laws on hate speech they've leveled multibillion dollar fines against google and apple but whether or not their model of action will you know that depends on who you ask i spoke with two lawyers both antitrust experts one from paris the other chicago the paris lawyer says listen you americans fell asleep at the wheel back in the nineteen eighties you let your antitrust approach focus way too narrowly on one issue if consumers are getting a bum deal because facebook is free according to the american approach akanbi bad but he said european regulators understand the real problem is competition when companies get way too big there's no space for startups now ready picker he's at the university of chicago law school he thinks the u._s. needs to take a hard look at big tech but he does not want americans following the european approach coach even if they've been far more aggressive i do not think they've accomplish very much i do not dave extracted a bunch of money but have they actually changed competition on the ground in these areas i don't think so he says what might really matter is looking at specific well defined ways companies have gotten too much power favor data over industries and then make them share so what can we expect to see in the coming months well i'd say years not months a tech c._e._o.'s are going to be sitting in hearings answering hours of questions much we saw mark zuckerberg do last year investors are going to keep an eye on this so stocks will go up and down a lot in this question of other tech companies are too big the outside role they play in everything we do the fact that one platform can reach more than two billion people that's becoming a mainstream political issue That's NPR's Artha Shahani, Arthur..

ari shapiro n._p._r.
"n._p._r." Discussed on 1A

1A

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"n._p._r." Discussed on 1A

"Don't miss n._p._r.'s our of puzzles where games and trivia back now to our conversation with professor mickey hiba of rice university sabrina schaeffer of right now women and the independent women's forum and amanda renteria of emerge america and formerly of hillary for america sabrina schaeffer let me talk to you about women on the political right here's a clip of carly fear rena and her response to some controversial comments donald trump made about her appearance back in two thousand sixteen during the presidential campaigns it's still different for women it's only a woman whose appearance would be talked about running for president never a man and i think that's what women understand that's why women understood what donald trump said about my face in the first place and also what he said about my face in the second place the point is women are half this nation women are half the potential of this nation but somehow we still spend a lot of time talking about women's appearance instead of their qualifications carly fiorina reacting the comments that donald trump made about her appearance during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign how much of this push to improve the way women are treated in politics sabrina has to do with donald trump and how much of it is other stuff it's been building for a while it seems like the phenomenon of candidate now president trump has kind of catalyzed it but it didn't begin and end with him he came from somewhere right not at all i mean look i think that this president says things that for a whole 'nother show right and i think carly is correct to push back on this i think she was a wonderful candidate but it actually takes us to one of the other issues beyond sort of the sexism question that's keeping more women from running for office and there was a really interesting study out of the university of pittsburgh a couple of years back which showed that it's it's not women's you sort of differences in ability or their differences in confidence levels with men what really seems to keep women out of politics six is the the noisy -ness of the modern campaign and this idea that they won't be able to get their point across they won't be able to have a real conversation about the policies that matter and i think that's what karl was sort of getting at there that that women who wanna get involved with politics want to have a conversation about the issues that matter and unfortunately and it is exacerbated by our twenty four hour news cycle and social media that they often feel like they can't and so that is something that i think we can all work on that we want to bring the conversation back to education or paid leave or workplace regulations or foreign policy or whatever it is that makes you know is important at the at the moment but trying to make the campaign less noisy fed route on our facebook page please have the panelists address the fifty one percent of white women who voted for donald trump after the access hollywood tape leaked and how women candidates will overcome that phenomenon in the future yes well look i think that partisanship is it's very strong we know that sort of our commitment to our party identification is stronger than religious identification can be very difficult for people to to think about voting for someone in another party it could take multiple election cycles for them to do so and so i think we need to keep that in mind this was a particularly divisive election i'm so i'm not sure i can give an exact answer for why people did that but i think that for a lot of republicans ultimately they were willing to sort of hold their nose about things they didn't like about the candidate at the time president trump now because they were hopeful that they would get market based policies that they've been working toward for a long time and people can have different opinions on whether that not you know whether that was the right thing for people to do or not but i think they looked at hillary clinton and they saw more big government in healthcare and more big government in the workplace and.

n._p._r. mickey hiba sabrina schaeffer professor fifty one percent twenty four hour