26 Burst results for "Myers Briggs"

S6 E9 - How to identify what you are passionate about

Courage to Fight Again

26:16 min | 2 months ago

S6 E9 - How to identify what you are passionate about

"This is the we served now. What podcast and if you're anything like me you've had a ton of questions after leaving the military and the lack of answers has left you frustrated and probably a little confused. This show is here to help you make sense of the craziness that is post military life so you can turn your post military life into your best life. Money was aaron perkins a. Us army combat veteran husband to a beautiful wife. Daddy to amazing kiddos and on this episode of the show. I want to talk to you about identifying your passion in life and how you do that. That's a big question. I think we all have even if we haven't put into so many words like how do identify my passion in life. It's like well aaron. Who are you to talk about identifying passion. Well number one. I've identified my own number two. I developed a process to do just that net processes called the nine line framework which i put into the book called resolve. That is just a step by step guide for you. The veteran to help you to rediscover purpose meaning and you guessed it. Passion in your post military life before i dive into the episode today. I want to take a few minutes until you a little story. I myself love stories. I love hearing them. And i love telling them and this story is really near and dear to my heart because it's about my son. His name is christopher and you may have heard me talk about him on the show before But this story. I've never actually shared on the show because actually just happened about a week or two ago and my son christopher almost twelve years old. he's a normal kid. Not a huge fan of school. Really good in school gets really good grades Does everything well is i. I don't know if i would say popular. But you know people like him he. He's just a normal kid. And he. And i we have this unique Father son relationship. I mean we joke around a lot. We have a very very similar Sense of humor. So we have memes that will share back and forth and that's actually across our entire family that we can laugh at together and everything but this story about his passion for video games. Now you might be thinking well yeah. He's eleven year old boy. eleven year. Old kid boy girl the one but he's eleven year old kid and he loves video games. Yeah what kid doesn't we're here's the thing. He is not just passionate about video games. He is passionate about tech in school and his technical classes studying python programming language. He studying java script and his his his little techy and he loves the technical aspect of it. Well there's this that he has for one of his platforms. And it's called beets saber. You may have heard of it. It's on playstation four for vr. And it's on oculus quest to In fact every year. we're pretty much every year. We get a family gift at christmas and this past year. The family gift that we all could use was the oculus quest to and that is a a virtual reality gaming system. That's fully wireless but the headset on. Hold the controllers and you could just play play games fun and while he has been absolutely just going nuts over this thing having so much fun with it. Well again. this game beats saber. You can create your own levels if you modify the game and there is no right or wrong i should. There is a right or wrong way to do it but there is no manual that you can look at and say okay. This is how you modify find the game. So he gets on discord. he's he finds Some experts who know about modifying the game he chats with him for hours. Some of some of them are as friends he's he's played games with everything and he's talking to them. Like how do i modify this game. What do i need to do. He figures out the programs. He needs to us figures out how to roll the game back to a previous edition. Now he knows how to launch the game with these modifications so he can play his own levels on the game. Keep in mind. This had nothing to do with school this nothing to do with any requirement. This was just something that he wanted to do something that he is naturally gifted at and naturally naturally passionate about and that is that's what that's one of the things i wanna point out here. Today is your passion in life is most likely going to be something that you are naturally geared toward you are naturally good at and maybe even it may even be something that you have spent a lot of time practicing and preparing at and you've spent a lot of time working on developing that skill. It could be anything from woodworking to the medical field to an to. I'm the the passion ideas for your life are virtually endless. But you heard me referenced. The nine line framework earlier. And as i look at this nine line framework. You know again. It's it's this step by step guide. It is the process that helps you rediscover passion in your life after the military. And i look at these these lines in here. These chapters and the storage is told about my son. I can see him in these chapters. I can see how his passion is coming out just in the things that he is naturally doing now in the last episode i mentioned and talked about quite a bit actually line four. Which is what is my personality type. you know. why does it matter. And it's not even so much. Why does it matter. But how does that. Impact me and my passion and my purpose for life. And so i'm going to touch on line for a little bit today but i want to give you some examples from line five later in the show about discovering that passion in your life but line four again i used sixteen personalities dot com. You can go there right now. You can take this free assessment to figure out to learn what your personality type is and again that is not the only tool you can use you. Can use myers briggs. You can use the disk assessment. There are so many tools you can use to figure out your personality because in the military unless you are you had a way different experience than i did. They really ask you. What your what your passion was or even more specifically. They didn't ask what your personality was. Just said hey here the jobs you can pick from pick a job do your job and then you go your military career and you get out and now you're here listening to this show and saying man. How do identify my passion in life. What is it that i am passionate about. How do i find that. Well you'll hear me say this more than once. Pick up a copy of the resolve book. That is really your first step to figuring out your passion and your purpose and your meaning in your life after the military but again light for just goes over. What is your personality type. It walks you through that process of discovering who you are and who you're meant to be and line five asks another question it says what do i have to offer. And that's very specific to you. What do you have to offer the world. Because i believe that. A life focused on making a difference in the world as a life worth living. I think that's really what we're all after is that we want to make a difference. Maybe it's just in our own personal lives. Maybe it's in the lives of our friends or family or our church or our school whatever it may be or or if your teacher may be your students you want to make that positive impact and so line five walks you through that process of figuring out what it is that you have to offer so coming up after the break. That's what i'm going to talk about. I'm gonna share some examples and walk you through blind five and sharing this for free and you can pick up a copy of the book on amazon or on kerr's to fight again dot com but i'm gonna share the the line five here with you and some examples that can help you figure out what it is you are passionate about in your life. That's after the break. Stay with us. Many americans today. Don't realize the stress and anxiety they feel is most likely because of their finances according to bankrate.com more than six out of ten people couldn't cover a one thousand dollar emergency seven out of ten. Don't budget regularly. An eight out of ten are living paycheck to paycheck to these describe you. Are you ready to live like others. Can't too many make the mistake of budgeting their lifestyle instead of budgeting their basic needs. I my friend. Marco over at mc business lab has a simple process to automate the basic things. You need to live and then never looking at one of those bills again. Head over to live like others can't dot com to get on the wait list for his own line course to learn this automation skill. That will significantly reduce your stress and anxiety. And if you think one on one attention could be the way for you. You can also schedule your free consultation with marco once again that's live like others can't dot com get on the path to your dream life today all right so as we go into these examples. I want you to have an open. Mind here right some of these examples. You may not even thought of. But i i want you to keep in mind that some of these may not apply to you. Some of the may apply to you perfectly but before we get into those examples and went to review. Read you this quote from a retired general martin. Dempsey actually had him on the show. A few seasons ago A great conversation. You can go check that out. He talks about you know continuing to provide leadership in your post military life again. If you don't know years he is the former or the lissi would number was of eighteenth chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and so again great guy. We had a great conversation. Should go check that out. But i want to read you a quote. He said sometimes we wait for thunderclaps drum rolls and clearly on calls to alert us to what's important when actually it's most often the subtle and persistent signals around us. That make the most difference. I want you to think about that for a minute when you think about your passion and life and what. You are naturally geared toward what are those subtle and persistent signals. So in in the book. I talk about the subtle and persistent signal. I got even as a child as a teenager. Really that writing is something i am. Naturally gifted at is something. I'm naturally good at in fact My mother found a poem that i had written She was cleaning. My room was teenagers. Don't ask me why she was cleaning my room and she didn't make me do it but i'm very grateful for her but she was cleaning my room and she comes into the room and she sees this poem that i wrote and when i get home from school she asked me about it. She says hair. Where did you copy this phone for. Almost didn't copy it. I wrote it. And i'm all of a sudden proud of myself because see my mother had always been this voracious reader with a strong command of the english language so hearing her say something like that. Which implied the poem was of this incredibly high quality right. It has stuck with me to this day. That aaron you you're naturally gifted at that and that the poetry. It wasn't anything i had to do. It was something i had in my head and maybe even my heart and just wrote it down. It was something. I felt naturally wrong to do. Just like my son was naturally drawn to develop this modification for this game and figure out all the additional software he needed and how to modify it and how to play the game afterward. I was actually drawn to writing so in that case even though my son and i we get along great and we have great father son relationship were way different as far as our passions. Go and that's okay. It's the thing is my. My writing skills are they. Were constantly improving through my life and the funny thing is even as i wrote the book wonder like am i the most qualified person to to write this book. Maybe maybe i am gifted at writing right. Maybe i am good at this. But am i the most qualified person and so why do i tell you this right. I tell you this. Because i want you to realize something that i'm still learning myself. The skills you have are probably around eighty percents better than you actually think. I want to say that again. The skills that you have are probably around eighty percent better than you actually think. Now what are get the eighty percent number. You know statistically they say what is seventy. Six percent of statistics are made up on the spot. I will say this. Evidence is more inaccessible and nature. But the things you are passionate about. You are geared toward learning more about it it just this natural thing. It's not something that you can really force. Can you learn things and learn more about Passions in your life. of course. you can't can you learn how to take care of the zales in your garden or in your new hangar. The year rose garden right. Is rose garden on. That makes sense but i looked at my window and saw zulia so i i mentioned it so it. Can you learn about that. Scher will you be passionate about it. Maybe you can develop a passion for it but passionate in your life is is this area of your life. That's built in. Its this natural part view. And so where do you go from here right. What are those examples that promised you a before we get into those examples. I want to share with you just a few questions that you can write down to ask yourself and you can kind of fill these out like to help you figure out where you go from here and figure out what it is you have to offer the world so the first question goes right along the lines of my story. I just told about not only about my son but about myself. I have always been good at blank. Fill in the blank there. What is it that you have always been good at something. That seems easy for you for me. It was english and grammar and for my son. Tech is easy for him. Technologies easy for him super easy a he is are basically our systems administrator at the house. he knows so much about For my daughter the things she is naturally good at and she finds easy music. She finds that incredibly easy from wife. She finds the medical field incredibly easy to pick up on. And it's not because it's not challenging to learn it's because we have a passion for those particular things in our lives. Here's a second question you can ask yourself. I don't know why. But i really just enjoy doing the following things and then list those things what things that you do really bring you joy for me. It's writing it's crafting something from nothing. It's looking at this blank page and putting words on it and impacting the world with a those words. And let's see what's the next one number three this. This is kind of long ones. All probably read it a couple of times. I never thought about what. I'm naturally good at and what i enjoy until what so for this question. Think of a time your life in which our knowledge or skills or ability was needed. Think of a time when you were able to use it and you suddenly realized that brought you joy so i to read that one again and explain that a little more. I never thought about what. I'm naturally good at and what i enjoy until this particular event in my life. I never thought about me being really good at writing until my mother when i was fourteen. Fifteen years old picked up that poland in my room and said hey this is really good. Where did you copy this from. I never thought about that. My son may not have ever thought about how good he is attack. Until i pointed it out and said dude that is amazing that you figure that out on your own you contact the experts in and you did everything needs to do on your own and so when you think we think of that like okay. I never thought about what i'm naturally good at. And what i enjoy until a particular event in your life and you think about when your knowledge or your skills or abilities were needed and and then you say okay. I was able to use it at that point in my life and then you suddenly realize man that made me feel really good. That brought me joy. That was dare. I say it fun and a lot of times. We as adults we. We tend to tend to think like well. You know i'm an adult. I don't need to have funding more. I shouldn't be having fun anymore. I'm more focused on business and and making money taking care of my family. Those are all great things but at the end of the day passion following that passion pursuing that passion your life a lot of times what it feels like is fun just a lot of fun number four thing. You can ask yourself. I was able to make a difference in a person's life by using one or more of my unique abilities which not only made a difference but it brought me joy as well and the question is list those skills or abilities that you use to impact someone's life or to make a difference in the world for me. They'll be writing for my son that might be tech my daughter that might be music for my wife that might be the medical field. So there's so many things that again virtually unlimited number of things where you can find passion in your life and it's those things that you are naturally geared toward they. Here's a few examples. I'm going to review these for you just to give you a sense of where you can find passion in your life and don't get caught up on the stories themselves. I want you to imagine yourself. What is it that you personally find your passionate about. Here's example number one. I was a cormon in the navy. And i learned a lot about helping others in times of medical crisis. I found so much joy. In this. I knew my job well and i knew i was making a difference. Pretty simple right pretty direct and so this person says hey. I knew what i was doing was making a difference. And i found joy in it. Here's another really good one along the video games. A video games idea. I love playing video games call of duty fortnight minecraft you name it. I get a sense of joy out of playing them and truth be told. I'm pretty good at it. My unique personality which i found in line for which i now understand. It equips me well as a teacher and so a combined those elements to start a video game players club in my community. We get together. We eat snacks. Play video games. Hold tournaments and get to know each other better. It's such a great time. And i love it. So being a woman in the navy versus playing video games way different right but still these people can find passion in these things see. Here's a here's another one very a very hands on example. I've never really enjoyed school or sitting in the classroom. But one thing i do enjoy working with my hands getting my hands dirty now that i know my unique personality type again that he learned in line for i understand more about wild like this type of work and why i tend to dislike sitting in the classroom. I love solving problems. I distinctly remember one time when my elderly neighbors toilet was leaking. She asked me. If i knew someone who could help and gladly volunteered myself. I checked out the situation figured out what. The problem was unseated. The toilet installed a new wax ring and reseeded the toilet. She was so grateful. And i had fixed a problem for her. I felt really good about myself. That's huge The the the What do you call it. The joy the inner joy that comes from making a positive difference in someone else's life is absolutely huge. Now here's here's the last example share with you because we're running up on time but this one. I really liked this one. Because i have a dog. I love my dog and a lot of you probably have pets as well but this one says. I am a pet whisper. Yes it may sound silly to some. But i have an incredible heart for dogs cats birds and just about any other animal who is suffering or quote unquote down on their luck. In fact i have adopted two dogs and two cats. I've them better lives. This has been so rewarding to me and it is a passion. I continue to pursue. See the thing is there is not one specific passion that we are all going to find fulfilling the passion in your life is going to be your own. Here's the last thing. I want to share with you how we are built as humans. We're designed to live our best life in the context of relationships with other people. I to say that again as humans. We're are designed to live our best lives in the context of relationships with other people. You know chances are we're not all going to be billionaires or a world famous politicians. Are you know billboard topping musicians but we can all make a difference when we find that passion in our lives. We all have a lot of questions but the most important question you can ask yourself is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith in jesus christ. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Hope it's been helpful for you and that you've learned at least a little bit about identifying that passion in your life again you can pick up a copy of the resolve book at courage to fight again dot com or on amazon and i will share those links in the show notes as i typically do. Leave us a review. I tunes at definitely helps so much. Of course follow social media kurds. Finding in dot com is our website. Thank you so much for listening. We will see you next time.

Aaron Perkins Christopher Aaron Us Army Myers Briggs Zulia Bankrate.Com Joint Chiefs Of Staff Kerr Dempsey Marco Scher Amazon Martin Tech
S6 E8 - Life: TBD

Courage to Fight Again

22:08 min | 2 months ago

S6 E8 - Life: TBD

"This is the we served now. What podcast and if you're anything like me you've had a ton of questions. After leaving the military in the lack of answers has left you frustrated in probably more than a little confused. This show is here to help you make sense of what can sometimes be craziness that is your life after the military. See you can turn your post military life into your best life. Now when i was working on this show. I thought you know. I don't even know what this next. Show season six episode. Eight is going to be about so in the show. Topic is making my notes. I just put to be determined. Dvd to be determined. And i thought you know what that is a perfect title or or maybe more appropriately. I think it's a good topic especially right now as it feels like we are nearing the end of this year. Long over a year now global pandemic that is covid nineteen and the truth is it's it feels like our lives have been in a to be determined status for that entire time right so you can't go anywhere you can't really get out of the house much. Could there's not a lot to do now if you like the outdoors. Maybe this was the perfect time for you to do that. but you wanna go shopping. You want to go out to dinner somewhere. We'll sorry you can't because everything is closed so our lives of felt like we're in a to be determined status but you know pandemic aside. Maybe you're wondering some more practical things you know. Maybe you're wondering if you ever be happy or if you ever get married or if you'll ever have kids or maybe you're wondering if the tonight is in your ears. Whatever shut up. I know i wonder sometimes. Or if you're ptsd symptoms will ever subside. I'm willing to bet that you felt an and maybe you're feeling right now that your life is on hold it. It's all in this kind of this murky to be determined status so my question to you is this. How will you know when your life is no longer on. Hold in this episode. I'm gonna share six elements of forward progress with you and buckle up. Because they're not easy. But i can assure you they are worth it. So by way of introduction mining aaron perkins. I'm a us army combat veteran also hosted. This podcast. I've been focusing on the veteran community. You basically ever. Since i got out you know i should be more honest with that right for a very long time after i got out on myself and focused on figuring out what my next steps were what my forward progress looked like once. I finally kind of got a handle on what my own life was looking like or what. It should look like what i wanted it to look like. I thought you know what. I can't keep this to myself. This is not something that i can say. Okay well i figured it out. All my other veteran brothers and sisters can just figure it out for themselves. So i wrote a book called resolve. That is a step by step guide. That takes you through the process of rediscovering purpose after the military but that aside today i want to talk about something really specific and and and a lot of the elements of the book. Come into to today's show. But i want to talk about those six elements afford progress with you. So look no matter where you're at you can live your best life. No matter what phase your life is in your best days are ahead of you and that and that's a key element and it leads right into this first piece. I want to talk about. Get your mind right. And i know you've heard so much about it. No doubt about mindset and how important your mindset is and how much it matters this. Honestly the most important aspect. Because if you don't get your mind right you are setting yourself up for failure if you are going into any challenge. Excuse me any challenge in your life. And you haven't i said okay. Let me you visualize what i'm going to do. Maybe let me rehearse it so to speak. Let me planet out now. Let me go tackle it. If you don't do those things then you are really like. I said setting yourself up to fail but more important than all those all. Those things i just mentioned is what comes before that and that is believing that you're going to be successful. So here's the thing when it comes to mind set right. It is not just a one time event. It's not just this decision. You make to say okay. Well i'm going to be Positive in this particular in this particular regard or I am going to say okay. I'm gonna change my mindset for this one time only. I know i normally have a negative outlook and i think that nothing is going to go my way and i it seems like life is crashing in on me but this one time. I'm going to believe it's going to get better. It's going to be better. Look your mindset. it's a regular event. It's not just a one time event. Maybe it's daily. It might be several times a day. Mindset is absolutely huge and a big part of the mindset is asking the why behind your desire to move forward or more specifically than. This is where i told you some elements of the book will come in. Maybe even the why try and so in the resolve book So i put together for the book. What is called the nine line framework. It is a guide a plan for you. The veteran to step through one step at a time for rediscovering your purpose after the military and line one in this nine line framework is why. Try you know we've already had purpose. We've already done so many things for our country and for allies for families. Why try and that. And that's one of the questions you have to answer in the book. I share more about how to get to that point right but element too so i wanna get your mind right get that mindset all clicking in the right direction element to is discover your purpose and you've heard me talk about a few times you've heard me say that discovery purpose rediscover your purpose even on this show on this episode and again talk a lot about this in the book and i wrote it with the belief that you do not have to suffer through life after the military. I'm going to say that again. You do not have to just suffer through life after the military because there is life after your military service you know. Maybe it's a whole new career or a whole new hobby or new opportunities. You simply couldn't take advantage of you. Were in the military purpose. Looks different for all of us. When i'm friends he was a medic In my unit that we deployed with and he is. He's big into fishing like that's his thing now. I'm not talking like you know. He just goes allen out on the lake every now and then this guy is a competitive fishermen really really great at his skill set and he has found a renewed sense of purpose just in fishing. And you know what is he doing. They're right what is he who what does he really getting at when you look at it like well okay. Cool like he's into fishing. But what does that mean as far as you know his life moving forward or discovering his purpose. Look here's what. Here's what i can guarantee you. In his life in his his new fishing fishing centric life right. He's got a family and everything that he's taking care of but this this is one of the best things for him because he has a passion for it and in that passion he gets to live out what he is really loving about his life and so in his day to day life where he gets to talk about fishing and and go fishing and all this. He's building these relationships with people around him and he's doing so much that it is. It's so cool to see when a veteran really really discover is in uncovers who they're meant to be after the military and again purpose different for all of us. So where i find my purpose are where my old dock mimetic buddy found purpose and fishing. Yours is probably going to be the same and don't expect it to. You shouldn't expect it to look the same as anyone else's that's why again that i created the framework that you can use to discover your own sense of purpose and the next element that leads me right into this. One is forgive. Look forgiveness is one of the least talked about aspects of transitioning from the military and it is arguably the hardest i say arguably because some people never even come close to really dialing into what it is. They need to forgive. They need to forgive themselves. Do they need to forgive. You know an old battle buddy Unit commander you know those who've been victims of trauma or If they have. Ptsd from their from their combat service. You know what are the elements of their lives that they need to forgive and again you know i feel like i'm talking about the book a lot and i'll be honest i am because there's so much more in the book and this is line three it walks you right through the process of forgiveness and forgiveness is not saying you know what it doesn't hurt it's not saying it wasn't a big deal. Forgiveness is choosing your own freedom. And i think i said this on the last episode of but holding onto unforgiveness or or bitterness even is like setting yourself on fire and expecting the person you were bitter at or angry at or holding a grudge against expecting them to die from smoke inhalation so all forgiveness is as tough as it may be all it is all it breaks down to is that you are choosing your own freedom so get your mind right. Discover your purpose and forgive what you need to forgive. Forgive who you need to forgive. Maybe that's you. Maybe that's someone else helmet four. Uncover you in other words. Understand how you tick. What types of choices do you make in specific situations and one of the best tools for this is a personality assessment and yes. That's part of the book as well. That's part of the nine line. Framework is discovering your personality. Because let's be honest in the military you know. Personality is fine when you're hanging out with your friends or your battle buddies or whatever you want to call them right but when it comes to getting the mission done your personality kind of takes a backseat. It seems to knocking out the mission to getting to mission success getting to mission completion and so a big part of your post military life like who am i to figuring out what it is that you are not only passionate about. But what are you naturally geared toward and in the book. I use a tool called sixteen personalities. And you can check out at sixteen personalities dot com that's one six personalities dot com. There's also a myers briggs assessment. There's the disk assessment. Which kind of is how you function in a work environment and so uncovering who you are and the key elements of your personality are really critical to your moving forward in life that brings me to the fifth element. Make a plan. The fifth element of moving forward in your life is to make a plan. Don't just imagine a plan get one now. Look i want to say something about plans here. Right it's a whole lot easier to turn to the left or to the right if you're already moving. Have you ever set in a vehicle. You're sitting in the driver's seat and you turn the wheel all the way to the left. It's kinda hard to do or maybe you need to turn it all the way to the right. It's kind of hard to do because the tires just kind of moving on the on the on the surface there and you're like this is. This is really really difficult. But if you're moving you can turn the wheel just slightly to the left or to the right in. It's a whole lot easier. So when i talk about making a plan you don't have to have every single thing figured out before you start moving. Make general plan now. Look there are a lot of great plans out there. The resolve book has just one of those. Which i've mentioned is the nine line framework. Now let me be honest with you here. Scrawling down your plan on the back of a cocktail. Napkin is about one hundred miles ahead of someone who never writes down their plan at all. There is a fundamental shift in our brains in imagining a plan and then writing out that plan so make a plan element six get accountability. Accountability is like magic. If there is some magic element to rediscovering your purpose and to moving forward in your life. Accountability is really kind of that magic. And you really get to kind of see behind the curtain so to speak and it's kind of the inner workings of how that m- all that magic happens and accountability can compel you to do things. You would not ordinarily do so take for example of a group of friends right so every saturday you go for run with those friends and you know you have to get up at five thirty. Am and it's saturday and you really have to work today. But you're getting up at five five thirty because you're going to go for a run with these friends and it's not just about the run. It's about the fact that if you don't show up there to give you a hard time about dude where were you like. Why were you not here. This is this is ridiculous right. And they're gonna they're gonna mess with you about it and and if you're a guy that they're gonna call out your man card and be like. Hey you know like we showed up. Why didn't you and so the there's this element of like men getting up at five. Am to go run now. If you're like a big into running and you do it anyway. Maybe this story doesn't resonate with you but for most of us. It probably does so. We're supposed to be showing up to this run right and we're like okay. Well here we go. Let's go tackle this thing but Man tired. I don't know if i want to do at this morning at saturday. I've gotten up early every single day this week. I have a hard all man. I just remembered these guys are going to be there. And i had better show up. Or they're going to give me a hard time and the thing is sometimes. It's fun accountability. It's it's light hearted but sometimes it's someone pointing their finger at you and saying. Hey why aren't you doing what you need to do or challenging you to say. Hey here's the next step for you. Here is what you need to be doing in your life. Go do it so element. Six is get account ability. So let me quickly go over these one more time number one. Get your mind right. Your mindset is critical and big critical part of that is asking the uae. Or the why tri- why should i even bother element to discover your purpose. How do you do that. Well one way you can do. That is pick up a copy of the resolve book. I go through that whole process. There and that process is called the nine line framework part of that nine line. Framework is forgiveness. One of the least talked about aspects of transitioning from the military. But i think one of the most critical element for uncover. You check out a personality assessment. Again you can look in the show. Notes shared a couple of links in there and you can use sixteen personalities. Dot com myers briggs disc assessment of variety. Once you can use but uncover how you naturally tick element five. Make a plan. don't just imagine it. Don't just think it write it down if you write it on the back of a cocktail napkin. That's fine at least write it down and remember. You don't have to have everything figured out before you actually start moving. It's a whole lot easier to make adjustments if you're already moving file element here elements six. Get accountability and accountability. Is that magic simultaneously that magic and it is the secret behind everything else that happens in your life. Can you do things without accountability. Sure is it a whole lot harder absolutely because again accountability. Is this thing in our minds. Says hey someone else's relying on you to do this to be that saturday morning. Run to show up at work to be at that volunteer opportunity. You promised you would be at an an again accountability. I cannot stress enough. i wish i could. I guess technically i could shout and scream and throw things and you know you know bangel desk and things like that but really accountability is so huge and it takes a certain level of maturity. It takes a certain level of maturity for to do that. Now look we all have a lot of questions but the most important question you can ask yourself is this have. I accepted the forgiveness of sins. That only comes through faith. In jesus christ while i hope these elements have helped you. I hope they hope you think about not only whether you should move forward in life but what your next steps. Are you're practical next steps. Four moving forward in life. And i'm going to ask you specifically right now to go. Pick up a copy of resolve at courage to fight again dot com. Maybe you're not ready to pick up a copy of the book and if not just go follow us on social media where facebook courage to fight again. instagram same thing Twitter at courage again a. We're the most active on facebook. Though post a lot of things there you can join our post nine. Eleven of veterans families facebook group on. That's also great way to get connected. But one other thing i would love free to do is leave us a review on itunes because it helps so much. Thank you so much for tuning into this episode. Be sure to check out our others episodes as well. I mean this is season six. So if you're just joining us secret a lot of content you can catch up on. Thank you again so much for tuning in today. I'll see you right back here. In two weeks we served now. What is the production of courage to fight again.

Aaron Perkins Us Army Myers Briggs Allen Trauma UAE Facebook Instagram Twitter
How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

All The Responsibility Podcast

02:20 min | 4 months ago

How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

"Even if you're a new product manager the chances are great that you have something amazing going on to be hired as a product manager in the first place that means. You're some kind of unicorn your interesting and accomplished with lots of skills and a resume that has compelling experiences an impressive educational background most likely and diverse interests and skills. But i'm going to talk about something different. We're all unicorns as product managers unusual and rare compared with other roles in the company even in life. But we're all still different from one another obviously so. What color is your unicorn. And what i'm talking about is what are your particular talents. Aptitudes and strengths that differentiate from other people even other product managers now. We often use the concepts of strength. Talents aptitudes special sauce superpower to mean roughly the same thing and that is the way that you see the world were act within it. Think and so on that are kind of unique and unusual to you and special and often. These comes so easily to you that it's hard to believe there's anything special about them. I always think about people who can draw and people can draw and think that it's pretty easy to teach other people to draw because they just show them how they learn to draw but the fact is. If you're somebody like me. Who really has challenges. Withdrawing doesn't matter how easy it was for someone else to learn it. They can't teach me how to draw. I just can't learn. This is something that i know about myself. I've tried multiple times. The fact is that usually you're aren't actually the best judge of your special talents. Because they seem so normal so obvious to you like the drawing talent for somebody who can draw now. Often were very aware of our weaknesses. Like i'm very aware by weakness as being able to draw very well. When i say strengths in this context though i'm actually using that as a technical term meaning the clifton strengths finder assessment. It seems to be a meaningful assessment of a person's strengths. It's definitely more meaningful than something. Like the myers briggs type indicator for example. And so. i'm going to talk in this episode about how to find out what your strengths are in this context of the clifton strengths and then how to make use of your knowledge of your strengths. Which you probably don't have if you haven't done this assessment yet to figure out how to make a name for yourself.

Myers Briggs
The 6 Types of Working Genius with Patrick Lencioni

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:35 min | 7 months ago

The 6 Types of Working Genius with Patrick Lencioni

"With have different talents than you. Sometimes that can be frustrating. But it's actually a good thing because we all have different strengths and different weaknesses. we have different personality styles. You guys know this. It takes a village but what we do to try to figure out the space and understand our people better. If you're like me you start taking. These assessments disc myers briggs in your graham. All good things. But here's what a lot of those things. Don't tell us. Can this person actually do their job from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we help business. Leaders grow themselves teams and the prophets. i'm your host tardy and my guest. today is paddling. Joni pats the founder and president of the table group where he spends his time speaking and writing about leadership teamwork organizational health. But here's the thing is. He's not just another consultant. We have worked with him. At ramsey solutions and andre leadership for years. We've given every one of his books to oliver team members and would give him out at our entreleadership events because his stuff is so legit. When it comes to team culture values you've got to be reading pellet joni now this is exciting. He and his team have developed a model that helps leaders identify their teams areas of working genius areas of life draining weaknesses. That if they're doing those activities too long they're going to burn out and quit. You don't want that so this is going to be a lot of fun but before we get into the model we have to first start with understanding the foundation of a great team. Well it all starts with trust which is humility based and vulnerability based if people can't come to sit down with their team and say i don't know the answer i need help. I'm sorry i was a jerk yesterday. Or i don't know what to do here somebody else or you. You're smarter than i am at this. I wanna be like you if people can't come work and be emotionally buck naked if you will it then you're done because if people can't come and be raw open honest they're not going to be able to engage in conflict because they're not going to be telling the truth and they're gonna feel like that's too risky. They're not gonna commit to decisions because they never really weighed in. They're not gonna hold each other accountable and say hey. You're my friend but you gotta do better than that on this one which is a great thing on a team. But if you can't be vulnerable you're not going to do that and they're not gonna actually do. What's in the best interest of the team. They're going to look at themselves. So that's the basic way that teams function from trust to results. But in order to do that you really need to be humble hungry. Smart person which is i. I don't think too much myself. I think others are more important than i am. Honor them. I work really hard. I'm hungry and inter personally smart. I know how to deal with human beings and if you can find humble hungry and smart people and put them in an environment where they build trust have good conflict hold each other accountable and do all those things. It's going to work. It's not complicated. I know i just went through that very quick. And i talked about eight different things but it's very simple. Are there blockers to trust aside from not having those people who are hungry humble smart well i would say there's blockers if the league doesn't have that and it's counter cultural by the way i should say that to people don't grow up thinking about being vulnerable they teach you to grow up and you know reveal just the parts of yourself that you think people like and this is. This is a problem. So that's why human beings have a hard time being vulnerable is because we think we're supposed to come into the world and protect ourselves but that's not what makes a team great so i think that if you have people that are humble hungry and smart and the leader gets that and nurtures that i. I don't know that there's other blockers. I'm trying to think what might that be. I mean there's environmental factors. Maybe working a company. That doesn't mike that doesn't reward that but if if the person at the top thinks it's important and crates environment from the top and i will tell you daniel that you know one of the reasons that i work with ceos and their teams because it needs to be modeled from the very top and it's not that they're more fun to party with like. Oh i want to be important. I just think if you can get the people at the very top organization to do that. You have a fighting chance in the rest of it. And when i go into an organization and i start at the at the bottom someplace. They're constantly looking up and going. Do you think they're ever going to get this so it just makes more sense to come. Which is why love talking entrepreneurs could is like you can turn your. You can turn your company into a trustworthy us. Good team quickly if you make that so with you and your leader well it sounds like what you're saying in some ways similar to our friend john maxwell he's has everything rises and falls on leadership absolutely. And if you're not working with the leader you're not working with the highest leveraged point of culture. Yeah that's their job. Yes and when they don't realize that when they think their job is just figuring out the technical parts of the of the operations then it's really difficult. So yeah john. And i would be incomplete alignment around that and that's why the leader is so important but that leader can't believe that they're inherently more important than the people lead their actions and behaviors are just more important. Yeah i think the is that they're more important but not more significant. Yeah you know. It's it's the it's the it's the challenge of humility article years ago called the trouble with humility and that is that as a leader. I have to believe i am just like anybody else here. I'm just a child of god a person. That's i'm no. I don't have more significance as you say. And so i have to believe that. But my words and actions are going to have a disproportionate impact on everything else around here. The problem is when people realize that their words and actions are disproportionately important. Sometimes they start to personalize it and say man. I'm pretty important here similarly people that say. Hey i'm not that important. So they forget

Ramsey Solutions Joni Andre Graham Oliver John Maxwell Daniel Mike John
The Truth to Shining Brightly & Letting the World See You by Shirley of Daring Living

Optimal Living Daily

05:28 min | 7 months ago

The Truth to Shining Brightly & Letting the World See You by Shirley of Daring Living

"The truth to shining brightly and letting the world see you by shirley of daring living dot com. Today i wanna share one truth shining brightly and presenting yourself in this world how it all started and some background into my past. Last weekend i attended a series of events held by mpg. Tgi where house honor to connect with a group of exchange university students from taiwan is a program that was involved in during my graduate years so group that holds very dear to my heart was again at the event. I saw my old self. Who as if. I was back there in the organizing team with them just a few years ago struggling and carrying along with me the overwhelming burden of school. The pressure of meeting up to appearance appearances. Society's expectations the constant struggle to finding my passions and most importantly the desperation to reaching that never ending benchmark of set forward for myself. I was never good enough this time. However i was the bystander with much more communist and openness than before i felt the exchange tunes hopes dreams aspirations for the future also saw their personal struggles of finding themselves searching for a place to belong in this world this experience stirred up a gentle reminder. I think we all deserve to hear about presenting ourselves to this world while also staying true to who we are. You do not have to be in the spotlight to shine in this society and organizations today that a certain type of people that everyone looks up to in order to be successful even during my years in business school in every class we were encouraged. Step onto the stage and take the spotlight own. The room with confidence communicate inspire people with our ideas see. We were taught to be leaders. Not just any type of leader. The extroverted charismatic leaders that were highly valued. Sometimes the idea you need to communicate is so important they have to take the stage to express them to the right people but being the center of the attention is not where everyone thrives for me. It is not where i thrive is not where i can be myself. You do not have to be in the spotlight to shine. If you not feel comfortable leading group or being in the center of attention it is okay was important is you must understand yourself and find the best method and environment that suits you where you can effectively and truthfully express yourself and what you have to offer. I used a model these attention loving sociable charismatic extroverts and thought i had to be them in order to be successful in life but the truth is everyone of our personalities is so different. According to the myers briggs personality test we generally group are personality traits in this world into sixteen different types out of these sixteen half of them are extroverts. Matt of the eight only two of them are considered to have the natural charismatic trait mehan. Tj and ian fj. So what does that mean for. Those of us who do not belong as an emt j. or espn fj. While it means that you simply cannot pretend to be someone you are not and he should not have to be even if you are one of the two leadership type personalities. How much do you understand yourself. Be aware of your strengths weaknesses. Any environment that you are most comfortable in but of course these personality tests are just a start because they are just categories and still don't fully define you dive into your past experiences if think about what you enjoy doing try different hobbies follow your curiosities engage and take part in different groups and communities find out the best way for you to express yourself to the world. Perhaps it is through art through inventions through the internet to writing or through verbal communication. What kind of environment. You thrive in his through one on one conversations or in small groups or in a big stadium with hundreds of people to work better by yourself or a team. We are all different. Don't ever compare yourself in your situation with someone else's focus on yourself work on yourself. That's the only way for you to grow what the world needs while we really need are all types of people portraying different strengths in this world. Q. imagine what it would be like if the world is filled only with allowed charismatic extroverts and actually be pretty scary place to be and nothing would ever get done. We do need charismatic. People in this world to inspiring gather people together a will. We need also are quieter introverted. People and leaders who prefer to stay behind the scenes and are not afraid to let others take the spotlight. Moee need our brave people who choose to believe and follow crazy leaders with visions. What we need are committed people who follow through with what they say and can put words into actions when we need are open minded people who can really lean in and listen first before speaking while we need are kind people who have compassion and can show empathy in this cruel world. What we really need are people who have strong self awareness who are honest and truthful to themselves so that men return they can be their best selves to better serve this world quote. Ask yourself when makes you come alive and go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive

Shirley Taiwan Myers Briggs Espn Matt Moee
July 2020 Book News

Books and Boba

05:56 min | 1 year ago

July 2020 Book News

"Back to books and Boba Club in pocket, which impose Asian and Asian American Authors Marinas Marina. And I'm re-re. You and we are here today our mid month episode toward the month of. July July. Twenty twenty. How're you doing? Good I can't believe that we're ready like halfway into July. Honestly if each like just started no right. Also, I realized that because Marvin and I used to record in studio. I used to see Marvin by twice a month in person, but we haven't. We haven't seen each other in like. Ever since March I don't think we've seen each other. It's been. It's been a while I think the last time we saw each other was when we were recording. What was our? Was? Our February book even. Was! It not south no map assault stars. was after I. Think it was May. who was such a long time, we? Can just look it up right now. I'm looking at right now. Because the Internet exists, I don't WanNa be one of those people who don't know how Gorka. Let's see now that there's like this website where you put in a Google Inc and then you send you send it to someone who asks you a question right like they could totally yes. Let let me Google there for you. Yeah, yeah, I back. When I was in Grad School, I was send to. My classmates would ask me dumb questions. They can just google themselves. sat quite a lot. In College as well our February Book Club pick was the kiss quotient. God so the one recorded with your friend Kaitlyn. That was our last the last time we saw each other. That's wow. Yeah. I feel like These past few months has reinforced idea that. I'm. Pretty Okay with staying at home all the time, which is something I didn't really know about myself or didn't remember about myself. What's your? What's your Myer Briggs by the way? I know it's I. I know it's complete bullshit, but. It does give me a good handle on whether someone is a really extroverted or introverted, and so my with the Myers Briggs is like so if I take the test I usually test at an NF, which is like the Uber. But because of the people I work with I'm often forced to take the set characteristics. So people are often surprised that I am at NFP because I was surprised, too. Because you know like your co host used to be Mindy. The. She does now she now does first of all which is. which is one of the PODCASTS Einar podcast collective and Like she's she's definitely like more extroverted. She's an actress, so yeah I was pretty surprised once I started co hosting with you. I thought it was just going to be to interest talking about books. That totally was not the case. The thing with like introvert extrovert is it's not really. Outgoing. This isn't the it's a trait of extroverts, but it's not. It's more of a symptom than like a core thing, right extroverts just means I. IF I'm out with people are like I can stay up all night. socializing gives me energy instead of expending energy I. Mean I think that's the core difference so? but but what I found is I do gain energy from socializing even online with people so I don't need face to face to be energized and the complete opposite for for. I mean like my Myers Briggs is on twitter, so a lot of people probably know already, but I am I've tested as I N T J. and. socializing is definitely not my strong point. Every time I do go out to Asian American like shindigs. People are always surprised that I'm there. 'cause tonight, because I, really I. Really don't go out. I'm pretty much a unicorn if you see me out in about. So I definitely adapted to the whole self isolation thing. Better than others I mean it helps. There's a lot of media to enjoy at home so I've been seeing a lot Final fantasy like the past. The past three weeks. Grace I recently I talked about this on some of the other pockets that I'm on I binged content this past week, so I washed the old guard, and that I watched all three seasons of dark, I watched the first season of umbrella academy I watched both current seasons of food wars, the the horny food anime, and then I went online and read the rest of the Manga series, so it's been Dan Marvin. I have unhealthy binge habits, which is why I try not to binge as much as possible because. Once I start something I will finish it. It's like it's not even it's not even a of a question. And then I'll spend the next ten hours reading pieces and analysis, so which is why like when you were watching killing eve as it was airing. It definitely curbed that addiction. I know but I've phone behind killing eve so now I have a whole season to binge later, so it's so good Marin about that So good. Yeah, I mean. It's the same with books to write I typically read books in like s few sittings as possible because. A because I have zero self-control, and if you give me the chance to just stay up all night and read something and free or something. I will take that chance

Dan Marvin Kaitlyn Google Inc Twenty Twenty Mindy Myers Briggs Myer Briggs Boba Club Authors Marinas Marina Grad School Assault Gorka Marin Twitter
"myers briggs" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

4 Things with Amy Brown

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

"Helpless and confused on everything that was happening in the world's end it was. Was Way for me to safely still help rescue I don't interact with humans. I just go pick up the dog and either take them to the vet or take them to their new foster home or pick them up from the shelter, just kind of all over the place, but it's been really fine, and then share their stories on Instagram, and all of them have been adopted so far so it's been really great. I love that, which if y'all WanNa see Avi Instagram? She's at Abbey smyers. Yes, that's me Myers with S. Myers s Abbas. All the organizations are involved in, but. Work with proverbs a lot. Yes, we work with proverbs, twelve ten lot, and all of our four dogs are from there and then last year. I got to meet this really special person named Kathryn and she moved here from La and my friend Devin who I was talking about earlier. She introduced US seven was for realtor. She worked for a really big rescue and still does Watson walks in Los Angeles and she moved here for her fiancee's career, and why Katherine start a wogs, Nashville, and she has just been doing the most incredible work, and so I- transfer why and transport for proverbs and we fundraise and do whatever we can to help. I'm super happy for all of Catherine's work in the city has been unbelievably amazing during covid nineteen, and also during operate after the tornado because the shelter was shut down. For a really long time when the city was shut down for both things, she took in way more dogs than she probably could or had the means to, and she just helped, and she has just been really amazing for national, so we're really happy to have another awesome rescue here. She she's doing great. Rain say her again. It's wags and walk. Oh, she as wags in walks. Nashville.

S. Myers s Abbas Catherine Katherine US Abbey smyers Nashville Kathryn Los Angeles Devin Watson
"myers briggs" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

4 Things with Amy Brown

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

"Yeah, now, just ignore it, but there's moments where now we have that. We might have to step up our game in the hey, you know, what can we? Can we talk more about what you just said? Because I'm curious where that came from, because they may not even realize what they have just said, and how hurtful that might be to somebody else I know. I get super overwhelmed like I was saying earlier when I see a change that needs to happen, and I want to meet Li like all. All wanted to change your whole life so fast in light. Try to fix this thing that I, feel like is a huge problem, and I think with this like you're saying it is such a big problem than I interviewed. This amazing woman was low-key and she makes ice cream and she does it like with black history. She brings black history into her ice cream in like she made a Dune team the ice cream all about it, and she gives history lessons on ice cream, so it's like she's like okay up two lines to give you history on lack history. Why are getting ice cream? And so? She doesn't really pull thing. It's called saturated ice cream row. Check out, we'll we. Where where do we get saturated ice cream? Already on order, it is on instagram saturated ice cream. She has like places in Nashville, so follow her saturate ice cream on instrument, but check out the Pike Stu, but what she said is, people can get almost fatigued. You can have something hits you so heavy, and you want to change so fast and like you're all in, but then you can burn out a little bit, so she like. Just make sure you pace yourself. I really taken that to heart. Because this is something that I want to commit to for the long. Long run and I WANNA change in my life, and I want to be that influence of everyone around me, too, and so I know that I have to pace myself on learning. Pace myself on Mike keeping the conversation going I don't feel like I have to six everything today or that. It's my job to fix everything, but it is my job to keep going to keep learning to pace myself and try to make the difference in my own life, so that's kind of one of the best pieces of advice. I got about this for the long haul I. Love It. It I think that that some wisdom that my listeners can take with them as well because I know a lot of there on this journey and I just want people to know that they're not alone. If they're struggling with they do this. What to do with the important thing is to just start taking those steps forward. Start doing it. That was freedom to me when Amar said that she said it is better to start the conversation, even if you feel completely ignorant, if you're just start the conversation that is better to do that than to say nothing and then. Then when she said that I was like okay, because I always is way too scared to have these conversations. Thank you for coming on and sharing with us what you're doing Super Proud of you happy to have you as a friend and I'M GONNA. Come be on your podcasts next month. Yes, mid-july you will come. Be My guest in. We'll maybe dive deeper into these topics and we go deep. We got a long history I've known you for a long time. We're in Texas. I, know we just need you to get you to move over here in Al? Thank you for coming on Caroline? Thanks for having me. So, this year's been filled with a lot of new challenges for all of us and one way that I relieve. The stress of the day is turning to a great story with audible stories of all kinds some that help us escape some help us learn others help stay informed, and then stay engaged, but let's face it. When do we actually have time to read? So audible is the leading provider of spoken word entertainment audiobooks, everything from celebrity, memoirs, business and self-development books to the latest bestsellers like wire. All the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria or Or untamed by Glennon Doyle, which are just a few of the books that I'm listening to audible also makes it easy to listen to a beautiful bedtime story with the kids to Access.

Mike Caroline Li Nashville Glennon Doyle Texas Amar
"myers briggs" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

4 Things with Amy Brown

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on 4 Things with Amy Brown

"A great week now. This episode was fun for me because I brought on four different girlfriends of mine to talk about four totally different things. We recorded each thing on zoom so that I could see their. So, you'll definitely have to bear with the audio sounding a little bit different. It's not ideal, but I think you'll enjoy what each my friends brought to the table in your walk away from this episode inspired by this women now here's a rundown of what you're GonNa hear today for the fourth thing. My friend Lisa, who a lot of you may know is at the wellness subsidies on instagram moved. Moved this last week as well I just moved into a new house last week. In case, you didn't know, but I wouldn't. Lee said to come on and share her approach of bringing in mindfulness to her daily spaces, whether it's a home or a hotel, any spay she's been. She tries to have gratitude for where she's banner where she's lived and then wishy going, so we also go over. Questions to ask yourself when you're organizing your home and thinking about what to keeper donate, so it's not just for if you're moving because I know a lot of you, listening may not be in that season of life, but it'll still be an interesting conversation for you own FYI. I for my move used bellhop moving got some messages from people asking how we move so fast. We got our home. Put together so quickly and definitely would not have been possible if I didn't use. Use Bellhop, moving so I gotta get crops in credit. Credit is due and I don't WanNa Miss Lee jaw. Thinking like Oh, who is snapped makers and moved and so if you happen to have a move coming up, big or small, I highly recommend bell. Hawk, I know that they're all country and they were giving shoutouts. You know something that came up in my conversation with Lisa was legacy box. You'll hear about it in our chat if you're not familiar with what it is. But I wanted to share the website that can give out on the bobby bones. Show Casey interested because. You can save fifty percent at least at the moment, so legacybox dot com slash bones for that. For the third thing on my friend Abby is on to talk about one of her favourite personality tests every smyers. She's obsessed with Myers Briggs. I had not taken the test the other day when she sent me a link. We also talk a little bit about the new Graham, but she discusses why she likes this personality test better and GM shares her journey of working with animal rescue groups and fostering dogs for the second thing. My friend Caroline Hobby is on talk about her journey of learning about racism. How she's bringing this new knowledge into her life, and she just like a lot of us trying to figure it all out and how she can. Be Part of. A change how we can all be the change, would you guys have been posting your be the change shirts on Instagram, ever because we've raised about ninety thousand dollars for the shot Ford ally fund to help fight racial injustice. Next, because a lot of you that are listening right now, so thank you and it's super cool for Stevenson. My son to see his handwriting on a shirt Annan, so many of your posts and Especially on a shirt. It's making such a huge impact, so if you WANNA support this cause or other efforts that we have going on, we can find lakes at some radio. Dot Com that and then for the first thing today you're going to hear my girl. Kelly Henderson at its edge as a lot of you know her through not following her for fashion and beauty stepping definitely should add, but she's on to talk about inner beauty and teaching young girls that they are beautiful and Kelly just interviewed Cassidy Bentley on her podcast about this topic and they discussed how we can try to. To be proactive, making a positive impact on young girls in their body image and I think you'll enjoy our chat and you're definitely going to want to go check out the podcast episode. She mentions with Dirks Finley's wife that she did Super Pool. So I'm really thankful for you to the girls on this episode baneful that they're in my life and I hope that you enjoy today's.

Lee Abby instagram Lisa Kelly Henderson bobby bones Cassidy Bentley Caroline Hobby Super Pool Hawk Casey Annan GM Stevenson Graham Ford Myers Briggs Dirks Finley
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:34 min | 1 year ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
Live From The HIBT Summit: Marcia Kilgore

How I Built This

08:01 min | 1 year ago

Live From The HIBT Summit: Marcia Kilgore

"So today we've got another one of my live onstage conversations from the how I built this summit that happened in San Francisco back back in October and many of the people sitting in the audience were an are super focused on a single idea. An idea. They're hoping to turn into a successful zestful business. Well today's guest Marcia Kilgore started out that way to one idea. One company called bliss a skincare brand. She wound ended up selling for tens of millions of dollars but as you may remember when she told her story on the podcast a few years ago Murcia did not stop there she. She went on to launch four more successful brands. Soap and glory fit flop super duper and beauty by so when she sat down with me on stage at the summit I was really curious to find out where she gets Oliver ideas not to mention her incredible energy and optimism. One of the things I remember when you on the podcast. You told me that that you love rubbing the sticks together right. I'm you love making things do you do. You know where that comes from That's a really good question. Where does rubbing the sticks come together from? Yeah I think it's probably EPA genetic. I'm from Polish and Irish Irish family. And they were farmers so I guess I'm somewhat of a farmer. I don't think you can completely lose. What is from your history and I just? I feel very comfortable working hard ride and struggling. And that's what makes me happy. It makes me feel really fulfilled everyday to be solving a problem to be digging in Earth. Whatever that Earth is trying to figure out how to grow? Oh something I mean. There are so many companies successful companies. You have founded sold some of them. You still run and I mean do you. Are you always thinking about the next thing. He knew guy what's really interesting and I think what's really important for all of us to do is to keep adding points of light right. Big Point of light is your show right every week. Do just listen again. Listen to them over and over again listen five times their points of light and then read as as much as you can and when you read and you add those points of light you create a picture for yourself. That is kind of like you know the lights on your Christmas tree. If you have a Christmas tree right there when you get a bunch of them up there you can suddenly see the shape of the tree right you see either a new idea or you can see the way through through a problem and you have a new path and it is by adding more points. Normally they say in sales if you haven't managed to sell something to somebody is because you haven't explained to them why they need that product that you're selling you haven't done. I'm s to connect those dots for them. So I think it's the same something when you're trying to solve a business challenge or to come up with a new idea that might pass that test. I have something that I call the Sowa test. which is you? Explain your your idea in one simple sentence ask yourself so what and if you can't answer so what in one simple sentence then you don't have it yet and you may need to add some more points of light. It's anyone who's heard your episode or who who's talk to you a bit knows that you're not motivated by money. I mean you sold all these companies. You've made a lot of money you don't need to work. You're motivated by experience. Said this show you one thing I remember is you said the idea of seeing a product that I had thought about that wasn't mine. Drives me cro would drive me crazy if you if you thought of something and then somebody somebody moved out but it happens does happen to all of us thought of something and idea and then you see like two years later at target. It's sad to think I didn't move on that one. It could have been mine mine. Is that idea. Just drive you so crazy that you have to. Oh really that the good ideas you know. I'll have like ten a day but the good ones are the ones that you know the nine of them kind of go away and one of sticks and you think really got to do that and then you kind of start to tell Franson and if you're a real entrepreneurial type you probably obviously the vision the most and you don't see the data and details until maybe later so you're up here and these people here can't see it and that's because you haven't may be connected elected all the dots for them yet. It doesn't mean that the idea is not good at the same time. If it's a terrible idea invite that criticism is the best thing that that you can get so you do talk about it with people. You don't keep it secret no I. Will you know it depends where we are in a patenting process. Sure if we want to have to keep something secret because we think there might competitor. That comes up really quickly. We haven't built enough of a first mover advantage then. I won't talk about it too much. Yeah and if you have an idea like that you know to get nondisclosure agreements anybody just starting out right. Get download one from the Internet and just give it to people that will stop them talking about your idea. At least if you can't afford a lawyer so one of the really cool things about your story. Is You move to New York. You were eighteen. You were hoping to go to college but you didn't have the money to do it and you were a bodybuilder. As as a young woman. You're a fitness instructor. And that's really how you started out. And then you got into skin care and you opened up your little two hundred square foot booth in Soho in in the ninety s and built this incredible business. You've now had success with cosmetics with shoes with soap. I mean you didn't go to business school. You didn't have the formal fancy degrees that some other people do which is awesome. I mean it's so inspiring hiring right. How have you know that these ideas were going to work? Actually what you need to understand is that there are has anyone done Myers Briggs Gill okay. It's good it's good to know how your brain thinks because your brain is one of sixteen types of brains so so the type of brain that I've got I'm an so it's the blueprint so I'm a typical kind of visionary thinker so I can see without necessarily explaining to you know. Some people can do math without doing all the work in between. Yeah that's me with with the idea and then I have to figure I do the work in between but I can usually tell after a while and that's just a gift I guess it's very whoever I mean. Have you ever ever had an idea that you tried and pursued for a while that you realize didn't wasn't going to work really. Wow really that's amazing. Not a big one and I mean you know at one point. Someone wanted us to do a men's line offshoot of soap and glory and that don't really work didn't buy cosmetics at the time it wasn't makeup but they wanted to spend ninety nine cents ends on a shower Gel and I couldn't make cheap. Didn't WanNa make it that. I could have no joy in that for me so we you know it was sort of a little offshoot luke that someone thought this would be a great expansion and it didn't really go but otherwise no I don't think so. I think I think about them for a long time. That something the house that I remember learning from a woman I think name is Christina. Brown used to run sacks and she said you know if you just sit for an hour every day. Don't look at your email and put the problem. You're trying to solve down in front of you and actually just think about that problem and map it out. Maybe put it on a wall and map out the pros and the cons and how you might be able to get here and what will happen if you do this the choice diagram. You probably solve the problem or see if there are too many insurmountable obstacles or see the things that you haven't thought about but we don't do that right because I mean there will be people in here who are real realist. But then also if you're somebody who's quite optimistic which is a requirement to be an entrepreneur. You have to be kind of optimistic to a fault. You won't want to look at the hurdles that may be the way. So actually sitting down and mapping things

Murcia Marcia Kilgore San Francisco Oliver EPA Franson Myers Briggs Gill Brown Instructor Soho New York Christina Luke
"myers briggs" Discussed on Bad On Paper

Bad On Paper

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Bad On Paper

"I always test. I always test sorry. I am an but I've had I've shown up as an I N T P before. Oh so t t in the last last two ones can flip for me interesting. Yeah is it based on like the tasks that you takers based on like where you are in your life I think I am in my life. I just I've taken it so many different times and those tool flip. Yeah I actually personally I since learning about it. I think that I like the Anti Graham. Better and Myers tire sprague. I feel like who look at my any around like Holy Shit like this is me for better or for worse. Well I think that the Myers Briggs very clinical where it's like. Yeah this yes sir that versus with the Graham there's more it's not so binary where it's like you're this you're introverted or extroverted your thinking or feeling you know. Yeah like I like that. There's like nine types that have like different facets of them. It's not just like you're in this or that. Yeah Yeah I agree So should we be done with personality types and talk about other things yes. Let's talk about what we're obsessed with. Oh Oh wait before we do though I feel like I want to invite everyone to the facebook group and I I don't have different threads or like I just want to talk about personality types of other people. Yes let's start a thread for each one. And he had Graham Myers Briggs and Love Language language. Okay Yeah Yeah So. If we haven't done that someone else do do it. Yeah we'll probably do it okay so back to obsessions so I have two free obsessions. I haven't bought anything this week. I don't think think you've been trumped in a whole week like a couple of weeks. I haven't really been shopping either. I did buy my silver dress for the The November live. Show that we did but but some knitting needles on Amazon. They're the wrong kind. I'm not obsessed with them anyway. Okay so first of all. I made a well last weekend in real life but a couple weekends ago in podcast time. I made short ribs and I've been looking for a short rib recipe and I have struck out a couple of times and I found one on the New York Times cooking sire. Soggy made them for me. I loved them And it's of of course. It's an allison Roman recipe. I love everything else in Roman does. But it's this Alison Roman garlic short ribs. So good you put like a whole head of garlic in it But this was insane. And I don't like I haven't Gotten Alison. Romans new cookbook. Maybe my obsession is Alison Roman. I'm unsure but the short ribs recipe is really good but it sucks that it's only on New York Times cooking so it's behind the pay wall. I actually started subscriptions that we could get it on my. That's so fun dollars a month but I feel like at least a couple times a month. I ended up trying to click on because I follow New York Times cooking on instagram. Yeah and I end up trying to click through and then hit the paywall. So I don't know I'll pay for it for a couple of months and the other thing you're obsessed this a couple weeks ago. I finally watch modern love. ooh My God it's the best show on TV. I stand behind that Chris. I was not prepared. Heard I wonder sobbed My way through the first episode in the last episode I watched the whole show. I WANNA weekend. There's only like eight episodes. I Oh my God it was. It was so good but I was not ready for that emotional breakdown. Yeah it's the best really good I think make re watch it. They got they got picked up for a second season. Oh my God. I'm so glad that and it's such a great concept because that show could just go on forever and ever and ever with like different actors and I would I would watch it into into oblivion yes. What's in what is your obsession? So mine's a beauty thing I've definitely talked before about Kosas. It's the brain is Ko SAS. You can get it at Sephora seeing it more and more places like it's everywhere yeah it really like I bought it this summer I was with my friend. Sarah Have I. Have you met Sarah Yet your cousin Sarah no my friend Sara. Her instagram is Sarah Lou. Who I've talked about her here before she has this really cute Pixie cut and she's gorgeous? She has the pretty like she's so pretty but she is amazing mazing at makeup and she was like we're at the Sephora event and she showed me coasts and she's like you know what this is my vacation make up which means you'd probably like it for like every day because I don't wear back into culpable off of him. No no it was a compliment. Like she's always like Oh. You don't need a lot of make up like Bola but and she doesn't either but she's like she will get done up and she's just so pretty but she told me about this tinted face oil which is kind of like a kind of like foundation. But it's just like very very It's very shear and it's just so pretty and it makes you look like you're not wearing makeup but just like have really pretty Louis glowing skin so I wrote a blog post all about this stuff. It's amazing using but now I'm on the brand's radar and they sent me their new lip glosses or lip oils. I guess they're called and they're so good they're also pretty like some of the colors. Look one of them was like this bright red-nosed you're not gonna like this and I put it on and I was like this really just juicy sheer read. I worked at dinner last night with you and molly. I didn't notice apparently talk about you yesterday. Yeah I'm so I'm so offended. I'm not But their products are great. They're completely clean. They're smaller brand like supporting a smaller brands. I love it so far has has been carrying a lot more like India beauty. 'cause I feel like lately I've been going there and discovering things I haven't already seen so can't say enough good things about this brand like literally every product they make is fantastic. I'm I'm curious to check some third stuff out. Yeah you should. What about on instagram? So so mine is From your Atlanta Ashley. Haseltine introduced us to Tristan Watson and we met him yes and she was like he is like the male Heather McMahon. So he's very funny. He you if you follow him on. Instagram Tristen T. R. I S. T. A. N. Underscore Watson W. A. T. S. O. N.. And he has his highlight on his instagram called meal. Prep and it is just so funny. So if you want to like I'm Mos- looking for like more funding people to follow instagram. Like highly recommend him. He's great What about you? I'm so mine is new book account that I found and so It is so we count is be under score spines and it's this girl. She lives in Chicago and and I think that we've complementary tastes in books and she has a very cute bookstore and but my complaint with a lot of books grams is that it's all book photos does and know people and I like accounts that have more human behind her. Now she's cute. She's super and you know she does like stories. I catch the camera. I like Bookstore Graham Starlike Morgan. Or I can't remember the girl's name. Her handles the spines like I. I like when they have people behind them. Yeah I we need a little more personality versus just the book racks. Yeah because I I like to know if I'm like. Oh why do you like this. Who are you You know but I'm I'm newly into her. I just followed what about books. I'm very excited by what yours is so I am right now. I'm about halfway through the gifted school. Glow what do you think which you recommended to me So it started slow at first but I'm really into it now. it's great. I think it's very much much like big little lies. Yeah maybe a little more literary than yeah. I agree it's great. It's really good. It was a sleeper. Hit for me where it was like something that I wasn't sure I was. It's GonNa like that much and then I ended up being obsessed with. Yeah I they sent it to me and I was like. Oh It's already out like these at me. Yeah so we must have sent it to six months ago and clearly. I did not prioritize it but is great. Yeah I'm really into it. It's like parents behaving badly carly just started at last tonight. Did she find out what she thinks. Okay Yeah so mine. I started this book. That's coming up next year. It's called perfect tunes by Emily Gould and Emily. Gould is an internet person. That I've tangentially followed for a long time. She used to be at home Gawker and Jazz Adele. She's written a couple of nonfiction books and this is her her first fiction book. And it's about these girls in I think it's like the early the two thousands and late nineties who moved to New York City and one of them is trying to be a musician. And the other one is like a makeup artist slash Stylus and It's kind of giving me vibes of like Daisy Jones in the six because it has a big music component and I've only probably like thirty pages and what. I'm really enjoying it so far. That sounds good and it comes out next year. I think it comes out in March or April. Okay but yeah Hon. Well maybe should we give a book Plug Tore November book. Yes so our November book is one of my favorite books that I read. I think that we read it this summer for the first time. But it's called. We came here to forget by Andrea Dunlop. And it's kind of like a thriller will acute kind on of romance side Bar Story to it so basically this woman Basically put her whole life on hold to pursue professional skiing but she her her family has like a very dark past and something really terrible happened so it's very dark. There's a thrilla is there's a thrilling component of it. It's it's a great book. Can't recommend it enough. We also will have the author coming on for a bonus episode. You'RE GONNA love it so pick it up and read it. Yeah and if you'd like more of US come to our facebook group and talk to us about your personality type and then Follow us on Instagram at Bat. On paper PODCAST. I and I'm on Instagram at Beckham Freeman. I'm on Instagram at Grace Atwood and I blog every day at the stripe dot com. And please leave us a review. Yes do do it. Okay bye bye..

Graham Myers Briggs New York Times Sarah Lou facebook Alison Roman Emily Gould Graham Graham Starlike Morgan S. T. A. N. Underscore Watson New York City Amazon Chicago Sephora Andrea Dunlop Beckham Freeman Kosas Chris Grace Atwood Louis India
Cynthia Forstmann Shares How Archetypal Storylines Help Leaders

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

03:43 min | 1 year ago

Cynthia Forstmann Shares How Archetypal Storylines Help Leaders

"I had a very formative experience back when I lived in Washington D C of meeting someone who was working working with archetypal storylines I'll tell you more about that in a minute but you know once we latched onto archetypes as a framework more for working with clients around their brand in their marketing programs that was just such a powerful way of helping gene leaders bring their teams together articulate kind of their passion their and even a growth strategy adage so while we came through the door of helping a company building brand once they became familiar with their own archetypal story lines. They kept calling us back. They wanted more. They wanted to you know how do I. How do I train my leaders around these core stories. How do I build out a marketing program. How do they recruit people. Get it that get what is super special about who we are in our story and let's pause before you go any further because it's just just go into a little bit about what is an archetype back just to make sure that we're we're getting everybody on the same page here yeah. It's a great question twenty years ago when we were using the word archetype. I don't think very many people at all new the word. I think it's more common today today. It's more often today but we definitely have people look at us cross-eyed when we came in and said we're GONNA talk about archetypes but archetype comes out of Carl young young in psychology. Many people are familiar with young because of the Myers Briggs assessment tools which are also amount of unions psychology psychology and archetypes are served with we consider them the other half of the young Ian whole they are universal timeless homeless story lines and characters that it considered part of the collective unconscious the idea that we scared as human beings and understanding of these timeless storyline so some of the archetypes you know our stories like hero and Creator and magician and Muehler and no matter his theory was no matter where you were in the world from a time standpoint or a geography standpoint it has human beings we understand kind of the motivations the passions the strengths and the shortcomings of those story lines and so you were bringing Neeson these end to work with these corporate partners and helping them look at their brand helping them work through leadership opportunities and changes changes in strategy and bringing this wonderful ancient stories basically storylines to the table to help facilitate those conversations since that's exactly right and I would say that the power behind the reason it was so powerful is because stories stories are really for human beings. It's how we make sense of the world right. It's how we communicate. It's how we remember things. It's how we carve out. What's what's meaningful in our lives is through stories in so to be able to bring that in you know in an make help organizations uncover. What are those deeper storylines running through our organization in? How do we capitalize on those things to really be authentic in in a brain and in in talking about what what we're all about an an how we get things done

Myers Briggs Carl Neeson Muehler IAN Twenty Years
"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

"Same. If you had to guess, what are you? I think I am in between both of you. I genuinely believe that. I think I'm right smack in the middle. So it would be probably an e n I think I might be what she is. He NFP no myself. And yeah, there's. Because you seem like you're an organizer us. Oh, I have people who organized for me and without them. I'd be a mess. I trust a button up shirt. I usually not I had someone else, but he's a butts. He doesn't usually not this button up usually T shirt and jeans guy and today excited I had important meeting. But yes, I can I rise of us. Us. One of us. I'm sorry. There's a reason to test him. I take the test. I want to hear what we okay would. I was gonna say is do you think that now? If you took the test for the first time now, you would be more in touch with who you were than when you actually it. No because I think you're constantly evolving. It's like did I know myself better in high school, or now, it's like, what don't you think, you know, yourself better now than in highschool? I knew I mean, all these things about your your less of a person in high school. So I probably knew who I was then that's just you know, I don't know. But, but I feel like what I think I'm curious about is if I would get introvert over extrovert now, if I took it I've thought I on some level kind of an only because of stuff I've noticed the last ten years, I feel is just me personally, but way, more self aware in my thirties than I was in my twenties before and I felt like a lot of things I arrived out about myself were brought really into focus with that test. But basically, I wasn't like, sadly, I was in shock about anything. She was saying did you feel surprised by anything that she was saying, no? Oh, but I do feel like some of the categories are a little like, you know, like do you like thinking about ideas or things that are right in front of you? I am like I said like very into like common sense things too. But I guess not to the extent that you are, you know, like I like big thinking too and. And like sometimes if I'm talking to someone in they're walking me through their whole thought process bit by bit. I'm like, I know I know I get the gist. Like, I I'm into the gist. I got set up right now. I don't even want to say like another word you. Goodbye. Like pleasure meeting, you listen. Thanks for having me. If you're really wrapping it up. I don't know. I was going to wrap it up. Yeah. But. Rainy day talking about Myers, Briggs. What would I do not know not that? That's my part. You're categorizing it for me 'cause you can tell this is making me feel comfortable. But I think this is a rare good opportunity in LA because people don't like when do talk about anything interesting in Los Angeles. It's always about movies TV. This is literally why did this because he pitched me something that wasn't even you? And I we wind up started talking about entertainment. And then you have these experts in you start talking about something else. More important. Nice break. Thank you so much for coming. Thanks for having me guys. Let's thank all of our sponsors today, including Lincoln Lincoln jobs makes it easy to get matched. With quality candidates who make the most sense for your role post job today. Lincoln dot.

Briggs Lincoln Lincoln Myers Lincoln dot Los Angeles ten years
"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

"Loyalty. Great good tonight. And the timing of good old boy. It was known as a boring, dick. No now, let's you're Chelsea ready. General please. Whic? Ingenious stimulating alert and outspoken resourceful in solving new and challenging problems adept at generating conceptual possibilities, and then analyzing them strategically paralyzed by such analysis meeting other people bored by routine, we'll sell them do the same thing the same way after turn to one new interest after another. It's very accurate except for that. I I would say that the thinking part does paralyze me and plague me with a lot of anxiety and anguish. That could be honestly that could be also all about like decision making skills. Like, really when you're growing up. It's rare that your parents display good natural decision making skills. In fact, that's one of the things that's really difficult for people in generals making decisions, especially free therapy generation that parents were part of Caracas. Yeah. If you need it get help wrong with it, especially on the east coast. That's where they like, they're right. Still bad word. I mean, we chased our parents for attention. And they say that we tell our children in our generation that we love them more than all the generations before us combined high said almost incessantly Tennyson. Yes. So I don't want you to think that there is a bad or good because there isn't toper. We got to you know, what here. I don't feel like being the host. You know, what I wanna do is rewrite your description make it a little snazzier punch it up a bit. That was like one of those negative horoscopes. Trying to be positive like, the it's it's basically like some bad stuff is going to happen. But you know, what? To learn what jumps out of that description to me is reliable. Yes, I think that's so rare, and such a gem will that very nice you to say, and I my recreate occuring theme in my life, especially when I was younger in that is like a very less sexy. Quality in your twenties is that I I'm more comfortable being whatever this description is forty now. Correct. But I remember in my twenties feeling like, I am really the boring one you wanted to be a bad. Boy. Well, I mean, those are the ones who are getting laid. It's like you. Get older, and those are the ones that are like can't hold a relationship do feel better now in juxtaposition of those guys. Yeah, now because you know, like, I think my wife knows for all those reasons you're talking about that. I'm like in it for real you. Yeah. Able to count on their men hell. Yeah. Better now. But but I'd still like, but isn't that true? I love stuff like that. Because it's like elementary school. Everyone's like, you're weird. You know, people always told me I was weird. I'm like, well, who's weird now weird all the way to the Bank bitches? So do you guys want to know, what percentage of your you are if you're of the popular I'm gonna go ahead and say ninety percent of the population as me and the man I 's TJ are six point four percent of the population sixteen sixteen point four. All accountants and for women E N T peas are two point four percent of the population..

Caracas Chelsea four percent ninety percent
"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

"Do you write every day for five hours, you're not answering the question? Little questions. So here, it's it's really interesting. It is actually the p and the Jay that you guys are now finally butting heads a little bit. What happens a couple meets ones? Jayme. One's a p. And what happens is Jay is attracted to the perceiver 'cause they go. Oh, my God this person so spontaneous and fun. And I plan so much. I love the fact that they're so spontaneous, right? Then they get together and very often get married and later on the J start saying to the p you're such a pig. Why do you leave your coat where you drop it off? There's a closet. Why can't you hang it up and the pieces. Oh, and then the or you're so in. And the Jason let's make let's make plans for next weekend. Honey and just goes, well, it's Monday, we can get to that on Friday. And then the Jason's, but you used to be so different in the pieces and you used to be so different. And that's where in my opinion. Most of the conflict happens in relationships is between the judging and perceiving. You have to understand toe for that every p wants to be J they want nothing more than to have planned organized lives. You know, they want things vile. She chose Joseph. I actually in this category. I mean in this Ellison this category because the clutter in my house makes me absolutely crazy. I would love if my house was tidy and organized, and I have never been that person me and my husband, both we come home. We throw our coat wherever we were standing, and then we get mail. We throw it whatever's near surface, and you know, it's just not organized or clean, and I try like get a final. Cabinet and I'll do and then I'll be stacking stuff on top of that filing cabinet like hold onto this. I wish I was like you Tofa complex for the assessment at the end. I wish my house is cleaner. So I think what we're going to say is that Chelsea is an extroverted toot of thinker perceiver. So it's an EMT every one of those sounds great. No toe for years is great to your introverted censor thinking judger. The word. Each one of these words. Extroverted intuitive intuitive thinking thinking receiver perceiver, none of those have negative connotation anyway. But. Thinking is my weakest one don't you think thinking to genius? What is what are introverted sensing things sensing thinking thinking that judging judger, but I sure I hate the word judger. So let's say J, so I'm gonna read you a short blurb about your type, and you're gonna say your name. Filing. Being an ASO showing up on time filing. I 's TJ as are quiet serious earned success by thoroughness, and dependability. Practical matter of fact, realistic and responsible decide logically what should be done. And this seems like rate partner has anyone had someone like has anyone ever had a show like wash the podcast interview? Where the host said like I'm out of here. The microphone and walked out. The guest will do excuse me. Goodbye. Steve. So you decide you standing right now the sheet to find something toward it steadily, regardless of distractions, you, take pleasure and making everything orderly organize your work, home, life view, traditions and.

Jay Jason Ellison Jayme Chelsea Tofa Cabinet partner Joseph Steve five hours
"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

"Have decision making. There's a thinking wave making decisions and feeling wave making decisions when you have decisions to make do you think about them logically analytically, and you sit and weigh the pros and cons and then come up with a decision that's made up here in the head or do you make decisions from your heart? So I would say like, let's say Tofa for has a decision to make and he would sit and he'd say like, okay, I need to do this. But wait Howell sim feel how Vicky feel how Chelsea feel and he'll take all of our feelings in consideration before he makes his decision. I am whatever the opposite of that. Is that you just described your the thinker? Thinker makes decisions up here in their head pros and cons on the later on goes. Ooh, did I step on Chelsea's toes? It's okay. 'cause you know, what made a lot of sense. I feel every answer. I've given I wish I was giving the other answers. Because sensors always want to be intuitive. Well, yeah, I think it looked so much more sort of sexy and cool. That's let's be honest. It is. Feel bad about. I feel like a good like short encapsulation. My life would be like I've made a lot of good decisions for me. And heard a lot about I've heard a lot of people in the way out man stepped down a lot of. No. But just like that. I I I feel like no one would say that was the wrong choice. Right because I waited out. Well, but but I don't like when when someone I mean, I don't feel like I've really hurt. I just be like, you know, little things right in relationships teaser with Fs after with teas, the only thing I always tell people is if you're thinker, and you're with a feeler, you have to be really careful to take their feelings into consideration because they're wearing their heart on their sleeve, and they're getting hurt by the thinker constantly. We'll just like if we think about what's going on in this situation. We know, blah, blah, blah, right? But a feeler it's like you can't talk to that. You can't talk about like will logically. What you're feeling is a little askew or Bubba, right? Because they're all they're coming from. It's totally right. That's so you probably are natural thinker whose developed a little bit of feeler, you know, at my example, is for the thinking feeling is like if I'm ordering food, and I'm looking at a menu part of me is like, well, I want this. But then another part of me is like, but what's the healthier thing? What's the cheaper thing? Or whatever, you know. So it's like, I always envied like my brother can look at a menu. And he'd looks at it for one second same with my dad, and then they go that's the thing. I'm getting there done. I'm like oh. No. I think they're feeling right. They're just going with. But they feel it's interesting. I don't know it could be who knows. But like, I spend way too much time thing about it. And then I'm envious of people who just go with their gut, and they have their order in they're talking and they're ready. That's the people in Hollywood that do the best. I don't know if these are thinkers are feels either, but the people who interact six. People like these like, these moguls I've met who don't give seem to you know, or political, you know, our president or some people who are just like I don't give a fuck about. What anyone like they're not only thinkers, they don't even feel bad about not feeling that. So you're the tea and you're reluctant t. Yeah. There's more adventurer head after this quick word from our sponsors. Minor adventures. Also, sponsored by Lincoln, the right, hire a huge impact on your business. That's why it's so important to find the right person. But where do you find that individual can post job on a job board and hope that the right person will find your job? But think about it. How often do you hang out on job boards?.

Chelsea Lincoln Howell Bubba Hollywood president Vicky one second
"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Minor Adventures with Topher Grace

"I'm curious if I did the full test what would happen now because I feel like I've gotten way more introverted. But I don't know if that's because Los Angeles is a hell scape. I think it's in reaction to the life that you live and being surrounded by people who want a piece of you all the time. They still need you in our podcast. You're most natural. You're probably an extrovert. Yeah. Maybe that probably won't change. And I think that you'd probably identified more as the introvert. Probably the opposite was maybe grown into trying to be more of an extrovert. Having a podcast. Probably not. Yeah. Yeah. So so so there truly is no kind of better where I thought this is going to be like are you a single path? Or are you a is kind of? Like where you are on the spectrum kind of there is no good or bad. It's really just who we are. And how we are around other people. All right. Well, the introvert me is feeling more comfortable ready to this dichotomy. All right. So the next one is called sensing an intuitive. But let me ask you some questions, and then I'll describe for you. But this is all about how we gather and take in information. So do you usually pay more attention to the facts and details or you try and understand the connections underlying, meanings and implications, you probably know my answer. Yes. But go ahead. Implication. Correct. That was what I assumed I would say I assumed that as well. But I'll get back to that in a minute. Are you more in tuned into the here and now or the future probably the future? Okay. And if I told you both more finish today or before today, we're going to just go sit in the room. And we're going to brainstorm ideas for this podcast. What would you guys say it's not wanna pug? Reggie. Take on in to a little you don't have to be the guest also. Thanks for having me. Your your own be store. I would say, yeah. Chelsea come on in. You've been a writer like help us out. Also, I gotta leave early. But if you don't mind staying kind of working through it, so brainstorm would be okay for you guys. I would I yes, I love this for myself. Yes. Not for Tokar screen yourself and ship for free. You know what I mean? And then one last question, then all hurrying described these for you. So do you like new ideas, just for their own sake, or you only like them, if they have practical utility, I like, new ideas? I think what we're talking about earlier. But one of my problem is I actually liked them when they're for practical sake. I wish I know people who I think are geniuses who love new ideas. But I like structure and stuff. Yeah. So I like him when they help within a structure, sadly interests. Mean, I know I know people who are like that's what they're fire big big thinkers like I'm kind of like how does this help within what I'm trying to accomplish? So let me ask you a question. If I gave you a project are you going to gather all the information and set it in front of you, and then work with what you're seeing. Or if I give you a project or you're going to constantly be going. We could do this. We could do this all we could do. I could see how this goes. Oh and put together the picture that way. I think I'd probably gather it and look at what I have and try to make something out of that. Okay. That's interesting. So in fact, you might be offices. I would do the one where you're talking about. Big thinking so sensors the person that gives a lot of data and details when they're communicating with you the Intuit or because they're always looking beyond the here. And now, and they're always imagined creative verbally creative. And all of that. If you go home, and you say to an Intuit or like, you let's say you walk in the house and your wife says to you or your husband says, you how was your day, Honey..

Intuit Chelsea Los Angeles Reggie Tokar writer
"myers briggs" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"I'm not don't actually think we're gonna do. Now, drew said that Robyn Akiba should take the Myers Briggs, sixteen personality types. But did I just see today that you just took this test get this? I mean, this came up on one of the patron podcasts where for a while. There have been requests for Nicole. And I to take the Myers Briggs personality test. It's not something that I find especially interesting. But there are some people that are riveted by Myers Briggs personality type test. Results. I've never taken one. So I don't even know what the like what it would mean. Yes. So if anybody's curious I was in. I n t j I think that's like the most famous one just because that's the only one I could named. But I don't know. Is there an EMT also? Yeah, you're either I don't I don't know what the Muny you're either a n or s you're either a T or an F, and there's sixteen possible ones that you could be. Has anybody done the brain steel with the Myers, Briggs personality types? Yeah, we'll get. We'll get somebody on. Yeah. No. I don't think there's enough there of like. Ooh. Oh, kiva turns out. He's a we also have a similar podcast when Robin Akiva, go to words, we're taking sort of a test and figuring out what we are. Yes. Maybe so maybe four or you go into your sorting hat, then you should get the Myers Briggs personality test to sit maybe at Hogwarts, they would make the Harry Potter and the Ron Weasley of the world like take I told my dad because he's such a big Harry Potter fan that we were doing that. And I said did you ever take the test? And he looked at me like I like if you ever asked me like, hey, if we're watching the game like the most obvious thing in the world. And then I'm like, oh, let me guess your house, and he was like even more insulting. Because apparently was so obvious. What is this is like a medallion like a grown man because he's a he's a mature person like other than this. He's not like he doesn't even watch TV or movies. He's like very busy. This isn't he he's not like into phantoms? But he was so like shocked that I wouldn't know, so he's a hustle puff. Yeah. And it was like he was supposedly very. Obvious. But I don't know anyway. So we talked last week about can you be your own mailman? I don't know how it came up. But we were discussing it last week. And you'd be your own came up was it during the Seinfeld podcast. It must've been something where there was no Newman last week. But I guess we we mentioned we're talking about. Oh, yeah. Because they went to the mail room something with the key or something. So oh, yeah. Because Jerry needed people get his mail. That's where it was from. Right. So Sean, a listener is a mailman. I think there was multiple. I think Bob who's also a mailman wrote in. So we have multiple mailman listeners. I I saw no feedback about the overall podcast, but like five tweets about him. It was abused with mailmen. Hey, robin. Akiva, I just you know, what maybe the podcast title was too confusing for people. Also like, we do it backwards. What does that mean? Like, maybe we should've been like, I don't know. I don't know. I don't know. I'm not saying you did the wrong thing. I would have said made it the same way. I just maybe maybe we weren't clear enough. I don't know anyway, Robin, Akiva, just listen to the backwards episode. I thought it was great so Sean disagrees. But you can absolutely be your own mailman. It's the best because you always know where your lunch and your break is going to be that smart. Oh, so you take the break at your own house, midway bathroom. Sure. Yeah. Use your own bathroom. Anyway. How about doing season three episode seven of Bob's burgers? Are you a Bob's burger? No, I never seen. It might my my high school sister. My baby sister says it's her favorite show. But I've never seen an episode. I don't even know what it's about other than maybe burgers. Yeah. Have you ever seen it?.

Myers Robin Akiva Myers Briggs Bob Sean Nicole drew Harry Potter Robyn Akiba Seinfeld Newman Jerry Ron Weasley
"myers briggs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Four nine four two seven eight six six if a comment on Twitter at biz radio one thirty two or my Twitter account, which is at damn loading twenty one I in reading up about this. I guess also the actual the terminology used to describe this test Myers Briggs type indicator. The word indicator will was kind of an important factor in it because and you kind of alluded to the second ago. It didn't make people feel like they were being judged like it was a test. It was kind of a way to to make people feel better about taking this. No, that's absolutely, right. And if you go to a contemporary Myers Briggs training session, which I had to do in order to write this book. One of the very interesting things, they tell you up front is that under no circumstances. Are you supposed to refer to? It as a test because the test is something that has right and wrong answers. A test is something that creates hierarchies of of its subjects based on how well they have answered the questions and the indicator, and this is going to sound a little bit a logical because it is the indicator is simply a tool that indicates something to you based on what you have revealed to and you know, this. I think we may have are you there? Yes. We lost there for one second. Go back reset. Oh, I was saying, you know, I calling it an indicator and describing it as they do is another way of getting around these questions of validity. Because the way that many Myers Briggs type, you know, the people who offer these these courses or these training programs the way they define whether the indicator is working or not as if you personally agree with the type that it has revealed to you. And if you don't agree with it. They often say, well, maybe you just took it in the wrong mindset. Maybe you answered the questions is your work, self or your your social self? Maybe you were an answering it as the true you. What is Bill Briggs Myers called your shoes off self? So that would that would lead to going back to some you said a moment ago the potential. Getting different results because of different mindsets. Correct. Well, right, exactly. And like I said for for the people who sell and market and teach based off of the test or the indicator. Sorry, it's hard not to slip into that terminology, the indicator. The only thing that really matters is whether or not you're satisfied with the results that you're giving. And this is kind of the larger argument that I make in the book is that, you know, alternately I don't care that much about these debates about validity or reliability. I kind of take for granted that it's not valid or reliable. But you know, as a humanist what I'm more interested in is why it is that the language of type these categories of extroversion and introversion or even introducing yourself by saying things like I'm an EMT. Jay, why is that that language has become so so prevalent, and why it is that we we find meaning in it, regardless of whether it's it's true in in a scientific sense or not how. Much more. Do we see personality testing now than when Myers Briggs first came out? Well, I think we I mean, there's definitely more of it. You know, like the the market has grown from. I think you know, in the nineties the number that was being thrown around and articles on it was between four hundred to five hundred million dollars an industry, and there's an internal report from Facebook that came out last year that put the market at around two billion dollars. So it has definitely grown in that sense. And I think what's interesting, though, is that there are many many more I tests out there. Many many more models of analysis than Myers Briggs. And yet Myers Briggs is still the one that has the most powerful pull on our imagination. So you don't often see people putting in their online dating profiles. For instance. They're like big five profile or their Aena Graham type you you do see them putting their Myers Briggs type in there or you don't see both the BuzzFeed quiz, right? That are. That are about your. I can't remember the name of the tests that puts you into four different color categories. But you don't see BuzzFeed quizzes around that or the big five you see BuzzFeed quiz and type tables about Meyers, Briggs..

Myers Briggs Bill Briggs Myers Twitter BuzzFeed Aena Graham Facebook Jay Meyers five hundred million dollars two billion dollars one second
"myers briggs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"And I guess it was also used to be back in World War Two as well. Correct. Yes. That's part of the history that the book tells us how actually the first person to purchase it from the consultant that Isabel Briggs Myers was working for was this guy named Donald McKinnon who ran a secret station station estrin World War Two, and it was a secret operation where they matched spies to the covert missions that they thought were best suited for their personalities. And so the Qin would administer it along with a number of other kinds of psychological tests, and you know, role playing situations and interviews and things like that to possible operatives whose personalities he was trying to assess, and you know, I have throughout investigating it. You know found that it's being used by the department of defense by the CIA by more kind of contemporary military institution. So there's definitely that angle on it to you talk as you mentioned about the growth of this type of testing starting in the eighties. But but seemingly every in a lot of the interviews. We talk about about businesses today. They wanna know about people's personality because they want them to be a good fit in the office. And that's been a conversation. We've really heard in the last few years, but it does go back a couple of decades as well. Yeah. No. Of course. I mean, this is why Isabel Briggs Myers. I found a really sort of interested clientele for her product in the. Forties. I mean, you know, and in the fifties when William H white publishes, the book the organization man, which is thinking precisely about the kind of person you have to be in order to be considered a good fit within corporate workplace. So you're absolutely right. That this conversation about fit and about what kind of worker looks like a good fit for a white collar job has definitely been around for a while. I it's really more that the Myers Briggs type indicator sort of pulled ahead as the leading tool around which these conversations were sort of oriented in the eighties was there as as the test was developed, and it was starting to be marketed. Was there any criticism because of the fact that it was a marketed tool because I think some people would have these options that something like this would be more of of an educational piece. Yeah. No, that's a great question. So one of the institutions that was interested in being the kind of primary publisher for it in the fifties and sixties was the educational testing services. Yes, they're the people who make the SAT, and they were interested in finding a test that could do for personality testing what the SAT a done for testing, right? Which was that every college would use it to help determine their admissions. And they were actually trying to validate it, and they couldn't their team of statisticians could not find a way do they just couldn't find proof for the fact that the questionnaire measured the categories that claim to measure or that it was even reliable? So over fifty percent of people who took it got a different result. When they took it a second time, and it's really interesting because at that point in the history, the people at ATS start saying things like, well, you know, when employers give employees give potential employees personality tests, often, the employee's feel alienated by them, they feel judged. What if the Myers Briggs were one that they could give the employees, and they could tell them their results on it. So they didn't feel so alienated. So they. Felt like the employer was actually sort of looking out for their interests. And was interested in them finding the job that was best for them or interested in them just sort of self actualize, more, generally. So when when they have to confront the lack of scientific validity and reliability the indicator actually takes on this very different kind of function a kind of ofter function away of sort of convincing employees that employers are actually looking out for their best interest. When perhaps they're not..

Isabel Briggs Myers Myers Briggs CIA Donald McKinnon consultant William H publisher fifty percent
"myers briggs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Podcast is brought to you by knowledge award. Have you ever taken the Myers Briggs type indicator that is what it's officially referred to chances. Are you have at some point in your life? It is a widely used tool to get an idea of a person's personality. It is used in everything from hiring it accompany online dating and even a century ago. The test is still needed as a very important component today. But there has been some controversy with it over the years, especially since a mother daughter combination came up with the test. And by the way, they didn't have much training in psychology to begin with the new book looks at a new book looks at Myers Briggs its popularity despite its origins as well as what the popularity of this test says about us, it is titled the personality brokers, the strange history of Myers, Briggs and the birth of personality training. The author of the book is Merv AM Ray who is an associate professor of English at the university of Oxford, and as well, a fellow at Worcester, college and pleasure to have her joining us on the show. Professor. Thank you for your time today. Thanks for having me. Thank you. I mean, I feel like Myers Briggs is something that that pretty much. Everyone has come upon in their life at some point. Even you correct. Yes. So my dirty little secret is that before I got a PHD in English literature. I was a management consultant at Bain and company, and that's where I I encountered it during an off site training where we were all asked to take the Myers, Briggs. And then and executive talent coach came in to debrief us on our types. And what our strengths and weaknesses might be going forward at the company. So what was the then that's part of what obviously drew your attention to it. But I mean to write a book like this and looking at the historical aspect of it that you know, that had to be something different coming for for as a driver for you. Yeah. I mean, you know, it was interesting. I mean, part of it was that when I first started researching it I hadn't. Realized that Myers Briggs were the names of two women like many people I had assumed that they were two men who had found themselves working together in a psychological clinic or a laboratory and had come up with this questionnaire and had sort of popularized it through their connections in the business world in the military, and the church all of the different institutions where Myers Briggs is really prevalent today. So when I discovered that it was a mother and daughter, the popularity of it acquired this new fascination for me, which was how did these two women who had no formal training in psychology develop the most popular personality indicator in the world today. What was it? The drove them in the first place..

Myers Briggs Myers Professor Worcester university of Oxford professor of English Bain Ray executive Merv consultant
"myers briggs" Discussed on Safe For Work

Safe For Work

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Safe For Work

"Can have a surgeon who has to be precise and button-down and locked down and could have this preference for free and open, and they're feeling and they're intuitive, and yet they could be a brilliant surgeon. So you can apply these things in different ways. And I think when companies try to use these to lump people and make big assumptions, I think it goes wrong pretty quickly some companies of used it to hire. I know I don't get that. I've heard people who are in meetings where they're wearing name tags. Have there four little letters. I know it's shocking. Right? So what are they trying to do? They're like, if you are one type, should you work better with other types or are they trying to put similar people together or dissimilar. So I'll tell you how I've used use the tool. Once you're aware of what your preferences are, what you know is when you're not thinking about it, you're going to go to your preference, right? So if you are not thinking about how I'm going to write my name, your, I'm gonna pick it up with my right hand, every single time will the same thing goes. If you're sitting in a team with people and you've got folks who want to nail things down and get it settled, it can be really helpful for them to recognize that there are other brilliant, thoughtful people in the room who wanna bang it around a lot more than they and explore that before they come. And so what seems somebody else's four letters can do is go, you know what? They're coming at that differently for me as an extrovert sometimes as you and I used to talk about this, you'd find an introvert and he'd be like, will you speak up? Tell me what you're doing for God's sake. Yeah, but meanwhile, they're thinking deeply about it and. And they're going to come to a brilliant conclusion. We've got to give them space to do that. And so that's where for me, it's being aware of what my preferences and recognizing that could be quite different from the talented person next to me. But my preferences can also change. Right? Because the last time I took this. So this week I was in an e n. f. pay. But last time I took it, I was an e. n. t. p. so what would be the difference? And that's when I was in much more of a corporate leadership role in a big company. Clearly. I'm not. I don't do that anymore. So tell me about that. Sure. So I'll tell you what, Myers, Myers Briggs. What what is bell and Catherine would say is, is you did it wrong and that you are. You are born with a set of preferences and they stay with you. I gotta tell you, it's not my experience. It is my, I'm in the change business. I see people focusing differently depending on the world around them, and it makes sense as you just. Said, you're in a corporate leadership role. You have to be think think thinking, conceptual all the time, and then you get into a role where you're like, look, I'm trying to talk to people and help solve problems and ask interesting questions. Why wouldn't you lean into something else? Right. So that makes sense to me. And actually, this brings up another interesting question, which is if I find out that I am an NF Jay and I don't that shows me that I'm deficient in certain areas or that in my current job, call it a deficient year difference. It's a different. I mismatched to my current job, right. And there are ways that if I were to tweak my personality, I would fit better into my job or it would be easier for me or something. Is that even possible? Can I change? Can I change myself from in the NF j two in the NFC circumstantially I think you can. So as an example, if ongoing in and working with say group of engineers, they are likely not NS..

Myers Briggs Jay Catherine
"myers briggs" Discussed on Safe For Work

Safe For Work

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on Safe For Work

"Like deliver your life on one hand? Do you feel comforted when you've got things thought through planned out, you've got a list, you actually are trying to avoid stress by doing preplanned having some structure. Exactly versus the other side, which is I actually get stressed out by having too much structure in too many plans. I like to have it open and have more options. The punk rock choice. Exactly. Okay. So where did we come out? Yeah, let's as we mentioned before we both. Listen, I took a Myers Briggs test this week. I am an e n f j personality. That's the best person that could is they refer to that as the Dahmer? No, no. I don't think that's true. I guess Jeffrey Dahmer with. So what's the thumbnail on the sure. So NF Jay's means you're extroverted, your intuitive in the way that you you gather information about the world. You tend to make decisions coming from what's the right thing for the people involved. Very good. Since this is an advice show, indeed would actually care about giving good advice. Seems like a positive for this game. I would say so. And then lastly you're a self described Jay, which means you like planning you like being organized that that helps you feel comfortable and productive, but what are you Liz? Well, I am an e n f p which means we share three letters p is clearly the better final letter. Right. Well, I don't feel like that's true, and I'm feeling earth. And seeing the neutral coach and also appeared. I've got to agree with Liz. His Co. nearly the preferable. Basically, I got to enough peas against me. That's not cool feeling. So so so in your type the way you selected Liz, you you, as you said three of them are exactly the same, and there's a lot that similar about the two of you in terms of of your interest, but you're clearly different people. And so I didn't mean to agree so quickly. Oh, yeah, he's don't love me. That guy did seem like she wanted to emphasize that did. That's true. We both were glasses. What is what is very interesting, win your in a group of people where you take this test together and you get people who are both e NFP's and you put them together when they talk about how they take in the world, how they liked to make decisions, how they kind of liked the live, you'll hear a ton of similarities, but when you observe them as human beings, they're different. And so you go all my gosh, they have the same set of preferences. I do, but they're radically different people. And I think that's what's interesting about this tool and it's a controversial to by the way, if you Google Myers Briggs on the internet, you will have people that are like it's a cult. It's evil. Yeah, it's a lie. They're putting people in boxes. My experience as a coach is this can be a ridiculously powerful insight tool for some people. Other people just gag on it. We'll give us an example. So how would one as saying business environment? How because of lot of businesses use this tool, they'll put all of their employees. And they'll make decisions based off of it. What is the correct way they ought to be using the correct way that business ought to be using it in my opinion, is to let people go through it and see what insights they take from it. I get scared when businesses take a tool like this and say, well, if we find people who were of these kind of preferences, they're going to make a great salesperson or a great customer service. It's not necessarily true. You.

Liz Myers Briggs Jeffrey Dahmer Jay His Co. Google one hand
"myers briggs" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"You to take the Myers Briggs test. And here's the big question is this scientific, scientifically valid is or anything here that's worthwhile and it's a coupla catered answer. But you know, in short, I would say that some people agree. Some people don't agree, but there are lots of professionals out there, professional psychologists out there that have been complaining against Myers Briggs for decades. There's over two million of these tests are administered every year. That's quite a bit quite a bit of tests that people are paying for different companies. So here's an interesting thing. If you retake the Myers Briggs test after only a five week gap. So you take it and then you wait five weeks and you take it again. There's a fifty percent chance that you'll fall into a different personality category. Yeah. The first time that you took the test, astrology, what's the percentage chance of that happening? Fifty percents fifty dam is it is the one that has the four. It's like sensing, touching feeling? Yes. Okay, so so you're this when, sorry, Jay, wouldn't you say that you fall fifty percent chance when you say completely different? You mean one of those letters are different or all four letters different? Probably one of them is. At least one is different, but that's that's terrible, bad ability. The test test, test, reliability, test retest, you test twice. If you get a different result that's bad. That's. It means the test is not valid. It's Wright argues against liberty of the test. There's four things here like two in each category. So you could you're either an introvert or an extrovert. You're either a sense in which is using basic information, your your intuition, which means you're interpreting you're either thinking which is logic and consistency or feeling which is relating to people in particular circumstances you're judging which is making decisions or perceiving, which is staying open to options. Yeah. So basically only the very first one of those actually has a really strong. Yeah. Introverted core? Yeah. Like and you know, Steve just did a story j. do you remember few weeks ago when he was talking about some sort of personality thing and he was talking about using the big five measure which has become much more common in psychology, right? Yeah, ocean which is openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeable, nece, and neurotic. Zm that's much more often use now in psychometric settings than Myers. Rakes. It's really been co opted by like this weird kind of management, corporate crap. It is the two big problems with us from my point of view, as kera said, other than introvert, extrovert. The other ones don't really touch upon anything fundamental about personality. And the second thing is these are massive, false dichotomies. Yeah, everybody is all of those. Yeah, can't be not. Not only is it like reducing many possibilities to too, but it's reducing it to win either or when we are complex combinations, these and many other things, even if you take the two that are the most valid. Like introvert, extrovert, depending on circumstances, you could be fully in one of those two camps. Yeah, yeah. A lot of that really is about, you know, we've talked about this a lot in psychology. All we can measure construct. We're not actually measuring something fundamental or measuring the behaviors and the feelings and the experiences that we think amalgamate to be that fundamental thing. So how do you define what an introvert is it you look like an introvert. You feel like an introvert. You act like an all those different things play into also neglects the playoffs. So you could be extroverted but shy. And then you act like an introvert because you have social anxiety, but you really want to be an extrovert. Hurt in some ways..

Myers Briggs Jay kera Wright Steve fifty percent five weeks five week
"myers briggs" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"myers briggs" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"And i think that god set out a system that has created the greatest civilization the history of mankind i don't think that's a coincidence trade says habeen what is your myers briggs type i can't remember what is myers briggs this the introvert thing i'll have to look it up rolfast oh yeah yeah the free personality test you know i i did it at one point and i cannot remember for the life of me which one which type i am i have to look up the types and i probably remember so i believe that there are letsie so i would i know i was an extrovert i know that in terms of sensing verses intuition i think i was a sensing verses intuition i believe that when it came to making decisions i was thinking versus feeling and when it came to prefer a judging verses perceiving i believe that i was a judging so i i was either an e s t j oranje and tj i believe so that's for what forever that's worth that that's where i think i was anyway i can't remember to be frank with you okay joy says do practicing jews still believe that there is a messiah and why is there a difference between jews today inches of the old testament thanks love your show so yes practicing jews believe that there will be a messiah and when he comes you'll pursers p will pursue certain functions you'll reestablish a temple on the temple mount he will he will be responsible for the ingathering of exiles who will establish peace in israel on this according ma'am oddities he has basically very set simple set of tasks he's not some sort of superhuman figure he's not a god come back to earth or anything like that and as far as the difference he jus today inches of the old testament so jews of the old testament were living in i mean at the traditional orthodox answers there's not a huge difference but the truth is that there's been development.

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