34 Burst results for "Myeloma"

Emilio Delgado, Luis on 'Sesame Street' for 45 years, dies

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Emilio Delgado, Luis on 'Sesame Street' for 45 years, dies

"The man who played a popular character who helped break barriers on Sesame Street has died we went I'm not trying to put this up and you have to think wait a minute for many American kids Emilio Delgado was a way to say or lock to Latinos in ordinary non stereotypical roles for forty five years he played Louise the man who owned the fix it shop on Sesame Street Delgado has died his wife Carol telling the Associated Press her husband died from multiple myeloma at their home in New York he was eighty one years old Delgado came along at a time when there were few representations of Latinos on TV other than bandits all gang members big where you don't need to be Spanish they have a pinata that all changed with Sesame Street which brought a diverse group of kids and characters together as they mingled with Big Bird Oscar the grouch Elmo and Grover I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Emilio Delgado Delgado Louise Myeloma The Associated Press Carol New York Oscar Elmo Grover Oscar Wells Gabriel
Watch Live: Colin Powell's funeral held at Washington's National Cathedral

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 10 months ago

Watch Live: Colin Powell's funeral held at Washington's National Cathedral

"Former diplomat Colin Powell will be remembered by family and friends at a funeral today at the Washington national cathedral Paul rose from humble beginnings to become the first black chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and later served as the first black secretary of state he'll be eulogized by Madeleine Albright who preceded him as the nation's top diplomat Richard Armitage who was deputy secretary under pol and pol son Michael Powell died two and a half weeks ago of complications of Colbert nineteen at the age of eighty four he had been vaccinated against the corona virus but his family says his immune system had been compromised by multiple myeloma a blood cancer for which he had been undergoing treatment my

Paul Rose Washington National Cathedral Colin Powell Joint Chiefs Of Staff Madeleine Albright Richard Armitage Michael Powell Colbert Blood Cancer Myeloma
Powell's age and cancer bout left him vulnerable to COVID

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Powell's age and cancer bout left him vulnerable to COVID

"Colin Powell's death from covert nineteen complications despite being fully vaccinated highlights the continued risk too many Americans until more people are vaccinated Powell had been treated for multiple myeloma a blood cancer that hurts the body's ability to fight infections people with weakened immune systems from illnesses like cancer don't always get the same level of protection for vaccinations as healthier people age also plays a role with the CDC tracking dips in protection among older Americans who were among the first vaccinated how old was eighty four and it's unclear whether he received a covert nineteen vaccine booster experts are again stressing widespread vaccination is the key to helping protect the nation's most vulnerable Sager mag ani Washington

Blood Cancer Colin Powell Multiple Myeloma Powell CDC Cancer Ani Washington
"myeloma" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

Mike Gallagher Podcast

06:15 min | 10 months ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Mike Gallagher Podcast

"Your source for breaking news and what to make of it all. This is the Mike Gallagher show. This man was such a man of consequence. And a consummate public servant. What President Biden is doing is unconstitutional. There is zero authority in the constitution that gives the president, the authority to mandate anybody taking a vaccine. There is no doubt no doubt that the Biden White House is aware that the president's poll numbers are dropping with each passing week. No. From the relief vector dot com studios. Here's Mike Gallagher. Of course, a big breaking story today, general Colin Powell died at the age of 84 of COVID complications on social media. It's his cause of death that has sort of ignited the Internet. Colin Powell evidently suffered from multiple myeloma, which is a cancer form of a cancer of the blood. Makes the immune system very vulnerable. He also had Parkinson's and he was 84 years old. Who knew Colin Powell was 84? And unlike people on the left, who ridicule and almost revel in the deaths of prominent conservatives, I don't think normal people on the right are going to take any satisfaction or joy in the death of somebody who's a liberal. Colin Powell was an Obama supporting liberal. And disappointed us politically over and over again, but that doesn't change the fact that a family is grieving. And America mourns with the colon pal family, just like America, mourn the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. My friend Joe Piscopo often points out how mean people are on the left. And they are, they're just vicious. And maybe that's why we lose elections. Maybe that's why we lose the media. Maybe we lose sometimes because we're not as vicious and mean as they are. But we're just not. We shouldn't be. We should have a degree of respect and decency and civility over the family of Colin Powell, who are mourning the loss of their loved one. And of course, a man with a significant and profound history and life of service here's general Jack Keane to Fox News senior strategic analysis analyst rather on Fox News. Here he was with Bill hemmer and Dana perino talking about the life the general colon Powell lived. When he first got the briefing to take down a dictator noriega in Panama, it was presented to him that we were going to build up our forces over days and a couple of weeks. And then conduct this invasion and Powell looked at enemy said, why are we doing that? We've been investing in fighting it tonight. We've got the technology we've been training all of our soldiers. Why don't we just go down and take this thug out during the middle of the night? And that is exactly what we did. We parachuted in there in the middle of the night with rangers with delta with others and in about three or four hours decapitated that dictated. Most people didn't see much of that because it happened so quickly. But America saw the unfolding of America's military that reached its prowess certainly in the 20th century when Colin Powell was also chairman of joint chiefs during the Gulf War. And they saw American conventional power on display, the fruition of a generation of rebuilding the military after Vietnam and sits Colin Powell in the highest position in a military journey unfolding of that campaign. And certainly he was an absolute reflection of what was taking place on the ground because he and many of his peers were responsible for one unfolded there and rebuilding this military. And it was there, Bill and Dana that the American people began to fall in love with the American military once again. Because they got to see them up close, and they got to see their passion and their commitment to America. And they're willing to sacrifice and their ability to articulate. Colin Powell knew if you have a VIP around send them down and see the troops and let the troops talk to him. They'll do it far better than any of the generals or any of the senior NCOs or officers. And yes, he's going to be missed, Bill. So a big, big announcement over the death of a very famous person from COVID. On social media and you know, we always reflect here what the big Talking Heads don't talk about. You know, people are speculating on social media about his manner of death. I'll bet Colin Powell lived his life. I'll bet he traveled a bet he went around, somebody gave him COVID. He wasn't hiding in his bedroom. Despite having multiple myeloma, he was fully vaccinated. According to his family, he was fully vaccinated and he died of COVID. I talked to a family friend over the weekend. Who has a dear friend whose husband died a week or two ago of COVID 50 something years old? Absolutely no preexisting conditions, no comorbidities. He was fully vaccinated and he died. There will be people who are going to die. But the problem with the mandates, the problem with the dictatorial Democrats, it is all rules for thee not for me. There were the bidens, walking through a fancy restaurant without their mask on in D.C. did you see that? How can that be? How can that be? Yep. Joe and Jill Biden walking through a restaurant surrounded.

Colin Powell Mike Gallagher President Biden America Joe Piscopo Jack Keane Bill hemmer Fox News myeloma cancer Ruth Bader Ginsburg Biden Dana perino Parkinson White House noriega COVID Panama Obama Powell
"myeloma" Discussed on Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Todd Durkin IMPACT Show

"I hope people. By raising funds through stair climbing. Because that's really what i do. I i raise money with all these races. I raised over. One hundred thousand dollars during charities mostly the multiple myeloma research downed asian and helping people that way and they're just like you know everything else that went through your life. I mean you can help people. And i realized that when i got to the top able tower as corny as this sounds a year after my stem cell transplant. I i was invited to. The eiffel is an elite before my transplant. I can't do it on among treatment. And they let me come back the following year. Now i didn't climb as well as i did. I did it within a year. And i said there has to be more to light to just this year. They just me running up the building. Taking pictures.

myeloma
Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld Dies at 88

Gary and Shannon

01:03 min | 1 year ago

Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld Dies at 88

"Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld has died. He was secretary defense for President Gerald Ford, also under George W. Bush. Presided over the Cold War strategies in the seventies. And, of course, the terrorism that marked the bush presidency. Um, also the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Afghanistan I should say died today, died yesterday. I'm sorry at the at his home. In New Mexico at the age of 88 multiple myeloma was the cause, and he was one of those rare. Politicians in general, one of those rare Cabinet members who made sort of the, uh, the encore in all of this. He served under President Ford from 75 to 77, then served for five years under George W. He was at the, uh, the youngest and the oldest. To hold the post ever 43 years old when he first served under Gerald Ford and then 74 when he served under George W. Bush, staunch ally of former Vice President Cheney, who had been his protege and friend for a long time.

Secretary Of Defense Donald Ru Gerald Ford George W. Bush Afghanistan Myeloma Bush Iraq New Mexico Cabinet Ford Vice President Cheney
Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC News after 55 years

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC News after 55 years

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC news Tom Brokaw of NBC news says he's retiring from television the eighty year old Brokaw who anchored NBC nightly news from nineteen eighty two to two thousand four says he plans to continue writing books and articles Procol last appeared on air on MSNBC's morning Joe on December thirtieth in two thousand seven Brokaw reflected on his arrival at NBC news after just two years on local TV in the Brzeska arrive in California working for NBC in nineteen fifty six just four years off the Great Plains working class families and small town Brokaw was with NBC news for fifty five years in twenty thirteen roll call was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and curable blood cancer that affects the bone marrow hi Mike Rossio

Tom Brokaw Mike Rossi Brokaw Nbc News NBC Procol Msnbc JOE Great Plains California Curable Blood Cancer Myeloma Mike Rossio
With Injury, Justin Fields Is Taking a Big Risk for Ohio State

The Dan Patrick Show

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

With Injury, Justin Fields Is Taking a Big Risk for Ohio State

"Tonight's national title. Game will come down to well. It's gonna come down to whether or not ohio state can limit the amount of big plays this alabama offense can create and we saw that throughout the course of the season but in particular in the semi final game bruce myeloma mater and the flip side. I think justin feels half the has to have a similar game so what he had in the semi final game which was his best game as a college quarterback so if he can so again blow for blow like i mentioned earlier in the nfl games but if he can do that. I this alabama offense. I think they stand a chance but the biggest question mark right now. Dan is how big an impact kobe. We'll have potentially on the delighted. How healthy justin fields is going to be with that rib injury that he's dealing with.

Bruce Myeloma Alabama Ohio Justin NFL Justin Fields DAN
"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"In two weeks. I kept saying at finally a nurse frustrated. When i appreciate your optimism optimism your outlook on life but you are not going lohan Your white cells red cells platelets hemoglobins. They're all gonna drop zero. You're going to be on bed. Rest you're gonna need oxygen. And then those counts have to rise in stabilized before anyone will ever consider going on and that's going to be for about a period of five weeks and i says no i'm going home in two weeks. I went home in two weeks. Although i was getting neupogen injections might might counts. Never went to zero then they triple than the tripled again. And i went home two weeks to the day in there looking at me like wow because i never surrender to cancer ever. You're not gonna keep me in the hospital for five. It's not going to happen. So it's mental seventy thirty. I believe it firmly. Believe it sure your resilience is is something to to emulate and you are a model to so many of us out here. Keep doing what you're doing. We appreciate you and thank you so much for joining us here on. Talk on calls you today. I really hope you picked up on some of the gems that we discussed here with David jacobs as he was fighting multiple. Myeloma one of the things he talked about is not owning it. Not accepting the fact that you have kanter saying oh i have cancer. No he didn't want to own that you know he fought it. He got the treatments that he needed what he didn't accept that you know that this was his defeat. And those what i picked up. And i hope you picked up on that as well and as you out here and you're fighting you're battling that cancer you don't necessarily have to own it. According to david m we look at the results for him. Here he is seven year mark still thriving going strong and it has a lot to say about your mindset. And he talked about that right. Is you recall. He talked about his seventy percent mental. And if you can get out of your head and and fight this battle mentally gonna get you that much further another gym that i hope you picked up on as he talked about the team that he had.

lohan cancer David jacobs Myeloma kanter david m
"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"Diagnosed early. It can be treated. You know what i mean. But those who who. Don't talk about in private. I speak for those people. Don't let them know you're not alone. You can do this right. Don't clam up share because if you don't share nobody knows nobody can support you. Nobody can help you for the past. Two weeks i've been receiving care packages in the mail. Because i thought my diagnosis had worsens. Because because of my blood count. I had to take a pet scan of find out. I'm still okay. But i posted that i was down before i could get in. Go into a dum boom. Here's a care package for. Fedex is a care package from the from the mailman. Here's a care package from. Ups is another one from federal. They just been coming in. You can't get that support. You can't get uplifted. You can't get all the the greeting cards from you know the congregation in on we're gonna we're worldwide faith. You know so. People were sending postcards from everywhere with encouraging scriptures. If they don't know you can't get that support so then you'll rely on your own thinking your own understanding and you'll be in your own little world your own little bubble and you're gonna go into funk and you're going to give in choosing the live.

Fedex
"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"Read and learn upon and learn lhermitte the latest research developments and the trial. Chemo's that are out. You know you could do could do a trial and not have to come out of pocket. Look for because some of those chemo visits can be one to three thousand dollars. Visit without the right insurance. That's that can be costly so learning about who to talk to in the hospital to help look out for those things for you to present them to you. It's so much mental and when you get diagnosed in your world spinning slowly like that you need to be able to turn somewhere. And say hey. It's okay yeah this is. What's this is what you look. This is what you should expect. This is what you should look into. This is what you should tell your family. This is the diet. That's probably going to work for you. Here's some resources. Here's some here's where you might wanna think about moving to for the best care you know. I miss being back in seattle. Now that has seattle cancer care alliance. Fred hutchinson and i mean. There's so much more than where. I am here in california but if you i i feel confident with wine with because they're kind of like the stanford so i'm good with that but knowing's half the battle your so talk to me a little bit about this because you know one. I'm happy that we have you on the show because for for multiple reasons and one one of the main reasons to is that men do not ask for help. They don't know how to do that. And it's a difficult thing when you're especially when you're suffering from a diagnosis like this. How do you get the help david that you need. What makes you so different. And what can you tell others that are reluctant to ask for or help. You're right. I don't know if it surprising i cannot ask. I will not ask for help. Most of those. Who.

lhermitte Chemo Fred hutchinson seattle cancer care alliance seattle stanford california david
"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"Digestive system for your life and so as you going through this i mean and that's that's all important for everyone listening end know who may be going through one of the things that we talked about before in a few episodes back was nutrition. And so is nice to know that you confirm in this also as you. You've lived it changing up your diet and getting the energy that you need making sure you have this set amount of proteins. Not walk is a little bit to david through the chemo journey. Because that's a whole nother beast right. I mean you're you're getting chemo was was it. Oral was an infusion talk to us a little bit about that experience. I've done all three. I've taken the poorest pills. I've done the injections and the left off with infusions because those get in right away and they just seem to be easier to to do but again is trial and error a lot of people. Think that chemo's chemo. They they look at it like it's Penicillin for infection or something like. It's an antibiotic but there are different. Chemo's for different cancers so. I can't tell someone who's been recently diagnosed as going to have to go through chemo that they're gonna have the same reaction to chemo that i did because if they don't have multiple myeloma they're not going to be on the side toxin or the revenue matter. Whatever that i'm taking they might be on something else for whatever cancer is that they have. So you're here might not fall out. You might not be nauseous. You might not be as sick. They're all constantly coming out with new chemo's and whatnot. But i had to learn many things for instance. I will go to to chemo. I was sitting in this chair. I'd get infusion for a couple of hours. I'd come home. I'd be sick as a dog. I got a medal taste in my mouth. Nothing tastes good anymore. You gotta find what good to drink. That's palatable what's good to eat. That's palatable that still good for you and how to combat that mental taste in your mouth. How to sustain an appetite. You gotta do something to get an appetite. You're not going to be feeling like eating..

chemo cancer Chemo david myeloma
"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

All Talk Oncology Podcast

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on All Talk Oncology Podcast

"Our on college. I'm your host. Tim perkins aka the cancer guy. And let me say again as always we have phenomenal guests on our show. You know you may have not known this gentleman. I have come to have the privilege of knowing him and getting a little bit of background on his story. This gentleman studied a little bit of the pre law and has been out on the road and trucking for over fourteen years. And so today when you think about topics as multiple myeloma what comes to mind and so you think of that. He can't help but think of tom. Brokaw off of a man who has battled this this cancer disease. And you think of roy snyder you may have known him but those are two young. You may not know but for some of us who who's been around a while. Were schneider was the gentleman from jaws. He's actor from jaws. So what al further do. This is a a subject that people have are going through as far as multiple. Myeloma is not an easy battle. You know when you especially when you're dealing with a blood type disease. How do you deal with that. How do you manage. we're going to find out today. Let us tune in as we listened to. David jacobs as in bring him to our show. All-talk oncology david. Welcome thank you thank you very much is here as a pleasure to have. You talked to us a little david. A mean of my lomas is no joke in none of these cancers are friendly right out there now. Welcome you with a open arms. Talk on the a little bit about your diagnosis. I am pretty ambitious guy. I had some physical jobs at before. I got my commercial. Driver's license went on the road. So the pain. That i was feeling from this was probably many years before i was actually diagnosed and i just thought it was from physical exertion because of as an internal pain like a deep tissue or muscular type strain from an active day lifting twisting and pulling pallets in you know stuff like that and i just chalked it up that it was a good day's work take absence all bath up some tylenol. Get up and do it again. Monday through fri- you know it wasn't until i moved to california from seattle and we didn't know anyone my ex-wife from the kids and i we didn't know anyone so we got annual passes to disneyland in california venture me when every weekend. Well that's when the pain worsened.

Tim perkins myeloma cancer disease roy snyder blood type disease cancers Brokaw David jacobs schneider david tom lomas al california seattle
"myeloma" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"How did you get so interested in in my aloma well We had to spend six months in a laboratory at that time as part of our internal medicine training. And i signed up for hematology. Because i knew less about it than anything else and then when i finished the laboratory i realized that i didn't know anything about the clinical aspects. So i took the hospital service and on that hospital service. Two things happened. I i saw electric ready pattern. I had never seen one before because it was a new test and Ned bought barad. Who was the consultant on the service. said why don't you look into it and so i did and reviewed the six thousand patterns that had been done here and Wrote a paper that was published and then during that same hospitalization a woman was admitted to the hospital With mile olma for radiation therapy. But as i've read the chart she had had a biopsy. The biopsy showed amyloid. And i said to my so what in the world is that. I had never seen her more appropriately. had never recognized patient of amyloidosis in four years of medical school. A internship two years in the air force as a physician and three and a half years as a fellow at the mayo clinic. So i had seen a goodly number of patients. So amyloid is an abnormal protein yet. collect the new. You saw that in a patient that you hadn't seen before. But i hadn't seen that i hadn't recognized this before is a more appropriate term and then this sorry to the serum protein electrophoresis. This this is a study that are are you. The one who figured out that there was a particular pattern that patients For with myeloma have Yes that was That was the so-called spike in the electro ferretti pattern and I reviewed those patterns and found that the vast majority of them did have multiple mile. Oma were walden. Strums macro lobby at anemia. Okay multiple myeloma. Tell us a little bit about the disease and in lay terms. I mean it's a cancer of the blood. It's a cancer of the bone marrow. Basically and these plasma cells become malignant continue to grow and produce more protein and damage the bone and did patients ever survive myeloma. I mean now it seems like it's getting a few years up to five years in some survival stories but back when you started doing this. Was there ever anyone who survived myeloma. Well only for a very limited period of time in my textbook in madison. It said that there were two treatments for multiple myeloma one was x. Ray therapy radiation therapy and the other was blood transfusion. there was no chemotherapy. No drugs available. So have you studied multiple drugs for myeloma and today. They're much better. I mean the survival. The average survival. For a patient with myeloma when i went through medical school and even residency was about three years. What is it now It is probably eight or nine years and for patients with good risk disease. It's even longer than that and in fact about a fourth of patients with multiple myeloma are actually cured or perhaps more appropriately said die of another disease other than their multi mile. That's amazing how what would you say is your most significant when you look back on career. There you've made so many isn't over yet that's right. What's what has been your most significant contribution in your mind. Well probably the major thing has been the the development of my younger colleagues and In the field disproved namias which include myeloma macro globule. Anemia and al amyloidosis as the major ones..

multiple myeloma amyloidosis Anemia mayo clinic consultant Ned Oma madison
Finding the Best Cell for the Job

The Bio Report

06:40 min | 1 year ago

Finding the Best Cell for the Job

"Eric thanks for joining us. Thanks so much that we daddy very nice to be on. Today we're gonna talk about berkeley heights. Your digital cell biology platform and its potential to impact finally therapeutic development and manufacturing but agricultural and industrial applications of biotechnology. Let's start with some terminology. Berkeley lights calls itself a digital cell biology company. I'm sure liz familiar with each of those words but maybe not put together in that way. What is a digital cell biology company. Yeah i mean so for for the listeners who are lights reposition ourselves as leading digital biology company. What it means dante's we're we're really focused on accelerating the rapid development and commercialization of bio therapeutics and other selves products. And and. so we do that because we really we. We've envisioned future. Where you know cells are skew volt steinway to manufacture the product. We need to live a long healthy life and and we also understand that. There's big challenges in making salvage products in a big challenge. Today is is that you really have to understand an assess how the cells performa hey In other words you functionally characterize many single cells at scale to find the single-cell that makes the product you need and so what we do at berkeley heights is. Is you know we we record. You know that that kind of qualitative information from these functional asked the cells we translate that into digital information and so this is the digital information which is associated with the digital sell vilocci component right. This is the digital information that our customers used to select the cells. And so you know. We provide this huge data cube of information to our customers and and that is why we are a digital biology company. I think for the purposes of this discussion people need to think a bit differently about cells than they might otherwise. You're not looking at sells for the role. They play in a living organism but as factories that have the potential for producing a desired end product. What our cells in this context we believe these cells are are these little factories like you describe in an inside of these sales there there. There are millions of things happening at any given instant them you know you have you have of course transcription from a Into ornate translation into different proteins. All covered by you know these crazy maddock reactions that allow these chemical reactions to have an at temperatures that are that are unforeseen and read sit around for seen outside of these little factories. And so you know these cells birthrights can be just about anything. It's actually one of the one of the wonderful things about our platform is we can handle wide variety of of different cells on the platform and so although our major workflows are in selig development where we used cells like Chinese hamster ovaries sales chose cells or in antibi- discovery where we either take plasma v cells and these can be from unionized. These be from humans can be from any host of of animals. It's been immunized or has been to disease and recovered so this is the fbi cells and antibody discovery. We have t. Cells that we pull on the device from for self therapy development workflows in synthetic biology can be bacteria yeast Different fungi A huge host of different organisms can be can be operated on the brake lights platform. So you know it's it's it's pretty exciting tasks be able to operate across central. Why a wide variety of of biological organisms one of the challenges of developing cell based products. Is that it requires living and functionally validated cells. Berkeley said adding methods to characterize cell functionality are insufficient and come too late in the process. Can you explain yes so for example of when you think about Let's let's take an example like antibody discovery in antibody discovery. It's it's not uncommon for you know the former customers or or or biotech companies to have is animals. And and so you know you take a blood sample from these immunize animals and you find that. Animal is has positive. There are antibodies in that animal. Which are specific to a therapeutic for a particular disease. And so you know one of the ways that that the most common way of a finding or discovering the b. cells which produce antibody which by the way have the code so that we can manufacture therapeutic. You have to find that. Sell one of the ways that they do it is. Is this process cold hybridoma. And so i in the hybridoma process you. You sacrificed animal. You grab the spun decides you then fuse them with his cancer cells myeloma cells in and you create this kind of frank inside cell which is all hybrid home now the functional characterization that process doesn't happen for eight to twelve weeks and so your way down your way way down the process and by the way in that first fusion process that i mentioned you lose a a very large amount of the genetic diversity in that process. So you're way way down the time line you don't know whether you do have a functionally a functionally diverse set of of anti pd. Candidates are not if you contrast that to the lights workflows. You know we do. Is we take the cells. Positives be cells directly from that animal and we put them on the system and within eight hours. I you know whether you do or do not have invaded therapeutic candidates and so we're able to perform this level of characterization very rapidly and it's not just it's not just you know isn't engine specific you know we. We also have the ability to measure cross species reactivity competitive binding essays and these are all kind of india isotopes. These are all kind of bread butter things but will we recently released. One of the workflows we recently released was our are viral news. Ation workflow in which we showcase day in the app note functional blocking acid so we can actually put either reporter cells or or proteins bound to feeds into the nfl with a cell that secreting antibody and show that you know that there is a blocking That blocking performer. If this is done with live cells you can actually see the the function on the live cells that the antibody blocks the interaction. So that's it for us. That's pretty exciting.

Berkeley Heights Berkeley LIZ Eric Selig FBI Cancer India NFL
Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

The Bio Report

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

"Greg. Thanks for joining US getting so much standing. My pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Cartesian therapies, exuma biotech, and your efforts to develop rapid point of care delivery of these therapies. Let's start with Cartesian therapies themselves out of these therapies work today. Well you know if we were to look at this technology today. And put it in the context of what we do in science and medicine even fifteen years ago. The the thought that we could truly have living medicine with genetically modified. LYMPHOCYTES in the body would have been unheard of it. And really I think the basic process of taking one cells from the body. In reprogramming genetically lymphocytes in returning them back into a patient to retrain those cells to see cancer antigens much in the same way we've done with monoclonal antibodies in the past, but wiring all that into itself is what is made Carta. Medicine which has been both exciting in is of course had. Equally that the number of challenges in in many different areas. Well. How are these therapies typically prepared and administered? Well it's a complicated process that has. A tremendous amount of technical skill required as well as logistics so typically. When a subject is entering into a trial or on therapy for approved medicines, their blood is drawn and separated into white blood cells and then shipped usually on a plane to a central manufacturing facility where those cells then are taken into a cleanroom, they are activated their genetically modified they're grown for about. Fifteen days, and then they are prepared just like you would with drug. And then ship back to the site. So there's a tremendous amount of time that can be lost for patients during this period and then once those cells. Are received. Back The patient receives Olympic depleting chemotherapy regimen to kind of make space. And then the cells are infused and at that point they take off and they're on their own. These cell therapies have been more successful in hematological answers than in solid tumors. What why is that? Well I. Think if you look at the history of the Field Dang, what you will find is that. One of the principal challenges in building cellular therapies has been it. They can be incredibly potent. So in the case of something, we know very well like CD nineteen, this isn't a liquid tumor setting those cells with CD nineteen will eliminate. All targets in the body that express CD nineteen, and this is found in many lymphomas. leukaemias. But the problem is in the case of CD nineteen, you're eliminating all of the normal cells make CD nineteen, which are called E. Cells, and this is tolerable in the case of liquid tumors. But when you think about the antigens targets that we go after in solid tumors, those are often expressed in tissues that. Not Be safe if the immune system were to attack it. So we've been forced to really take steps back on how well we can make a car for solid tumors to try and make them smarter to help recognize friend from foe. So the great efficacy I think that you've seen in relapse refractory ael l.. As well as in diffuse large B. Cell Lymphoma, and now also I think exciting we in places like multiple myeloma getting that stain level of efficacy in solid tumors has required that people really think about the precision inside of the problem to make sure can get a potent car but also one that is safe.

Solid Tumors United States Carta B. Cell Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Field Dang Olympic Principal
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Lester Morales, CEO at Next Impact

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 2 years ago

Lester Morales, CEO at Next Impact

"Marquez Marquez's here and today I. Have the privilege of Hosting Lester Morales. He is a true consultant in the human capital and employee benefits arena, and currently serves as CEO of next impact. LLC focused on innovation and changing the status quo. Next impact is a full service employee benefits and Human Resources Marketing and consulting company committed to helping other companies grow and add value to their clients before he. He founded next impact. He Co founded in Selah, a benefits administration company focused on helping advisors support their clients with ACA compliance prior to becoming an entrepreneur, lester serve nearly three years as executive vice president and chief growth officer for Willis's human capital practice, one of the largest insurance brokerages in the world in this role Lester lead over two hundred producers consultants in forty plus offices as part of a three, hundred and fifty. Fifty Million Dollar Practice Willis. A single largest practice in North America during a previous eight year stint at Willis Lester, was consistently among the top five consultants nationally between those assignments Lester served as national vice president of sales for Health Stat orlean provider of worksite clinics and disease management services. Leicester's thought later in the benefit space, and I had just the opportunity to connect with them before this and his passion for making healthcare. Healthcare more equitable employers and the employees is palpable He's he's. He's all in and I'm privileged to have them here on the podcast today, Lester, really looking forward to our discussion, they have. We should have nothing to be here -absolutely so lester before we dive into what you guys do at next impact and the quote here on the front of your site. starbucks spends more on healthcare than they do on coffee wow. Right we're going to dive into that and what your you and your team is doing to help. Prevent that or turn it around to something more sustainable. Tell us a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah, yeah, you know most people that end up in the insurance advisory space. While into it's the Mine is I'm doing this on purpose. I have a very stinks. Why unfortunately I have been a product health care insurance employee benefits when I was sixteen years old. My Dad was diagnosed with multiple myeloma for you. Listeners that don't know what that is. That's cute of your bone marrow. So I was sixteen got diagnosed found out San France Limo radiation several years back baffled. That's. Unfortunately ends up being that me. Combat statistics so sixty two's. Depending on which report you live, read out personal bankruptcy puzzle medical reasons while unfortunately we were part of that statistics are my parents had to file bankruptcy? In order to make ends meet the rent in worse yet. It's interesting about that is they've got health insurance? both employer based insurance, but you know we're in an out of pocket mass along as Hand Fifteen, twenty, two thousand a year for family. You know you do that. Do three years in a row. How many families have extra thirty forty fifty thousand dollars sitting? There Bang you. You know when you're trying to send your kid baseball camp. You get on the new pair of Jordan. Then all the thing that wonderful parents which I had you know to water? Parents did Zach I mean down the road of of Yao, interest in and understanding vow health insurance, but it also makes you understand how they're using the system is and and that although you got insurance, although theoretically that insurance is supposed to be there to supporting how it was, it was really more of a hoop jumper, and you know an obstacle alone commerce so. Back, down the field, and then the last part of really what what drives me and my? Why unfortunately I'm a big I'm a big. Momma's boy is most Latin. Men Are. A BIG MOMMA's boy. Unfortunately in two thousand fourteen moms diagnose pancreatic cancer and she passed away August. Eleven thousand seventeen, so man I'll tell you I get up every day fired up to fights for changing because I have seen that you most important. Pete in my life away from cancer the amount of money we spent the amount of confusion. The amount of just uncertainty and Hoots Jeff Junk mail system just makes sense air, and so that's that's what we get. Get up every morning

Willis Lester Lester Morales Marquez Marquez Human Resources Marketing Multiple Myeloma Starbucks North America Vice President Of Sales CEO Executive Vice President ACA Leicester Momma YAO Pete San France Baseball
COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:01 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

"This healthcare podcast is sponsored by Indiana University School of Medicine whose mission is to advance health in the state of Indiana and beyond by promoting innovation and excellence in education, research and patient CARE I. I School of Medicine is leading Indiana University's burst grand challenge, the precision health initiative with bold goals to cure multiple myeloma, triple, negative breast, cancer and charts coma, and prevent type, two diabetes and Alzheimer's Disease Jim Welcome. Thanks for for having me.

Indiana University School Of M Indiana University Indiana Multiple Myeloma Alzheimer's Disease
Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Seattle company gets green light for human tests on potential COVID-19 cure

"The Seattle based infectious disease research institute will soon begin trials on an investigational immunotherapy that could be a promising treatment option for covert nineteen it's based on immune cells in the body known as natural killer in case cells which are already used to treat leukemia multiple myeloma patients the immune cells to get the sites of active via affection kill the virus in induce an immune response that controls the if infection the trial will begin soon with approximately a hundred patients diagnosed with a coded nineteen infection

Seattle Leukemia Multiple Myeloma
6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:53 min | 2 years ago

6 Decades Later, This Atomic Vet Is Finishing His Music Education

"Heck Bolden is an eighty three year old undergraduate at the heart school of music in Connecticut is also an atomic vet one of thousands of soldiers exposed to secret nuclear weapons tests during the Cold War Connecticut public radio's Diane Orson has the story of one man's remarkable journey in nineteen fifty five Hank Bolden was in his late teens and stationed in California one day the young musician was told he'd been chosen to participate in a special military exercise I had no idea what I was selected for he was flown to desert rock Nevada where he joined hundreds of other soldiers from across the country he didn't know anyone else there a day later they were marched out to trenches and the trash that I was and there was nothing but so does that look like me our our black faces a countdown began when it got down to zero that's when the big flash one of the big flash with the dropping of the atomic bomb for the testing and they had us place two point eight miles from ground zero not only in the path of the fallout but in the predicted path for the fallout then came a wave of heat and dust and there weren't any goggles a debt that we have to place our rise just had a helmet in arms supposedly to protect the eyes and give visibly see so your bones and he visibly see or other folks skeletons in our that's what I saw yes after the tests pulled in and the other soldiers had to swear an oath of secrecy never to talk about when it happened not to family doctors or to each other violation of the oath was punishable by ten years in prison and a ten thousand dollar fine golden says for decades he never talked but as the years went on he was diagnosed with bladder cancer multiple myeloma and subcapsular cataracts he began to worry that his health problems might be connected to what he'd seen there were a lot of tests in this period Alex Muller Steen isn't a story in of nuclear weapons at the Stevens institute of technology he's speaking by Skype these are really tests to see what happens to soldiers if they see a live nuclear weapon go off can they still be command do they become hysterical and no longer take orders did they become so overcome with fear that they can't do anything at the same time military commanders were not fully aware of the risks of exposing soldiers to ionizing radiation says well Steen slowly veterans who'd been unwittingly used as human research subjects began quietly sharing their stories Congress lifted the oath of secrecy in nineteen ninety six today those who can demonstrate their atomic veterans and have developed one of several specific medical conditions are eligible for compensation last year after receiving his compensation Hank bold and decided to go back to college when he got out of the army back in the fifties hidden rolled at the heart school of music but never got a degree but dropped out of college to go on a rope and music and I love to complete before right but have started so the eighty three year old audition for renowned saxophonist trevan Jackson director of hearts jazz studies division it was apparent to me that he is a practitioner about to said musician who can do it but he wants to come in and learn a little bit more about the nuts and bolts of music which I think is some to be an off old and was accepted and awarded a scholarship he says he's come to terms with what happened decades ago when he was a young soldier I have no regrets about being involuntarily volunteered because after he has played a part in and to my being here now where Matt as for sitting in classes alongside students one quarter his age Bouldin says well music will keep

Heck Bolden
CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

Healthcare Triage Podcast

09:07 min | 2 years ago

CAR T-Cell Therapy and the Future of Cancer Treatment

"Today we're GONNA be talking to Cherie Virago professor of medicine and medical molecular genetics and also director of the stem cell program. I use school of Medicine. He Generals General's GonNa talk to us today about stem cell. Therapy and car T.. Therapy in particular which you may have heard in the news but before we get to that. Let's start with some basics first of all. Welcome to the program program thank you. Can you tell us in general what it means to be not only a professor of medicine but a professor of medical and molecular genetics so medical Michael Molecular Genetics. It's a very broad term It's it's really looking at the molecular basis of disease Not just inherited a disease but Many of the diseases have a molecular basis. Even if they're not directly inherited had he actually look get to the molecular basis. What kind of research technologies are you using? The biggest technology at the moment is Sequencing genes particularly in in terms of Chewers in my area sequencing can cell's genome to identify particular mutations. That could be targetable identifying mutations Sion's that in future could be Way We could design drugs perhaps decided Also there are ways of personalizing Medicine in a way Way We can identify Because not all cancer even the same kind of cancer is not all Homogeneous there's a lot of heterogeneity so if you can identify certain mutations in a person's at cancer cell you may be able to target that specifically perfect for that person's cancer as opposed to all the people with that kind of cancer. So how do you train to do this kind of work so in your career career how what did you do to get to this point. Well I guess there are various ways of getting there the way I got there. I trained actually in Australia Did all my hematology. Aw called you training in Australia. And then I did a PhD. That was more related to stem cell transplantation rather than molecular medicine at the time and then I moved to Ohio state where I stayed there for about six years on faculty and then the opportunity came to lead the transplant program. Ram At Indiana University. So I moved there in two thousand six. So we're talking about treating cancer. Is it all kinds of cancer or specific kinds of cancer. Turner accident well as a stem cell transplant. we're really focusing on hematological. Kansas blood cancers So leukemia multiple myeloma lymphoma. These are the ones that are amenable really to stem cell transplantation. You talk about what the differences are between those three short so It's really the cell of origin or the origin of the cancer so leukemia we're really talking about Cancers of blood stem cells the bone marrow in multiple myeloma. We're really talking about Cancer cells plasma cells which really part of the immune system in lymph falmouth with talking about cancer cells that are also part of the immune system that the less differentiated cells than the Coloma. So what what causes these. What makes someone developed one of those types of cancer? Well that's a really good question and we don't know all the the answers to that but It the it's silly as with other Kansas to I'll just blood cancers there are Hits in the genome of the the cans of the cells that turns them on to become cancerous essentially and so once they become cancerous. They just start growing multiplying without controls trolls. That the gist of it. Or Yeah. That's basically it they. They're able to multiply without control but they're also able to survive better They have a survival advantage compared to their normal counterparts talking about the history of treatment of those types of cancer. Like what do we do. And what are we. What are we got into now? And specifically of course what is stem cell therapy. Happy at the end. Yes so you know historically the we have been treating and we still the do treat These cancers with conventional cytotoxic agents these agents are essentially cellular toxins that cause DNA damage to the cells and as a result they The cells sells died and they because cancer cells tend to divide more frequently or more rapidly than normal cells and these conventional channel cytotoxic target the proliferating cells more than the Doman cells. So we're able to Mo- selectively kill cancer cells. But they are. They also affect normal cells as well as things have evolved We are now able to. We learn more about the genetics of the Kansas. His when now able to design drugs that particularly targets in pathways molecular pathways. That these cancer cells depend on so Treatment has become Less toxic to the to the patient in general so we're trying to target specifically just killing the cancer while not killing other other rapidly or any other kinda cells in the body. So what is then stem cell. Therapy like what. What's the difference between what skyping there and then going all the way to say? We're GONNA do a stem cell. Trance have so in some cases not all Kansas but some Kansas are also amenable to stem cell transplant therapy. And they're really too broadly. Speaking to approach is one where we use. The patient's own stem cells called tolerance stem cell transplantation. And where we use dona cells or allogeneic stem cell transplantation so with autologous transplantation plantation would really reverting back to the classic cytotoxic approach way we give very high doses of chemotherapy to Kill Oh as many cancer cells as possible. One of the side effects of this is that it will also cools a permanent damage to the bone marrow of people without stem cell support report. They would Essentially die of marrow failure so to collect stem cells. I there on stem cells assuming their stem cells not diseased. Then when you can give high dose. Chemotherapy give back stem cells and allow the marrow to recover so I have a couple questions there first of all. How do you get the stem cells? Out So stem cells live predominantly in the bone marrow But they do circulate the blood so you can either collect directly from the bone marrow but more commonly family today in the autologous approach we give growth factors which can move stem cells to circulate more in the blood and then we collect them. I'm by a process called a ferocious. Where basically they are collected a blood donor machine essentially that will collect them from the blood? How do you how do you how are you sure? You're not collecting cancer cells at the same time you do Some of these stem cell products will be contaminated but to some extent by cancer sells but it seems that most relapses after autologous transplantation occur not because of contamination. But because you really the the chemo a high dose chemotherapy that you've given has not killed the last cancer cell in the body. So how are you also assured that the stem cells are not. Can't where's the cancer come from. If it's not coming mm from stem cells as the simpsons or what about the sort of the the. He met a poetic stem cells. That give rise to the sherm tie. He met a point system. MM-HMM SO For example in multiple myeloma these inadequate ext themselves are not cancerous. Okay and in lymphomas Somali. They are not not cancerous. Can you just give us just a brief description of what the poetic system is so the Humana poetic system is essentially all blood forming cells and immune cells so the very primitive stem cells that give give rise to the humanitarian existent. They give rise to white cells red cells platelets as well as the components of the immune in systems such as B. Cells. T. Cells natural killer cells. We're just trying to figure out in my head and where it comes from. Because if if the are the white blood cells coming from the bone marrow in the stem cells though in development I it depends on the Canada Essentially for example if we take multiple well my Lama so the Within the immune system one cancer cell becomes Transform to become malignant and phones a clone in that clone of actually expands and has sub clones of its own and that's really the cancer but that's not arising from a in the actual stem cell of the very primitive stem cell that gives rise to all the blood forming cells in the Merrill.

Cancer T. Cells Kansas Multiple Myeloma Michael Molecular Genetics Australia School Of Medicine Professor Of Medicine Cherie Virago Ram At Indiana University Myeloma Lymphoma Director Ohio Professor Sion
First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as gene-editing human trials get underway

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

First U.S. patients treated with CRISPR as gene-editing human trials get underway

"For the first time doctors have used the new gene editing technique known as crisper to try to treat cancer patients in the US NPR's, rob Stein has more. For the patients for treated at the university of Pennsylvania one has multiple myeloma. The other has coma both had suffered relapses after undergoing previous treatment, scientists removed immune system cells from their bodies and use the new gene editing technique called crisper commodified, the DNA in the cells, and then infuse the cells back into the patient's bodies. The hope is the cells would attack the cancer. No information has been released yet about how. Well, the approach may. Or may not be

Multiple Myeloma Rob Stein Coma United States University Of Pennsylvania NPR
"myeloma" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

06:12 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Suffering as doctors giving them more chemo and more chemo. And it just doesn't work in the pains getting worse. And that's why he came here. He came to me because he's in tears. Pain and suffering. And he heard that we often treat people with cancer. That's true with pain. That's true in often relieve the pain and suffering that's true too. So we treated him which last year for this myeloma in the pelvic bone. Terrible pain. Terrible suffering getting more and more chemo wasn't working more side effects. Get them narcotics wasn't working very well and side effects from narcotics. And then he came here. We offered all the options we talked about all the options, and you chose our treatment. And our treatment is very successful to eliminate the myeloma in that bone and to place him in remission and that bone and take away the pain. And that's what we did. And he's now pain-free doing great. And this is the work. We do every day. And speak about a fifty five year old woman who came to me, she came to me with a recurrent Joma. He had surgery at one of the biggest most prestigious hospitals, the chairman of neurosurgery at the most prestigious hospitals in New York, and the chairman went into respect them and Ngoma meningioma is named for a tumor of the covering of the brain the Menendez and the surgeon left the tumor behind. How do we know that well, we can look at the margins? Usually when a surgeon removes a tumor the surgeon sends the tumor to the pathology department, and there was tumor at the margin where he cut he left tumor brain tumor inner head, and then he wanted to cut it again because she was having a tumor that was growing and she just did not want to go back. If you couldn't cut it the first time, why would he be better off the second time, and then they gave him gamma knife. It didn't work. So she had surgery this big hospital. Didn't work didn't work and came to me with recurrent aggressive. Menendez Oma surgery didn't work that Shurmur the department at this most prestigious hospital and he gave her gambling. I've treatment didn't work and then came here, and I saw her she has a deformity in her head when he opened up her head have to open up the bone when you opened up the bone. You should put it back in the right way. While the bone was left to formed markedly deformed it was her forehead. So it was something that she'd really didn't like the tumor was growing back. I met with her. We talked about all the options. She did not want to go back for surgeries you'd had surgery. It didn't work. It didn't work their radiation doesn't work and she came here for treatment. And now, it's years later. I didn't tell you that. But years later, she came to me years ago with a recurrent aggressive and GM we treated her after their surgery failed left tumor behind their radiation failed. And she came to the doctor who I delivered radio surgery for brain tumors in New York, one of the first in America when the first of the western hemisphere here now at thirteen eighty four Broadway, and we treated her years ago, and she's in remission doing well and happy about it. And I'm happy to of course, because we want our patients to succeed and we follow our patients, and we give our patients documents the patients understand exactly what's going on in their head in their body. This is the work. We do successful treatment from an NGO. Mr. success rate is very high. Even if surgery failed and even if other radiation failed. This is the work. We do every day at thirteen four Broadway. Broadway and thirtieth street in the heart of New York City. We're talking about a ninety two year old woman. She came probably does take this Colorado collar, so. Yes, hello. How are you? Hello. Okay. No one seems to be there. So about a ninety two year old woman who is widowed. She has two children. She came with her son. And she's as blood in the urine. So she has this bladder cancer. She was worked up one of the biggest hospitals, and that one of the biggest super duper big hospitals than even bigger hospital so into three big hospitals in New York City. So I say she went to the super pooper as she went to three of the super pooper hospitals. They found blood in the urine, they founded an invasive bladder cancer, all three hospitals and all three doctors told her they wanted to remove her bladder. Not remember she's ninety two years old. She has decreased hearing and high blood pressure anemia dementia, and she's a little bit fragile. And. She and her son just did not feel comfortable. And so they came here me, Dr Liederman that thirteen four Broadway. Members went to three big hospitals. And they all wanted to cut out her bladder at age ninety two they didn't do any other tests and said you have to cut your bladder. She smoked in college. So sometimes smoking is related to bladder cancer. It's another reason to stop smoking. If he's forty years old, and you stop smoking today, you'll live nine more years, which is a big dividends. I examined her. And I told her I told her son. Hey, no one's ever looked at the rest of your body to see if this is a cancer, this traveled, and what is cancer do cancer travels, and the sunset said, well, I went to the three biggest hospitals. Why didn't they do it?.

Pain bladder cancer chemo cancer New York City New York chairman Menendez Ngoma meningioma GM Colorado Dr Liederman America ninety two year ninety two years fifty five year forty years
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"We've got about two minutes left for you to sum up what you wanted to present our listeners. I guess my big ten in Newark Care. This way you can make informed decisions, but the only way that you can be that active participant to make informed decision. Is You need to educate yourself. You need to know everything there is about your disease. So you can participate in discussions and ask intelligent questions. And for Cancer Multiple Myeloma it's also very important that you see a specialist someone who only treats you're kind of cancer..

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Blood test because you can. Almost. Diagnosed Myeloma from a blood test that has to be compared through them their biopsy. But you know a blood test look for those raised levels of protein will help. So that's what we're trying to do. Educate education is important to you know it's interesting. Yesterday was present as a housekeeping supervisor was talking to a new employee. And she was given this person. They checklist of things to look for in the room of the person that she was entering to to clean the room, and she says, now, one of the things that you have to watch out for though is not to get. So focused on this list of things that you develop tunnel vision and overlook things because you can concentrate on this list and there's other things going on in that room and you'll miss it. We. have patients like that because the doctors are telling them. These are these are the things that are wrong with you, and this is how we're going to treat it, and they're kind of ignore these other side effects going on sometimes and I think you spelled it out good with this crab illustration because. Not only could that be something with Myeloma? There are many of those other ingredients that that could happen with diseases as well. Exactly, and and I think the point is if your doctor thinks it something. You start getting treat it. Like, you see no improvement. You can't be have to. You have to advocate for yourself. Tang, listen. You know we've tried this I've really seen no improvement. What else can it be? Should be senior doctor? Are there any test that we should be doing because sometimes that initial diagnosis the doctor makes isn't the correct diagnosis stiff takes twice as long to respond as you think it should or the doctor thinks that should. Start looking for something else like if it takes two or three courses of antibiotics, instead of one if it takes. More than three months of physical therapy. It takes in a normally long time to respond to something or if the response occurs and then goes away. Look for something different. Exactly, and and that's in my crew when it was when my back pain for two years wasn't getting any better with the pain medications or with the physical therapy, it was actually getting worse. So I'm. To the point. So debilitating that I almost couldn't teach because the pain was so great joke. If, I if I can't transport myself now that said it wouldn't happen. But back then I, guess wasn't that active participant in my care, I just listened to the doctor and. was just doubting myself thinking, maybe I have a low tolerance. Maybe I'm not feeling that physical therapy the right way. Just, you know I kept on doubting myself instead of. Pushing further saying, this is this isn't helping what else can A. Good Sydney..

Myeloma supervisor Tang Sydney
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Doctor. Questions. 'til diagnosis, especially, if you're having a hard time finding without the actually wrong with the one thing that a lot of people don't realize about multiple myeloma is how much can affect your bone. people can have unexplained fractures of their cyber bone. But one of the biggest things that can happen is you have unexplained fractures of your spine and collapse of your spine. It's not uncommon for people to six inches of their hike because there's fine collapsing on itself and people don't don't realize that can be a sign of multiple myeloma. So there's a great deal of stuff with back issues that people should be asking what else did. Exactly, and I. Because my. Beginning, presented as back pain. Obviously, I went to orthopedic Doctor Because. That's who you see for back pain and I do have to read chewing on a little secret. I really didn't have a primary care physician at the time. I was busy young mom running around and you know my health was fine. I only would tell adopted when I was is wearing that was a bad decision to make and it's so important to have those checkups. But so I didn't have a relationship with a primary care physician and I know blood work going on. So my only relationship at that point was with an orthopedic doctor and. For. And that's what many of them. I will the patients present I. Myself was three and a half inches height due to compression fractures. But I. Guess. Because, at the time I was in my forties and. Mild with patient. is in their sixties. Probably, multiple myeloma is off of my doctors, read our. Actually what the international, Myeloma, Foundation. It's doing this month during multiple myeloma action month is we have letters, their patient ladders. That were asking patients to give to their primary care physicians and to force appeared doctors especially talking about those crops. Mile that if they're seeing a patient who is tire to crab meaning, it's C. R. A. V., the C. stands for if your patient has elevated calcium levels sometimes. Because, my had the bones and the bones are calcium. Calcium will reach out into the bones. The art is for renal disfunction because. My Loma sometimes processed through the kidneys. It may affect your kidneys the as ringing mea, the blood cancer. So when the myeloma up Gets out. Moved out the red blood cells you get tired and the B. is for bone bone pain bone destruction. So we're trying to the primary care. And the peaks after snub, if you're seeing people, no matter what age presenting with some of these happy teachers, who is simple.

multiple myeloma bone pain C. R. A. V. Foundation
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Your doctor you're dealing with a life and death situation, I mean when you get a new roof put on your house, he get a few people coming in to give you ideas and estimates. When you're dealing with something, precious is your life. You should get a few people giving you ideas especially in the area. Possible. Where there's really no one set treatment path, they're different. There's different options and you WanNa, hear all the options that are available to you and what? Why you're ticker physician might suggest one or the other. So it and to this day whenever I have a treatment decision, make I, see multiple doctors and you know and ask what they think and why they think. So I can make the best decision for me. That's something to consider because in in the United States about every fifteen minutes, someone is diagnosed with my Loma and and you said something very important back then. At the at the very start of of your statements that. You've been seeing the doctor for years. They've been treating you for back pain. And it would give any medications. They didn't do he emerging and you were taking through art listening to yourself because really you were thinking to yourself there something else going on here, but they're not addressing that. And how many people did you run into Cindy in in your? Twitter feeds and facebook pages, and in talking to them face to face. That are going through a similar circumstance with their with their condition. Tapping you know we know our bodies, the best and. Knew. Something should have been done. I should have had at least next year if my back after seeing the doctor for two years. But that was just something that I might did that little voice in my head was telling me but. because. I was brought up in that age, of Dr. News. I didn't listen and I think many people especially, the myeloma population which tends to be an older population. Many of those people were brought up in the age of Dr News Best, and they just blindly follow with their doctors saying even if it may not make sense to them, it's important to find that voice and ask questions that you think that you want answered. Right? Even the imports. What else could this be? The. Because exactly because sometimes they just aren't aren't looking for them. And you can give them a gentle reminder. Exactly I read this wonderful book. It was Paul how Doctors Stink. and. It said exactly that like when you're diagnosed with something that one of the questions should be is what else could this date besides that or my presentation? The two things go along instead of one. So. It's a great book. I would recommend anyone to read it. Just kind of gives you ideas how you to ask your.

Dr News Best United States Twitter facebook Paul Dr. News
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

04:12 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Hard to change your mindset from doctor knows best. WHO, Hey, wait I know something to, how would you describe that progression in? Your Life. How it was slow, it took A. Long Time. I. Realized I after I was diagnosed. I knew I had to educate myself thing a teacher. So I timed an International Milo town Dacian They have been publication him families seminars. So, I tend to one of them. That was in my area. and. When those at the seminar, a lot of the patients there was talking about this online patient community. That's how they did call them. ovine patient communities, they call them whispers. That was called Acor Aco. Are and that you could ask questions and get information back. So I signed up for that eight list or and there I know how important it was to these patients was a worker in the beginning. To ask questions and So I knew I need to start learning baffles for my room. So I could ask my doctor questions. And so I started doing that. But even in the beginning when I knew this listen for in and something I should be doing. I I was shy. Almost fifty years of my life, I just listened. So I would write down questions. I. Wanted to ask my doctor. Book. And I would write them from like the most important to the least important, and then this way when I went to the doctor's office the doctor say you question I would look at them and I would force myself to ask those questions. And sometimes, very beginning. I was practiced them at home just because it wasn't like me to ask questions especially, if the questions I was asking was. I. Can challenging, but there's questioning something I was told. So it took a while and but now much more comfortable in this conversation with my doctor. Educated. My doctor knows that I'm asking community. So. But it. It was hard in the beginning. You know I just want. I. I guess I didn't have faith in myself and maybe I was being disrespectful to the doctor. Well, you know, I, think a lot of people have that. You in when they have to advocate for themselves. Oddly. It's sometimes easier when you have to advocate for your child or your spouse. And, I'm not sure why that is. A of people who sound that exactly. The Mama they're. Either advocating or your spouse or for your child for yourself. Yeah. I agree it just and I knew everyone was telling me how important it is to seeking second opinion and to seek second opinion with the myeloma specialists with a doctor who only fees my limitations because my. This kind of a little cancer and it's really important that you see doctor that just specializes in myeloma. and. So I knew I had to do that. I pushed myself to do that I found specialist. Did I went there. And wanted to specialists to ask me for the game of my community doctor. So the doctor could send especially, the century puts my community doctor. I said Joe I don't want my community Dr to know. I came to you. He might think I, I didn't trust him. You can they cleaned. This is common that you know specialist work with community doctors and seeking a second opinion is something that you should. I just thought I was going to be offending Dr Khomeini's tasty. Think that. You, know I. It's not that you don't trust..

Joe I Dr Khomeini cancer myeloma.
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Accidentally stumbled on social media. Actually I was watching the today show and Kathy Lee and Hoda on the today show asked me or ask gaffer buddy if they. We would follow them on twitter and I said, well, let me was twitter. is about what everyone's talking about? This was probably eight or nine, maybe ten years ago. So it was a while ago. It was like everyone knew twitter twitter was fairly no, maybe not brand new. So I signed up for twitter account and I started smiling Kathleen, hold on twitter, and there wasn't quite rather information that they were producing that I. Really. Needed to follow. But I also noticed that there was a search bar on twitter. So since my Loma, was always on my mind I typed multiple myeloma in the search engine on twitter and all these tweets came out and I saw that lot information was being shared on twitter about multiple myeloma and a lot of that information was being shared by reading special risk that to ski and I, M B Anderson and. Rush. Tomorrow Mayo Clinic. So I decided that what we twitter would be away from me to gather information because being a teacher I always thought knowledge was very important knowing things. And then in time I, a moment where I thought well, not only can I gather information, but maybe I could use twitter and other social media. The share information on morning with others because I saw an educated patient had better outcomes, I learned the hard way that. Being in that age of doctor knows best is not always the best that you really needed to be an engaged patient. So I changed my name because when I initially started twitter I, think my name was cindy see or something you know very generic and I saw there was a Myeloma Joplin twitter and a mile reverse. So since I was a teacher and I had multiple myeloma I changed my twitter name to my little teacher I started getting many followers and five hours I started. getting I. Realized that I now need to start for just saying. Good content and information and. That's what I did, and now I have over. Six thousand six hundred followers, and over forty thousand tweets and has been invited to many watch medical conferences talking to the audience about the value of social media and twitter and hematology, and I just find. It a good source into free source. People know about it as a way of educating. Alert you go. We gotTa Rockstar, with US Robin. Any questions for this..

twitter multiple myeloma Kathy Lee Mayo Clinic Hoda twitter. Kathleen cindy M B Anderson
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"So I really didn't have a period of watching Lee I can start treatment immediately, induction therapy and the first month or two was going well, my my little ones going down nicely, I returned to work. I was a fifth grade teacher and things were things were going well. But then three months into my action therapy. Began to stop working and My doctors were concerned because usually that doesn't happen. Usually you have a response at least for a year or so to get your numbers into a complete remission. So. To, go. There weren't as many as a treatment for my room as there are now. So things might depend gift saying if I were diagnos now because of all the choices I have. Done. My doctors decided that I probably should have a stem cell transplant that tried to get rid of the my Luma that was in my blood and marrow as quickly as possible. So I agree to have a stem cell transplant and that was an autologous transplant, a transplant using my own stem cells. And the key time point in the. Stem cell transplant is one hundred days post transplant they. Run Your Myeloma markers at that point to see what kind of a response you would have. And a hundred days post transplant. My response was something they designed as a minimal response on my mind. Going into, transplant. And coming out of transplant where exactly the same transplant really did not burn down. Get rid of them, you my cancer. So at that point. I was very depressed. I was scared because now my head on through to the treatment. That were available to me and. Not knowing what to do and wanting to be opened to travel if I needed to for clinical trials, her to be able to go inside a clinic for Infusions, i. made the decision to retire from teaching. So I could pursue different treatment options and luckily for me a new newly approved FDA combination therapy, they were starting to learn that time that combining two or three therapies together seem to have more efficacy. There was a synergy between different drugs com combining. So I went on a combination therapy and Slowly. Shortly, my little began to sant-. To. that. Combination. Therapy. And And probably took though. I. I I guess. I could define myself as a slow responder as maybe where typical mile on the patient. If there is a typical one I, don't think there are any there really isn't all unique but many myeloma patients may respond to therapy with an eight to ten cycles maybe within the year. is almost three and a half four years to reach what they called my maximum response, which was the maximum amount of that the therapy. Would work and that brought me into what they called was a very good partial remission. So I still have some. Blood. But I'm able to maintain that remission using maintenance therapy. So as I was getting better and feeling better and getting energy back and I back pain was starting to decide I started feeling. An emptiness inside you know my entire life, I worked I was a teacher, and now I was home retired. kind of like a not planned retirement i. didn't have these exciting vacations planned or I wasn't. My daughter was marrying I. didn't have grandchildren stay fit. So I really just had this emptiness. I was now feeling better. But I really had nothing to do and.

Lee FDA sant
"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"myeloma" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Glad to have you with us today for this. Important. Conversation Robin. So glad you're part of this broadcast team. I'm really looking forward to it. Multiple Myeloma an caused near and dear to my heart, and our guest today is dealing with just out. So I'll let you introduce. She certainly is and the American Association for Cancer Research Describes Her in this manner. They say that Cindy Szymanski is a social media rockstar and myeloma patients circles. So with that, we would like to introduce a Rockstar to you today. Cindy welcome to our podcast. Thank you for inviting me. I've never been described as a rockstar before Fine. Well that's that's what the American Association for Cancer Research Credits You with when when they did article and we'll have the link to that own owner, a summary, four year program, and you're involved in a lot of organizations, a lot of activities and a lot of advocacy I. Know you've got a very massive twitter following, and so why don't you tell us how you got involved in? START US off with your story about. Your experience with multiple myeloma. Okay, thanks I'm well, I factors with Myeloma in two thousand eight. But basically, I probably had my prior to that I had been going to seeing orthopedic. Doctor. For. Several, years. With this horrible horrible back pain and. Knowing that that pain is one of the main sites mile over at Diagnosed with degenerative disease and I was being treated with physical therapy prescription medication for over two years. There was something that bothered me about that with because my doctor never did any imaging of my back and I was wondering, well, how does he know that it was just that could be anything else. But. That's and I was in that age of Dr. News? Best and. I thought to myself, who was, I, ask the doctor question. So I didn't listen to myself and but finally, after was two years, an X-ray was finally done and I was going into surgery to repair what they found US and part of crew surgery protocol was to have some blood work done and when the blood working back abnormal I was referred to an hematologist oncologist and just with that looking my blood work and the signs that I was very tired had ongoing back pain some this cop symptoms of multiple. myeloma. I was diagnosed with my rumor and began treatment almost immediately and Would you like? Me To get into a little bit more about trading or just I. Would you like to ask some questions? Yeah. Let's let's go with the treatment and what was available back then and you can kinda lead us through some of the development has taken place since this period of time in two, thousand, eight okay right. Once, I was diagnosed, my role was considerate stage three and in blood cancer multiple myeloma. Particularly, they don't have the stage for though that was the most the highest stages be there was my walmart in over ninety nine percent of my own..

Multiple Myeloma Cindy Szymanski American Association for Cance pain US Robin twitter walmart degenerative disease American Association Dr. News
Progress in the fight against Blood Cancer

Today's Health And Wellness

01:10 min | 4 years ago

Progress in the fight against Blood Cancer

"Here's today's health and wellness podcast. I'm Mark news. Thanks for joining us. Progress is reported in the fight against blood cancers. Dr Gwen Nichols with the leukemia and lymphoma society says, there's promise in something called car teeth therapy. This is genetic engineering therapy where you use your own immune system of the patient's own immune system to help fight their tumor cells. Doctor nickel says, blood cancers can take many forms. Ludd cancers include leukemia and lymphoma as the leukemia lymphoma society name suggests, but also myeloma and a number of other blood cancers that are somewhat rare that involve the blood, the bone marrow and the lymph nodes. Nickel says, some blood cancers are now being cured, and hopefully more will be soon you can learn more at these -ociety is website at l. l. s. dot ORG. That's today's health and wellness podcast.

Leukemia Lymphoma Nickel Dr Gwen Nichols L. L.
The fight against blood cancers sees progress

Coast To Coast AM: Somewhere In Time

00:45 sec | 4 years ago

The fight against blood cancers sees progress

"Progress is being reported in. In the fight against blood cancers. Dr Gwen Nichols. With the leukemia and lymphoma society says there's promise in something called car T therapy. This is genetic engineering a therapy where you use your own immune system on the patient's own immune system to help fight fair tumor cells, the doctor says some blood cancers are being cured now. And hopefully more will be soon you can learn more at L L S dot org. Marg cancers include leukemia and lymphoma as the leukemia and lymphoma society name suggests but also myeloma and a number of other blood cancers that are somewhat rare that involve the blood the phone Mero and the lymph.

Leukemia Lymphoma Dr Gwen Nichols Monica Nilsson NBC