18 Burst results for "Myeloid Leukemia"

Undruggable Drugs

a16z

08:54 min | 1 year ago

Undruggable Drugs

"So I thought maybe we could start about just talking about what the category of undrivable really means to the industry. What is traditionally mean? This is a favourite subject but also for me a sore subject. The term undrivable refers to as yet the inability to drug a protein or protein family or a piece of origny. It said an unfulfilled promise. Imagine Drug hunting with small molecules. Where I've worked and trained as sculpting drug molecule that fits into the pocket of a protein. What if there's no pocket? That protein may be regarded in our discipline as a Priori undrivable. So is it always shifting kind of category or was there a particular group that always was understood to be that kind of undrivable? It's very much both you know. Mars is unworkable right until we arrive there serious. Human Diseases of the non infectious nature are often caused when pathways go awry and these cellular pathways are driven by little machines called proteins. That are globular and They have in where biology occurs. Enzymes that metabolize food and such when these pathways go awry. We tried to identify a critical note in that. Pathway typically a protein and work to understand functionally. If it's too active in which case we tried to inhibit it or not active enough in case we tried to activate it in the discipline of drug discovery. This biological knowledge is very powerful but sometimes we regrettably find out that it's a type of protein or protein. Fold that has never been drug before and this creates real challenges. So this is the undrivable when we have no idea how to get that protein there these are the undrivable proteins and and there are whole families of very tantalizing protein targets creating a conceptual risk that often keeps many scientists away from pursuing coordinated efforts in drug discovery. In my time as a professor I studied the way genes were turned on and off and cancer as a cancer doctor. I was interested in the proteins that would cause the growth program to be activated to turn one cancer cell into two and so on and so on these proteins called transcription factors that bind. Dna turn genes on our consideration be beyond the reaches of drug discovery undrivable. Class which is regrettable because the perception that they may be hard to drug has kept many scientists away from even trying so people. Don't they literally? Don't touch it because it seems like such a challenge. There are a couple of important exceptions. The estrogen receptor binds estrogen. It is therefore drug -able by the sex hormone estrogen rest revile. But the most commonly activated gene all of cancer called Mick the protein that sits around the human genome orchestrating. The Growth Symphony has never been successfully drug even though it is one of the best. Validated targets in Over the last thirty years in cancer science. It's so interesting because I sort of assumed that it had to do with a lack of of biological knowledge. But it's not using the not. The biology is very well understood. But we just haven't understood how to approach it so what is changing now. What are where are we in the landscape of these undrivable? Categories of drugs. I mean one way to think about that. Is that in a sense? When we mean undrivable. It's undrinkable by the way we normally do things. And only when you start to develop these new methods you realize even in the old targets. There's other things you might WanNa hit in other ways to hit it. That's right one of the things that really interests in years. You know we think about targets. We add adjectives to the targets. We HAVEN'T DRUG TARGETS. In the fullness of time there may be no such thing as an undrivable target when you take in sort of the full momentum of different modalities that we might go after a specific target. Can we take the other side of that coin for second? Is there such thing as a novel target a novel target in the language of drug discovery is maybe the first recognition that a protein is really involved in a disease process and the biological experiments have validated that protein or gene in that process novel targets may be fully drug -able like the proteins that sit on the surface of a cell that because of successful prior campaigns to drug kindnesses are now as a group considered easily drug -able but sometimes novel targets are in these undrivable protein families and this gives us pause? I believe that some of the best validated targets in disease biology would have clarified path to helping patients. If only we could get out of our own way and really commit to approaching these proteins as drug -able to challenge the dogma till echo of the the old concept that's right I'd love to hear what some of those successes that really sort of forged a whole new path forward for people were and then also break down the tech behind. What made those possible. I think a very fine example where drug discovery has taken down and undrivable protein. Target is our work to develop the first hitter of what's called foss face in this case a protein called ship to okay. Foss faces are some of the most interesting proteins in disease biology there. Fossil taste is very important for diabetes. And a couple extremely important for cancer you might know what a kind aces. This is a protein that drops what are called phosphate groups onto proteins and there are a great many important kindness. Inhibitor Drugs That followed once. Novartis developed the first if not one of the first called Glee Vic for chronic myeloid leukemia as there are interesting kindnesses that drop phosphates onto proteins. There are counteracting faces that pull them off Interesting and it's for no particular reason that kind aces are so commonly drugged and Fossa tastes are not Except that for twenty years people tried to make phosphates inhibitor drugs and they just couldn't do it. It's one of the most famous protein families in the UNDRIVABLE CLASS. And there's something really peculiar about it. Phosphates drug discovery campaigns almost always produce a very potent and sometimes very selective inhibitor of a pure enzyme studied. Say outside of a cell. Okay but these molecules don't work when the enzyme is inside of the cell the pocket. That's drugged in the phosphate. Tastes is very positively charged. You know how opposites attract the molecules that are discovered are very negatively charged. And they can't get into cells. Scientists Bang their heads against the wall for decades trying to make phosphates drugs for cancer and diabetes and other disease states and were unsuccessful. Well some very creative. Scientists at Novartis did really interesting experiment. They imagined that may be a way to inhibit. The FOSSA taste isn't to go for the most active site But to try to inhibit the enzyme through what we call an alistair excite to sort of sucker punch the phosphates at a different part of the protein and so we perform to high throughput screens. One with the full length phosphates that has two or three globular domains like three beads on a string and second full high throughput screening campaign where we just looked at the active enzyme. Pocket it self. We found two thousand hits in this essay and we through all of them out except to we only kept the molecules that would work in the full length protein but wouldn't work in the small format protein Basically that you'd find the the molecules that would hit the pocket that's only presence when the whole protein is there exactly drug discovery is like trying to find a needle in a haystack. Performed thousands sometimes millions of experiments with chemicals to try to find the one chemical. That does what we want. We threw out all the molecules that would hibbitt inhibit the active site and kept only molecules. That worked when these other sites were present called Alistair excites. After many years of very careful science we produce the very first inhibitor of a phosphate tastes and the way this molecule works is it glues the ship to protein together we call it an intra within the same molecule and Intra Molecular Glue. What a cool

Cancer Novartis Diabetes Cancer Science Intra Molecular Glue Growth Symphony Alistair Professor Fossa Foss Mick
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on Science for the People

"Not. My answer is yes I will take it also because there is a twenty four percent chance that I will be alive in five years with chemotherapy. The question is why is that the only thing being offered? Why is that the only choice I would have? And why is that terrible choice being repeatedly given and how to do better going forward so yes? I think that there has been Concentration on early detection but North Enough. We need more resources. We need now. That more technology has become available. We need to have a completely different approach. Are there some ideas out there? About what type of approaches we should be focusing more on than we are now when to begin with we have to get away from reductionist approach that has been always used in the beginning. We felt that they be one gene producing abner abnormal protein. That can be targeted with one magic bullet and we'd find a cure and LO and behold. It turned out to be correct because Right after this approach was started we did discover that didn't very potentially lethal and aggressive kind of. Up Mia that evolves from Something called Chronic myeloid leukemia which getting become acute and we'll the universally. Fatal illness was found that this particular type of U. P. Chronic myeloid leukemia or C. L. is caused by one genetic do defect and the Drug Matt and that was developed to target that cure. It so it's basically curing it now at this was a great success but then it also has put her feedback by twenty years because basically everyone zoomed then that each answer would have the same one problem one treatment Kind of issue and all we have to do is find the gene that has malfunctioned in pancreatic cancer or lung cancer and targeted. It turned out that there is a soon Nami of genetic mutations that most of the cancer that they are not caused by one and if you think about chronic myeloid leukemia the same drug matinee which is curing chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Today is useless when the disease it bounces to even accelerated phase or an acute phase so in other words you're catching that you earliest form in the chronic phase and treating it right there. That's what I was hoping to do with. Md and treated the MD stage and not not let it develop into acute myeloid leukemia. Unfortunately turned out for me that more. Mda's by itself is very can be a very malignant and very complex disease and there is no single genetic abnormality that can be targeted like in chronic myeloid leukemia. So that has been really the issue that we are. We have used a kind of reductionist approach so what should be the next. The next step is let's get away from trying to find cancers by using ancient technology in this day and age of imaging and scanning techniques that are so efficient and so we have to be able to develop Better ways of finding early cancer. And what I'm saying is instead of using reductionist approach trying to find one gene that school for pluralist stick approach which means stubby whole cells that are cancerous there are innate the DNA their protein their metabolites that they are producing studied them repeatedly studied them in all kinds of secretions blood. Sweat tears urine stool everywhere. Essentially treat the human body as Dr Sam Gambhir from the Canary Cancer Center at Stanford says treat the human body as if it is a machine and Gone Stanley monitored for appearance of the footprints of cancer. This is what we need to have a really Pluralistic approach using not one test to diagnose cancer early like a mammogram article or no Skopje or a PSA but rather using all the latest sophisticated things even if it means two hundred points of information needs to be generated. That's what we have to generate. And that's how we will find cancer before it becomes clinically step wished. I remember reading through the book. And it's I sort of knew this already but I felt like I didn't really appreciate it in the same way I do now Which is your analogy of seed in soil with cancer and also the idea that cancer is so complex and so different from person to person that one of the biggest challenges for treatments especially he wants cancer gets into its later stages is that it different treatments work for different people are mostly. Don't work for different people and we aren't actually doing a great job in tracking what treatments might be better for what types of people with the quote unquote same cancers and that. I found really surprising that we're not trying to figure out which treatments that may be. Have a twenty percent. Efficacy rate are more likely to work. For which twenty percent of people if that makes sense? I found that really surprising that we're not doing a better job of of tracking and trying to at least target some of those treatments better completely. Unconscionable imagine that we are doing clinical trials today more than ninety percents. Unical trials that are done today for cancer or done in the same exact way that they were done in nineteen seventy seven just given to everybody see the thirty percent responded and get the drug approved without making any attempt to try and understand what these thirty percent responded and why and why aren't they institutions. Were supposed to protect us. Not doing anything to demand that sponsors of those trials make some attempt when the stand because imagine when you give the drug to a hundred patients. Seventy not respond. Which means they're getting the drugs for no reason at all. They're going to be physically and financially suffering all the talk society that comes along with no benefit at all for the sake of the thirty percent who will benefit for a short time basically month so I know experimental. Trials are a very. It's how a lot of medicine is done An in particular with cancer at feels like a lot of people are more willing to jump into experimental trials of all types. Because a like you say. There's this mixture of hope and despair. You you'll try just about anything because you want to. You want to keep living. But they're they're often challenges there because patients who are selected for experimental. Trials aren't necessarily representative of the types of patients who are more likely to get these kinds of cancers and so you end up with kind of sometimes skewed results in these trials that when you take those treatments that even appear to have maybe a thirty percent efficacy which isn't great but I guess at something and then move them into a general population. You find even like smaller numbers because you. It's just the trial groups just aren't reflective of the actual population who who's experiencing these these diseases absolutely right and let's not forget that ninety five percents ninety five percents of canceled experimental. Trials failed today the five percent. That succeed in my opinion should have fairy because they're only prolonging survival by a few months for a fraction.

cancer leukemia Md Canary Cancer Center Skopje Mda representative U. P. Dr Sam Gambhir Gone Stanley Stanford
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Khloe. Once you hear the word she thinks. This isn't good in twenty seventeen. Khloe Dixon was extremely tired. After the birth of her baby girl I she thought nothing of it but it kept getting worse than I start having these headaches and that was like an elastic band around my head. So then I thought right I better go to the GP blood test revealed. Khloe had chronic myeloid leukemia or C. L. Which is a type of cancer that affects her white blood cells? I'm talking to Khloe about her cancer but particularly her diagnosis. What does it feel like waiting for the news? How do you tell your family? And how does having cancer affect your daily life was horrific? I mean holding my girl and thinking I'm not saying thanks year. Awful plus later in the podcast. I'll be having coffee with Dany. One of Macmillan's fantastic professionals to give her thoughts on what to do when someone says those three fateful words you've got cancer you could actually have a conversation with someone and even if they seem silly questions to you. The professionals at the end of the line will not mind in the least women melon and we're talking cancer lowy. Hello.

cancer Khloe Dixon Macmillan
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"The investigators performed a comprehensive analysis of samples from patients who had a relapse of acute myeloid leukemia AM L after he a poetic stem cell transplantation to define the genetic. And epi genetic alterations that allow leukemia cells to escape the graft versus leukemia effect and to determine whether the dysregulation of known immune related genes is a common feature of relapse after transplantation on Exon sequencing the spectrum of gained and lost mutations. Observed with relapse after transplantation was similar to the spectrum observed with relapse after chemotherapy, specifically relapse after transplantation was not associated with the acquisition of previously unknown AML specific mutations or structural variations in immune related, gene. Enes. In contrast, RNA sequencing of samples obtained at relapse after transplantation reveal dysregulation of pathways involved in adaptive and innate, immunity, including down regulation of major histocompatibility complex m h c class to genes to levels that were three to twelve times lower than the level seen impaired samples obtained at presentation flow Saitama tree and immuno history. Chemical analysis confirmed decreased expression of m h c class to at relapse in seventeen of thirty four patients who had relapsed after transplantation evidence suggested that interferon gamma treatment could rapidly reverse this pheno type enamel blasts in vitro. Overall survival with value MAB after chemo radiotherapy in stage..

relapse leukemia interferon
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Disagreements can go in both directions, sometimes doctors recommend treatments and parents refuse. Sometimes parents request continue treatment that doctors think inappropriate such conflicts have occurred in cases of hypotheses encephalopathy, degenerative neurologic diseases and even brain death these disagreements can cause moral distress among doctors, and nurses and debates about the ethical justifiability. Of unilateral decisions that treatment is futile. And should be withdrawn. Usually disagreements are resolved by ongoing discussion between doctors and parents by bringing in other family members, or by consulting an ethics committee. Most intensive ists. Learn how to negotiate with families in these situations occasionally disagreements become intractable and cases end up in court attention to the process by which decisions are made rather than to the result of the decision. Making process has changed the way we think about Neo Natal bioethics recognition of the role that doctors play as choice architects suggest that there might be new ways to think about the ethical responsibilities that go along with that role. A fifty eight year old woman with Paris, thea and weakness of the left foot and domino wall. A case record of the Massachusetts General Hospital by Tim Reta and colleagues a fifty eight year old woman from New England presented to the outpatient neurology clinic in early autumn because of Hypo Sesia Paris, these ya and weakness ten weeks earlier back pain developed between the shoulder blades. The pain resolved without an intervention six weeks before this presentation, numbness developed in a band like distribution around her trunk one week later, the numbness extended to the upper abdomen. Paris Thenia developed in the third fourth and fifth fingers of the left hand and the fourth and fifth fingers of the right hand. M R I of the spine was scheduled, however, two weeks before this presentation the numbness extent. Ended to the genital area. And urinary incontinence developed prompting the patient to present to the emergency department overall, this patient syndrome was most consistent with a sub acute. Polly ridiculous Pathy or poly ridiculous neuropathy. There are several disorders that can cause or mimic sub acute Polly ridiculous Pathy or poly ridiculous neuropathy patients who have Lima ninja ridiculous typically present to eighteen weeks after infection during the early disseminated phase with pain sensory loss and a reflexive weakness over half of patients with Lima ninja ridiculous present with seventh cranial nerve palsy a manifestation of Lyme disease that many recognize, but any cranial or spinal nerve root may be involved. Inhibition of casing kind as one alpha in acute myeloid leukemia. A clinical implications of basic research article by Benjamin Ebert from the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston acute myeloid leukemia. AM L is genetically heterogeneous cancer that arises in Hamadeh poetic stem cells for the past forty years standard treatment for AM L has consisted of a combination of two chemo therapeutic agents site, Tara bean and an anthracite Clint this regimen results in high rates of remission. But in the majority of cases fails to Aratu, Kate, the residual lewke MC stem cells that are the reason for relapse and poor outcomes. In patients with AM L, the comprehensive genetic analysis of AM L in the past ten years has revealed recurrent, somatic Lee MU. -tated genes leading to the development of new targeted therapies, including inhibitors of FMS like tyrosine kinase three an.

Polly neurologic diseases Dana Farber Cancer Institute Hypo Sesia Paris Paris Thenia Neo Natal urinary incontinence Paris Massachusetts General Hospital Benjamin Ebert Tim Reta Lima Tara bean Hamadeh Lee MU. relapse New England Aratu
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Is is always encouraged and leads to. Leads to successes and new new treatments being developed. I think more work needs to be done on the reimbursement side, especially with these new therapies like I've just described. I am not an expert in public policy or government relations for healthcare. But I do know that we with these new gene therapies like car cell therapy. We need to figure out a way to. To fun sustainably the treatment of Medicare patients in particular who need these therapies. When we are looking ahead at some of the trials that are going on understand that there are a lot of moving parts. And and you you don't necessarily have a timetable on when things are going to get done. I have there been any specific breakthroughs, or at least maybe some positive signs on on any of those particular fronts with regard to treatments that maybe they at least signs of treatments that are coming that. Maybe he didn't have much hope for maybe six months ago or a year ago. Absolutely within each of those categories of blood cancers, we've had successes come along. I mentioned car tesol therapy. That's been FDA approved within the last year. And that's offer treatment hope for people who really were without hope in leukemia in particular, acute myeloid leukemia. There's been several new FDA approved medications to treat AM L or acute myeloid leukemia within the last several months, and in fact prior there hadn't been FDA approved therapies for refractory and Allen in decades. So there's certainly making progress in in the fight against multiple myeloma fifteen twenty years ago, it was a grim prognosis. And we now have a number of different categories of treatments for multiple myeloma patients that have have come along within the last ten years or Carlo bit longer and that we're. Continuing to refine and survivals improved for all these categories. Blood cancer within the last ten years. So there are some positive there's some positive steps in some some noted progress that's being made yet from the information. I understand that your team sent me that I guess less than five percent of adults living with cancer will enroll in a cancer clinical trial. Why is that? Well, not every cancer physician or cancer center will offer clinical trials or they may not offer clinical trial specific to the type of cancer that that patient has. But I think it's truly important that that cancer patients and their families are aware of clinical trials this offer what he's are offering treatments that doctors and scientists believe could be better than what currently exists and all those new treatments that I've mentioned are because people were willing to engage in clinical trials, try new things out. And so I always encourage people to seek out what clinical trials there could be eligible for. And and I think you know, we need to encourage people to get second. Opinions. There's a lot that we've covered here. And certainly the new at imagine that part of our audience has a need to find out more for themselves. We're gonna go online to do that. So patients and their families can go to the lukaemia lymphoma society at L L, S dot org. On that website. They can also find a phone number for a patient helpline or they can get help. Navigating patients to open clinical trials. In addition. I always encourage people to go to clinical trials dot gov. That is a website maintained by the federal government where patients and their families can search for clinical trials said that are open for their particular.

FDA cancer multiple myeloma leukemia federal government Medicare Carlo Allen ten years fifteen twenty years five percent six months
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on The Big 98

"Institute is is always encouraged and leads to. Leads to successes and new new treatments being developed. I think more work needs to be done on the reimbursement side, especially with these new therapies like I've just described. I am not an expert in public policy or government relations for healthcare. But I do know that we were these new gene therapies like Kartini cell therapy. We need to figure out a way to to fund sustainably the treatment of Medicare patients in particular who need these therapies. When we are looking ahead at some of the trials that are going to understand that there are a lot of moving parts. And and you know, you you don't necessarily have a timetable on when things are going to get done. I've been any specific breakthroughs, or at least maybe some positive signs on on any of those particular fronts with regard to treatments that maybe they are at least signs of treatments that are coming that. Maybe he didn't have much hope for maybe six months ago or a year ago absolutely within each of those categories of blood cancers, we've had successes come along. I mentioned cartoons cell therapy. That's been FDA approved within the last year. And that's offer treatment hope for people who really were without hope. In leukemia particular, acute myeloid leukemia. There's been several new FDA approved medications to treat AM L or acute myeloid leukemia within the last several months, and in fact prior there hadn't been FDA approved therapies for refractory and Allen and decades. So we're certainly making progress in the fight against multiple myeloma fifteen twenty years ago, it was a grim prognosis, and we now have a number of different categories of treatments for multiple myeloma patients that have have come along within the last ten years or her a little bit longer. And now we're continuing to refine and survival is improved for all these categories have blood cancer within the last ten years. So there are some positive there's some positive steps in some some noted progress that's being made yet from the. Formation. I understand let your team sent me that I guess less than five percent of adults living with cancer will enroll in a cancer clinical trial. Why is that? Well, not every cancer physician or cancer center will offer clinical trials or they may not offer clinical trials specific to the type of cancer that that patient has. But I think it's truly important that that cancer patients and their families are aware of clinical trials this offer what he's are offering treatments that doctors and scientists believe could be better than what currently exists and all those new treatments that I've mentioned are because people were willing to engage in clinical trials, try new things out. And so I always encourage people to seek out what clinical trials there could be eligible for. And and I think we need to encourage people to get second. Opinions. There's a lot that we've covered here, and certainly the mood. Imagine that part of our audience has a need to find out more for.

FDA cancer multiple myeloma leukemia Medicare Allen ten years fifteen twenty years five percent six months
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Percent and ninety two percent respectively the addition of sodium sulfate administered six hours after sis platinum chemotherapy resulted in a lower incidence of sis platin induced hearing loss among children with standard risk hypolito blast oma without jeopardising overall or event free survival durable remissions with ivo sitting in idea h one mutated relapsed or refractory am l by courtney denardo from the university of texas md anderson cancer center houston mutations in the gene encoding h one occur in six to ten percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia am l this phase one dose escalation and dose expansion study assess the safety and efficacy of ivo sydney monotherapy an oral targeted small molecule inhibitor of mutant idea h one in two hundred fifty eight patients among patients with relapsed or refractory aml treatment related adverse events have great three or higher that occurred in at least three patients were prolongation of the q t interval in seven point eight percent of the patients the idea differentiation syndrome in three nine percent anemia into point two percent thrombosis subpoena or a decrease in the platelet count in three point four percent and leukocyte osas in one point seven percent in the primary efficacy population the rate of complete remission or complete remission with partial humidity logic recovery was thirty point four percent the rate of complete remission was twenty one point six percent and the overall response rate was forty one point six percent the median durations of these responses were eight point two months nine point three months and six point five months respectively transfusion independence was attained in thirty five percent of.

courtney denardo university of texas ivo sydney four percent six percent thirty five percent ninety two percent three nine percent eight percent seven percent three months five months ten percent two percent two months six hours
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Proposition sixty five i have this product that i've been utilizing for three years maybe it's raw vegans it's our ganic but it does have the warning top sixty five label on it and it says that it's because there might be miniscule amount from the soil and that's it's on there i guess it's on a lot of products for california nonetheless it still does concern me should i be concerned and also just to let you know when i went through the airport with this product it it ran it sounded off their alarms i'm thinking it's in a powder form maybe but then someone said oh maybe it's because there's preservatives as far as i know there's no preservatives on it in it but it is a powder but like i said it's all the dan and it's organic well thank you it's interesting that there are some things that come from the soil that can contaminate food whether it's organic or not i'm not an expert at prop sixty five i've had to put some attention on it because roundup was just named a cancer causing agent last july july seventeenth by the by the prop sixty five mandated group in california and in fact i attended the hearing in january where last year where but santa was trying to sue california to say it shouldn't be a hey carcinogen and the judge did not have any did not hear that they were they were the judge ruled in our favor and they're going to declare it as a carcinogen and right outside the courtroom after the proceedings were over i attended a press conference with bobby kennedy junior and other lawyers who end their plaintiffs who had done hodgkin's lymphoma or they were the survivors of family members that did because they were suing monsanto because not only was it a carcinogen but it had laid a long track of of people with serious serious answers and new research shows that there's even more research perhaps for acute myeloid leukemia and if you look at the leukemia death they rise absolutely in parallel with the increased use of roundup sprayed on genetically engineered soy and corn you know it's amazing jeffrey just how many different facets of these tentacles that the they reach these gmo foods and the pesticides i mean it's just unbelievable isn't it affects so many things for example as i mentioned earlier there as well e nieto nicotinoid sectocide.

california santa hodgkin monsanto jeffrey bobby kennedy three years
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"Now if you happen to be a patient who is undergoing or undergone chemotherapy or bone marrow transplant how would luke kind figure in to your life so today lupines approved to treat patients with with am l acute myeloid leukemia or under a bomoh transportation transplantation and what happens in those cases is you need to enamel for instance the the cancer is against the immune system and destroying immune cells so lukashenka helped reconstitute in and rebuild your immune system when you're getting chemotherapy for treatment so you don't have an infection so effectively replaced the cells that are cancerous that are gonna kill by the chemotherapy the same is true with bomani transplantation where you have to re grow restimulate a replace that means system because many of those patients they don't die the cancer that i have infections as a result of the cancer reducing their immune system's effectiveness lucon restores the immune system so that they don't they don't suffer those facts i want to talk about the process of getting the drug appr approved by the fda because there's been talk that the fda is trying to expedite approvals in response to the to the cries for cheaper medications did you find that it was a faster process then you've heard an experienced than in the past it was a very fast process for us but but not one that's a typical today we applied for something called priority review which is available to any drug that is deemed to be important to to public health to particular treatment of condition where you really have a breakthrough therapy opportunity and so we apply for priority review in the fda granted that priority review and review the drug in essentially a six month timeframe has opposed to you know typical twelve or fourteen months what are you working on now what's in the pipeline well for luke what's exciting about it is that even therapy which is the latest in cancer is is a really important going area and lupine is a whole number of trials including a big face three in frontline melanoma today as well as in trials with cancer vaccines and in the second area.

fda luke cancer fourteen months six month
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Molecular minimal residual disease and acute myeloid leukemia by moyed cy young in lorenzetti's from the razzmatazz university medical center rotterdam the netherlands patients with acute myeloid leukemia aml often reach complete remission but relapse rates remain high this study involving four hundred eighty two patients with newly diagnosed am l investigated whether targeted molecular monitoring with next generation sequencing could add clinical value for predicting the recurrence of leukemia sequencing was carried out at diagnosis and after induction therapy during complete remission at least one mutation was detected in eighty nine point two percent of patients mutations persisted in fifty one point four percent of those patients during complete remission and were present at various wheel frequencies the detection of persistent mutations which are often present in persons with age related clone tomato polices was not correlated with an increased relapse rate after the exclusion of persistent mutations the detection of molecular minimal residual disease was associated with a significantly higher relapse rate then no detection fifty five point four percent versus thirty one point nine percent as well as with lower rates of relapse free survival thirty six point six percent versus fifty eight point one percent and overall survival forty one point nine percent versus sixty six point one percent a comparison of sequencing with flo saitama tree for the detection of residual disease showed that sequencing had significant additive prognostic value among patients with am l the detection of molecular minimal residual disease during complete remission had significant independent prognostic value with respect to relapse.

lorenzetti razzmatazz university medical netherlands four percent nine percent one percent six percent two percent
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"The american red cross urgently needs blood and platelet donations and asks donors to schedule an appointment to give now every two seconds someone in the united states needs blood your blood donation is critical and could help save lives please schedule an appointment today download the blood donor app visit red cross blood dot org or call one eight hundred red cross today you can make a difference the leukemia lymphoma society has been funding blood cancer research for the last sixty five years it was the l l s funding of dr brian gruber's research that changed chronic myeloid leukemia from a deadly disease to one controlled with just a pill a day our next target acute myeloid leukemia ml it kills ten thousand people a year in the us alone where betting dr ruger can make history again visit l l s dot org that's l l s dot org gartner red aboard iran ruggiero khobar bruce's give new building read superstar titus o'neil it only takes a moment to make a moment take time to be a dad today learn more at eight seven seven four dad four one one or visit fatherhood dot gov brought to you by the us department of health and human services and the ad council sliding around in sock feet is a pretty common activity and a fissure house you see every year thousands of kids stay here to be close to a wounded mommy or daddy receiving care at a military your va medical center it's the place where they can feel at home when they're not and we're kisses and hogs are only minutes away instead of time zones which for a kid with a soldier as a parent is an unfamiliar luxury to learn more about the fisher house foundation and how you can help go to fisher house dot org today basil if whittle motto program on news radio eight three cage vdh.

dr brian gruber us iran ruggiero khobar bruce titus o'neil va medical center fisher house foundation us department of health whittle sixty five years two seconds
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"And there were plenty of things that needed to be worked on but it was a viable alternative everybody thought they were gonna be coming back player thought they were coming back league officials the only to people that knew they were not gonna come back dick ebersol in vits mcmahon they already knew that we're not going to do this again but evident tell anybody you got players and coaches and teams and this at the other all gearing up ramping up for a second year and they pull the plug xfl was for one season only now because as jeff and i were talking about coming back part of it because of the diminished presence of the nfl man it's going to be interesting 850 leukemia lymphoma society has been funding blood cancer research for the last sixty five years it was the l l s funding of dr brian gruber's research that changed chronic myeloid leukemia from a deadly disease to one controlled with just a pillar day our next target acute myeloid leukemia aml it kills ten thousand people a year in the us alone we're betting dr drew khor can make history again visit l l s dot org that's l l s dot org as your child swatted your medicine your longer detergent your nail polish remover call the poison help have you and hailed paint thinner glue pesticides cobra poison helpline have a question about a judge of fume something your kid just drank call the poison health line poisonings can happen at the home on the job or immigrate outdoors call the poison helpline first for fast free advice from medical professionals call one eight hundred two two two one two two two.

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"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Life saved under project fortyfour that was the impetus for doing the story it is it is an amazing one it's incredible one and i highly recommend if you haven't ready yet please do please share it and this is a been pretty cool to see so many people being spire to to sign up and than others who already have i mean i had people reaching out saying i lost my brother to acute myeloid leukemia which is what deegan scott beat other saying you know i've got a son who had it and he's he's beaten it cj more over at the field house in coordination with the athletic has a story up right now about mellick newman befriending a boy seven years old who uh who be acute myeloid leukemia it's a really great story a highly recommend you go check that out as well so that's a that's a long when the way of explaining some of the background with the story my thanks to brad stevens i'll be honest with you i don't think there's another nba coach out there that would have done what he did in regard to helping out with the story agreeing to sit down on camera and in talk extensively about everything in regard to this particularly because the celtics are will have of quite the interesting season and for a little bit of more context he did this interview literally the day before isaiah thomas was going to make his return he didn't end up playing in that game but it was in the context of giving the interview there was a lot going on with the celtics at that point so brad was just terrific with all of that and then cement the first and foremost she is a she's awesome she's an awesome person are really courageous what she she does to get the continued get the word out there in a lot of people behind the scenes michael called mark chrissy eddington on if in affiliation with butler they were they were great and then obviously our bosses were just awesome to uh to do this not just the story but the video component like the plan is to have this air on cbs sports network in february and potentially even have it aaron cbs uh for the incidentally tournament if uh if the.

celtics isaiah thomas mark chrissy eddington butler newman brad stevens nba michael aaron seven years
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"In fifty daily newspapers and primetime television smoking causes heart disease emphysema acute myeloid leukemia cancer at the mouth of south africa's larynx stomach kidney bladder and pancreas philip morris r j reynolds among other companies appeal two thousand six ruling that efforts must discuss the dangers of smoking it all pan in 1999 with the justice department ruling that said tobacco companies intentionally described the public about the effects of smoking the ads begin today pat piper washington wbz news time 1134 as uber retailers of new england allwheeldrive traffic on the threes what's and look i doubt there david struck leader i we've got some very busy spots will start off with the expressway southbound backed up from southampton street done to a crash near granite abc ninety five south is football trap one and then some pockets of congestion getting by mechanic street route 1 southbound on and off the brakes from ninety five down past the stadium it's about four miles backup there 94 northbound heavy at times getting by 495 and then reduce speeds about three miles getting by the stadium down at the cape route six westbound seeing about a one mile backup getting to the south the mortgage west of the city the mass pike westbound has delays around the western state police barracks and then extensive delays almost eight miles of slow going from arbor in through and then more than a three mile backup getting the roof eighty four rude eightyfour east is tied up over three miles getting to the pike 495 self inching along from just after route one seventeen all the way down a to ninety two night east backs up about a mile getting the root 495 your next report at 1143 on wbz's traffic on the threes this is wbz newsradio 1030.

south africa heart disease justice department pat piper washington david football
"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And the support brought to you by nevis discount tire say on tires and maybe it's tired icon yankees ending 2017 with the four nothing game seven lost the astros houston's called the world series of play the dodgers joe girardi contract about to expire his status with the yanks uncertain i'll sit downs are my wife and my fears and see whether at with this thing we'll see what the yankees that's not my concern right now you know i've i've had angry here's year i feel extremely bless god has been good to me it was the future that courtesy of the sec said that he might have pitched his final game with the bombers in general manager brian cashman last year of his deal as well one in five giants a 425 kick off against it three two seahawks and met life pregame on the fan at 210 three in three jets hit three into dolphins this afternoon muhammed wilkerson his active western ones coverages sunday night football in the family i'll be joined the epa giants post game with the patriots hosting the falcons next caught up a 21point lead to the pistons in their home opener and lost one eleven wanna seven netzer on w cbs 80 this afternoon a host the hawks coverage begins at 320 and devils four brian boyle is back practice include the vehicle participant first time doing so since his diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia with reports every twenty minutes tv ran wfan 2020 sports each the nsl on sean be listening to dave were giants football his big blue is home to take on the seattle seahawks gain time is 425 with chilean scheme to ten then later on tonight we hit up to new england for the patriots in atlanta falcons all this here on your flagship station food giants football and the nsl the fan sports radio 101 nine fm and sports radio 66 wfbc in nwfp again as them new your each foot bull sunday on.

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"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To john stashower you want about a twins in new york this week open as the series with the yankees this afternoon they could very well be back in two weeks with a one gave america the wildcard playoff game yanks won last night five two one nine of eleven the way they're going there near locked up be no worse than the wildcard twins lead the angels by a game and a half of the second spot cc sabathia winter last night for the 125 work the first six innings bullpen took over from there with three scores are all this chapter the save for both brett gardner installing castro here's joe girardi i thought our hitters did a really good job tonight me they really made new burials workers really really hard tonight eighty some pitches in the in the fourth inning and maybe even more than that so you don't seem like we had a lot of opportunities but they made him work and we got enough runs to win the game gerardy has moved his as louise severino up to today that's an effort to have him on track to start a potential wildcard game next they'll three games behind the red sox they've taken ten of thirteen last they won not been at baltimore orioles wild pitch in the eleven thinning mets marlins were in the 10th in miami what ball one strike pitch is hammer told us fail this could it is up trump what 524 marlins radio the call miami tied it with three in the ninth the mets dropped seven of nine is one of detroit giants beat the rockies won the devil showed up for training camp all the players that visit goals and that's when it was discovered the devil's brian boil 32yearold center sign of the offseason has chronic myeloid leukemia type of bone marrow cancer the doctors say they can be treated with medication with bloomberg nbc sports update i'm jon stashower bob thank you john the.

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"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"myeloid leukemia" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Yet problems remain these methods are difficult expensive and not without risk jordan and colleagues report on a novel approach enzymatic destruction of preformed anti hla antibodies with the ijg degrading enzyme of streptococcus pya giannis i deaths although the result seem promising there are certainly concerns about the adverse events that may occur with a desk treatment of note the study did not include longterm follow up without doubt future randomized controlled trials that compare i deaths with other means of decreasing the levels of preformed antibodies and that follow the recipients longterm will be important my dasta in plus chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia with an f l t three mutation by richard stone from the danafarber cancer institute boston patients with acute myeloid leukemia a ml and in flt three mutation have poor outcomes my dasta in an oral multi targeted kind ace inhibitor is active in patients with an f l t three mutation in this study seven hundred and seventeen patients with acute myeloid leukemia and this mutation were randomly assigned to receive standard chemotherapy plus either my dostram or placebo rent position was stratified according to subtype of f l t three mutation overall survival was significantly longer in the my dasta in group than in the placebo group hazard ratio for death zero point seven eight as was event free survival hazard ratio for event or death zero point seven eight in both the primary analysis and and analysis in which data for patients who underwent transplantation were censored the benefit of my dasta ruin was consistent across all f l t three subtypes.

jordan richard stone ace inhibitor danafarber cancer institute boston