35 Burst results for "Myanmar"

UK sanctions Russians, Saudis under new Magnitsky powers

WBBM Late Morning News

00:23 sec | Last month

UK sanctions Russians, Saudis under new Magnitsky powers

"Britain has announced an economic sanctions against individuals and organizations from Russia, Saudi Arabia, Myanmar in North Korea under new powers to punish human rights offenders. Country's foreign secretary says they target those behind some of the notorious violations in recent years. They include Saudi intelligence officials accused of involvement in the murder of journalist Jamal Cash. O G and Russian authorities implicated in the death of an anti corruption

Saudi Arabia Jamal Cash Russia Secretary North Korea Myanmar Murder Britain
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

The World

03:44 min | Last month

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

"A landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar has killed at least 170 people with more feared dead Search and rescue efforts continued for a second day today, authorities say a pile of mine waste slid into a lake after heavy rains that sent a wave of mud and water that buried dozens of people. In a video from the scene. A greenish wave of water floods down a hillside into a valley below workers who are not visible in the frame are further down the hillside fleeing for their lives. Hold on a witches with global witness and environmental and human rights advocacy group. It joins us from Washington. It's jaw dropping this video Paul, it's hard to tell. But this lake seems really big in the waves that resulted from This hillside of waste are enormous. It's scary to watch what happened. How common are these incidents? Unfortunately, also come in. We've seen these types of incidents happened over the last several years with scores of Miners dying As a result, My understanding is that the situation in this case is even worse. An artisanal mining. These were informal workers scavenging the mining ways left behind by a larger mining company. Can you explain how this all works? So mining companies are granted licenses to operate minds. And what happens is as they are digging out the stone where the jade is located there, Dumping the waste into these huge files with building building building two mountains of waste, and you have tens to hundreds of thousands of people in formal miners. They're known locally as M S a Now These informal miners are often mining very perilous conditions with no protection and these rock piles can become unstable and is this like today will then happen. The leader of Myanmar's government on Song said she pledged to clean up the industry when she assumed power back in 2016. What is Myanmar's government doing to regulate these mining operations? And what's changed since on Sun City made that pledge? Well when the end of the government took power. The first thing that they did to address these issues was to suspend the issuances of new license or the extension of existing licenses in an attempt to gain control over the sector and to begin a reform process. Unfortunately, the fundamental problem in the J money area is that there is no rule of law. The area is controlled by armed groups, both me and my military as well as powerful ethnic armed groups and government backed militias. Are all extorting miners illegally taxing you really have along the situation that despite the government's efforts to reform the regulatory framework have not addressed some of the fundamental issues. Yeah, On some suit, she commented on this disasters, she says joblessness is to blame but doesn't sound like this is a new development, as she's implying, is that we have seen an increase in dangerous mining practices since the licensing suspension. One of the prime reason is being that as licenses are set to expire. Companies are mining as fast as possible or when their licenses to expire, though then often partner up with companies that still have activations is And mine as fast as possible in those sites, so that creates a very dangerous condition. Ciccio is right that the informal miners, they say, are often from impoverished communities who come to the jade mines of Contin continue state to try to strike it Rich. Unfortunately, that's a very rare occurrence and more commonly, monies will get hooked on methamphetamine and other drugs and will not be able to survive the experience. Jade industry is a driver of conflict. There's no doubt about it and the revenues That it turns to conflict. Actors are key in their ability to sustain their activities. So there's no doubt that there is a real link to conflict in jail.

Myanmar Methamphetamine Paul Washington Partner Ciccio Song Contin
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

Tim Conway Jr.

00:10 sec | Last month

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

"Landslide at a jade mine in Myanmar has killed more than 160 people. The slide happened in a place that's in the middle of the world's biggest and most lucrative jade mining industry

Myanmar
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | Last month

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills at least 162 people

"News from across the way At least 162 people have died. They say as a result of a landslide in Myanmar. This happened out of mind in the northern part of that country. The centre of the world's largest and most lucrative jade mining industry, 50 form or people rushed to the hospital. Is the deadliest jade mining accident on record. 113 people were killed in the landslide in November 2015

Myanmar
Missouri man freed from prison with help from WNBA star

First Take

01:43 min | Last month

Missouri man freed from prison with help from WNBA star

"Wrongfully convicted man who has the WNBA Myanmar fought for was finally released from prison yesterday. You see the moment right there. Jonathan Iron served twenty two years of a fifty year sentence after being convicted in one, thousand, nine, hundred and burglary and assault with a weapon, he walked free Wednesday. More was amongst those to greet him as he walked out. The four-time wnba champion, put her career on hold, missing two seasons to help him or family Ma- irons prison ministry in two. Two, thousand seven before her freshman year at uconn penitentiary visit here. She was on good. Morning America in that moment. I just really felt like I could. I could rest I mean I've been standing, and we've been standing for so long and it just it was an unplanned moment where I just felt relief in. Just it was kind of a worshipful moment, just dropping semi knees, and just being so thankful that we made it, and you know when I stepped away. To two springs ago, I just really wanted to shift my priorities to be able to be more available and present to show up for things that I felt. were mattering more than being a professional athlete, and so this is obviously one of the. Biggest and most direct results of that. Obviously you guys know. I went to uconn season ticket holder to men's and women's basketball and a followed my more for a long time. She gave up two years of her prime as the star. For this mission, it is absolutely unbelievable when we talk about the sacrifice into see this man walk free. It is such a remarkable moment in just kudos to her. What a special woman! In Role Model

Wnba Jonathan Iron Uconn Penitentiary Uconn Myanmar MA America Burglary Assault
Landslide kills more than 100 people at a jade mine in Myanmar

WBBM Morning News

00:29 sec | Last month

Landslide kills more than 100 people at a jade mine in Myanmar

"At least 113 workers are reported dead following a landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar. A huge pile of mining waste collapsed into a lake, triggering a wave of mud and water that buried many workers, deadly landslides and other accidents are seen as common in the poorly regulated minds of the country. Around 100 people were killed during a collapse in 2015 which strengthened calls to regulate the industry. However, observers say conditions have not improved

Myanmar
Landslide kills more than 100 people at a jade mine in Myanmar

Red Eye Radio

00:06 sec | Last month

Landslide kills more than 100 people at a jade mine in Myanmar

"At a jade mine in Myanmar has killed at least 50 people, according to rescue workers. Others still accounted for

Myanmar
Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills more than 100 people

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | Last month

Landslide at Myanmar jade mine kills more than 100 people

"The authorities in Myanmar say more than 100 people have been killed in a landslide at a jade mine. Officials in Cochin States say there had been heavy rain in the area and the miners were buried in a wave of mud. Rescue efforts are continuing. Jonathan head for reports, The video taken from the hills above shows a landslide pouring into the pit lake, churning up the blue green water. A moment later, the lake empties is its side collapses the water thundering into the valley below. Thousands of poor workers from all over Myanmar are attracted to these jade mines, which are believed to generate billions of dollars a year for mining companies. The hills have been denuded of trees. And carved into a bleak landscape of ban mud slopes.

Myanmar Cochin States Pit Lake Jonathan Head
"myanmar" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:51 min | Last month

"myanmar" Discussed on AP News

"Thousands of people in the area of western land mall where there have been clashes between the government and ethnic rebels have been fleeing from the villages often evacuation order from officials in all the last Tuesday residents were told to stay away from their homes due to military plans to conduct a clearance operation against rebels clearance operation is Myanmar military language the counter insurgency action the exodus for more than 40 villages is going ahead almost a week later even though the world was revoked last Friday the government has been embroiled for more than a year in an intermittent conflict with the Arakan only a well trained and well armed guerrilla force representing members of the areas that keen ethnic group I'm Charles the test my

Charles Myanmar
Myanmar military warning of action causes thousands to flee

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Myanmar military warning of action causes thousands to flee

"Thousands of people in the area of western land mall where there have been clashes between the government and ethnic rebels have been fleeing from the villages often evacuation order from officials in all the last Tuesday residents were told to stay away from their homes due to military plans to conduct a clearance operation against rebels clearance operation is Myanmar military language the counter insurgency action the exodus for more than forty villages is going ahead almost a week later even though the world was revoked last Friday the government has been embroiled for more than a year in an intermittent conflict with the Arakan only a well trained and well armed guerrilla force representing members of the areas that keen ethnic group I'm Charles the test my

Charles Myanmar
Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

Morning Edition

03:57 min | Last month

Rohingya Refugee Camps Recorded First COVID-19 Death

"As hard as it can be for most people to maintain social distance consider how much harder it is for refugees packed into makeshift camps that is the reality for one a million Muslim minority rocking guy who fled Myanmar their camps are in neighboring Bangladesh and those camps recorded their first confirmed deaths from covert on June first Michael Sullivan reports two weeks ago Bangladesh declared parts of the Cox's bazaar district where the camps are located a red zone and climb to lock down on those areas as the virus spread I think everybody is very concerned that the numbers are going to increase significantly Louise Donovan is spokesperson for the U. N. H. C. R. in Cox's bazaar if you look at Bangladesh's Utica Cox's bazaar the numbers are increasing very rapidly and we're concerned that the same thing will happen in the camps camps that have some of the highest population density in the world Rahm das runs the roving the relief effort in Cox's bazaar for the NGO care international it is four times the density Arafat New York City eight times the density of Wuhan city about how activities but here you are at and that he says make social distancing in the camps almost impossible your contact the people inside the house thirty four hours they have to go out for food they had to go to the community Charlotte they have to go to the house that does though it thank you photo make sure that all the a million people followed the thunder one million people aid groups are struggling to finish twelve new clinics for COPD patients with a total of nineteen hundred beds by the end of June Robert look what does food for the hungry opened the first a few weeks ago we are using it as a crime I think casting top style because of the need on the ground we had to modify each better faster and to ensure that we are responding to that I did to needs which is called his clinic has fifty beds for isolation and treatment of moderate to severe cases another clinic outside the camp has one hundred and fifty more but critical cases the require intensive care and ventilators we'll have to go to the government hospital in Cox's bazaar and that worries him the number of beds in Cork's Bastos de limited as I talk now I told you there any beds that are blind right now with that being said all I did accident dropping their question Keysight Torah the number of cases another concern Rohingya in the camps are reluctant to come forward for testing and instead self medicating with help from makeshift pharmacies inside the camps so Tom Raheem ola runs one after another not that excited again about it do you fear he's the go to the clinic the doctors will send them to a different team not just them but their whole families so they come here in the state yes me Dara is arriving activist who works for an international aid group to build awareness in the camps my name and the lamb are bad I hope they will guide you right now some deep blue sea yeah I'm afraid to go to the cleaning because they have heard there will be Q. we told them no and explain what isolation and quarantine are and we told them if there are C. will get treatment and Judy are better then they will go home but people are still suspicious the Bangladesh government's ban on internet in the camps isn't helping people get information either and then there's the rainy season which brings a slew of illnesses that present much is cobra does with costs eighty bones and fevers that leads people to self medicate for those elements instead of getting tested combine that with the fear factor and it's little wonder that some aid workers worry the number of cases in the camps is far greater than what's being reported so far

UN agency warns of fentanyl production threat in SE Asia

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

UN agency warns of fentanyl production threat in SE Asia

"Not critics police in Myanmar the seized a large amount of liquid fentanyl providing the first evidence that the synthetic opioid is being produced in quantity in southeast Asia's Golden Triangle region are you in office on drugs and crime system discovery during a series of raids in Myanmar's Shan State suggests a market potential exists in the region I was concerned Southeast Asia is poised to become a significant source of synthetic drugs worldwide the agency says what has been on the earth is truly off the charts he believes in network production facilities like those found would not be possible without the involvement and financial backing of serious transnational organized criminal groups I'm Charles the last month

Myanmar Fentanyl Asia Shan State Southeast Asia Charles Golden Triangle
UN agency warns of fentanyl production threat in SE Asia

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

UN agency warns of fentanyl production threat in SE Asia

"Thank you an office on drugs and crime system discovery during a series of raids in Myanmar's Shan State suggests a market potential exists in the region I was concerned to Southeast Asia is poised to become a significant source of synthetic drugs worldwide the agency says what has been on the earth is truly off the charts he believes in network production facilities like those found would not be possible without the involvement and financial backing of serious transnational organized criminal groups I'm Charles the last month

Myanmar Shan State Southeast Asia Charles
Facebook removes accounts linked to QAnon conspiracy theory

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Facebook removes accounts linked to QAnon conspiracy theory

"Hi Mike president Rossi trump a is reporting making Facebook himself exhibit removes any accounts for re linked opening to the the country Q. one on conspiracy with a trip to a factory theory in Arizona Facebook says now it has making removed N. several ninety five groups masks accounts and pages linked a sign to inside the right the wing Honeywell pro trump plant conspiracy in Phoenix theory advised known employees as Q. anon and visitors Facebook to also wear removed a mask accounts at all times linked to the anti factory immigrant workers US reporters website V. some der White House as staff well as and accounts secret in service Russia did Iran just spent Mauritania for president Myanmar trump and and his the top country aides of in Georgia Honeywell executives Facebook did announced not the the purges people as part of our of country its monthly all briefing orders on at coordinated an earlier stop inauthentic the president acknowledged behavior on returning its platforms the country and Facebook the economy is trying to normalcy to root out fake would have accounts a human ahead costs of the twenty some twenty people presidential be affected election badly yes hi Mike Rossi but up we have to get our country open and we have to get it open soon the president is predicting an economic rebound by the end of the year the people have lost a loved one even a close friend you know nope nothing can ever happen that's going to replace that I'm Ben Thomas

Mike President Rossi Trump Facebook Der White House Russia Iran Mauritania Mike Rossi President Trump Ben Thomas Arizona Honeywell United States Myanmar Georgia Honeywell
Facebook removes accounts linked to QAnon conspiracy theory

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Facebook removes accounts linked to QAnon conspiracy theory

"Facebook says sign it has inside removed the several Honeywell plant groups in Phoenix accounts and advised pages employees linked and to the visitors right wing pro to wear trump a mask conspiracy at all theory times known as Q. factory anon workers Facebook reporters also some removed White House accounts staff and linked secret to service the anti did immigrant just spent US website for V. president der trump as and well his as top accounts aides in Russia in Honeywell executives Iran Mauritania did not the Myanmar people of and our the country country of a Georgia warriors at Facebook an earlier announced stop the the president purges acknowledged as part of its returning monthly briefing the country and on the coordinated economy to normalcy inauthentic behavior would have a human on its platforms costs some Facebook people be is affected trying to badly root out yes fake accounts but ahead we of have the twenty to get twenty our country presidential open election and we have to get hi Mike it open Rossio soon the president is predicting an economic rebound by the end of the year the people have lost a loved one even a close friend you know nope nothing can ever happen that's going to replace that I'm Ben Thomas

Facebook White House United States Russia Iran Mauritania President Trump Mike Ben Thomas Honeywell Phoenix Myanmar Georgia
Myanmar military may be committing new war crimes

UN News

01:04 min | 3 months ago

Myanmar military may be committing new war crimes

"A rising number of attacks by me on military on ethnic communities in the country have raised fears of possible war crimes and crimes against humanity there U N appointed Human Rights Expert Young Lee on Wednesday called for an investigation into events in kind and Chin states where she said that air and artillery strikes that killed and injured scores of adults. Children Armed Conflict has taken place in Russia and Chin States since December twenty eighteen between the Myanmar military known as the Tatmadaw and the American army more than one hundred fifty seven thousand people have been displaced hundreds including women and children killed and wounded since the conflict started the special rapporteur on the situation of human rights in our noted that calls for a ceasefire have gone unheeded instead. Government soldiers have prevented injured people from accessing. Urgent medical care. Mislead insisted while men suspected of links to the American army have been detained and tortured. Schools houses and Buddhist temple have been burned or destroyed including an entire village of up to seven hundred. Homes said the rights expert who also called on the Erika Army to protect civilians.

American Army Children Armed Conflict Erika Army Chin LEE Buddhist Temple Myanmar Russia
"myanmar" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:01 min | 3 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Slows down innovation. Thanks very much for.

"myanmar" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Took on Tuesday. A driver for the world. Health Organization was killed in rock kind state in Myanmar. After his car was hit by gunfire the attack took place in a region where government troops have been locked in fierce fighting with the Arakan Army which wants greater autonomy for the state and for the kind of Arakan people countries including Britain and America have called for an end to fighting amid the cove nineteen pandemic but clashes have intensified governments. Flailing response seems to be boosting. The Arakan Army and the and army declared a month-long ceasefire but it was rejected by the government as unrealistic. Charlie McCann Economists Southeast Asia correspondent fighting between the army and the Burmese military has escalated over the last two months as has a war of words that they've been fighting. Each group has blamed the other for firing at the. Who car which was carrying swabs from patients to be tested for Krona virus. So this conflict get it start then. The conflict erupted on January fourth. Two Thousand Nineteen not coincidentally Myanmar's Independence Day about three hundred and fifty fighters from the army attacked for police posts in northern. Rakhine state killing thirteen officers. Now there had been skirmishes between the American army and the Burmese military before that but the insurgents had never been quite so brazen in response the government. Which of course is led by Aung San Succi a Nobel Peace Prize winner instructed the army to crush the rebels and the military has since deployed an estimated. Fifteen thousand to twenty thousand troops and deployed heavy artillery airstrikes hidden and even naval patrols despite all this the economy is actually making some headway. And so what are the stakes in this fight? What is it that the army wants with African army are ethnic rock kind? Buddhists who are longing for independence. They feel neglected by the central government for decades. Rakhine is one of me and Mars poorest states and the advent of civilian rule with Aung San Suu Dci in two thousand sixteen Only exacerbated tensions the Eric a National Party won a majority of parliamentary seats in the state of Rakhine and they believed that Aung San Suu Cheese Party. The National League for Democracy would let it nominate the state's chief minister instead the ANALII appointed one of their own and the a. n. p. and and many were kind sell. This is a great betrayal. That sense of embitterment deepened in two thousand eighteen. When the police killed seven protesters and arrested that. Npr's chairman all of which contributed to further radicalizing the raccoons and this is a state in. Myanmar. There's not unfamiliar with with sectarian tensions. That's right in two thousand seventeen. The Burmese military launched its clearance operations against the hinge a persecuted Muslim. Ethnic Minority Walser lived in Rakhine state. The kind the hinge Are Two of many ethnic. Minorities got it across me and mark who are discriminated against and are advocating for fighting for more freedoms if not independence and ask for the conflict between the Arakan army on the national military. How how's that going? The military is suffering terrible casualties. And the army are are humiliating. The military I conducting hundreds of duck shins of politicians businessmen civil servants and indeed soldiers the military's accustomed to siege warfare not to the kinds of tactics being deployed by the army which hides the jungle but also operates an urban areas which takes pot shots at our patrols also does all these brazen things like bombings and abductions and to the military's really floundering. It's response the army's successes really driven in large part by the group's Commander Thuan Rot nine. I am the leader of Argon. Army Major General Plan Renai educated. He's charismatic he's young. We have lost our rights. The rights of the indigenous people in contrast to many of the leaders of the countries other insurgencies who has been described to me by an analyst as comprising the FISA Club of guerrilla leaders. The commander recently called on his followers to throw off the shackles of Burmese. Racism and colonialism. So uses this very rousing language. Harks back to the long periods when kind state was a glorious independent kingdom. Every American has a dream in their heart is slickness is mirrored. In the group's social media videos which feature attractive young soldiers declaring their love for their homeland and engaging in wholesome wrestling matches we will never ever give up and and so with its army on the back foot. Then how has the government responded to this slick operation having handedly in June? It blocked mobile Internet service to about one million people in Rakhine engine states according to Human Rights. Watch this is one of the world's longest government imposed Internet blackouts last month. That also blocked access several news websites. That report on the conflict as well as designating the Eric Armenia. A terrorist organization that then enabled police to charge journalists who interviewed. That can army's commander in chief with violating the Counter Terrorism Law and we're kind civilians are really coming under fire. Amnesty International claims that the military has been shooting indiscriminately at recline towns and has been torturing and murdering civilians. We know that more than one. Hundred thousand civilians have been displaced by the fighting and now a meteoroid reports shows that forty two civilians have died since March twenty third and so again in our we have this example of the military taking an extremely heavy handed approach against its own citizens under the watch of Aung San. Suu She I mean. Her reputation suffered greatly after the crisis. How do you see this crisis? Playing out on Sun suits. He won election twenty-six teen on her promise to bring peace to the country the fact that her government has instructed the military to crush the rebels as she put it has designated them a terrorist organization. There's no way that she'll be able to bring about peace with methods like those to me. It looks as if the conflict is only going to escalate the atkin armies ten unflicting so much damage the government will have to make some concessions and indeed has over the past six months more than two hundred hand government employees and Chen state which is just north of re kind. A lot of the fighting has taken place have resigned after being threatened by its fighters. Now the rebels don't have the firepower to defeat the government militarily but they might not need to if they can inflict enough humiliation. The government might decide to retreat from the fight and seek a political settlement. Either way see piece for the possible future curly. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you for a lot. More analysis like this subscribe to the Economist to twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds. Just go to economist dot com slash radio.

army government Arakan Army American army Rakhine state Myanmar Aung San Succi Rakhine Arakan Aung San Charlie McCann San Suu Cheese Party Health Organization San Suu Dci National League for Democracy America Suu Commander Thuan Rot
Rakhine and ruin: insurgency in Myanmar

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:43 min | 3 months ago

Rakhine and ruin: insurgency in Myanmar

"On Tuesday. A driver for the world. Health Organization was killed in rock kind state in Myanmar. After his car was hit by gunfire the attack took place in a region where government troops have been locked in fierce fighting with the Arakan Army which wants greater autonomy for the state and for the kind of Arakan people countries including Britain and America have called for an end to fighting amid the cove nineteen pandemic but clashes have intensified governments. Flailing response seems to be boosting. The Arakan Army and the and army declared a month-long ceasefire but it was rejected by the government as unrealistic. Charlie McCann Economists Southeast Asia correspondent fighting between the army and the Burmese military has escalated over the last two months as has a war of words that they've been fighting. Each group has blamed the other for firing at the. Who car which was carrying swabs from patients to be tested for Krona virus. So this conflict get it start then. The conflict erupted on January fourth. Two Thousand Nineteen not coincidentally Myanmar's Independence Day about three hundred and fifty fighters from the army attacked for police posts in northern. Rakhine state killing thirteen officers. Now there had been skirmishes between the American army and the Burmese military before that but the insurgents had never been quite so brazen in response the government. Which of course is led by Aung San Succi a Nobel Peace Prize winner instructed the army to crush the rebels and the military has since deployed an estimated. Fifteen thousand to twenty thousand troops and deployed heavy artillery airstrikes hidden and even naval patrols despite all this the economy is actually making some headway. And so what are the stakes in this fight? What is it that the army wants with African army are ethnic rock kind? Buddhists who are longing for independence. They feel neglected by the central government for decades. Rakhine is one of me and Mars poorest states and the advent of civilian rule with Aung San Suu Dci in two thousand sixteen Only exacerbated tensions the Eric a National Party won a majority of parliamentary seats in the state of Rakhine and they believed that Aung San Suu Cheese Party. The National League for Democracy would let it nominate the state's chief minister instead the ANALII appointed one of their own and the a. n. p. and and many were kind sell. This is a great betrayal. That sense of embitterment deepened in two thousand eighteen. When the police killed seven protesters and arrested that. Npr's chairman all of which contributed to further radicalizing the raccoons and this is a state in. Myanmar. There's not unfamiliar with with sectarian tensions. That's right in two thousand seventeen. The Burmese military launched its clearance operations against the hinge a persecuted Muslim. Ethnic Minority Walser lived in Rakhine state. The kind the hinge Are Two of many ethnic. Minorities got it across me and mark who are discriminated against and are advocating for fighting for more freedoms if not independence and ask for the conflict between the Arakan army on the national military. How how's that going? The military is suffering terrible casualties. And the army are are humiliating. The military I conducting hundreds of duck shins of politicians businessmen civil servants and indeed soldiers the military's accustomed to siege warfare not to the kinds of tactics being deployed by the army which hides the jungle but also operates an urban areas which takes pot shots at our patrols also does all these brazen things like bombings and abductions and to the military's really floundering. It's response the army's successes really driven in large part by the group's Commander Thuan Rot nine. I am the leader of Argon. Army Major General Plan Renai educated. He's charismatic he's young. We have lost our rights. The rights of the indigenous people in contrast to many of the leaders of the countries other insurgencies who has been described to me by an analyst as comprising the FISA Club of guerrilla leaders. The commander recently called on his followers to throw off the shackles of Burmese. Racism and colonialism. So uses this very rousing language. Harks back to the long periods when kind state was a glorious independent kingdom. Every American has a dream in their heart is slickness is mirrored. In the group's social media videos which feature attractive young soldiers declaring their love for their homeland and engaging in wholesome wrestling matches we will never ever give up and and so with its army on the back foot. Then how has the government responded to this slick operation having handedly in June? It blocked mobile Internet service to about one million people in Rakhine engine states according to Human Rights. Watch this is one of the world's longest government imposed Internet blackouts last month. That also blocked access several news websites. That report on the conflict as well as designating the Eric Armenia. A terrorist organization that then enabled police to charge journalists who interviewed. That can army's commander in chief with violating the Counter Terrorism Law and we're kind civilians are really coming under fire. Amnesty International claims that the military has been shooting indiscriminately at recline towns and has been torturing and murdering civilians. We know that more than one. Hundred thousand civilians have been displaced by the fighting and now a meteoroid reports shows that forty two civilians have died since March twenty third and so again in our we have this example of the military taking an extremely heavy handed approach against its own citizens under the watch of Aung San. Suu She I mean. Her reputation suffered greatly after the crisis. How do you see this crisis? Playing out on Sun suits. He won election twenty-six teen on her promise to bring peace to the country the fact that her government has instructed the military to crush the rebels as she put it has designated them a terrorist organization. There's no way that she'll be able to bring about peace with methods like those to me. It looks as if the conflict is only going to escalate the atkin armies ten unflicting so much damage the government will have to make some concessions and indeed has over the past six months more than two hundred hand government employees and Chen state which is just north of re kind. A lot of the fighting has taken place have resigned after being threatened by its fighters. Now the rebels don't have the firepower to defeat the government militarily but they might not need to if they can inflict enough humiliation. The government might decide to retreat from the fight and seek a political settlement. Either way see piece for the possible future curly. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you

Army Government Arakan Army American Army Rakhine State Myanmar Aung San Succi Rakhine Arakan Aung San Charlie Mccann San Suu Cheese Party Health Organization San Suu Dci National League For Democracy America SUU Commander Thuan Rot
Ceasefire during COVID-19 pandemic essential, to safeguard 250 million children

UN News

02:13 min | 3 months ago

Ceasefire during COVID-19 pandemic essential, to safeguard 250 million children

"N Children's Fund UNICEF F. One on Friday that two hundred and fifty million children around the world living in the waking nightmare of conflict desperately need warring to stop fighting as the cave in nineteen pandemic spreads in an appeal UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta. Four urged belligerent. To consider that they would not be able to battle the disease while still fighting each other to the children through these waking nightmares. A ceasefire could mean the difference between life and death. She said adding that it would protect children from being killed maimed or forced from their homes and stop the attacks on health centers water and sanitation systems. Misfortune call comes nearly a month after you and chief. Antonio Guitarist appealed for a global ceasefire which has resulted in a temporary lull in hostilities. In eleven countries violent conflict continues nonetheless in parts of Afghanistan became a facile Libya Mali Myanmar Syria Ukraine Yemen and elsewhere. The unions have appeal coincides with the release of UN research suggesting that the recession caused by cave nineteen could cause hundreds of thousands of additional child deaths this year responding to the findings which would reverse gains in reducing infant mortality. Un Secretary General Antonio guitarfish called for urgent action to protect youngsters wellbeing even before the pandemic childhood malnutrition and stunting were at unacceptable levels. He said now with classrooms closed almost everywhere. Nearly three hundred ten million children who rely on school meals are missing out on this. Daily dose of nutrition children are victims and witnesses of domestic violence and abuse with schools. Closed and important early warning mechanism is missing the UN chief explained reviews household income will force poor families to cut back on essential else and food expenditures particularly affecting children pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers and the self-services become overwhelmed. Seek children are less able to access get with the global recession gathering base there could be hundreds of thousands of vicious child deaths in twenty twenty in addition to the suspension of polio vaccination campaigns measles immunization has also been halted in at least twenty three countries the UN secretary general continued

UN Secretary General Antonio Guit Libya Mali Myanmar Syria Ukrai Unicef Antonio Guitarist Afghanistan Executive Director
UN appeals for US$877 million for Rohingya refugee response in Bangladesh

UN News

01:25 min | 5 months ago

UN appeals for US$877 million for Rohingya refugee response in Bangladesh

"Un agencies together with the Bangladesh authorities have appealed for eight hundred seventy seven million dollars to support hundreds of thousands of Ruhengeri refugees from Myanmar. Where conditions are still not conducive for their safe. Return you in refugee agency chief. Filipo Grandi said on Tuesday in August. Twenty seventeen a military operation in Myanmar's Rakhine state in response to separatist violence prompted hundreds of thousands of ethnic grandeur to flay speaking on the sidelines of an appeal for eight hundred fifty. Five thousand ethnic hanger and more than four hundred and forty thousand vulnerable Bangladesh's in host communities. Mr Grandy urged me on March to take quick action to help the displaced return home to wreck state and integrate. In their own country the solution continues to be in Myanmar. The problem is that things that need to be done there to create conditions for refugees to return from Bangladesh into Myanmar are too slow and or not happening yet freedom of movement the return of internally displaced people that are in camps in. Rakhine state respect of housing land property. Mr Grandi insisted that the hanger needed clarity on the pathway to citizenship that various commissions have indicated as being the fundamental step that needs to be taken in reference to recommendations by you and appointed panels of

Myanmar Bangladesh Filipo Grandi Mr Grandy UN
"myanmar" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Carol hills. Two Reuters journalists are released in Myanmar after spending more than five hundred days in jail for their reporting on the Rwanda crisis. This activist is familiar with the prison where they were held and he's not like the prison in Europe oriented state. It's also how the documentary surviving R Kelly encouraged many Ethiopian women to speak up about the abuse. They suffered from the older men in their lives. Water pick some stories that we got as bid people or they're on coal or someone who's twenty thirty four years older than them. Plus the enduring legacy of Argentina's Abe Perron on the one hundred anniversary of her birth. Those stories and more ahead on the world. I'm Carol hills. And this is the world thousands of prisoners were released from jail in Myanmar today. It's a custom around this time of year when the country celebrates its new year among the people released were to journalists for Reuters while loan and Chow so who were arrested in two thousand seventeen for breaking Myanmar's official secrets act I'm so happy for them. However, we also have to remember that from the first place this journalists should not be arrested, and they shouldn't spend more than a year inside the prison. That's Rohana activist way way new will hear more from her just ahead while loan and chose imprisonment drew attention to the ongoing persecution of Rohingya Muslims that began in two thousand seventeen the world's Patrick win explains. How the reporters got in trouble with Myanmar government day helped to uncover a massacre? Ten Rohana men were killed by soldiers and villagers and dumped into a grave on these two journalists help. To expose that it made the army look bad. And so then they were contacted by someone within security forces. Who said, hey, I've gotta show you something. They went out to meet that person, the person handed them a sheet of papers. And then within minutes, they were arrested for having secret documents in their possession and these two journalists Wallone, he's thirty three choice. Oh, ooh. Twenty nine. What is behind these releases the court said you're pardoned, but it didn't say you're innocent. And I think there's a really big difference there. I think what me and Mars government is looking for from. This is a big hug, you know, something to look like they're sticking up for human rights. There are dozens of other journalists and bloggers still in prison under baseless charges in also the government of Yanmar still thinks in general journalists should apologize for the way that they've covered the brutal ethnic purge of this Rohingya minority group one of the most persecuted groups in the world, they think that the way the journalists have covered this. Atrocity has been unfair. So I I don't necessarily see a big turnaround in the government's disposition towards journalist or the situation as a whole who are these six thousand five hundred twenty prisoners who are being released today. I mean, what do they represent their from all sorts of walks of life. This tends to happen. Every year every other year and Yanmar they'll do a mass pardoning of prisoners normally people who are in there for more garden variety crimes. So, you know, you'll have this mass outpouring of prisoners, and it makes the government look good, and they probably need to release the strain in their prisons. Anyway. Should we assume that unsung Succi is behind it? I mean in terms of the release of these two journalists, I don't know exactly what prompted these guys to make the list of the pardoned. I can't tell you that there's been enormous pressure. These two reporters recently got the Pulitzer prize even in the US State Department under President Trump, you don't think of them as pushing hard for the rights of journalists. But they have spoken up about these two journalists Mike Pence has brought this up to the government. Nikki Haley, the former US ambassador to the UN. She has pushed back on this. What is actually the sort of twisted catch twenty two?.

Myanmar Carol hills Reuters Yanmar Wallone R Kelly Rwanda Europe Mike Pence Pulitzer prize Nikki Haley Rohana Abe Perron US State Department US UN Argentina Chow Patrick
"myanmar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The verdict while alone and show sue were arrested in December and charged this is, while they were investigating a massacre of ten Rohinton. Muslims in. The northern part, of me and mar a judge is now sends them to seven years, in prison that massacre, took place. During a crackdown by the Myanmar army sending hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fleeing into. Bangladesh last week the UN said. The Myanmar military should be investigated for genocide we're joined now by. Reuters regional. Editor for Asia Kevin. Krolik. He works. With the, two journalists and was. In. The courtroom in the Myanmar capital when the? Verdict was handed down I know. This must be a very difficult day for your organization, repre- shit you're taking the. Time welcome thank, you it's a it's a, disappointing day yeah what what was the reaction in the courtroom Courtroom. A district court in Yangon was packed today Even more than it has been as this case has been. Followed closely by a number of diplomatic delegations Within Myanmar and, seen right les has a watershed for for the free press in Myanmar Halfway through the today's hearing the lights went out. The room went dark shortly after the judge read the verdict Heartbreaking moment for for while on for for their young families and their, colleagues the room went. Dark I mean that the lights went off what was happening Lights went out and we lost power it's it's all unusual it's happened before but it. Happened the verdict came down to that that's so IRI like almost some? Kind of, metaphor that I'm I'm trying to sort of confront as you describe it can you just tell me remind me how your. Two colleagues were detained. I mean the details of this case are pretty shocking Yeah, you know journalism you pay is not a crime that shouldn't be a political or controversial statement Martone constitution safeguards a free press and. In this case there there was a, real crime and you referenced it they were reporting at the time of. Their arrest on December. On the mass, killing of ten. Boys sorry ten men and boys. And village called, in then prosecution witness a police officer testified that he had been with other police when they talked. About setting up alone until CEO and stopping this recording and we're looking? Specifically involvement, of men March security forces in that killing They met police contact who handed them documents they didn't, solicit and never had. Time, to read shortly after they left that meeting on the outskirts, of Yangon they were arrested that was the setup that you're describing even though they are now sentenced to prison could can you just. Tell us the impact of the reporting, that they were able to do There there was. A mass killing that would not have come to light headed not been for their reporting Despite this attempt to to stop that reporting and with their support we published, that story in February and They believe and we have drawn strength. From their their strengths in all of this that the truth matters that facts matter committed and professional journalists but they also believe that doing their jobs and reporting is their contribution contribution, to democracy beyond bar their way of securing, a better future for the next generation speaking to Kevin crow who is the Reuters regional editor. For Asia two of his colleagues. Have been sentenced to seven years in prison after their reporting in Myanmar thanks so, much for your time we appreciate it Tomorrow, is primary day in Massachusetts and in one democratic vote for. Congress a veteran lawmaker faces a challenge from a rising star here's Anthony Brooks of WVU are this race represents among other things a generational split Michael cap Yano is sixty six first, elected to congress twenty years ago I on, a Presley is forty four first elected to the Boston city council eight years ago and the. First woman of color to serve. On that part Plus closely campaign in a black. Church in Boston from where a group of senior. Citizens we're about to head off on a Boston Harbor cruise, I.

Myanmar Myanmar army Yangon Reuters Asia Boston Bangladesh UN sue Kevin crow Editor Massachusetts IRI Anthony Brooks Michael cap Yano Congress Boston city council CEO officer WVU
"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington DC and I'm David Greene NPR west. In Culver City California to journalists working for Reuters in Myanmar have been found guilty of breaking the law on state secrets This was the scene. Outside as the two journalists left the courthouse following the verdict wa alone and show sue were arrested in December and charged this is, while they were investigating a massacre of ten Rohinton. Muslims in. The northern part, of Myanmar a judge a judge has now sends them to seven years, in prison that massacre, took place during. A crackdown by the Myanmar army sending hundreds of thousands of Ruhanga fleeing into Bangladesh. Last week the UN said the. Myanmar military should be investigated for genocide we're joined now by Reuters. Regional editor for Asia Kevin Kroll. Icke. He works with the two journalists. And was in the courtroom in, the Myanmar capital when, the verdict was handed down. I know this, must be a very difficult, day for your organization we appreciate you taking the time welcome Thank you it's it's disappointing that yeah what. What was the reaction in the. Courtroom Courtroom district court in gone was packed today Even more than it has been this case has been followed closely by a number of diplomatic delegations within Myanmar and seen right house a. Watershed for for the free, press in Myanmar halfway. Through the today's sharing the lights went out the room went dark shortly after the judge read the verdict It's a heartbreaking moment for for wall on for for their for. Their young families and their, Colic's the room went. Dark I mean that the lights went off what was happening Lights went out and we lost power it's it's not unusual it's happened before, but it happened as the as the verdict Ken Johnson that's so IRI? Like almost, some kind of metaphor that I'm I'm trying. To sort of confront is as you describe it can you just tell me remind me how your. Two colleagues were detained. I mean the details of this case are pretty shocking Yeah you know. Journalism is not a. Crime that shouldn't, be a political or controversial statement beyond Mars, home constitution, safeguards a free, press and in this case there there was a real problem and you referenced it they were reporting at, the time of their arrest on December on the mass killing of ten? Boys sorry, ten men and boys and village called in Then A prosecution, witness a police officer testified that he had been with other police when they talked about setting up alone until sue and stopping this. Reporting they were looking specifically involvement of, men March security forces in that killing They met police contact who had them documents that didn't solicit never had time to read and shortly after they left that meeting on the outskirts of Yangon, they were arrested that would that was the setup that you're describing even though they are now sentenced to prison could can you just, tell us the impact of the reporting, that they were able to do Well there. Was a mass killing that would not have come to light had it not been for their reporting. Despite this attempt to to stop that reporting and with their support we published that story In peddler and They believe we have drawn strength from their their strikes in, all of this the the truth matters that facts matter, committed professional journalists but they also believe that doing their jobs and reporting is their contribution on its contribution to, democracy San mar their way of securing a better future for the next generation speaking, to Kevin Krolikowski who is the Reuters regional, editor for Asia two of his colleagues have been sentenced to seven years in prison after their reporting in. Me and mar thanks so much. For your time we appreciate it Tomorrow is primary day in Massachusetts and in, one democratic vote for congress veteran lawmaker faces a challenge from a rising star here's Anthony Brooks of WB you, are this race represents among other things a generational split Michael cap Yano is sixty, six first elected to congress twenty years ago, I on a Presley is forty four first elected to the Boston city council eight years ago and the. First woman of color to serve. On that far Mostly campaign in a black church. In Boston from where a group of senior citizens. We're about to head off on a Boston Harbor cruise I,.

Myanmar Reuters Myanmar army Culver City California NPR Boston editor Steve Inskeep sue David Greene UN Icke Washington Kevin Krolikowski Yangon Kevin Kroll Massachusetts Anthony Brooks Ken Johnson Michael cap Yano
"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Create is the government here in myanmar insists it wants to bring home these were hindu families as quickly as possible but that deeply skeptical they believe they're the people that no country wants we've managed to join government trip to rack state it's billed as a chance to see peace and stability but it feels like a grim sightseeing tour of a place where crimes against humanity a said to have taken place where we now racing through the green and lush raccoon country songs but every now and then you spoke walls arrange avantage race to the ground or this left patches of blackened and it's remarkable every model so you travel you see what was a a community now destroyed and abandoned he will come to the all reporters media boston man mall claims it's working hard to bring back any ryan wants her itself so we're taken to a reception centre uniformed man sits stiffly desks pens poised but there's no one to register usa ushered into a cabin and invited to speak to nine ranger men and deploy you've obviously been waiting for us they all look bewildered and scared they released rugby is it an nbc unprompted they produce newly issued id cards withhold there among one hundred thirty eight ranji people you've come back to myanmar and have already been processed but as soon as his they've never actually been to finish next the village of indeed in the only place where the military has admitted it soldiers killed mahindra civilians in the latest violence the family still here are ethnic raccoon buddhists the hatred of their former muslim neighbors is clear we tracked down the village administrator how would you describe the ranger people in three words he only needs one at the mobile terrorists terrorists when the hinge moved down the bulldozers moved in this landscape is being reshaped and with united nations fact finders banned from collecting evidence in this part of myanmar there's concern that crimes committed here or never be on earth the un says raccoon state is not ready to receive stranded rohinton that they wouldn't be safe and so for now they remain in bleak camps homeless helpless as the world watches on mcpeek reporting having had rare access to northern rak hind conroy's we were talking about refugees at the start of the program here is a classic example what thoughts do you have well it's an appalling tragedy great atrocities have being committed by the myanmar government military forces they've not been held accountable the accounts of ethnic cleansing and war crimes against rang the people are just appalling widespread rape torture indiscriminate killing of civilians as a result several hundred thousand people have been forced to flee i have no question that it's not safe for them to return to reckon state and indeed if you talk to ranger people that's what they say there are no guarantees for their security certainly not from the myanmar government that has been part of murdering them but also from the un nonetheless i'm afraid to report that the un has agreed a secret memorandum of understanding with me i'm more government just come to light in the last couple of days without consulting the range of people themselves about returning ranjha to reckon it's a pretty disgraceful example of a of a secretive diplomatic process which is excluded the actual people whose whose fate whose lives are at stake and that has to be addressed that has to be uncovered we need an international debate about what should happen to their hinge on how they can be protected so what that has led to your saying is some sort of deal whereby people can go buy a call might be encouraged to go back without the protection that they need bangladesh doesn't want hundreds of thousands of people living in refugee camps on its border in cox's bazar there's a huge question of what is to happen to these people my own feeling is that this is totally implausible for most of them if indeed any of them to attend to reckon state under current circumstances even if there were a un protection force in rakhine which i think is plausible i'm not sure that even then they would be safe because i'm afraid the un's recorded protecting vulnerable populations in circumstances like this where the government is profoundly hostile to that population is is not great what did you take out of nick peaks report well i think it's absolutely terrifying what those people are going through and also i think there has been a complete breakdown as one can see.

myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"European union federica marini said the sanctions run attempt to punish individuals but not disrupt mas democratic process you know that's our approach to sanctions is always gradual reversible it is very important for us that's on one side we use the instruments of pressure we have but also that we keep in mind the overall picture and the bigger picture in this case is the need also to preserve and protect the democratic process in which is a recent young one i would say without giving up obviously to the principles and values and objectives that of protecting during copulation and guaranteeing full implementation of the agreement that was signed between the and modern manga dish on the need for their return mug arenas who was the sacking of the general assigned that the targeted sanctions working barbara a lock villa is a member of the european parliament from germany and as being tobacco fashion myanmar to assess the crisis well it is a good reaction because for many months now the international community has asked the myanmar government to really take action against those military personnel border guards in police officials who have been involved we tried or the european union announced ready in february and asks the government of myanmar to really follow up end to find out who has responsibility no reaction in april again the council said we adopt a legal framework to really come to targeted restrictive measures and now we have this list so this is positive but i say this is not the only thing that you should do but in sacking may major general amongst so the the burmese army haven't acknowledged his responsibility in the persecution of ryan jim muslims in fact the very opposite they say that he lost his job for showing weakness in the face of ranger militant attacks so they haven't accepted any responsibility.

myanmar myanmar government european union burmese army federica marini germany
"myanmar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from npr news i'm david green and i'm steve inskeep we've been chasing down the story behind a question to mark zuckerberg the founder of facebook was questioned by congress this spring most attention focused on facebook sharing personal data and facebook being used to spread disinformation less noticed was a question about facebook's role in violence in myanmar zuckerberg's answer lead npr's anthony kuhn divisible me in marin search of a fuller answer at a senate hearing in april vermont senator patrick layhee grilled facebook ceo mark zuckerberg about neon mar recently u n investigators blamed facebook for play rose hiding possible genocide in myanmar has been genocide ethnic conflict and military antiinsurgent operations if sent an estimated seven hundred thousand rohingya muslims fleeing into bangladesh lahey was referring to accusations that facebook helped fan the flames by providing a platform for hate speech zuckerberg acknowledged that he's aware of those charges senator what's happening in myanmar is a terrible tragedy and we need to do more we all agree with that to understand how people see facebook here i came to pan dr yanggon based tech hub that's been active in combating hate speech online my name is stan and i am a digital rights activists for me amar he says the men mars undergone a digital revolution in just a few short years some ninety percent of the population of myanmar has gained access to the internet mostly through their mobile phones the country has some twenty seven million facebook accounts for a population of about fifty three million people think facebook is internet it comes free in store on the phone that they buy and three years is very short time to get accustomed to the.

npr stan senator bangladesh ceo vermont senate marin david green steve inskeep myanmar mark zuckerberg senator patrick layhee anthony kuhn congress facebook founder ninety percent three years
"myanmar" Discussed on Click

Click

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Click

"The main thing is it knows where to fight i say parts based on the surveys that a previous spices squadron of drones have produced but the in terms of the ecology of it all we're talking about these coastal regions in myanmar mangroves that course grow in brackish water and salt water so presumably this is then to help to create almost like a barrier a guard against damage hurricanes that kind of thing indeed mom myanmar is obviously very vulnerable to storms and there was the second nargis and southbound eight that destroyed millions of lives i mean the modern hundred thousand people died and of course millions of people who are factored by the cyclone and only the villages that feel protected by the leave in mangroves have survived so now clearly the government sees the potential democracy to protect life and international organization and u n environment who supports this projects they see the potential mongrels to protect lives from the ocean but also to create livelihoods because in the mongrel environment you can develop a crop farms can develop shrimp farms especially usually because the background would grow back over a long period of tally there were stable part of the ecosystem there they are affected by things like hurricanes which take a loan it takes a long time to combat what you did with the the dreaded planty is just eighty the natural process you don't actually totally to change what is going on and i think that's where it becomes really valuable and they're trying to take oji allows you to reach places which would just be impossible it'd be so much it would take so much longer to do this was early other way yeah and can you give us a sense of how much quicker is is to do this using driving's rather than people going out there and manually putting the pots into these swarms well of course it all depends on the environment and as you can imagine it's really laboring.

myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Four hours senator what's happening in myanmar is a terrible tragedy and we need to do more we all agree with that okay but how can you dedicate and we'll you dedicate resources makes her sure such hate speech is taken down within twenty four hours yes we're working on this we really welcome the twenty four hour commitment mic because that's the first time that they're really attempting to target i think there's still remains to be done that's victoria rio she's a social media analyst based in yangon myanmar and she spoke with my colleague lydia amana leader joins me now so how big a problem is this in marla yet it's a really big problem in myanmar and other countries as well so you might remember earlier this week we spoke with buzzfeed's asia correspondent who told us about how a very similar scenario is playing out in sri lanka where you have extremists posting content that eventually leads to violence and that's what we're seeing in myanmar's well in fact the un the independent international factfinding mission on me and mar just last month they said that social media sites and facebook in particular played a quote determining role in spreading misinformation and hate speech that lead to violence and of course in myanmar we're we're looking at nearly seven hundred thousand rohingya muslim refugees fleeing into bangladesh escaping a military crackdown escaping hate so what are these groups like the the people victorio is associated with in myanmar digital activists what do they wanna see so as you heard rio say earlier she and the digital rights groups that she's working with on the ground in myanmar are very pleased that mark zuckerberg made this commitment to respond to flagged hate speech within twenty four hours but they say there is a lot more that the company can do i think maybe the first thing would be to stop setting up a dedicated country team so at this point is no one there's no one from facebook in me and more so it's really important that they.

myanmar analyst buzzfeed sri lanka facebook bangladesh mark zuckerberg senator yangon lydia amana asia twenty four hours twenty four hour Four hours
"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What may happen now i managed to catch up with one of the lawyers for the two men and this is what i said to him do you think your clients will be freed i firmly believe that they will be released if there is a frantic one of your colleagues mentioned another alternative would be under a new president a new year your clients may be freed how realistic is that it may be wishful thinking because the new president is my pollick i've worked with him in i believe in him but i don't believe in the situation now he is so that was khin maung saw one of the lawyers for reuters man just wants me after the latest hearing it sounds that there are signs neck of the myanmar government softening its stance on all of this has been a visit for instance by government official to the refugee camps over the border in bangladesh hasn't that absolutely i think this is something which has raised eyebrows because the accusation towards steve she and her political cabinet here in myanmar is they've been completely apathetic to the plight of the hinge but as you say this visit from the welfare minister the man who is supposed to be in charge of the whole reassessment process if ryan muslims comebacks he's been visiting people today in cox's bazar this is something that people thought would happen so certainly the government trying to show some signs that they do care about the plight of these some seven hundred thousand people how is this case being received in myanmar well if you talk to the man or the woman on the streets you'll find that this is not making headline news here it's more of the international media which are pursuing this case lots of journalists here today and that probably is because the fact that myanmar is predominantly a buddhist country and the support for the military is actually increased over the past few months at the same time that hundreds of thousands of hindu people have been driven out the are a group of people that the majority of people here don't seem to care for in particular and so the plight of these two journalists is not something that mainstream opinion here seems to be aware.

president khin maung myanmar government official bangladesh steve myanmar cox reuters
"myanmar" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Last august the militry of men mob began a crackdown on what they said was militant activity in raccoon state since then hundreds of thousands of members of the muslim minority roma hinge of people have fled some six thousand stranded on the thin strip of land between the two countries living in basic conditions in makeshift camps i'll correspondent albert arson at erosion went to one of them behind that camp that is a barbed wire fence red i could see a hill on top of the hill that observation post by the man maher bought a god's add that are lots of people standing on the hill closely observing what is happening below in these scams we are right on the edge of the border and these if you do have been complaining that they get threats from the myanmar border police use some time loudspeakers sometimes fired blank shots telling them to go into bangladesh they don't want them to stay in these noman'sland which is technically myanmar under have been asking them to leave the area but people have been refusing and they are staying put the conditions are appalling in they have tinroof houses some more covered with plastic sheets that taller saw it on the side of the cannot with just tinroof surrounding them there is no running water they are shot a food that already are was in other camps which we will be covering in the next few days i like how that if you decide managing for the last six months and how are fearing for the monsoon and also any outbreak of disease and the situation of women in these scams we will be looking into these issues in the coming days and will bring you more from under us an erosion in bangladesh over the next week cervical cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer in women however australia could become the first country to eradicate states the international papillomavirus society puts the decline down to a national immunization program that i boys and girls which began in.

albert arson maher bangladesh myanmar international papillomavirus s australia six months
"myanmar" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Last august the militry of men mob began a crackdown on what they said was militant activity in raccoon state since then hundreds of thousands of members of the muslim minority roma hinge of people have fled some six thousand stranded on the thin strip of land between the two countries living in basic conditions in makeshift camps i'll correspondent albert arson at erosion went to one of them behind that camp that is a barbed wire fence red i could see a hill on top of the hill that observation post by the man maher bought a god's add that are lots of people standing on the hill closely observing what is happening below in these scams we are right on the edge of the border and these if you do have been complaining that they get threats from the myanmar border police use some time loudspeakers sometimes fired blank shots telling them to go into bangladesh they don't want them to stay in these noman'sland which is technically myanmar under have been asking them to leave the area but people have been refusing and they are staying put the conditions are appalling in they have tinroof houses some more covered with plastic sheets that taller saw it on the side of the cannot with just tinroof surrounding them there is no running water they are shot a food that already are was in other camps which we will be covering in the next few days i like how that if you decide managing for the last six months and how are fearing for the monsoon and also any outbreak of disease and the situation of women in these scams we will be looking into these issues in the coming days and will bring you more from under us an erosion in bangladesh over the next week cervical cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer in women however australia could become the first country to eradicate states the international papillomavirus society puts the decline down to a national immunization program that i boys and girls which began in.

albert arson maher bangladesh myanmar international papillomavirus s australia six months
"myanmar" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"The nineteen th of november web the igc next sunday eight o'clock eastern on abc that all right yeah i guess going to be a really fun to see i diana ross perform the i haven't seen her in i don't even know how long ag these last year that share did a big performance or was at the grammys member but it was called a see share perform to all these like vintage artists that we don't see on tv heavy could be pfizer bob geldof the founder of live aid handing back his freedom of the city of dublin worried also held by the kgb bureau of myanmar aung san suu kyi in protest over her handling of the crisis in genius it has a junior year right and that is there that is i mean phonetically looks yep yep yeah i think you at all he said ray could share the honour where this person who's come under heavy criticism for not speaking out against the ethnic cleansing going on in myanmar half a million of these people have fled violence of the country since august and they're all pouring into bangladesh with some really horrible stories of the atrocities going on he says i don't want to even obama really proud of it you know i get handed things by states and cities around the world but i am a job the dubliner and this may have a lot to me i don't want to do it but it's the most i can do and the least i could do a man of conscience it would seem that who desert regions what happened with his song in that while the other things shall so that's the under wind situation 1985 is live aid i got to remember that make up now but hannah and it was a long time ago by tornado after dj v time ig save hundreds of dollars by switching to gaiko i'm so happy i feel like i can fly disclaimer you will not be able florida shattering the tagako this is.

founder ray myanmar bangladesh hannah florida diana ross bob geldof dublin kgb bureau of myanmar aung san obama
"myanmar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of their hinge a muslim leaders that the government is trying to put new landmines all the fear of landmines will prevalent people from going back into myanmar the un security council is due to meet today to discuss the crisis and it was reported that mian mars leader aung san suu chee would participate now we're hearing that she is no longer planning to according to me and my government officials so the state councillor and foreign minister ons on so she has decided to postpone her meeting in the united nations mainly because she wanted to focus on the issues on the current developments within the country but many people would see this as that she's not willing to face up to the international community when she goes and meets world leaders because the pictures of these fleeing refugees are being brought caused being told in many and a media organizations throughout the world and this is creating where's strong impressions on why these people are targeted why these people are fleeing violence in myanmar on most of them carry similar tales of their houses being burnt down and and the relatives are being shot it just to put the other side of the story what the million mark government says is that the militants from the hinge a community they first initiated a wave of a tax on police checked boys in the evacuation state and then the military responded to the uae liens and they also accused these militants of attacking some of the buddhist religious and hindu villagers this is the russian given by the manmark government hub let us know independent verification of either of these claims and the man more government now says that the state councillor on sense which either de facto leader will not attend this meeting and instead somebody else wilder percent critics have been saying that she has disappointed the international community by keeping quiet are not speaking out against violence against israel jaffe all along she has.

myanmar un security council aung san suu chee foreign minister united nations media organizations mian mars uae manmark government israel
"myanmar" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This is the bbc complete range of programmes bbcworldservicecom slash costs welcome to the latest global news recorded it thirteen hours gmt on monday the eleven to september i'm alex ritz but the selection of highlights from across bbc world service news today coming up the un says the treatment of rare hinge a muslims in myanmar is a textbook example of ethnic cleansing stories of survival after hurricane erma in florida storm surge warnings remain in place as millions of residents cope without electricity many of them in evacuation areas far from their homes fairly down there is worse frenzy coworkers is very odd we're feeling no one's going to go back to meanwhile in the british virgin islands people appeal for more aid right now if any hair podesta could airports we mean fold what sharlto 10 sounding australian scientists claim a breakthrough in the spread of skin cancer basically what the trials have shown that we're able to in a fixed mellon i'm in its tracks fly preventing it from spreading to distant organs and the world's highestpaid youtube star pudi pie in trouble again for making a racial slur but first the un estimates that there are around three hundred thousand ruin jim muslims who have fled myanmar for bangladesh since violence erupted two weeks ago and today the un human rights chief is aid rod alhussein as described the violence as a textbook example of ethnic cleansing mr alhussein was unequivocal as he addressed delegates at the un human rights council in geneva because miramar has refused access to human rights investigators the current security cannot yet be fully assessed brought the situation seems a textbook example of ethnic cleansing moumia nmore government should stop pretending vertically rangers are setting fire to their own homes and laying waste to their own villages this complete denial of reality is doing great damage to the international standing of a government which until recently benefited from immense goodwill.

alex ritz myanmar mellon bangladesh geneva miramar human rights bbc florida un thirteen hours two weeks