35 Burst results for "Myanmar"

Biden pledges US will work with Southeast Asian nations

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden pledges US will work with Southeast Asian nations

"President Joe Biden promised that the U.S. would work together with a vital coalition of Southeast Asian nations as China also tries to expand its influence in the region speaking at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations summit Biden expressed the importance of ASEAN to his administration ASEAN is the heart of my administration's in the Pacific strategy The president hoped U.S. collaboration with the ten nation bloc would help to deepen peace and prosperity throughout the region to resolve challenges from the South China Sea to Myanmar and define innovative new solutions to share challenges Biden's efforts at this year's ASEAN summit are meant to lay the groundwork for his upcoming meeting with Chinese president Xi Jinping Biden will meet with Jean Bali at the G 20 summit at a time when China is now considered as the U.S.'s most potent economic and military rival I'm Karen Chammas

President Joe Biden Asean Biden U.S. China South China Pacific Chinese President Xi Jinping B Myanmar Jean Bali Karen Chammas
 SE Asian leaders do little to raise pressure on Myanmar

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

SE Asian leaders do little to raise pressure on Myanmar

"ACM leaders are struggling to come to a consensus on how to pressure Myanmar to comply with a plan for peace Indonesia's president Joker weeded out says the Myanmar crisis has worsened and more must be done Deeply Disappointed The situation in Myanmar is worsening and ASEAN plan calls for the immediate cessation of violence in the country a dialog among the parties that

Myanmar President Joker Indonesia Asean
Ethnic group says Myanmar air attack kills 60 at celebration

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

Ethnic group says Myanmar air attack kills 60 at celebration

"Air strikes by Myanmar's military have killed more than 60 people including singers and musicians According to a rescue worker the victims of the attack had been at an anniversary celebration of the Kachin ethnic minorities main political organization The attack comes three days before Southeast Asian foreign ministers hold a special meeting in Indonesia to discuss the worsening situation in Myanmar The number of casualties appeared to be the most in a single air attack since the military seized power in February I'm Mimi Montgomery

Myanmar Indonesia Mimi Montgomery
Philippines extending state of calamity for virus pandemic

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Philippines extending state of calamity for virus pandemic

"Philippine president Ferdinand Marcos junior's extending a state of calamity declared by his predecessor more than two years ago to deal with continuing concerns over the coronavirus pandemic Previous president Rodrigo Duterte placed the entire Philippines under a state of calamity in March 2020 because of the coronavirus now Marcus junior's press secretary says the state of calamity which was to expire on Monday may be extended by around three months primarily to allow emergency purchases and provide hazard allowances for healthcare workers masks will still have to be worn in crowded areas where people can't observe social distancing The Philippines and Myanmar are the last two countries in Southeast Asia that still require the wearing of masks outdoors I'm Charles De Ledesma

Rodrigo Duterte Ferdinand Marcos Marcus Junior Philippines Myanmar Southeast Asia Charles De Ledesma
 Philippines ending compulsory mask wearing outdoors

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Philippines ending compulsory mask wearing outdoors

"The Philippines president has okayed the removal of face masks in public more than two years after the law was imposed The Philippines and Myanmar are one of the last countries in Southeast Asia to lift the compulsory wearing of masks outdoors authorities have said the change will take effect as soon as president Ferdinand Marcos junior issues an executive order the Philippines and interior minister said a study has shown that lifting mask wearing requirements in other countries has not led to a surge in new infections however authorities

Philippines Myanmar Southeast Asia Ferdinand Marcos
"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:47 min | 3 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

"This is Matt wells at UN news. Well, it's been 5 years since the bloody crackdown in Myanmar that forced nearly 1 million members of the minority Rohingya community to seek shelter in neighboring Bangladesh, joining scores of others who'd fled previous ways of violence. Nicholas cum Jian heads the international investigative mechanism for Myanmar, established by the UN Human Rights Council to document crimes committed in the country, including in the wake of the February 2021 military coup. During a recent visit to UN headquarters, mister kunjan spoke to Diane Penn about the mechanisms work, its outreach to Burmese citizens and the challenges facing its staff.

Matt wells Myanmar Nicholas cum Jian UN Bangladesh UN Human Rights Council mister kunjan Diane Penn
Myanmar executes ex-lawmaker, 3 other political prisoners

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Myanmar executes ex-lawmaker, 3 other political prisoners

"The executions of four prisoners By Myanmar's military government announced in state media has drawn widespread condemnation The deputy Asia director of the watchdog Human Rights Watch Phil Robertson roundly condemns the hunters action and says the executions point up the failure of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations or ASEAN to take the lead in trying to resolve the situation in the country and that it was time for the international community to act decisively This is a real wake up call for the international community that they can not allow Myanmar to slide off the table to be concerned too much about other things and ignore Myanmar's worsening Civil War in the human rights atrocities that are going along with it One prominent activist tells the AP the execution show the generals were out of control and predicts the deaths would harden resistance I'm Charles De

Watchdog Human Rights Watch Phil Robertson Myanmar Association Of Southeast Asian Asia AP Charles De
Ali Velshi, Many Other Democrats Are Anti-Semitic

Mark Levin

01:41 min | 8 months ago

Ali Velshi, Many Other Democrats Are Anti-Semitic

"Who is Ali velshi Ali velshi is a reprobate Who is on MSL Estee And the other day he compared the State of Israel To countries that slaughter people the tortured people That have concentration camps for people and on and on and on Because the hard left in this country is as I say all the time anti semitic Oh yes Anti semitic And a big chunk of the Democrat party It's a real shocker to some Democrats but they need to wake up and smell the Marxism Here he is hat tip Alger minor Go If it's tough for NATO when the UN to prevent one country from actually invading another and subverting its population imagine the struggle our world order has with those countries in which portions of the population are persecuted by their own governments Afghanistan Syria China Myanmar Israel India to name just a few What Israel Here Israel has a parliamentary system in which Israeli Arabs participate Their members of the Knesset they're free to vote They now part of this coalition government they have there

Ali Velshi Ali Velshi Israel Democrat Party Nato UN Myanmar Syria Afghanistan China India
Thai wildlife group says tiger missing a leg needs help

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Thai wildlife group says tiger missing a leg needs help

"Forest Rangers in western Thailand are searching a remote jungle on the Myanmar border hoping to rescue a wild tiger with a missing a leg from an area where poachers have recently been operating video from a surveillance camera shows the three legged tiger feeding on the body of a water buffalo experts fear the slow moving female nickname I do want which means the amputated one is at risk from hunters or of starvation you can find here not not difficult patch right sang Chagas with the wildlife protection organization free land use the body after death Bob hello Hong for six minutes for her to he the remains then they shoot her with a tranquilizer dart it's not clear how the tiger lost a limb freelances specs the animal was a victim of poaching the use of snares is common in jungle throughout Southeast Asia I'm a Donahue

Forest Rangers Myanmar Wildlife Protection Organizati Thailand Bob Hello Hong Chagas Buffalo Southeast Asia
Violence, protests mark anniversary of Myanmar army rule

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 10 months ago

Violence, protests mark anniversary of Myanmar army rule

"A a a a nationwide nationwide nationwide nationwide strike strike strike strike in in in in Myanmar Myanmar Myanmar Myanmar marks marks marks marks the the the the one one one one year year year year anniversary anniversary anniversary anniversary of of of of the the the the army's army's army's army's seizure seizure seizure seizure of of of of power power power power a a a a sporadic sporadic sporadic sporadic protests protests protests protests and and and and violence violence violence violence across across across across the the the the country country country country Facebook Facebook Facebook Facebook the the the the international international international international concern concern concern concern photos photos photos and and and video video video on on on social social social media media media show show show a a a countrywide countrywide countrywide silent silent silent strike strike strike had had had emptied emptied emptied out out out streets streets streets in in in Myanmar's Myanmar's Myanmar's largest largest largest city city city Yangon Yangon Yangon and and and other other other towns towns towns as as as people people people stayed stayed stayed home home home businesses businesses businesses shut shut shut their their their doors doors doors in in in a a a show show show of of of opposition opposition opposition to to to army army army rule rule rule clashes clashes clashes and and and violence violence violence were were were reported reported reported as as as well well well as as as the the the country country country faces faces faces an an an insurgency insurgency insurgency that that that some some some of of of you you you and and and experts experts experts characterize characterize characterize now now now as as as a a a civil civil civil war war war the the the end end end of of of the the the street street street because because because also also also attracted attracted attracted international international international attention attention attention president president president Joe Joe Joe Biden Biden Biden has has has called called called for for for the the the ministry ministry ministry to to to reverse reverse reverse its its its actions actions actions free free free on on on sung sung sung su su su chi chi chi on on on the the the gauge gauge gauge in in in meaningful meaningful meaningful dialogue dialogue dialogue I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles through through through this this this month month month

Myanmar Army Yangon Facebook Army Army Army President President President Ministry Ministry Ministry Sung Sung Sung Su Su Su Chi Ch Charles Charles Charles
 Myanmar's Suu Kyi sentenced to 4 more years in prison

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 11 months ago

Myanmar's Suu Kyi sentenced to 4 more years in prison

"Myanmar's Myanmar's Aung Aung sung sung suu suu kyi kyi has has been been sentenced sentenced to to four four more more years years in in prison prison legal legal official official says says the the goal goal sentencing sentencing chief chief after after finding finding her her guilty guilty of of illegally illegally importing importing and and possessing possessing walkie walkie talkies talkies and and violating violating coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions the the noble noble peace peace prize prize laureate laureate was was convicted convicted last last month month on on two two other other charges charges and and given given a a four four year year sentence sentence then then which which was was then then a a hall hall but but the the head head of of the the military military installed installed government government the the cases cases are are among among a a dozen dozen goals goals against against suu suu kyi kyi since since the the army army seize seize power power loss loss February February I'll I'll sing sing her her elected elected government government suu suu kyi kyi supporters supporters say say the the charges charges against against a a contrived contrived to to legitimize legitimize the the military's military's actions actions I'm I'm Charles Charles Taylor Taylor this this

Aung Aung Sung Sung Suu Suu Ky Myanmar Suu Suu Kyi Kyi Army Army Charles Charles Taylor Taylor
 Myanmar court sentences ousted leader Suu Kyi to 4 years

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar court sentences ousted leader Suu Kyi to 4 years

"The the special special court court in in Myanmar's Myanmar's capital capital the the sentence sentence the the country's country's ousted ousted leader leader Aung Aung sun sun suu suu kyi kyi to to four four years years in in prison prison legal legal official official says says the the court court has has found found suu suu kyi kyi guilty guilty of of incitement incitement and and violating violating coronavirus coronavirus restrictions restrictions the the case case involves involves statements statements posted posted on on her her party's party's Facebook Facebook page page off off to to she'd she'd already already been been detained detained by by the the military military the the sentencing sentencing is is the the first first in in a a series series of of cases cases in in which which the the seventy seventy six six year year old old Nobel Nobel laureate laureate is is being being prosecuted prosecuted since since the the army army seize seize power power on on February February one one preventing preventing her her National National League League for for democracy democracy party party from from starting starting a a second second five five year year term term in in office office the the verdict verdict in in another another case case against against her her is is expected expected next next week week I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

Special Special Court Court Myanmar Aung Aung Sun Sun Suu Suu Kyi Court Court Suu Suu Kyi Kyi Facebook Army Army National National League Leagu Charles Charles De De Ledesma
U.S. Journalist Danny Fenster Is Freed From Myanmar Prison

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. Journalist Danny Fenster Is Freed From Myanmar Prison

"R. U. S. journalist jailed for months in Myanmar has arrived in New York Danny Fenster was sent to prison for charges that include spreading false or inflammatory information he was handed over to former US diplomat bill Richardson so long time coming you know it's a it's a moment for that and then imagine so so long Richardson helped negotiate the release it's worth the effort everything we had but it took a one on one with the leader

R. U. S. Danny Fenster Myanmar Bill Richardson New York Richardson United States
WorldView: U.S. journalist sentenced to prison in Myanmar

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

WorldView: U.S. journalist sentenced to prison in Myanmar

"A Myanmar court has sentenced an American journalist to harsh jail term a cold in the military ruled Myanmar the sentence detained journalist on the fence that to eleven years in prison with hard labor after finding him guilty on several charges including incitement for allegedly spreading false or inflammatory information his lawyer says Fenster the managing editor of the online magazine frontier Myanmar was also found guilty of contacting illegal organizations and violating visa regulations hence that is the only foreign journalists to be convicted of a serious offense since

Myanmar Fenster Online Magazine
Myanmar military uses systematic torture across country

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar military uses systematic torture across country

"Me on most bitter tree who's used systematic torture across the country the AP has found the military has been torturing detainees in a methodical and systematic way since his takeover of the government in February the AP investigation was based on interviews with twenty eight people imprisoned and released in recent months with photographic evidence and testimony from three recently defected ministry officials in the most comprehensive look into a highly secretive detention system holding more than nine thousand people data also indicates the military has been taking steps to hide evidence off it's torture I'm Charles Taylor this month

AP Charles Taylor
"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

"We said that we were very concerned given the history of Myanmar of so many crimes against civilians occurring in political conflicts that we would be watching the situation closely. And what we've seen since then is, unfortunately, it appears that very serious crimes have been happening throughout the country in different regions in the country, systematically on a widespread basis. So we're collecting that information. And many different sources have been voluntarily reaching out to us to provide us with information. Others we have contacted. And we've collected, we received over 200,000 communications just in the first few months after the coup with information that people wanted to share with us. So it's increased the burden on us, but it's also given us that opportunity that we have more individuals and organizations willing to speak to us more opportunities to talk to those who have information about what is happening or has happened in the past in Myanmar. And this has created some opportunities for our investigations. Is it correct to say that some of the investigations you're conducting some of the information you're collecting wouldn't be otherwise collected? Yes, I believe that absolutely that's fair to say. I've worked on different war crime tribunals, the different processes for to seek accountability. And one of the things that we've seen in other conflicts is the importance of preserving information while it's still fresh. While you can because of course, crime scenes get disturbed, bodies decompose, wounds can heal, people's memories can fade, witnesses with information can die. And can pass away without that information being collected. So it's very important to collect the information while you can. Because unfortunately, international justice often is a long process..

Myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"The boeing company blaming what they call the foreign pilot deflecting blame to to them city. They did that. Feel like a significant detail to you. The sort of blaming of the pilots. Yes for sure that was quintas carajas. Yes he lost five of his family numbers on the ethiopian airlines flight. There were times when boeing insinuated. Very strongly that the pilots were at fault. Thowing and a lot of people in the united states believe that american pilots would not have been in that circumstance because of higher levels of training they'd had and more experiences than say developing country pilots have had. There is a large sense of of the debate weighted towards the blame towards the developing country pilots. That was probably undeserved in this case. One thing that's striking about. Your documentary is what is not there. Boeing wouldn't talk to you. The faa wouldn't talk to you. I mean where is the accountability of the. I'm more a little. I guess. Journalistically grieved that the federal aviation administration wouldn't They are public servants after all. They refused to comment and boeing just had the sense that there's nothing that they could say in the light of three hundred forty six deaths that would make them look any better than they do and they didn't look very good. They're hoping desperately to just move on. It's not something the families though would really agree with. They're still suffering. That are still grieving for the loss. If they encountered boeing seven thirty-seven. Max are back in the air today or any changes made to the plane before they were put back into flight. The m caste system was given a second failsafe. It gives the pilots. Much more flexibility. It gives them a sense that they're in control and they got 'em counts now though. Faa put a rubber stamp on it and now we have about three hundred of the seven. Thirty seven max. Flying around the world and service would you riding. One i would. I would ride in senator. He said an accident. It's the most test airplane now in the world i. I'd be cautious. I've become much more cautious about flying. I think that there's a lot of this group think that goes in to play that we don't know about and i'm suspicious of the safety records. Generally tom jennings is the director of frontlines new documentary. Boeing's fatal flaw out this week on. Pbs thanks a lot. Tom thank you if the name. Cristiano ronaldo does not ring a bell. Just know this. He's one of the highest payed soccer players in the world. But it's his diet. Not just his prowess on the pitch. That's rubbing off on his new teammates at the english. Premier league club manchester united goalkeeper lee grant let loose little gossip from a recent team. Dinner here is on the. Uk's talksport network was christiana ghani's plight thorough. I've got an overseas the cleanest most healthy plight you can imagine and it just cracked me up. How not one single player dead alpin tight. That junk food on which was laid out. That's right no pudding. Brownie or apple. Crumble no desert rinaldo and by the sounds of that goes for the rest of man united but was on cristianos plate. Ktar and avocado and a couple of boiled eggs. That was one of the place. I didn't get the other one. It's making me. Think of ice cream and getting out of here. That's our cherry on top for today. The world comes to you. Each day from the nan and bill harris studio in boston. I'm carol hills back with you tomorrow..

boeing quintas carajas Faa Boeing tom jennings united states Premier league club christiana ghani Max Cristiano ronaldo lee grant Pbs Tom soccer united rinaldo Uk apple bill harris carol hills
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"But then five thousand feet up and down just diving. The film is a production of frontline. Also produced here at gbh in boston. Jennings joins me now from new york tom. Your film condenses years of investigative journalism. I'm going to ask you to condense even further in the end. What brought the two boeing planes down. There is not one individual who brought down seven. Thirty seven max. It was all about group. Think it was about a certain kind of inertia at the federal aviation administration the regulator but it was also the corporation itself and how it had come to believe in its own sense of mission and engineering capacities. Its ability to do no wrong. What technically went wrong with the planes may what was the technical issue there was a software program embedded into the cockpit is called an cast. It was all about letting pilots handle the plane effectively that program though who was designed in a way that was only for the highest of rare in extreme circumstances but blowing decided a certain point to implement that at normal operating levels in that problem with that was if there is a malfunction with that caste system at low levels. The pilots didn't have time to respond to it if it went into malfunction. And that's exactly what happened in those two flights that went down. The documentary goes over the context in which the seven thirty seven max was brought to market. Even though there were host of red flags within boeing. Here's one of your new york times collaborators. All of this comes out of trying to give airlines the most fuel-efficient version of plainfield. They can spend as little money training their pilots on. To what extent was this a corporate culture problem and to what extent was just plain malfeasance on boeing's part or was it both it's both it's malfeasance in the sense that there was a demand placed upon the engineering design process from the highest ranks from the c. Level down to contain costs. Because of that pressure that natalie kitchen f in that clip was talking the airlines. Were demanding a very fuel. Efficient cost effective airplane. Any kind of thing that went into the design process that effectively increased. The cost to the airlines was really looked down upon that resulted in a full-on attempt to reduce the cost of training of pilots. It's interesting the crashes both happened. In developing countries indonesia and ethiopia. A man who you interviewed in ethiopia lost five people in his family in the crash and was told it wasn't boeing's fault at.

boeing gbh federal aviation administratio Jennings boston tom new york plainfield new york times max natalie ethiopia indonesia
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Swedish is also spoken. there and public sector workers are expected to be fluent in both penelope ru who's from the uk has been living in finland for twenty years. Still when asked if she's fluent in finnish she says no definitely not now an even now. I think i would really struggle to have a proper conversation with somebody. Rue says. that's not just because of finnish. Language is so tough to learn one of the excuses that a lot of the foreigners give is that every time we try and use finish fins answers in perfect english so you feel most guilty about making them sort of suffer with your a very elementary finish when actually it would be much more efficient if both people spoke english rooted need flew in finish to get her first job as an english teacher in finland. But others haven't been so lucky new yorker Gouty move there in twenty seeing for love. As she was determined to find work there were forty seven positions that i applied for formerly eventually gowdy was called for an interview but she says her lack of finish made it all a a bit of a struggle. I did as much finish. As i could. And then i switched into english and i think it really rub them the wrong way but i was like. I'm doing the best i can. Cow didn't get the job and she since that a business outside of the capitol. The mayor zinke is johanna var. Theon he says expecting foreigners to speak fluent finish is reasonable. If i think he wants to attract international the common work there he says making english and official language will help. Miscalculation is delighted with idea. He's without stinky business. Hope which had foreign companies set up shop in the capital has become much more international. It attracts much more. International people and talent and investors. Icu death as a great opportunity for people to actually come here. He set up a program for foreign workers and their families to come to finland for three months last year. It's called the ninety day Thousands applied hackler says. Some of those workers are now planning to stay long term but not. Everyone is taken with the mayor's suggestion. I don't see that that is a needful because in housing gig. A speaking english area hopper korpi is with the social sciences faculty at temporary university. She says it's the healthcare sector the restaurant business that we need workers. These employees do need to be able to speak finish to their customers. Hopper copy says this english language proposal might be more of a publicity stunt by the mayor than anything else. He's starting his career so i don't think that he is totally one hundred percent serious bozo but for anyone thinking of moving to finland. I asked comedian ismal. If there are any words that foreigners should absolutely learn well owner or ghalia That would be like hail ghalia beer. There's no word for please finish so as most says if you just walk up to the bar and say ghalia that should do the trick for the world. I'm ori russian president vladimir putin announced. Today he's going into self isolation after possible exposure to cove it just prior to that however he met with serious president. Bush are allah saad. Russia militarily intervened on behalf of assad government in two thousand fifteen since then russia's bombing campaigns in syria have left many dead and wounded russia's also played the role of conflict mediator between the syrian government and opposition rebels to better understand russia's role in syria. We got in touch with mona uku. Ian she's a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace in washington mona. Let's start with a meeting between assad and putin. what was that about. i think that first shows very clearly. How beholden assad is to putin but we also see. I think russia trying to shape the narrative on syria trying to gain greater legitimacy for us this is following the presidential election this past spring widely viewed as a sham election. And i also attempting to demonstrate its influence in syria in the middle. East more broadly. I was going to ask why. Why did russia intervene. In the first place i mean. Why does it matter to russia. Well it came in the wake. Of course the arab uprisings and the assad regime was in great trouble in two thousand fifteen and was truly truly facing existential threat. And this is what prompted moscow to intervene on behalf of the assad regime of course along with iran which had also intervened earlier and remains a key ally of the assad regime on the ground in syria but why syria i mean there's uprisings all over the globe. What's russia's real interest in syria. Well russia's had a long standing interest in syria in. Russia has been involved in syria for decades. Well before charlot during the time of his father hoffa's al- assad and again i the middle east is of course a strategic part of the world and russia has long sought to demonstrate its influence on the ground and again i do think the arab uprisings were an important Happening in terms of the way putin perceived these uprisings as being a threat much more. Broadly a threat. That could eventually even come to russia. Russia continues to drop bombs in opposition held territories in syria. Do you see this continuing for the future. I think we are going to continue to see it. Although again more sporadically. Not the sorts of large scale. Offensives that provoked. Large displacement large flows of syrians fleeing either to other parts of the country or out of the country as refugees. I do think we will continue to see the russians. And of course the assad regime used military force where and how they can to make small gains on the ground but i think the battle lines in syria right now are largely frozen russia's also tried to play a mediator role in syria between the government and opposition rebels. Hasn't made any progress well. This summer saw a lot of violence. In southwestern syria town called dera which is known as the cradle of the revolution and for weeks the russians were attempting to mediate a truce between regime forces and rebels. That were holed up. In certain part of dera they eventually succeeded in negotiating this truce. Just a few weeks ago. And that ended up allowing syrian government forces. Now back into parts of dera for the first time in several years. I think we should be under no illusion that southwestern part of syria remains rest of. It's a very complex mix of forces on the ground there ultimately know what do you think is russia's end game in syria. Well i think. Russia is trying to make the best of what it's been able to achieve in its intervention in syria. I think it's easier both for the role of being able to reestablish itself in the middle east it would like to use syria as a springboard to project its influence elsewhere in the middle east. We've seen for example. Russian influence in places like libya they have shown an interest in developing relations with gulf arab countries. And they've also developed back room or even front room understanding with israel. On how israel comports itself in syria so there's a regional role that russia's seeking to to play. But i also think russia looks at its intervention in syria or is trying to portray it as part of what russian analysts like to talk about as the post westworld a world after what some have called the unipolarity moment of of us dominance not only at least but in the in the world. More broadly. and i think for for some russians or russian analysts moscow views. Its intervention in syria as a success as what they call the first post. West success mona. You could be in a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace in washington where she joined us from. Thanks a lot. Mona thank you so much for having me. There's bad news about a virus and is not the one that causes covert nineteen. It's about hiv. The virus that causes eight for the first time in twenty years. The decline in new hiv infections has stalled in two thousand twenty. There are one point million new infections three times as many as predicted the pandemic. It's partly to blame. It's cut off access for many people to hiv prevention education and testing us according to new report by the nonprofit global fund in the west african country of ghana. There's also an acute shortage of.

syria russia finland penelope ru gowdy zinke johanna var Theon assad hackler hopper korpi temporary university putin ismal assad government syrian government Russia mona uku washington mona Gouty
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"That. How do you stop. Lincoln's answers to the questions about the tens of thousands of afghan people who've been behind the people the us could not get out in time. His answers were evasive and unclear. We still don't really understand. The universe of those who helped the united states over the course of twenty years who remained in afghanistan are eager to leave. We know that those are many many many thousands more than those who actually were able to get out in this period of time. Finally going forward with the way. The biden administration handled the exit from afghanistan. Go down as a. Us foreign policy failure. Look the whole experiment is going to go down as a us foreign policy failure. That's four straight. Us presidents when the world's greatest military power spent two decades in country and then leaves under conditions like this and the government that was created propped up trained advised and solicited by united states collapses within eleven days. That is a black mark on the united states. It's not attributable to any one person but it is unquestionably a failure. One that will be studied for a long time to come. But the evacuation took place under joe biden's administration and he's the one who pulled the plug. Finally do you think this will him throughout the rest of his presidency. He will be accountable to that now. If history is any guide the american public has been very disinterested by and large in afghanistan for much of the two decades that we've been there so i'm guessing that the united states leaving the conditions under which it did so is not going to be more of a public political issue here in the united states than our presence was for the last two decades and i would think as a matter of politics. It's likely to fade fairly quickly. But as a matter of execution you know. Many presidents have faced foreign policy embarrassments overseas especially in their first years and that ended up being part of the records. And i think that's what we're looking at here which oh biden and the afghanistan withdrawal. Susan glasser is a staff writer with a new yorker. She's been talking with us about secretary of state antony blinken testimony before congress about the us exit from afghanistan. Thank you very much. Thank you between all the wildfires heat waves and droughts it can all feel a bit overwhelming for young people. The fear and anxiety about climate change are even more pronounced today bath university in the uk. The climate psychiatry alliance released the results of a new study. They polled ten thousand people between the ages of sixteen and twenty five across ten nations. Some six in ten said they are very or extremely worried about climate change. More than half agree. With the statement that humanity is doomed. The powerlessness is really crippling jennifer. Chendo from nigeria is one of the young climate activists who spoke at a press conference today. You know it's something that's young people like myself have to grapple we have to think of. This is something that is really affecting your people all over the world. The new study bears. That out says dr. Liz marks from the university of bath. She's one of the lead author of the new study that interviewed young. People nearly have told us that this effects than normal daily life things like eating sleeping going to school say that young people also report having doomsday thoughts about climate change. Overhaul things that families security will be threatened over half that the things that they most valley will be destroyed and four out of ten hesitant have their own children because of climate change of course. Climate change won't affect everyone equally. The study shows higher levels of distress in countries already feeling profound impacts caroline hickman. The other lead author of the study shared. What one child told her jobs in the maldives trip to me. He said climate change like tunnels soon the avengers and game whose ideology is to kill off off the planet. So the hopkin thrive and then he said the trailblazers with half being children hickman said she knew when she started the research that many children and young people were anxious and afraid. She just didn't know how afraid they were. Josh recessions me. I'm scared to brief the outside my house. I'm scared of the weather. Do you know that's why hickman says the anxiety makes sense though. It's a rational reaction to what kids constantly hear and read phrases like an existential threat and a planetary emergency. It may not be the avengers but it's still terrifying. You're listening to the world. i'm carol hills your with the world. Sex selective abortion in favor of boys is common in many countries. It's been the practice in the eastern european nation of georgia mark cord out say from the united nations population fund says doctors sometimes influence the parents decision to abort a girl don't use very because if a woman goes to get an ultrasound and they can have two girls and the third one is also girl this.

united states afghanistan biden administration Susan glasser antony blinken climate psychiatry alliance Chendo joe biden Lincoln biden caroline hickman university of bath hopkin congress nigeria hickman jennifer Liz uk dr
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"What they don't have is any outside country saying yes. We acknowledge that you are the legit government of myanmar. But philip on of it thinks the un should say exactly that assuming relations with the national unity government as a government would be a major game. Changer it would mean this. Revolutionary government could get foreign help like health services from the un right now it does treat patients with the help of nurses who defected from government hospitals. But they have to operate in secret since the military took over. Public services have basically collapsed. Many schools are shut. Emergency rooms closed and people are fending for themselves on of it says you. In recognition for the elected government is the way to go the major turning point in this current resistance and would would probably help national unity government and its allies to knock over a struggling to that has no supporting the this shadow government with its armed allies in the borderlands controls about twenty percent of the country the military about seventy percent. The rest is run by other armed groups that haven't picked sides so basically victory for the counter. Coup is by no means certain that is why officials such as linda. Thomas greenfield the united states. U n representative will say things like this. We will show the military that their actions have consequences but so far. The us isn't taking much action. Washington might be afraid to recognize a government that could sputter out in a few months. But here's the thing. Countries that are closer to myanmar's military like china. They don't fully recognize the regime either. Because what if the military can't hold power long-term already. Millions of citizens refuse to pay taxes to the military government and nearly half a million government workers won't show up to work. So is the military really running the country the un special representative for me mar christine trainer. Bergener says not really. She told the un earlier this year that this was only an incomplete attempted coup. I say attendant seems to take over has not stabilized. It would appear to be roundly rejected by the people. The un has kind of backed itself into a corner in june. It overwhelmingly approved a resolution telling the regime to back down and reinstate elected officials again. Here is philip out of it. The former un adviser. I don't see a pathway. Forward at would give a mea mukunda any path to formal acceptance in the international community now diplomats at the un. They have a third option kicking. The can down the road deferring any decision on mar until november when the committee that decides who's in and who's out we'll meet next. That's probably what they'll do this week. At the un general assembly in new york and while they make up their mind those are revolutions on the march in myanmar. This week with their rifles. Meanwhile the regime has been torching villages and launching airstrikes. Both sides will now try to gain more ground before november to have a stronger claim to truly running the country of myanmar for the world. I'm patrick win. And today in washington we heard from secretary of state antony blinken who testified before congress on the us exit from afghanistan and its aftermath after twenty years. Two thousand four hundred sixty one. American lives lost twenty thousand injuries. Two trillion dollars spent time to end. America's long as senators from the foreign relations committee. Put lincoln on the hot seat during the hearing. Here's republican senator rand paul and how he saw the biden administration's withdrawal from afghanistan never in my worst nightmares who'd anyone or conceive of such colossal incompetence. We're joined now by susan glasser. She's a staff writer at the new yorker where she writes about politics and global affairs. Susan what was your main takeaway from secretary. Lincoln's appearance before the senate panel today. Well this is an administration. That is very unrepentant. They are refusing to say mistakes. Were made even in the execution of the withdrawal secretary blinken just like president biden has been leaning very hard into the decision certainly broadly supported by the american people to withdraw from afghanistan and essentially using that as a broad cover for not really engaging in the specifics of how that withdrawal was carried out. How do you think. Lincoln's testimony is being received by. Us allies abroad specifically the eu. And nato partners you know. I think there were a lot of bruised feelings in brussels and around the nato alliance who had been with the united states for the whole twenty year duration of the us involvement in afghanistan after nine eleven. They felt that they had not really been fully consulted or given a voice in both the overall decision by president biden to end the nato operations there but also in the specifics of the withdrawal so the question is is there going to be lasting damage from this or is it just another example of the us acting in a high handed and more or less unilateral way when it's interests are involved. I'm curious if there's any criticism over the last two days that's really stood out to you for me. The republicans democrats. I do think that it's a sign of these hyper polarized and partisan times that there can't be a serious conversation in which the by administration would be able to acknowledge some of the failures of thinking that led up to this catastrophic collapse of the afghan government and they just have been unwilling to do that. Because the issue has been so supercharged. Until i you know i've been surprised and disappointed by that. I mean the bottom line. Is that the president had states. Joe biden in july eight said that it was extremely improbable that the taliban would have any kind of swift takeover of the country. That's exactly what happened just a few weeks later. How can we be having a serious reasonable conversation about.

un myanmar national unity government Revolutionary government Thomas greenfield mar christine Bergener us philip president biden afghanistan antony blinken foreign relations committee biden administration susan glasser blinken un general assembly
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Hills is the world we start with a big meeting kicking off in new york. Today it's opening day at the seventy six session of the united nations general assembly. One hundred ninety three member states are taking part but to countries present an immediate challenge. The first is afghanistan and the question here is whether the un will officially recognize the taliban as the legitimate representative of the afghan government. The other country is me and it was taken over in a military coup back in february which was followed by a deadly crackdown by the army to governments claim to run myanmar. So the un has to decide which one to recognize the world's southeast asia correspondent. Patrick win reports on. What the un's decision on me and mark could mean for the troubled country who deserves to run the country of myanmar for a lot of folks. That's pretty obvious. It's the people who won election last november only they are now tormented by military that has seized power and instead of sitting in parliament there in prison or on the run. Some of them remain underground in me emma. They don't go out. They rely on their relatives to get them food. Many of them have to change locations. Philip anivit worked with many of these elected officials as a un adviser until last year he still keeps in touch when you have to move to use networks of safe houses that have been settled by activists to evade arrest and probably torture better ashamed. Once they get wrist being hunted. These ousted leaders have managed to set up what they call the national unity government. It's still making decisions for the country. Often over encrypted apps it has a ministry of education holding on line classes. It's ministry of finance takes donations and it even has a brand new army which is working with armed indigenous groups in the borderlands to overthrow the central military and restore democratic rule. Yes they even have a battle anthem..

un afghan government myanmar united nations general assembl Philip anivit taliban afghanistan new york army Patrick asia parliament mark national unity government ministry of finance
Bangladesh Vaccinating Rohingya Refugees Amid Virus Surge

Dan Caplis

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Bangladesh Vaccinating Rohingya Refugees Amid Virus Surge

"ABC News Roam the government of Bangladesh has started vaccinating Rohingya refugees as a covid surge raises health concerns. More than one million people who fled Myanmar are sheltering in crowded camps. The delta vary in driving the surge across Bangladesh, particularly in the southern

Abc News Bangladesh Myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"The same time. There's these free cross which has destroyed round thirty to forty percent of her harvest becoming much more frequent. And this is something that worries winemakers reporter. Hanna nevio okay. Also points out. This problem is expected to worsen unless major changes are made what needs to happen really is changing the types of writers of grapevine at our us if we want to make them more resilient to climate change. We would have to consider planting more diverse and resilient varieties. That's hannah nebula v. Okay at the economist. Speaking to their podcasts the intelligence about the impact climate change is having on the wine regions of europe shake jaros small neighborhood in east jerusalem that serves as a microcosm of the israeli palestinian conflict. A recent eviction notice into four palestinian families. There became a battle over history land rights and national identity today. The israeli supreme court weighed in on the matter. Joining me now to discuss. This is lawyer. Roni levine schnur. She's a property and land. Use law expert at idc herzliya college in israel. Ronnie was a ruling that the judge decided on today. so today's justice is Opens the discussion with a compromise proposal. Offered to put aside the prioro decisions that order a fiction and instead freezes situation and allows the residents to maintain their current startling switches of protected residents in the news was that it would not mean that the residents wave their claim of ownership and that would be disgusting future unique procedures these availabilities to determine ownership rights which is called settlement. The of bottom line though the four palestinian families in shake jar will not be evicted immediately. Correct. they will not be evicted immediately. No decision was granted today. Generally the ways was positive This is on the way it can change direction and the court that allowed the residents to submit further evidence as to specific people that's residing houses and they also heard arguments with respect to my own part in the game which is an expert opinions that was submitted on the president's behalf last week in which i provided a set of Documents that recently retrieved from jordanian lives that show sats jordanians were very forthcoming with fee ownership self serve residents and as atrial sixty seven just a few weeks before the six days war they were about to complete or proceeds settlement type of procedure and according to my opinion are there is rarely law. The exact developments at happened under dan rule must be continued by israel and remind us very briefly why the jordanians have been weighing in on a neighborhood matter in the city of jerusalem so this area was under jordanian rule from forty nine to six sixty seven so for the nineteen years it was part of jordan and so's the line. The green line distinguishing between the pars possessed or occupied by israel. And that by jordanians. Were just the line was just crossing less than kilometer from chester. Chester is still under judean. Rule the judge at the israeli supreme court seem focused on the practical side of this case. Not the emotions. What does today's judgment actually mean practically speaking so. Let's put aside the judgement or decision. Because they were not undertaken. But let's talk about the direction whereas the saying to go since they said. Listen we know that there are decisions ordering the eviction of the families. That's put this decisions aside. Let's maintains a statue school. Let's not decide. But hello. you need to decide the wonderful so it sounds like you see. The status quo is unsustainable. What do you hope happens next. We'll see with the nets t. Rink i believe the court would want to continue with a compromise attempt. I don't think compromise is bad to the contrary. I think compromise is very good in general the details so the question is will the residents be binding to compromise agreements. Would in the end be used against all woods. Accord be there on the residency side to assist in securing a real fair compromise agreement that would allow all parties involved to maintain their status crew until the proper procedure for ownership. Determination will be undertaken runied levant nor is a property and land use law expert at idc hertzel ecology in israel discussing the israeli supreme court's recommendation giving four palestinian families protected status in jerusalem's shake jarrah neighborhood. Rony thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much. Finally we remember musician. Who left us last. Friday jakob devalue a name. I imagine that's not familiar to many of you. He was a guitars composer and singer from the french. Overseas territory of guadeloupe. None other than miles. Davis was a fan of devalue and the band. He co founded kosov in his autobiography davis. Name three artists who in his expert opinion. Where the innovators of the future. He was watching. Prince was one nigerian afrobeat. Pioneer fela kuti was another the third a ban from guadeloupe kosov. A name inspired by the french word for many off the woody shrub that's a staple of many tropical diets. The bank kosovan their leader devalue coined term for their sound. Zouk if you've been at a party in the tropics in the past twenty years and did not hear this track then. You're the wrong party..

israeli supreme court Hanna nevio hannah nebula jaros Roni levine schnur idc herzliya college israel east jerusalem Ronnie europe jerusalem idc hertzel chester Chester dan jordan jakob devalue nets Rony
"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

UN News

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

"The daily positivity <Speech_Male> rate at <Speech_Male> reached as high <Speech_Male> as forty percent <Speech_Male> so access to <Speech_Male> hospital beds and <Speech_Male> oxygen is <Speech_Male> is limited you <Speech_Male> insufficient supplies <Speech_Male> and mando. <Speech_Male> So there's an immediate <Speech_Male> need for scaling <Speech_Male> up <SpeakerChange> of the published <Speech_Male> critical health services <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> co in making <SpeakerChange> vaccination <Speech_Male> applets. <Speech_Male> The un country team <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> is <Speech_Male> booking <Speech_Male> address oxygen pottage <Speech_Male> through the procurement <Speech_Male> of oxygen <Speech_Male> awesome traitors <Speech_Male> and other necessary <Speech_Male> cubans through <Speech_Male> multiple channels <Speech_Male> now dishing <Speech_Male> efforts to accelerate <Speech_Male> kobe. Ninety <Speech_Male> vaccination <Speech_Male> including <Speech_Male> its availability <Speech_Male> is also underway. <Speech_Male> You enter nations <Speech_Male> agency. World <Speech_Male> organization <Speech_Male> is leading <Speech_Male> efforts <Speech_Male> to operationalize <Speech_Male> testing <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> kobe. Nine thousand treatment <Speech_Male> centers. I've been <Speech_Male> established <Speech_Male> that available <SpeakerChange> resources <Speech_Male> and capacities. <Speech_Male> Finally <Speech_Male> what would <Speech_Male> your message be for <Speech_Male> the people of myanmar. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> you have mentioned that you're <Speech_Male> in contact with civil <Speech_Male> society. But <Speech_Male> what is it that <Speech_Male> you really want to <Speech_Male> tell them in <Speech_Male> terms of <SpeakerChange> paps reassurance <Speech_Male> that you're still <Speech_Male> with them <Speech_Male> message be the human <Speech_Male> in myanmar <Speech_Male> continues <Speech_Male> to stat and solid <Speech_Male> added in the people <Speech_Male> of myanmar <Speech_Male> respecting. <Speech_Male> There will <Speech_Male> continue <Speech_Male> to call out human <Speech_Male> rights violations <Speech_Male> and is committed <Speech_Male> to stay <Speech_Male> and deliver lifesaving <Speech_Male> humanitarian <Speech_Male> assistance <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in addition to <Speech_Male> strengthening the <Speech_Male> over ninety response <Speech_Male> as one of the <Speech_Male> major problems <Speech_Male> that the union is facing <Speech_Male> and this box <Speech_Male> office is <Speech_Male> the access. <Speech_Male> This includes cumbersome <Speech_Male> travel authorization <Speech_Male> process <Speech_Male> limited access <Speech_Male> of country <Speech_Male> onto <Speech_Male> the security shoes <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> villas the <Speech_Male> ongoing disruptions <Speech_Male> in the banking systems <Speech_Male> limiting <Speech_Male> the ability to <Speech_Male> pass a funds to <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> does delivering <Speech_Male> humanitarian <Speech_Male> assistance in <SpeakerChange> a timely <Speech_Male> manner <Speech_Male> but despite this <Speech_Male> the un <Speech_Male> has continued to <Speech_Male> deliver lifesaving <Speech_Male> assistance <Speech_Male> in ongoing <Speech_Male> mandalay <Speech_Male> and also <Speech_Male> in brooklyn <Speech_Male> and in many parts <Speech_Male> of the country however <Speech_Male> the response <Speech_Male> also constrain <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> from myanmar. <Speech_Male> The sponsors <Speech_Male> plan for me <Speech_Male> and mar <Speech_Male> is currently <Speech_Male> funded <Speech_Male> only twenty <Speech_Male> eight thirty <Speech_Male> percent of its overall <Speech_Male> envelope of <Speech_Male> two hundred and <Speech_Male> seventy five million dollars <Speech_Male> and this is <Speech_Male> one major area <Speech_Male> which needs to be <Speech_Male> address by <Speech_Male> donor governments <Speech_Male> as the <Speech_Male> seeking <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to grease <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> humanitarian <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> assistance <Silence> <Advertisement> to people <SpeakerChange> of.

myanmar un brooklyn
Blinken Urges Myanmar Action in ASEAN Meeting With Its Envoy

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Blinken Urges Myanmar Action in ASEAN Meeting With Its Envoy

"Secretary of state Antony Blinken has urged action on Myanmar in ASEAN meeting with the nation's envoy Lincoln has lost his southeast Asian counterparts to join you press for an end to violence in Myanmar it's return it to a democratic PA off on the release of all political prisoners Myanmar's ministry appointed foreign minister attended the video meeting with the top U. S. envoy and association of southeast Asian nations representatives however it wasn't immediately clear if Myanmar's representative responded to Lincoln's concerns or previous ASEAN to moms the group also discussed the South China Sea territorial disputes with China and searching corona virus outbreaks around the region I'm Charles the last month

Myanmar Secretary Of State Antony Blin Asean U. S. Envoy And Association Of Lincoln South China China Charles
Myanmar's Suu Kyi Tells Lawyers Trial Testimony Against Her Is Wrong

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Suu Kyi Tells Lawyers Trial Testimony Against Her Is Wrong

"Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi tells lawyers testimony against her is fulls and whenever that the almighty did the one he did not give any secretary coming with missing with interest during the entire court hearing process and told us which testimony is wrong and which one should be cross examined the charges are relatively minor but if convicted could keep her from contesting new elections published by the minute tree within two years of its take other critics of the ruling junta safe the proceedings against suu kyi a politically motivated the meant to try to legitimize the military's seizure of power and discourage her I'm Charles Taylor this month

Suu Kyi Myanmar Charles Taylor
Myanmar Rejects UN Resolution Urging Arms Embargo

All Things Considered

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar Rejects UN Resolution Urging Arms Embargo

"myanmar" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

08:19 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Newt's World

"If you're not a traditional burmese buddhist what extent all of those other ethnic groups under pressure so honored ethnic communities most of them are christians and some buddhists wild but the military intensified the fighting against these ethnic communities lately and when they have this fighting against them basically basically target the entire population civilian and rape women. You know kill people and they practice of Arrest and extrajudicial killing has been like daily life experiences of the people in ethic communities in addition to limiting their access to -tarian aid if they become internally dispaced person or laura jeez in addition to the ability to access education health care and other leading. Who's there has been the active practice self obligatory arrest Closely and many forms of violence against the ethnic communities including sexual lennon's the sexual violence has been used as a weapon of the war against ethnic communities for decades. There are several women's organizations including shan women action network women lick off the they came out with a very substantial report on how the military has used these sexual violence against the women rape as a weapon of war for decades and there were no accountability for their practices thus the military continue to use rape as a weapon against the hindu population to terrorize to destroy entire populations so there has been thousands of women who have been raped during the clearance operations in two thousand sixteen and seventeen and they're living witnesses in refugee camps today. Part of the psychology of using rape as a weapon of war to enforce humiliation on the defeated side in this so for the case of rhodesia. It was to humiliate and to terrorize the entire populations. Because we were not actively fighting against the military and it was not a civil war unlike in many other ethnic communities and situations the multiples very clear that they want to humiliate row as a group so that they would never return to Once they are expelled from their land. And you know it's not just that rape to humiliate and terrorize. But they actually very aggressively conducted mutilations. They raped they kill the torture. And the and this practice has been done in front of the family members that whole village openly and in some cases y as they were raping female they were killing their husband and taking their children and putting them into the fire so that parents were more terrorized before they've been killed so it's been very aggressive very horrific form of violations against fellow humans so that level our barrick behavior and ruthlessness. You seem like a remarkably balanced normal person. How did you survive in. Prison is a very young girl. Must've been a time of constant here when we were arrested. Amin i was barely a teenager so it was extremely hot to understand why we were put in jail. I mean as a teenager. I suppose to be going to school and extremely difficult to understand in hot to cope with it for a couple of years but then i decided to no. I cannot just give up at be sad all the time and pry for the release. It's not going to happen. So i decided to just change my mind and stay strong and i feed myself in many many ways i try to spend my time including readings in talking to people and i realized what happened to us was not at fault. It's actually the military dictatorship who's supposed to be accountable for their act against innocent people like us. So i guess that notion empowered me and i was able to stay strong but when i was released i was really expecting. That will have democracy and we'll be able to contribute to building and democratic nations. But instead what i realized was enacted areas. That prosecution has actually intensified in many many incidences in in particular in the case of Is not only that the prosecution human rights violations has had intensified but it's actually rushed to a very adopt and horrific experiences self this genocide which remain unaddressed. Today i was very closely involved in trying to stop the genocide as as ended impunity for the military. We've been documenting what happens to the people very closely even learning and documenting this process. It's not easy because you know one incident astra one incident is. There's no good story at all and it's extremely difficult to mentally coop with as well. I was privileged to be healthy to have more freedom than many of those people who have been targeted for many forms of violations including sexual violence. Since i was released went back to school night was constantly lun into girl myself so i need to use my knowledge my experience and my ability to influence to help others. If we don't do that. Who else is going to help. Who will do this walk and we will be just witness in our fellow. Human being off communities have being killed are depressed often. Human dignity that i felt. It's the sense of duty and responsibility fly fellow communities regardless of my community or not. I cannot sit and watch to let this have. And i need to take actions. And that's how. I think feeling of privilege and enjoying freedom empowered me bother to take actions. The evolution of me on more may be about to begin. Just have a sense. That time is running out. We don't know how long it will be but we very committed to win this fight and to really change the country to bring freedom democracy equality and peace in my. We're going to follow your courageous jenny. And we're going to link to your organization women's peace network and i look forward as your journey continues. Maybe doing another interview with you future. So i really wanna thank you. This has been a very enlightening at the same time. Very humbling conversation very brave woman and admire greatly. What you're doing. thank you very much. Been an honor talking to you. Thank you. I guess why. Why do you can read more about china. And myanmar on our show page neutral. Dot com niche world has produced by gingrich and sixty and i heart media are executive producers. Debbie meyers our producers guards and sloan and our researchers. Rachel peterson your work for the show was created by steve hanley special. Thanks team gingrich. Sixty if you've been enjoying neutral. I hope you'll go to apple podcast and both rated with five stars and give us a review so others can learn what it's all about right now listeners neutral consignment for my three free weekly columns a gingrich three sixty dot com slash newsletter..

Rachel peterson steve hanley five stars Debbie meyers Today sixty two thousand both myanmar china thousands of women seventeen one incident jenny three free Amin sloan i heart media decades sixteen
"myanmar" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Today, Explained

"John you talked about over eight hundred people dying in the wake of these protests yet somehow people in myanmar are still optimistic. Why Because i think this is something where they feel like. There's nothing really to lose. Which is maybe doesn't sound very optimistic. But there is this idea of everybody is coming together to defeat a common enemy which is right now the myanmar military and this idea that they could achieve or create. Something that has never been created before in myanmar. And i do think there is the sense of like well else. Can we do. And so there really is no other option but to sort of embrace this very uncertain future and push forward and at the same time there are also some really remarkable and positive developments. I would say you know. Mars very ethnically diverse country but ethnic and religious minorities have often faced discrimination racism and sometimes downright brutality at the hands of the myanmar government and the myanmar military. And you're seeing a real reckoning with that in myanmar right now as it is also plotting its future and it's really kind of remarkable to see. Have we ever seen anything like this. Before where you have various ethnic groups coming together working towards a common cause in myanmar yet. We actually have. Which is what makes this also very interesting. So in the past democracy protests that are seen most notably in the late nineteen eighties and early nineties where students led a pro democracy movement. The military kinda followed a similar playbook where it began to crack down and many of these students and protestors fled to sort of the borderlands of and which are often controlled in some cases by ethnic armed organizations many of which had been fighting the myanmar government our military and those ethnic organizations and their civil arms took in those protesters and sort of gave them shelter and protection but also kind of helped train them and at the same time that that happened. When myanmar's were to became a quasi democracy a lot of those ethnic groups were not included in the conversation or the development of democracy. But we're seeing the same thing happened now where many of these protesters and these students and these professionals who are protesting against the military are now also feeling that they're unsafe that they're under attack from the military and so they're seeking haven in these areas many of which are controlled by these ethnic armed organizations. Where they're getting food and shelter and they're also in some cases learning how to fight. They're they're learning how to use weapons. They're preparing for possible warfare. And so you see this alliance which is born out of this joint opposition to the our military and it is somewhat born out of necessity but there's also again this hope for creating a more democratic and equal future for myanmar. Can you talk about some of these groups that are on the border regions of myanmar. That have basically been in conflict with the military for a long time and are now taking in some of these protesters. Yes oh for example in the caution state. There's been an insurgent movement that's been at war with the myanmar military on and off for decades of fighting for their independence chin or a very strong rebel group own hierarchy and their own army. They present quite formidable opposition to the ma'am authorities. There's also the karen people who've basically been at civil war since the creation of the country. We have fought against them for so many years. So we know that myanmar will not give us equality easily now only the karen but other ethnicities too so we have to fight for rights but if we cannot make peace in our time it will be up to the next generation and so those places to it's worth keeping in mind or under attack by the military. These are not exactly safe havens. They are being bombed and shelled and many people civilians are being displaced on some for example across the border in thailand. So these are very precarious places right. Now they're not exactly safe but they feel safer for people who are in opposition to the military because you have you know like minded people again who are all united for this common. Cause what is the main reason. These groups give for fighting for independence. Are they frustrated. With the amount of power the military has and is a slept pro democracy effort or is it something else. A lot of the ethnic armed organizations each have sort of specific goals or aims. Many of them are fighting for greater autonomy or independence on but they're also just fighting for their survival. You know some of these groups have been brutalized and have been discriminated against and so they're sort of standing up for their own interests in what is really happening or what has happened because of the the coup in myanmar is that a lot of the burmese majority who were removed from these armed struggles on. Who didn't even really understand them. Or maybe thought these ethnic groups were sort of out to advance their own interests now very much realize that these ethnic groups are part of military's pattern of of brutality. And so you know it's sort of this idea of like oh you know now. They're coming for me and so you're seeing this. Recognition of what many of these ethnic minorities and religious minorities have gone through in me and mar and that realization is kind of dawning on the broader population. Which is why you're seeing this unity. Hi this is. Nissan louis and activists and co founder of the free range a collision in network ruin the activists and friend of hinduja. I am based in jumpy. I have family related and a lot of friends in memo rangan and rookie state. I left from yemen. Twenty years ago in two thousand one. I was born in your tone in russian state but i was raised in rangan. Former capital of nemo my people beck iraklion state have been suffering from various of secretion which amounted to genocide since nine hundred seventy eight s. I want to enjoy the freedom and wanted not to be discriminated. I left from the city for. I grew up in the past on this show. We've talked a lot about the military genocide against the roe honda. Where does this wave of conflict leave them. Obviously the most notable kind of crime by the our military has been the atrocities against the rohan. Joe which are a muslim minority and kind state and beginning are around. Twenty seventeen hundreds of thousands of rohan had to flee to bangladesh where there now in refugee camps because of what the united nations has basically said amounted to genocide would like to thank gambia fleet. The legal process bug for giving us shelter now. Finally recognizes are suffering and the atrocities..

John bangladesh thailand Twenty years ago myanmar government nemo late nineteen eighties Mars early nineties Nissan louis nine hundred seventy eight s. myanmar military two thousand each Twenty seventeen hundreds of t yemen myanmar hinduja gambia over eight hundred people
"myanmar" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's today explained. I'm halima sitting in for sean ramos firm protesters and military in myanmar have been mired in a bloody conflict for months. It all started back in february. When people took to the streets to protest a military coup the political party led by aung. San suu cheat. The national league for democracy won parliamentary elections but the military claimed fraud and detained top l. d. leaders since then things have only escalated at the beginning. We didn't feel like Lights were being threatened. A stock warning from the un special envoy on myanmar quote. A bloodbath is imminent. But i think we've got the message loud and clear by the end of march today on the show we'll hear from people who've been resisting myanmar's military and we'll find out why this might mark a turning point for a country that has spent most of its history under military rule. John kirby your foreign and national security reporter for vox dot com and we just heard from someone in myanmar who described violent military crackdowns on protesters. How did things get so bad after. The coup thousands and thousands of people in me amar took to the streets for these massive protests just hundreds of thousands of people walking through communities and professions into a remarkably coordinated show of opposition. They're protesting in big cities like gang on they're also protesting in different corners of the country. There is a real massive outpouring of support for unsung succi and opposition to the military takeover. People are wearing red. They are holding up their fingers in this three finger salute which is an image to the hunger games there are professionals and students who are leading these protests the force of the protests and the size of the protests were even somewhat unexpected. You know. I had talked to some folks before who had a pretty dismal view about the pro democracy movement in myanmar but These young people these professionals. I mean the protests included a huge cross section of people and a real groundswell of support and movement of opposition against the coup and that kind of massive peaceful protest movement continues but as the weeks. Ground on things take darker. Turn a site. The anti coup protest movement never wanted to see the death of a protester march. Twenty seventh was the bloodiest day to date. More than one hundred people were killed today. The us ambassador to myanmar said security forces are murdering civilians. There's last protests that went to was a flash protests that happened was the army date and that protests involved a lot more running and hiding regrouping compared to back in february and since then it has only gotten worse. More than eight hundred people have died. According to figures at the hands of the military and more than four thousand have been either charged or detained. What happens in detention. You know there's a lot of allegations of of torture and abusive practices on beyond that and right now. There's a sense of this military conducting the reign of terror forces report of the opened fire on mourners at the funeral of the students. Who amongst those killed there are reports of people now becoming fearful of you know who to talk to and whom to trust because people are reporting in secret to the police. The military is using people that they've killed according to reports to kind of terrorize communities and at the same time communities are trying to build up their kind of defenses against the military. I'm trying to fortify neighborhoods but there is a lot of fear. There is a lot of mistrust you know. I talked to one protester who used a a student who basically said know when she goes out into the street. She makes sure that she never has anything on her phone. Because if anybody sees her organizing or coordinating a protests. She doesn't know what will happen to her. The peaceful protests have kind of morphed into something a little bit closer to a resistance movement kind of an acknowledgement that. Maybe the the peaceful protest won't be enough to kind of fight this military at the same time. The economy is struggling and the de factor civilian leader on song cheever remains in prison on trumped up charges mr chase facing charges that range from illegally possessing walkie-talkie radios to violating state secrets laws. The country seems on the brink of a possible civil war or revolution so the public is largely angry with the military. But where does the previous government stand on this. Are they trying to retake power. Are they involved in this resistance. Some other members of the l. d. have kind of taken to form their own political party in kind of a government in exile which has been known as the national unity government and they are fighting for international recognition. And they're also trying to establish kind of people's defense force to possibly take on the military and their goal at least one of the goals that they've stated to eventually kind of form or become the new democratic government of myanmar who is still supporting the military if anyone the military i mean i am sure Listeners have heard that in myanmar there is a real kind of segregation between the military and the rest of the general public and the military kind of socialize in their own circles. They have their own media. And so it's a very very insular institution and so there is a lot of support there. But outside of the military among the general population there really seems to be this growing sort of anti military sentiment that wherever you stood on the political spectrum wherever you stood in terms of your religion or ethnic background there is kind of a growing sentiment of. We're all in this together against the military. We're talking about a country that has spent most of its sixty year. History under military rule and while protesters are hoping for the best in want this to lead to revolution. What are the chances this could turn into civil war instead. Yeah i mean. I think there's just so many question marks that it's really hard to predict right now and i think you know the discussions of the civil war are serious but at the same time. It's important to recognize that me mar in many ways has been at civil war for the entire course of its history. The differences that many of these civil wars took place on the borderlands of myanmar with ethnic armed organizations who've been fighting with the military on and off for decades and so me and has never fully been at peace. What is different now. Is that the civil war. Become something that engulfs the entire country and includes a population and people who may have not been necessarily involved in fighting the government before but it is sort of important to keep that in. Mind when we talk about me and more that this country has not really known piece in many ways when it comes to a revolution i mean. I've talked to many protesters. Also members of ethnic armed groups who really see themselves as embracing a kind of mission to bring democracy to me amar and truly believe that they can win and that they will try to win at all costs to establish a democracy. How they will do so is really hard but what i do find interesting. Is that among the people who are fighting for this democratic future. They have.

february John kirby today thousands more than four thousand More than eight hundred people More than one hundred people one protester sixty year end of march today hundreds of thousands of peopl thousands of people myanmar three finger sean ramos dot decades seventh one least
"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"Unser Immunsystem ist so ein richtiges Bollwerk gegen Eindringlinge von es wert Bakterien und mutierte Zellen ab und nach einer Impfung oder bei einer Infektion zum Der leistet es absolute in der Korona Pan wird wieder viel über das Immunsystem gerätselt und gefachsimpelt und es erhält einen richtigen Aufmerksamkeits Und mein Zeit Kollege Moritz Esslinger hat in der aktuellen Zeit dazu ein wirklich sehr interessantes Dossier und er weiß auch darüber was nicht nur unser Immunsystem für uns tun sondern was wir für unser Immunsystem tun Hallo hi vielleicht noch mal kurz zu deiner recherche zum immunsystem du beschreibt es als wunder wie die Zellen sich Angriffe merken wie sie dazu lernen wie sie sich weiterentwickeln gab seine erkenntnis den ich am meisten fasziniert hat auf jeden Also zum beispiel gibt es eine die heißt den tri tische die es so was wie der General der Immunabwehr befehl den anderen Wer wie angegriffen wird ist eine die hat so lange fortsetze und wenn sie an eine wunde kommt dann nimmt sie einige bestandteile der mikroben die dort sind auf und bringt sie zu den nächstgelegenen Wird sich dann eine ganze armee dieser t zellen bildet und dann dann weiß man ja dass rauchen oder schlechte ernährung für das immunsystem schädlich Was sind denn so faktoren die das immunsystem stärken oder es gibt würde ich sagen drei die ist auch nicht ganz sind aber ganz Das ist zum einen ausreichend wenig Stress und viel was man eigentlich auch so aber interessant fand dass beispielsweise bei der Bewegung dass wir spazieren gehen oder Laufen oder Sport der Blutkreislauf angeregt wird und dadurch wiederum die die sich im Blut natürlich viel mobiler dadurch sind und viel schneller und effektiver an mögliche Eindringlinge kommen und so eben uns besser vor Krankheiten schützen Und was kann man noch Beispielsweise soll die richtige Atmung gut fürs Immunsystem weil das Stress und Entzündungen vermeiden Die perfekte Atmung laut Experten jedenfalls sieht so dass man fünfeinhalb Sekunden lang einatmet und fünfeinhalb Sekunden lang ausatmet und das am besten durch die Darüber hinaus soll Küssen sehr gut was ja eine ganz schöne Erkenntnis weil das Stresshormone im Speichel abbaut und man dadurch einfach entspannter ist und das wiederum sich positiv auf das Immunsystem ausgelebt der auch das System Immunsystem Wenn wir optimistisch bleiben wie stärkt den Optimismus das Optimismus soll das Immunsystem dass es Studien bei denen man den Probanden Bilder gezeigt hat und im Nachhinein festgestellt dass die die sich eher an die schönen Bilder mehr Antikörper hatten als die an die unangenehmen Bilder zurück dachten und es gibt mehrere solcher die dass die eher positiv optimistisch mehr Immunzellen im Körper haben als die Also bleiben wir wenigstens der Gesundheit Danke vielen das war was jetzt für heute in unserem ab 17 Hören Sie meinen Kollegen Moses Fendel mit weiteren Schreiben Sie wenn Sie Fragen haben oder etwas loswerden wollen unter was jetzt Zeitpunkte.

Moses Fendel Moritz Esslinger fünfeinhalb Sekunden drei mehrere solcher einige bestandteile heute ausreichend wenig Stress Antikörper vielen Immunzellen Korona in jetzt aktuellen Zeit 17
"myanmar" Discussed on Quick News Daily Podcast

Quick News Daily Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Quick News Daily Podcast

"Sunday <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> with chris wallace. <Speech_Male> That was not <Speech_Male> can be an easy task. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Not by <Music> a long shot <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> that is going to do it <Speech_Male> for the news here today. <Speech_Male> Thank you again <Speech_Male> so much for listening. <Speech_Male> I do want to direct your <Speech_Male> attention to the <Speech_Male> the sources hyperlink <Speech_Male> in the show <Speech_Male> notes in the episode <Speech_Male> description. There <Speech_Male> that's where. I put all <Speech_Male> these sources that are <Speech_Male> used for every show <Speech_Male> and it even <Speech_Male> includes articles <Speech_Male> that I don't <Speech_Male> actually use in the show. <Speech_Male> But i think you <Speech_Male> know are borderline <Speech_Male> but this <Speech_Male> is supposed to be all about <Speech_Male> what you need to <Speech_Male> now. Those are ones that <Speech_Male> usually. Don't quite make the cut <Speech_Male> but if you want <Speech_Male> more to read or <Speech_Male> think that the news is a <Speech_Male> little short for the day. <Speech_Male> Go check those out. <Speech_Male> Maybe there's a <Speech_Male> sort of a funnier <Speech_Male> story in. There <Speech_Male> may be a more <Speech_Male> active <Speech_Male> story. I don't like to do <Speech_Male> those too often. Like you <Speech_Male> know what could be happening. <Speech_Male> Like for instance. <Speech_Male> There's a couple <Speech_Male> articles in there about <Speech_Male> how biden <Speech_Male> thinks that he can get gun. <Speech_Male> Control measures passed <Speech_Male> in some senators. <Speech_Male> Who've done it in the past <Speech_Male> talking about <Speech_Music_Male> it. But i <Speech_Male> believe that stuff. When <Speech_Male> i see it so go. Click <Speech_Male> on that link and <Speech_Male> find all the sources <Speech_Male> that a us and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Read up if you have <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the time or want to know more. <Speech_Male> I do also <Speech_Male> take this time <Speech_Male> to thank our contributors <Speech_Male> our producer. <Speech_Male> Cathy <Speech_Male> and executive producer <Speech_Male> gwen for supporting <Speech_Male> us via patriots. <Speech_Male> Steady pay <Speech_Male> pow <Speech_Male> however you would like <Speech_Male> to. It does <Speech_Male> in fact help out the show <Speech_Male> you can find <Speech_Male> for that as well <Speech_Male> in the episode description <Speech_Male> but within <Speech_Male> stay <Speech_Male> safe out there <Speech_Male> practice your good social <Speech_Male> distancing <Speech_Male> and other covert preventative <Speech_Male> measures for <Speech_Male> what seems like <Speech_Male> just a bit longer <Speech_Male> since we are getting <Speech_Male> those vaccinations <Speech_Male> going get vaccinated <Speech_Male> when it is <Speech_Male> your turn when you are eligible. <Speech_Male> It seems like quite <Speech_Male> a few people are eligible <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And i will plan <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on seeing you

"myanmar" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"To get to the point that it's willing to accept that evidence as unrebutted in there for a true for purposes of deciding to legal issue. So it'll be if myanmar there's a lot of hits here but if myanmar doesn't appear than there will be the question to what extent is the icy j. willing to draw adverse inferences based on the fact that mars is not responding to the evidence and arguments that the gambia's putting forward sank. Suci was actually myanmar's agent in this case. I think that's the right terminology in the icj but they can change agent if they wanted to. Yes thinkers any obstacle to that the government would just need to communicate to registry of the court that an agent is being replaced by another agent. Of course that happens other times for less dramatic reasons than a than a military coup. The other question. I think it relates to whether myanmar will continue to participate in the case. Actually there are two points that would make one under the provisional measures order from january two thousand twenty myanmar has this periodic reporting requirement. So they're supposed to be sending reports now every six months to the is c. J. about what they're doing to implement the measures that were imposed on myanmar and those measures basically told me on mar to not engage in conduct. That would amount to violations of genocide convention not terribly specific and also not to engage in conduct and in fact to take active measures to prevent the destruction of evidence relates to the claims in the case and two of these reports have been submitted so far confidential so we don't know exactly what they say and i have made arguments elsewhere that they should not be confidential that it would be beneficial on several fronts for them to be made publicly available But it's so this is an open question woman. Mark continued to participate in the case in that way will they submit their next periodic report and then different question so we know on succi is extremely unlikely to be part of the team going forward if me and mark continues with the case it's unthinkable and there may be other members who were on people who were heavily involved in the case like on g are now in detention or no longer in any position of authority. I think another interesting question. Though is whether myanmar's outside legal counsel will want to continue representing myanmar under these circumstances and that in particular i think question for professor william shave this genocide expert and was really lead counsel from mar the provisional measures face professor it has been harshly criticized for taking on this role for accepting men mar as a client. I think the issue is maybe not so black and white as a matter of principle. I think it's a good thing for states. Even states accused of horrific actions to be represented by highly capable legal counsel..

Mark mark Suci january william shave two points one mars c. J. thousand six months two succi these reports gambia mar myanmar twenty
"myanmar" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KCRW

"Go Slash black freedom. It's 8 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm the wheel King. Good Morning, Me and Mars Military ruled that country for almost 50 years in 2015, a Democratic election brought on song Souci, who'd peacefully fought against military rule to power and then this week, the military took power back in a coup. And Souci has been detained. Aaron Connolly is an analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. He's on the line with us from Singapore. Good morning, Aaron. Good morning. Well, were there any warning signs this coup was coming about a week ago, The military started to make threats that if the civilian government didn't take its issues, with November election for which it had provided no evidence More seriously than it would consider taking power. It seemed to step back from that threat on a couple of occasions, and then on Monday morning, it arrested key civilian leaders. But it was really only about a week ago that most people in Myanmar and most Myanmar specialists overseas started to believe that the military was serious about taking back power. What is the military claiming happened in this election? They claim that there were irregularities with voter lists in the election, particularly in ethnic areas, and that if the election voter lists were scrutinized more closely than that, they would have had a chance of winning more seats in the national legislature. But again they haven't provided any evidence for those claims. Okay, So you're skeptical of the claim that there was something wrong with the election. What's the relationship between Souci and the generals who now detain her? It's been a touchy relationship over time. Of course, they detained her for many years from 1990 until 2011 releasing her on a couple of occasions. But then she appeared to be trying to build a more solid relationship with them. After she took power in 2016, at least control over the civilian government military maintain control over the three key ministries, the Ministry of Defense Home Affairs Order affairs and also all the security forces. At times, she appeared to be trying to build a working relationship with them. But ultimately that foundered when they refused to respect her ambitions, particularly to become president, which they had outlawed under the Constitution that they wrote in 2008. Okay, so she lost the General's has she also lost the civilians? What, to ordinary people there. Think of her Well. She won the last election. Her party that nationally for democracy, won the last election in November in a landslide. She remains incredibly popular in Myanmar. And that's likely to continue. There's no change to that. What do you envision will happen over the next couple of days and weeks? Will there be any kind of push within the country or outside the country to release her to end the could give power back to people have been democratically elected? It's still really unclear. There was one statement that was released on one of her Facebook pages yesterday that suggested that before she was detained, she had called people out onto the streets. But then there were other members of her party. You said that that statement was inauthentic. There are some who would prefer to see street demonstrations against this. They believe that that might reverse the result of this coup. On the other hand, there are those who remember what happened in 1988 when people came out onto the streets following a military coup, then on hundreds, possibly thousands of people died in the violence. After the military sought to suppress those demonstrations. Myanmar was ruled by the military for decades. Is there a fear that the country could be headed back in that direction? Yeah, Absolutely. The military says that it's only going to take back power for one year and then it's going to hold elections and return power to a civilian government. But it might not necessarily adhere to that timeline. It believes that if it removes on since achieve from politics that it could begin to win elections again, But it's not really clear that that's the case and it's not clear that people will cooperate. Participate in a semi democratic system that excludes on San Souci, or the National League from Democracy. What are the implications outside of Myanmar in Southeast Asia more broadly well yesterday, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, which is the regional block in this region. I'm in Singapore issued a statement calling for return to what they said was normalcy and number of Southeast Asian diplomats have said to me on background that, but they're looking for his return to the status quo as of Sunday evening, That's a relatively strong statement for as Ian And the U. N Security Council is scheduled to hold a meeting on the situation later today. The UK is currently in the presidency of the Security Council and has tended to focus on me and Mara issues when it's held the presidency. So I would anticipate quite a bit of international pressure both from within the region and around the globe on the military to at the very least, truncate the period in which it intends to hold power and perhaps to shape the nature of the government that would follow after the military hands back power. Aaron Connolly of the International Institute for Strategic Studies and Singapore. Aaron. Thanks for being with us, thanks to will Hmm. This week. Brian Sick, Nick.

Myanmar Souci Aaron Connolly Singapore International Institute for St Steve Inskeep NPR News San Souci Ministry of Defense Home Affai Facebook Association of Southeast Asian Security Council Southeast Asia UK president analyst Brian Sick National League from Democracy Mara U. N Security Council