37 Burst results for "Myanmar"

Fresh update on "myanmar" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:45 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "myanmar" discussed on Morning Edition

"Prepare President Biden's chief medical adviser doctor Anthony Fauci said over the weekend that it's inevitable that o'clock will turn up in the United States President Biden is to update the country on his administration's response today A verdict expected tomorrow in the trial of me and Mars supposed leader Aung San Suu Kyi She has been charged with incitement and faces three years in prison if given a maximum sentence But she could be jailed for decades if convicted of the other charges brought against her Michael Sullivan reports The list of charges against Suu Kyi is long including corruption violating Myanmar's official secrets act and violating coronavirus restrictions Critics of the military say the charges are bogus an effort to remove the 76 year old Suu Kyi from politics in Myanmar for good She was detained by the military on the morning of the February 1st coup and has remained in detention since This is NPR news Honduras seems said to have its first woman president celebrations broke out last night as a result showed her with a widely Castro's claiming victory but the ruling national party says its candidate won the election She is a former First Lady whose husband was ousted.

President Biden Suu Kyi Anthony Fauci Myanmar Michael Sullivan United States NPR Honduras Castro National Party
Fresh update on "myanmar" discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:52 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "myanmar" discussed on Jim Bohannon

"Dale is in our WGN radio studios not to talk about pets though I want to read the first two sentences of a story from I think this is Associated Press It is state line New York American journalist Danny fenster who was freed after nearly 6 months in jail in military ruled Myanmar arrived Tuesday in the United States for an emotional reunion with his family his family by the way includes a brother Brian who will hear from in a minute went to school at Columbia college here in Chicago This is a Midwest family Michigan I think is that they have their roots Fenster again the brother who was in Myanmar Danny finster was sentenced last week to 11 years of hard labor but was handed over Monday to former U.S. diplomat Bill Richardson who helped negotiate the release He is one of more than 100 journalists media officials or publishers who have been detained since the military ousted the elected government of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi in February This is another one of those stories of where the government in some countries decides the journalists are a threat and if they don't cut their heads off or shoot them in the back they'll detain them for sometimes years on end and often for almost always on trumped up charges And so here's this Danny finster guy who you and I didn't know anything about is suddenly what what happened He was there about to come home to celebrate a family birthday family reunion grandma who will hear more about her stories interesting in another way Well into our believe her 90s just to see family because he hadn't in so long He goes through security at the airport like we all go in my comeback to the Midwest Absolutely Detroit specifically It goes through security is about to board the airplane literally stepping on to the airplane window authorities said you can't do that In fact we're putting you in jail and when asked for what What charges Well it took months for the government there to figure out what the charge is even worse Would they put him when they took him off the plane Insane prison That's the name of the prison A doesn't sound like a happy place And in fact COVID vaccines are not common there apparently testing for COVID doesn't happen and guess what I believe and we'll hear in a moment on top of everything else the poor guy came down with COVID What was the charge to ostensibly why did they arrest him I can not say because I don't know that there's an answer to that question Here he is he's not a reporter He is not reporting on Let me back up one step And explain why I feel so passionately about this If we did not hear from journalist all over the world in places we love like the UK in places we may not love so much anymore like China We wouldn't know anything about what's going on in these countries So we need these journalists to do their job They serve us in America but they serve the world as well He in particular wasn't reporting on anything as far as I know nothing controversial per se is an editor It made no sense that he was detained but it doesn't have to make sense there apparently Do you think that sometimes they say token American If we gave American now we're telling the world we're playing Hard and fast by the rules It could well be It's 1115 Okay so he though has thanks to Bill Richardson somehow release was negotiated and now he is back in the United States hooray I've been following your reporting on this on weekends for the last half year Spend fascinating Thank you It's been troubling It's been weird Yeah And so now his brother is on a phone line Bryant's talk about that Brian is the man that you would frequently talk to on your show American journalist Danny finster who is freed after nearly 6 months in jail in military ruled Myanmar got back into the United States on Tuesday Fencer was sentenced to 11 years of hard labor but was handed over Monday to former U.S. diplomat Bill Richardson who helped negotiate his release Hundreds of journalists media officials publishers have been detained there Since this overthrow of the government Steve Dale is in our studio why Because Steve is the one that's been telling Chicago about this story and has been frequently visiting with Danny finster's brother Brian weekends on the radio That's right It's been a fascinating journey and frankly I didn't have much hope for you guys because I thought these crazy people will lock somebody up and never care Never care and I thought well where is dick Durbin or where's Tammy Duckworth or wills you know where is the president Where's the Secretary of State Somebody ought to get this guy out of it I kept asking that same question and we have diplomatic relations with this country too So why is there a hold up However the good news is that the story has a happy ending and the brother Bryan fenced a fence fence fenster who you've been talking to is on a phone line Brian you're on WGN radio again How are you Hey fellas Thank you so much We're doing great now Say hello to your friend Steve Dale.

Danny Finster Myanmar Danny Fenster Fenster U.S. Bill Richardson Midwest WGN Columbia College Brian Aung San Suu Kyi Associated Press Dale Chicago Michigan Grandma New York Detroit Steve Dale China
U.S. Journalist Danny Fenster Is Freed From Myanmar Prison

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last week

U.S. Journalist Danny Fenster Is Freed From Myanmar Prison

"R. U. S. journalist jailed for months in Myanmar has arrived in New York Danny Fenster was sent to prison for charges that include spreading false or inflammatory information he was handed over to former US diplomat bill Richardson so long time coming you know it's a it's a moment for that and then imagine so so long Richardson helped negotiate the release it's worth the effort everything we had but it took a one on one with the leader

R. U. S. Danny Fenster Myanmar Bill Richardson New York Richardson United States
WorldView: U.S. journalist sentenced to prison in Myanmar

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

WorldView: U.S. journalist sentenced to prison in Myanmar

"A Myanmar court has sentenced an American journalist to harsh jail term a cold in the military ruled Myanmar the sentence detained journalist on the fence that to eleven years in prison with hard labor after finding him guilty on several charges including incitement for allegedly spreading false or inflammatory information his lawyer says Fenster the managing editor of the online magazine frontier Myanmar was also found guilty of contacting illegal organizations and violating visa regulations hence that is the only foreign journalists to be convicted of a serious offense since

Myanmar Fenster Online Magazine
Myanmar military uses systematic torture across country

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Myanmar military uses systematic torture across country

"Me on most bitter tree who's used systematic torture across the country the AP has found the military has been torturing detainees in a methodical and systematic way since his takeover of the government in February the AP investigation was based on interviews with twenty eight people imprisoned and released in recent months with photographic evidence and testimony from three recently defected ministry officials in the most comprehensive look into a highly secretive detention system holding more than nine thousand people data also indicates the military has been taking steps to hide evidence off it's torture I'm Charles Taylor this month

AP Charles Taylor
"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:56 min | Last month

"myanmar" Discussed on UN News

"We said that we were very concerned given the history of Myanmar of so many crimes against civilians occurring in political conflicts that we would be watching the situation closely. And what we've seen since then is, unfortunately, it appears that very serious crimes have been happening throughout the country in different regions in the country, systematically on a widespread basis. So we're collecting that information. And many different sources have been voluntarily reaching out to us to provide us with information. Others we have contacted. And we've collected, we received over 200,000 communications just in the first few months after the coup with information that people wanted to share with us. So it's increased the burden on us, but it's also given us that opportunity that we have more individuals and organizations willing to speak to us more opportunities to talk to those who have information about what is happening or has happened in the past in Myanmar. And this has created some opportunities for our investigations. Is it correct to say that some of the investigations you're conducting some of the information you're collecting wouldn't be otherwise collected? Yes, I believe that absolutely that's fair to say. I've worked on different war crime tribunals, the different processes for to seek accountability. And one of the things that we've seen in other conflicts is the importance of preserving information while it's still fresh. While you can because of course, crime scenes get disturbed, bodies decompose, wounds can heal, people's memories can fade, witnesses with information can die. And can pass away without that information being collected. So it's very important to collect the information while you can. Because unfortunately, international justice often is a long process..

Myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"But then five thousand feet up and down just diving. The film is a production of frontline. Also produced here at gbh in boston. Jennings joins me now from new york tom. Your film condenses years of investigative journalism. I'm going to ask you to condense even further in the end. What brought the two boeing planes down. There is not one individual who brought down seven. Thirty seven max. It was all about group. Think it was about a certain kind of inertia at the federal aviation administration the regulator but it was also the corporation itself and how it had come to believe in its own sense of mission and engineering capacities. Its ability to do no wrong. What technically went wrong with the planes may what was the technical issue there was a software program embedded into the cockpit is called an cast. It was all about letting pilots handle the plane effectively that program though who was designed in a way that was only for the highest of rare in extreme circumstances but blowing decided a certain point to implement that at normal operating levels in that problem with that was if there is a malfunction with that caste system at low levels. The pilots didn't have time to respond to it if it went into malfunction. And that's exactly what happened in those two flights that went down. The documentary goes over the context in which the seven thirty seven max was brought to market. Even though there were host of red flags within boeing. Here's one of your new york times collaborators. All of this comes out of trying to give airlines the most fuel-efficient version of plainfield. They can spend as little money training their pilots on. To what extent was this a corporate culture problem and to what extent was just plain malfeasance on boeing's part or was it both it's both it's malfeasance in the sense that there was a demand placed upon the engineering design process from the highest ranks from the c. Level down to contain costs. Because of that pressure that natalie kitchen f in that clip was talking the airlines. Were demanding a very fuel. Efficient cost effective airplane. Any kind of thing that went into the design process that effectively increased. The cost to the airlines was really looked down upon that resulted in a full-on attempt to reduce the cost of training of pilots. It's interesting the crashes both happened. In developing countries indonesia and ethiopia. A man who you interviewed in ethiopia lost five people in his family in the crash and was told it wasn't boeing's fault at.

boeing gbh federal aviation administratio Jennings boston tom new york plainfield new york times max natalie ethiopia indonesia
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

05:18 min | 2 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"That. How do you stop. Lincoln's answers to the questions about the tens of thousands of afghan people who've been behind the people the us could not get out in time. His answers were evasive and unclear. We still don't really understand. The universe of those who helped the united states over the course of twenty years who remained in afghanistan are eager to leave. We know that those are many many many thousands more than those who actually were able to get out in this period of time. Finally going forward with the way. The biden administration handled the exit from afghanistan. Go down as a. Us foreign policy failure. Look the whole experiment is going to go down as a us foreign policy failure. That's four straight. Us presidents when the world's greatest military power spent two decades in country and then leaves under conditions like this and the government that was created propped up trained advised and solicited by united states collapses within eleven days. That is a black mark on the united states. It's not attributable to any one person but it is unquestionably a failure. One that will be studied for a long time to come. But the evacuation took place under joe biden's administration and he's the one who pulled the plug. Finally do you think this will him throughout the rest of his presidency. He will be accountable to that now. If history is any guide the american public has been very disinterested by and large in afghanistan for much of the two decades that we've been there so i'm guessing that the united states leaving the conditions under which it did so is not going to be more of a public political issue here in the united states than our presence was for the last two decades and i would think as a matter of politics. It's likely to fade fairly quickly. But as a matter of execution you know. Many presidents have faced foreign policy embarrassments overseas especially in their first years and that ended up being part of the records. And i think that's what we're looking at here which oh biden and the afghanistan withdrawal. Susan glasser is a staff writer with a new yorker. She's been talking with us about secretary of state antony blinken testimony before congress about the us exit from afghanistan. Thank you very much. Thank you between all the wildfires heat waves and droughts it can all feel a bit overwhelming for young people. The fear and anxiety about climate change are even more pronounced today bath university in the uk. The climate psychiatry alliance released the results of a new study. They polled ten thousand people between the ages of sixteen and twenty five across ten nations. Some six in ten said they are very or extremely worried about climate change. More than half agree. With the statement that humanity is doomed. The powerlessness is really crippling jennifer. Chendo from nigeria is one of the young climate activists who spoke at a press conference today. You know it's something that's young people like myself have to grapple we have to think of. This is something that is really affecting your people all over the world. The new study bears. That out says dr. Liz marks from the university of bath. She's one of the lead author of the new study that interviewed young. People nearly have told us that this effects than normal daily life things like eating sleeping going to school say that young people also report having doomsday thoughts about climate change. Overhaul things that families security will be threatened over half that the things that they most valley will be destroyed and four out of ten hesitant have their own children because of climate change of course. Climate change won't affect everyone equally. The study shows higher levels of distress in countries already feeling profound impacts caroline hickman. The other lead author of the study shared. What one child told her jobs in the maldives trip to me. He said climate change like tunnels soon the avengers and game whose ideology is to kill off off the planet. So the hopkin thrive and then he said the trailblazers with half being children hickman said she knew when she started the research that many children and young people were anxious and afraid. She just didn't know how afraid they were. Josh recessions me. I'm scared to brief the outside my house. I'm scared of the weather. Do you know that's why hickman says the anxiety makes sense though. It's a rational reaction to what kids constantly hear and read phrases like an existential threat and a planetary emergency. It may not be the avengers but it's still terrifying. You're listening to the world. i'm carol hills your with the world. Sex selective abortion in favor of boys is common in many countries. It's been the practice in the eastern european nation of georgia mark cord out say from the united nations population fund says doctors sometimes influence the parents decision to abort a girl don't use very because if a woman goes to get an ultrasound and they can have two girls and the third one is also girl this.

united states afghanistan biden administration Susan glasser antony blinken climate psychiatry alliance Chendo joe biden Lincoln biden caroline hickman university of bath hopkin congress nigeria hickman jennifer Liz uk dr
"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

01:58 min | 2 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Hills is the world we start with a big meeting kicking off in new york. Today it's opening day at the seventy six session of the united nations general assembly. One hundred ninety three member states are taking part but to countries present an immediate challenge. The first is afghanistan and the question here is whether the un will officially recognize the taliban as the legitimate representative of the afghan government. The other country is me and it was taken over in a military coup back in february which was followed by a deadly crackdown by the army to governments claim to run myanmar. So the un has to decide which one to recognize the world's southeast asia correspondent. Patrick win reports on. What the un's decision on me and mark could mean for the troubled country who deserves to run the country of myanmar for a lot of folks. That's pretty obvious. It's the people who won election last november only they are now tormented by military that has seized power and instead of sitting in parliament there in prison or on the run. Some of them remain underground in me emma. They don't go out. They rely on their relatives to get them food. Many of them have to change locations. Philip anivit worked with many of these elected officials as a un adviser until last year he still keeps in touch when you have to move to use networks of safe houses that have been settled by activists to evade arrest and probably torture better ashamed. Once they get wrist being hunted. These ousted leaders have managed to set up what they call the national unity government. It's still making decisions for the country. Often over encrypted apps it has a ministry of education holding on line classes. It's ministry of finance takes donations and it even has a brand new army which is working with armed indigenous groups in the borderlands to overthrow the central military and restore democratic rule. Yes they even have a battle anthem..

un afghan government myanmar united nations general assembl Philip anivit taliban afghanistan new york army Patrick asia parliament mark national unity government ministry of finance
Bangladesh Vaccinating Rohingya Refugees Amid Virus Surge

Dan Caplis

00:16 sec | 3 months ago

Bangladesh Vaccinating Rohingya Refugees Amid Virus Surge

"ABC News Roam the government of Bangladesh has started vaccinating Rohingya refugees as a covid surge raises health concerns. More than one million people who fled Myanmar are sheltering in crowded camps. The delta vary in driving the surge across Bangladesh, particularly in the southern

Abc News Bangladesh Myanmar
Blinken Urges Myanmar Action in ASEAN Meeting With Its Envoy

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Blinken Urges Myanmar Action in ASEAN Meeting With Its Envoy

"Secretary of state Antony Blinken has urged action on Myanmar in ASEAN meeting with the nation's envoy Lincoln has lost his southeast Asian counterparts to join you press for an end to violence in Myanmar it's return it to a democratic PA off on the release of all political prisoners Myanmar's ministry appointed foreign minister attended the video meeting with the top U. S. envoy and association of southeast Asian nations representatives however it wasn't immediately clear if Myanmar's representative responded to Lincoln's concerns or previous ASEAN to moms the group also discussed the South China Sea territorial disputes with China and searching corona virus outbreaks around the region I'm Charles the last month

Myanmar Secretary Of State Antony Blin Asean U. S. Envoy And Association Of Lincoln South China China Charles
What Is The "McNamara Fallacy"?

Fallacious Trump

01:54 min | 5 months ago

What Is The "McNamara Fallacy"?

"A logical fallacies in reasoning that results in bad or invalid arguments and logical fallacy. We're looking at this week is the mcnamara fallacy also known as the quantitive fallacy. Yes i think this is the only only the second fantasy we've done which is named after someone. Yeah because you had the cash gal gallo and this one. The montmartre fallacy is named after robert mcnamara. Who will see. Us sector defense from nine hundred and sixty one to nineteen sixty eight and he was previously an executive at ford and did very well for ford in terms of kind of finding stuff that could measure measure and fixing those things that they weren't doing as well He also saved a lot of people's lives by insisting that will fold cons had seat belts and things like that Which is proprietor. The government requiring it But then he killed a lot more because he was secretary of defense during vietnam tried to measure that stuff. Yeah yeah. He tried studies. Yeah le- and death the myanmar fantasy as when people focus on something which can be measured at the expense of possibly the more important stuff. So you've the things that are easy to measure as important because you can measure them in that you can kind of affect change but you kind of dismiss all look as unimportant the stuff which is hard to measure like qualititive stuff clueless the tips so moore was in vietnam and they wanted to figure out you know if they will winning right Basically what he did was said. Well we're going to just measure the number of vietnamese. We kill

Robert Mcnamara Ford Gallo Vietnam Myanmar United States Moore
Myanmar's Suu Kyi Tells Lawyers Trial Testimony Against Her Is Wrong

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

Myanmar's Suu Kyi Tells Lawyers Trial Testimony Against Her Is Wrong

"Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi tells lawyers testimony against her is fulls and whenever that the almighty did the one he did not give any secretary coming with missing with interest during the entire court hearing process and told us which testimony is wrong and which one should be cross examined the charges are relatively minor but if convicted could keep her from contesting new elections published by the minute tree within two years of its take other critics of the ruling junta safe the proceedings against suu kyi a politically motivated the meant to try to legitimize the military's seizure of power and discourage her I'm Charles Taylor this month

Suu Kyi Myanmar Charles Taylor
Myanmar Rejects UN Resolution Urging Arms Embargo

All Things Considered

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Myanmar Rejects UN Resolution Urging Arms Embargo

"myanmar" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

08:19 min | 6 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Newt's World

"If you're not a traditional burmese buddhist what extent all of those other ethnic groups under pressure so honored ethnic communities most of them are christians and some buddhists wild but the military intensified the fighting against these ethnic communities lately and when they have this fighting against them basically basically target the entire population civilian and rape women. You know kill people and they practice of Arrest and extrajudicial killing has been like daily life experiences of the people in ethic communities in addition to limiting their access to -tarian aid if they become internally dispaced person or laura jeez in addition to the ability to access education health care and other leading. Who's there has been the active practice self obligatory arrest Closely and many forms of violence against the ethnic communities including sexual lennon's the sexual violence has been used as a weapon of the war against ethnic communities for decades. There are several women's organizations including shan women action network women lick off the they came out with a very substantial report on how the military has used these sexual violence against the women rape as a weapon of war for decades and there were no accountability for their practices thus the military continue to use rape as a weapon against the hindu population to terrorize to destroy entire populations so there has been thousands of women who have been raped during the clearance operations in two thousand sixteen and seventeen and they're living witnesses in refugee camps today. Part of the psychology of using rape as a weapon of war to enforce humiliation on the defeated side in this so for the case of rhodesia. It was to humiliate and to terrorize the entire populations. Because we were not actively fighting against the military and it was not a civil war unlike in many other ethnic communities and situations the multiples very clear that they want to humiliate row as a group so that they would never return to Once they are expelled from their land. And you know it's not just that rape to humiliate and terrorize. But they actually very aggressively conducted mutilations. They raped they kill the torture. And the and this practice has been done in front of the family members that whole village openly and in some cases y as they were raping female they were killing their husband and taking their children and putting them into the fire so that parents were more terrorized before they've been killed so it's been very aggressive very horrific form of violations against fellow humans so that level our barrick behavior and ruthlessness. You seem like a remarkably balanced normal person. How did you survive in. Prison is a very young girl. Must've been a time of constant here when we were arrested. Amin i was barely a teenager so it was extremely hot to understand why we were put in jail. I mean as a teenager. I suppose to be going to school and extremely difficult to understand in hot to cope with it for a couple of years but then i decided to no. I cannot just give up at be sad all the time and pry for the release. It's not going to happen. So i decided to just change my mind and stay strong and i feed myself in many many ways i try to spend my time including readings in talking to people and i realized what happened to us was not at fault. It's actually the military dictatorship who's supposed to be accountable for their act against innocent people like us. So i guess that notion empowered me and i was able to stay strong but when i was released i was really expecting. That will have democracy and we'll be able to contribute to building and democratic nations. But instead what i realized was enacted areas. That prosecution has actually intensified in many many incidences in in particular in the case of Is not only that the prosecution human rights violations has had intensified but it's actually rushed to a very adopt and horrific experiences self this genocide which remain unaddressed. Today i was very closely involved in trying to stop the genocide as as ended impunity for the military. We've been documenting what happens to the people very closely even learning and documenting this process. It's not easy because you know one incident astra one incident is. There's no good story at all and it's extremely difficult to mentally coop with as well. I was privileged to be healthy to have more freedom than many of those people who have been targeted for many forms of violations including sexual violence. Since i was released went back to school night was constantly lun into girl myself so i need to use my knowledge my experience and my ability to influence to help others. If we don't do that. Who else is going to help. Who will do this walk and we will be just witness in our fellow. Human being off communities have being killed are depressed often. Human dignity that i felt. It's the sense of duty and responsibility fly fellow communities regardless of my community or not. I cannot sit and watch to let this have. And i need to take actions. And that's how. I think feeling of privilege and enjoying freedom empowered me bother to take actions. The evolution of me on more may be about to begin. Just have a sense. That time is running out. We don't know how long it will be but we very committed to win this fight and to really change the country to bring freedom democracy equality and peace in my. We're going to follow your courageous jenny. And we're going to link to your organization women's peace network and i look forward as your journey continues. Maybe doing another interview with you future. So i really wanna thank you. This has been a very enlightening at the same time. Very humbling conversation very brave woman and admire greatly. What you're doing. thank you very much. Been an honor talking to you. Thank you. I guess why. Why do you can read more about china. And myanmar on our show page neutral. Dot com niche world has produced by gingrich and sixty and i heart media are executive producers. Debbie meyers our producers guards and sloan and our researchers. Rachel peterson your work for the show was created by steve hanley special. Thanks team gingrich. Sixty if you've been enjoying neutral. I hope you'll go to apple podcast and both rated with five stars and give us a review so others can learn what it's all about right now listeners neutral consignment for my three free weekly columns a gingrich three sixty dot com slash newsletter..

Rachel peterson steve hanley five stars Debbie meyers Today sixty two thousand both myanmar china thousands of women seventeen one incident jenny three free Amin sloan i heart media decades sixteen
"myanmar" Discussed on Newt's World

Newt's World

07:28 min | 6 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Newt's World

"Some of our listeners will still remember the country of myanmar burma. That's the name they grew up with but it was changed by the burmese government. And it's now called me and mar so. Don't be too confused. Is that pretty large country just southeast of india and due south of china while i knew welcome. Thank you for joining. I want to start with your personal story because it's so powerful. It's such a model for other people. You talk just for a couple minutes about growing up in myanmar your father's role in government. And how you ended up with your family in prison sure. It's an honor to be here. So i was born in western part of Myanmar in kind state as a member of hinduja where majority of jolliffe resides in. So i was born. There grew in brooklyn state until like nine in. It wasn't early nineties there. Were you know repressions around my communities than i somehow witness some of those repressions which were not as severe as today then. We moved to young mainly due to my father's political activism. He was an elected parliamentarian. In one thousand nine hundred elections in he was chased by the police and military and those days and he was actually locked out for about a month and he was released later however there has been governments meetings and other activities ongoing in the capital city and young so my father decided to move from rookie. Young go so basically majority of my childhood i spent in yengo angolan. Who's an instrumental power of my life. And who i am today growing up with him being very close to him and see and you know what he does all the time and like learning politics sleight just being with him has been incredible experience for me. After thousand nine hundred elections. The military did not transfer the power to the wing in political parties including the national league for democracy led by the aung san suu itchy. That history is repeating today like today in those days. They locked up. Major political leaders and there were severe form of political repressions. My father was one of the leader. Among the eighteen political leaders come up as a coalition called committee representing people holloman led by the onset suci nobel laureate in the current leader who has been jailed recently the military so due to his political involvement with har- and opposition with this opposition group. He was targeted. At that time. It was in two thousand five. I was eighteen years old. He was arrested and then two months later the entire family was arrested. My mom my sister my brother and meet and after two months of close trial within the prison without having legal counsel or access to legal representations appeal we was sentenced to seven years in my father was sentenced to forty seven years. We had to spend almost seven years in prison and we were released in two thousand twelve with the political opening in at that time in two thousand eleven along with other six hundred twenty three political prisoner through the presidential. Amnesty occurs understand. Why the military would target your father. Why did they target. The whole family is a great question so they talk the whole family because the hated my father more than other politicians because of his identity be in a row hinge although other political activists wear targeted but the target against their populations has been there since early ninety s. We believe part of the reason behind what an anti of family in prison was due to our identity and one of the charge was the immigration act so basically they were saying that moving from raquin state too young goal within the country one state to another state it's violation of law but there has been no law that prevented but they were practising like local directive and all of which were confidential and they sent us jail so part of the charges was that may gration act and the other charge. Was that political act. Which in those days five day the national security act to the military focus on the hendra. What was there in the story relationship or the ideology ethnicity said something. Where on costa was the ambassador. Got it contract work with the church in trying to find ways to help real hindrance clearly was very deep austerity from the the an mardika. That's another great question. I think a lot of people try to understand when we look at the repressions than prosecutions and human rights violations in denmark we also need to understand psyche the ideology of the military institution itself. The burma's institution was born during the independence movement before nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred forty two appeared our of strong burmese nationalism to fight against british colony. But then ever since we've got independence in nineteen forty eight the military institutions felt. They are entitled to the country than they should be seen as guardians of the nations. But then with this political change leads started to feel losing their power. We have an internal coup in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight under this parliamentary democracy and then we have actual coup in one thousand nine hundred sixty two by a general they win. Who was part of the independence movement so since one thousand nine hundred sixty to the military has become more aggressive and their ideology has shifted to. What's a more buddhist ideology from the solely like or anti colonial ideology so they have to trust long as a protector of not only nations but also buddhism and but also booms majority burman populations with this ideology. They created an image among the military individuals and institutions that the nation's belong to their buddhism and the nation's belong to the ethnically burman people group which is majority group indian show basically very systematically promoted buddhist nationalist ideology and with this ideology they.

seven years brooklyn six hundred forty seven years two months two thousand today early ninety s. national security act denmark one thousand eighteen political leaders one Amnesty two thousand twelve hundred elections almost seven years eighteen years old yengo twenty three political prisone
"myanmar" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:28 min | 6 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Today, Explained

"John you talked about over eight hundred people dying in the wake of these protests yet somehow people in myanmar are still optimistic. Why Because i think this is something where they feel like. There's nothing really to lose. Which is maybe doesn't sound very optimistic. But there is this idea of everybody is coming together to defeat a common enemy which is right now the myanmar military and this idea that they could achieve or create. Something that has never been created before in myanmar. And i do think there is the sense of like well else. Can we do. And so there really is no other option but to sort of embrace this very uncertain future and push forward and at the same time there are also some really remarkable and positive developments. I would say you know. Mars very ethnically diverse country but ethnic and religious minorities have often faced discrimination racism and sometimes downright brutality at the hands of the myanmar government and the myanmar military. And you're seeing a real reckoning with that in myanmar right now as it is also plotting its future and it's really kind of remarkable to see. Have we ever seen anything like this. Before where you have various ethnic groups coming together working towards a common cause in myanmar yet. We actually have. Which is what makes this also very interesting. So in the past democracy protests that are seen most notably in the late nineteen eighties and early nineties where students led a pro democracy movement. The military kinda followed a similar playbook where it began to crack down and many of these students and protestors fled to sort of the borderlands of and which are often controlled in some cases by ethnic armed organizations many of which had been fighting the myanmar government our military and those ethnic organizations and their civil arms took in those protesters and sort of gave them shelter and protection but also kind of helped train them and at the same time that that happened. When myanmar's were to became a quasi democracy a lot of those ethnic groups were not included in the conversation or the development of democracy. But we're seeing the same thing happened now where many of these protesters and these students and these professionals who are protesting against the military are now also feeling that they're unsafe that they're under attack from the military and so they're seeking haven in these areas many of which are controlled by these ethnic armed organizations. Where they're getting food and shelter and they're also in some cases learning how to fight. They're they're learning how to use weapons. They're preparing for possible warfare. And so you see this alliance which is born out of this joint opposition to the our military and it is somewhat born out of necessity but there's also again this hope for creating a more democratic and equal future for myanmar. Can you talk about some of these groups that are on the border regions of myanmar. That have basically been in conflict with the military for a long time and are now taking in some of these protesters. Yes oh for example in the caution state. There's been an insurgent movement that's been at war with the myanmar military on and off for decades of fighting for their independence chin or a very strong rebel group own hierarchy and their own army. They present quite formidable opposition to the ma'am authorities. There's also the karen people who've basically been at civil war since the creation of the country. We have fought against them for so many years. So we know that myanmar will not give us equality easily now only the karen but other ethnicities too so we have to fight for rights but if we cannot make peace in our time it will be up to the next generation and so those places to it's worth keeping in mind or under attack by the military. These are not exactly safe havens. They are being bombed and shelled and many people civilians are being displaced on some for example across the border in thailand. So these are very precarious places right. Now they're not exactly safe but they feel safer for people who are in opposition to the military because you have you know like minded people again who are all united for this common. Cause what is the main reason. These groups give for fighting for independence. Are they frustrated. With the amount of power the military has and is a slept pro democracy effort or is it something else. A lot of the ethnic armed organizations each have sort of specific goals or aims. Many of them are fighting for greater autonomy or independence on but they're also just fighting for their survival. You know some of these groups have been brutalized and have been discriminated against and so they're sort of standing up for their own interests in what is really happening or what has happened because of the the coup in myanmar is that a lot of the burmese majority who were removed from these armed struggles on. Who didn't even really understand them. Or maybe thought these ethnic groups were sort of out to advance their own interests now very much realize that these ethnic groups are part of military's pattern of of brutality. And so you know it's sort of this idea of like oh you know now. They're coming for me and so you're seeing this. Recognition of what many of these ethnic minorities and religious minorities have gone through in me and mar and that realization is kind of dawning on the broader population. Which is why you're seeing this unity. Hi this is. Nissan louis and activists and co founder of the free range a collision in network ruin the activists and friend of hinduja. I am based in jumpy. I have family related and a lot of friends in memo rangan and rookie state. I left from yemen. Twenty years ago in two thousand one. I was born in your tone in russian state but i was raised in rangan. Former capital of nemo my people beck iraklion state have been suffering from various of secretion which amounted to genocide since nine hundred seventy eight s. I want to enjoy the freedom and wanted not to be discriminated. I left from the city for. I grew up in the past on this show. We've talked a lot about the military genocide against the roe honda. Where does this wave of conflict leave them. Obviously the most notable kind of crime by the our military has been the atrocities against the rohan. Joe which are a muslim minority and kind state and beginning are around. Twenty seventeen hundreds of thousands of rohan had to flee to bangladesh where there now in refugee camps because of what the united nations has basically said amounted to genocide would like to thank gambia fleet. The legal process bug for giving us shelter now. Finally recognizes are suffering and the atrocities..

John bangladesh thailand Twenty years ago myanmar government nemo late nineteen eighties Mars early nineties Nissan louis nine hundred seventy eight s. myanmar military two thousand each Twenty seventeen hundreds of t yemen myanmar hinduja gambia over eight hundred people
ASEAN Leaders Plan Myanmar Visit This Week Amid Divisions

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:55 min | 6 months ago

ASEAN Leaders Plan Myanmar Visit This Week Amid Divisions

"February's coup d'etat. In myanmar presented a considerable diplomatic headache to the association of southeast asian nations or as the on myanmar is a member of as yan and but as he and maintains a general policy of not getting too involved in the internal affairs of its members. However there are indications as the end does understand that. This is at least kind of the problem this week. As yan secretary-general lim jock of brunei will visit me and ma and indonesia mainly is pushing for as to name a specialist myanmar envoy lon join now by ronan lee an academic and author of myanmar's row hindu genocide identity history and hate speech ronin. Thanks for joining us. First of all do we understand how much the the gionta in myanmar might actually care. What as thinks will the will care to the point that they feel is going to affect them the mesh with as enemies five weeks ago since the joint met at a special meeting with the leaders of as and there was a five point. Saints ham dived at that point. But not one of the points in the five point consensus has been delivered on since that diane even an even the appointment of an envoy has some good at the chances that joint oh will allow a representative representative of as ian to land in myanmar. Well that would depend on the calculation that the joint aches. We choose whether or not the would be any any downside for them. By rejecting the arrival of anez ian rent the military in myanmar is very good at delaying things. They've they've done this repeatedly of a many decades and they do that to take the political sting out of situations and to take the impetus away from people who might be able to force them to change their direction.

Myanmar Yan Secretary General Lim Jock Lon Join Ronan Lee Association Of Southeast Asian Gionta Brunei Indonesia MA Anez Ian Saints Diane IAN
facebook says Russia Is Still the Biggest Player in Disinformation

Cyber Security Headlines

01:52 min | 6 months ago

facebook says Russia Is Still the Biggest Player in Disinformation

"Belgium disrupt cyber espionage in the wake of microsoft's recent disclosure of exchange server vulnerabilities belgium's federal public service interior launch. An investigation in march with the help of the center for cyber security belgium. The agency eventually discovered a cyber espionage campaign underway that dated back to two thousand nineteen. Although it's unclear if the campaign was related to experts in the exchange vulnerabilities that triggered the investigation authorities characterize the damage from the campaign as a limited and contained despite existing for years the operators had sabir capacities and extensive resources with timing. That suggests a state actor. Facebook says russia is still the largest producer of misinformation. This comes from a new report. The company released this week detailing how the platform disrupted one hundred. Fifty different disinformation operations overall. Facebook claims to have uncovered disinformation campaigns in more than fifty countries. Since twenty seventeen aside from russia iran myanmar the united states and ukraine were the most identified originating countries of disinformation operations while the united states ukraine britain libya and sudan were the most frequently targeted. Facebook isn't just taking actions against misinformation campaigns however the company announced a new system that reduce distribution of all posts from individual accounts that routinely share misinformation. This policy had previously been in place for pages and groups but has now extended to individual accounts. What's absues over indian. It laws these laws were originally passed in february and effective on may twenty six. The law requires messages to be put traceable database to identify unlawful content. This would require what's up to no longer offer end to end encrypted messaging in order to be compliant. What's up to the. Laws are unconstitutional and a violation of citizens rights to the preservation of privacy comparing the traceability requirement of the law to mass surveillance

Belgium Center For Cyber Security Facebook Russia Ukraine Microsoft United States Myanmar Libya Sudan Iran Britain
Myanmar's Junta Uses Bodies as Tools of Terror in Crackdown

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Myanmar's Junta Uses Bodies as Tools of Terror in Crackdown

"An AP investigation finds that some young moms who uses bodies to terrorize analysis by the Associated Press human rights center investigations lab at the university of California look at cases where bodies of those targeted indiscriminately by police and the ministry of being used as tools of terror in Myanmar the findings are based on more than two thousand tweets and on line images in addition to interviews with family members witness accounts and local media reports the research identified more than one hundred thirty instances where security forces appear to be using corpses on the bodies of the wounded to create anxiety uncertainty and strike fear in the civilian population I'm Charles at the address bar

AP University Of California Myanmar Charles
Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi Appears Personally in Court

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi Appears Personally in Court

"Myanmar's leader. Aung san suu. Cheap has appeared in court in person for the first time since the military seized power on february. First michael sullivan reports from neighboring thailand. Her lawyer says the seventy five year old suci looked in good health and wished myanmar's health as well. He said her defense team was able to meet with her for about thirty minutes. Before the largely procedural hearing in the capital nippy suji faces several charges including violating the colonial era official secrets act. if convicted. She could be jailed for up to fourteen years so she has been in detention since the morning of the coup. Her supporters say. The charges against her are politically motivated aimed at keeping her from holding office in the future. The military justified its goo- by claiming massive fraud in the november twenty twenty election. Suci party won in a landslide

Aung San Suu Myanmar Suci Michael Sullivan Nippy Suji Thailand Suci Party
UN Launches Response Plan for Rohingya in Bangladesh

UN News

01:13 min | 6 months ago

UN Launches Response Plan for Rohingya in Bangladesh

"Bringing Refugees who fled persecution in myanmar. For years ago are more vulnerable than at any point since two thousand seventeen the. Un has warned in an appeal for international support to help them launching the cool for nine hundred and forty million dollars for nearly nine hundred thousand refugees in bangladesh's cox's bazar camp complex un refugee agency chief. Filippo grandi also urged india and thailand to keep their borders open to those fleeing from violence linked to the myanmar coup tuesday's appeal covers requests for more than one hundred thirty four partners who include un agencies international ngos and a majority of bangladeshi ngos if funded it will also benefit almost half a million bangladeshi nationals living in communities that are hosting the refugees the world food program which is also present in cox's bazar warned that the covid nineteen crisis has reduced opportunities for refugees. The camp complex also disaster-prone and faces a monsoon to cyclone seasons every year which is why the un agency continues to support disaster risk reduction activities. These include rebuilding cyclone shelters improving drainage systems stabilizing slopes and helping communities diversify their livelihood activities. So that they do not need to rely on agriculture for income

UN Myanmar Filippo Grandi COX Bangladesh Thailand India
Myanmar Coup Leader Arrives in Indonesia for Asean Summit

BBC Newsday

00:49 sec | 7 months ago

Myanmar Coup Leader Arrives in Indonesia for Asean Summit

"Who led the military coup in Myanmar in February, has arrived in Indonesia to discuss the turmoil in his country with regional leaders. It's men and fangs first trip abroad since seizing power, but it has been widely condemned. As Jonathan Head in Jakarta, explains. Mamma's Remember. Question is is general men online? The coup leader recognized as the leader of the country. He's there, and that has caused outrage among opposition groups in Myanmar. Many human rights groups who say this is giving him to factor recognition. What officials here say in Thailand. Other countries is we've got to talk to the person who actually holds power in Yama. You have to talk to him. It's notable that some of the statements from some of the individual states are very careful not to give a sense that they recognize men online as the legal leader of Mama.

Jonathan Head Myanmar Indonesia Mamma Jakarta Thailand
Myanmar Is on the Brink of Collapse

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:50 min | 8 months ago

Myanmar Is on the Brink of Collapse

"The roads outside me on mars government offices are splattered with red. Paint protests against february's military coup or unrelenting and demonstrators are trying to shame the generals the paint red blood spilled as the army's campaign grows increasingly brutal and indiscriminate a week ago on state television the announcement. Twenty-three protestors would be put to death. Hundreds are already dead with the is undeterred. Strikes and boycotts are strangling the economy on the country's fringes rebel militias made ethnic minorities. That have fought. The government for decades are banding together and external pressure is rising targeted international sanctions are stacking up this week. The un's human rights commission lambasted. The army's crackdown the military seems intent. On intensifying its pitiless policy of violence against the people of myanmar using military grade and indiscriminate weaponry. They're clear echoes of syria in two thousand eleven. He'd an investment are all but frozen just. Today a south korean steel-making giant called posco said it would hold plans for a joint venture. The country is fast heading toward becoming a failed state but both sides of the conflict are dug in determined and seemingly fearless. The burmese military is gunning down people from all walks of life. Charlie mccann is the economists. Southeast asia correspondent students activists taxi drivers even children. They've killed scores of children and even in the face of that danger. People are still protesting in in big numbers. Yeah that's right that's still demonstrating but these administrations have gotten much smaller. Since the military started cracking

Army Human Rights Commission Posco Myanmar UN Charlie Mccann Syria Southeast Asia
Myanmar Could Descend Into a Civil War Comparable to Syria

UN News

01:06 min | 8 months ago

Myanmar Could Descend Into a Civil War Comparable to Syria

"The ongoing repression of largely peaceful protests in san market descended into full blown conflict on a par with syria. You and rights chief. Michelle basch lead has warned in a fresh appeal to the country's military rulers to stop using live ammunition on demonstrators. The high commissioner also urged states with influence to take immediate action to halt the slaughter. She warned on tuesday that a small number of people had decided to on themselves after security forces reportedly used indiscriminate weapons against them including mortars from the office of the high commissioner for human rights. His spokesperson ravina. Shonda sanni in geneva over the weekend credible reports indicate that the tatmadaw forces opened fire with rocket propelled grenades fragmentation grenades and mortar. Fire in boggle in the south of the country security forces also reportedly prevented medical personnel from helping the wounded more than seven hundred a report of being killed in the crackdown by security forces. Since the military coup on the first of february the un human rights office said that clashes between the military and ethnic armed groups have also intensified in kachin. Sean and in states where the military have carried out air strikes that have killed and displaced civilians.

San Market Michelle Basch Office Of The High Commissione Ravina Shonda Sanni Syria Geneva Un Human Rights Office Kachin Sean
More Than 700 Civilians Killed By Myanmar Junta Since Coup

WBUR Programming

01:48 min | 8 months ago

More Than 700 Civilians Killed By Myanmar Junta Since Coup

"Civilian leader on San Souci was hit with another criminal charge by the military this time for allegedly breaching covert 19 restrictions under the country's natural disaster management law. Souci, who has been detained since the February 1st coup now faces six criminal charges altogether, as well as lengthy prison sentences. Meanwhile, more than 80 people were killed by security forces on Friday. It's the largest single death toll in weeks, Yet protesters are still trying to reverse the military coup. Some say it has left me and more on the brink of collapse. Reporter Michael Sullivan spoke with a woman who has lived through several crackdowns in Myanmar and a warning this story contains graphic descriptions of violence. University of Washington professor Mary Callahan has had a front row seat watching me and Mar descend into chaos. Her neighborhood in the commercial capital Yangon. Ah, hot spot for protests and the crackdowns that follow seeing from my condo balcony. People fleeing Into the spider web of streets in the neighborhood and soldiers chasing them in then random shootings and the terrorizing Of the people on the streets every night. Her routine the past few months has included a nightly walk around the neighborhood just before sundown and nightly chats with some of the young people. They all know me and they all know I speak for my knees. And it's like they wait for me to show me Grisly pictures and videos of things. They took or they pulled off Somehow, social media even though they no longer have no bio data. Mobile data was cut

San Souci Souci Mary Callahan Michael Sullivan Myanmar University Of Washington Yangon
Violence In Myanmar Continues As Military Cracks Down On Opposition

Democracy Now! Audio

00:34 sec | 8 months ago

Violence In Myanmar Continues As Military Cracks Down On Opposition

"In. Burma were than eighty people. Were killed friday when soldiers opened fire on a crowd of protesters demanding a reversal of the military coup that ousted burma's democratically elected government survivors. Said soldiers used grenades and other heavy weapons to fire at anything that moved. The massacre took place in the town of boggle northeast of the capital rangoon l. swear an alliance of fighters from ethic minority groups attacked a police station in eastern burma saturday. At least ten officers were reportedly killed in the attack.

Burma Boggle Rangoon
"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

04:02 min | 8 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"Unser Immunsystem ist so ein richtiges Bollwerk gegen Eindringlinge von es wert Bakterien und mutierte Zellen ab und nach einer Impfung oder bei einer Infektion zum Der leistet es absolute in der Korona Pan wird wieder viel über das Immunsystem gerätselt und gefachsimpelt und es erhält einen richtigen Aufmerksamkeits Und mein Zeit Kollege Moritz Esslinger hat in der aktuellen Zeit dazu ein wirklich sehr interessantes Dossier und er weiß auch darüber was nicht nur unser Immunsystem für uns tun sondern was wir für unser Immunsystem tun Hallo hi vielleicht noch mal kurz zu deiner recherche zum immunsystem du beschreibt es als wunder wie die Zellen sich Angriffe merken wie sie dazu lernen wie sie sich weiterentwickeln gab seine erkenntnis den ich am meisten fasziniert hat auf jeden Also zum beispiel gibt es eine die heißt den tri tische die es so was wie der General der Immunabwehr befehl den anderen Wer wie angegriffen wird ist eine die hat so lange fortsetze und wenn sie an eine wunde kommt dann nimmt sie einige bestandteile der mikroben die dort sind auf und bringt sie zu den nächstgelegenen Wird sich dann eine ganze armee dieser t zellen bildet und dann dann weiß man ja dass rauchen oder schlechte ernährung für das immunsystem schädlich Was sind denn so faktoren die das immunsystem stärken oder es gibt würde ich sagen drei die ist auch nicht ganz sind aber ganz Das ist zum einen ausreichend wenig Stress und viel was man eigentlich auch so aber interessant fand dass beispielsweise bei der Bewegung dass wir spazieren gehen oder Laufen oder Sport der Blutkreislauf angeregt wird und dadurch wiederum die die sich im Blut natürlich viel mobiler dadurch sind und viel schneller und effektiver an mögliche Eindringlinge kommen und so eben uns besser vor Krankheiten schützen Und was kann man noch Beispielsweise soll die richtige Atmung gut fürs Immunsystem weil das Stress und Entzündungen vermeiden Die perfekte Atmung laut Experten jedenfalls sieht so dass man fünfeinhalb Sekunden lang einatmet und fünfeinhalb Sekunden lang ausatmet und das am besten durch die Darüber hinaus soll Küssen sehr gut was ja eine ganz schöne Erkenntnis weil das Stresshormone im Speichel abbaut und man dadurch einfach entspannter ist und das wiederum sich positiv auf das Immunsystem ausgelebt der auch das System Immunsystem Wenn wir optimistisch bleiben wie stärkt den Optimismus das Optimismus soll das Immunsystem dass es Studien bei denen man den Probanden Bilder gezeigt hat und im Nachhinein festgestellt dass die die sich eher an die schönen Bilder mehr Antikörper hatten als die an die unangenehmen Bilder zurück dachten und es gibt mehrere solcher die dass die eher positiv optimistisch mehr Immunzellen im Körper haben als die Also bleiben wir wenigstens der Gesundheit Danke vielen das war was jetzt für heute in unserem ab 17 Hören Sie meinen Kollegen Moses Fendel mit weiteren Schreiben Sie wenn Sie Fragen haben oder etwas loswerden wollen unter was jetzt Zeitpunkte.

Moses Fendel Moritz Esslinger fünfeinhalb Sekunden drei mehrere solcher einige bestandteile heute ausreichend wenig Stress Antikörper vielen Immunzellen Korona in jetzt aktuellen Zeit 17
"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

05:10 min | 8 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"Es ist der 30. und das ist was jetzt der Nachrichten Podcast von Zeit online und hier durch dieses Mikrofon hinein in ihre Lautsprecher und Kopfhörer spricht heute Elise Land Check zu Hier geht es gleich um die eskalierende Gewalt in Myanmar und wie wir unser Immunsystem stärken Und in New York ist jetzt das Kiffen offiziell Aber jetzt erst mal die Seit zehn Jahren ist Syrien jetzt schon im Fast 400.000 Menschen kamen dabei ums mehr als 12 Millionen Syrerin und Syrer sind auf der Flucht Nach Angaben der UNO sind insgesamt 24 Millionen Frauen und Männer auf Hilfe In Brüssel endet heute die fünfte Geberkonferenz für die Vereinten Nationen hoffen auf Zusagen der Geberländer in Höhe von zehn Milliarden US Auch die Frage nach der Verteilung der Gelder soll besprochen Also wie kann die Hilfe bei den Menschen ohne über das Assad Regime zu laufen und was muss getan um Geflüchtete in den Nachbarstaaten zu Die Konferenz findet virtuell statt und wird von der UNO gemeinsam mit der Europäischen Union Deutschen Waffenproduzenten ist es ja Waffen in Krisengebiete zu Daher hatten die zuständigen Ministerien einen Waffenexport nur in bestimmte mexikanische Bundesstaaten Das Unternehmen Heckler und Koch hat jedoch von 2006 bis 2009 mehr als 4000 Sturmgewehre und Zubehör durch erschlichene Genehmigung in Unruheregion Zwei Mitarbeiter wurden 2009 zehn durch das Landgericht Stuttgart zu Bewährungsstrafen 3,7 Millionen Euro an Strafzahlungen kamen zudem auf den Waffenhersteller über die Dazu will heute der Bundesgerichtshof Redaktionsschluss für diesen Podcast ist fünf Nachdem die Putschisten des Militärs in Myanmar am Wochenende mehr als 100 Menschen getötet ist es doch deutlich dass die Gewalt gegen die Bevölkerung jetzt ein neues Level erreicht Wahllos ist Menschen in den Rücken geschossen worden oder den die Soldaten haben auch nicht davor Kinder zu ermorden und es gab die haben davon dass das Militär dabei wie in einem Blutrausch vorgegangen Die freie Autorin Verena Hölze ist Myanmar Expertin und kennt sich aus vor Jetzt gerade ist sie allerdings in Hallo hallo Nach dem Putsch am Meer die Militärs offenbar jetzt die letzten Skrupel abgelegt Was wollen Sie denn mit diesem Gewaltexzess Gewalt ist eigentlich die einzige Sprache die dieses militär spricht und was jetzt versuchen ist diese proteste solange bis bis das volk tatsächlich aufgibt und dieses repressive regime wieder mit dem sie schon jahrzehntelang in der vergangenheit gut gefahren sind und das hat mit demokratie auf jeden fall überhaupt nichts mehr zu tun die demokratie Aktivisten in Myanmar haben jetzt die bewaffneten Milizen der ethnischen Minderheiten gegen das Militär um Hilfe Wir sind in diese milizen und haben eine also mehrmals im Vielvölkerstaat und in diesem Vielvölkerstadt herrscht seit vielen Jahrzehnten es handelt sich da sogar um einen der längsten der das wundert einen vielleicht bei diesem militär auch nicht und diese das Volk setzt jetzt große Hoffnung in diese Minderheiten Armeen manche von denen auch schon dass sie helfen Wie das genau aussehen soll ist noch bisschen Was auf jeden Fall schon Stadt dass in den die unter Kontrolle dieser Rebellen Aktivisten Unterschlupf finden und offenbar auch nicht nur sondern dass da auch schon gezielt Leute trainiert werden für den bewaffneten Jetzt hat der US Präsident beiden Sanktionen Gegen Myanmar müsste die internationale Gemeinschaft deiner Meinung nach auch insgesamt noch deutlicher und und geschlossene die Gewalt in jammer Also ich hab in den vergangenen tagen vor allen waren die worte die man gefunden hat er schon wirklich sehr Und es hagelt von allen seiten Es gab ja auch schon Sanktionen seitens der EU als auch seitens der Es ist gleichzeitig im immer noch gibt es noch Tools die einsetzbar zum beispiel in globales Was man allerdings auch immer leider mit dazu sagen muss dass diese Verurteilung aus dem Ausland den generellen scheinbar wirklich nichts auszumachen weil bisher das nicht dazu dass mit weniger Brutalität gegen das Volk vorgegangen sondern eher das.

"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

Was jetzt?

04:56 min | 8 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Was jetzt?

"Is a stint tax that rice estimates on vast yesterday national podcast funded online. Microphone nine player on cop. Herash playtoy eliza sanchez to win. He gets on the calendar divide in myanmar onto down via the immodest stack. Come on in new york jets task kiffin not allowed by it s might heighten zaid senior is doing yet sternum damage. So stent first. Few thousand mention calmed by unsleeping. It's me one of their now non gabrielle owners and inzamam fianc wanted me on kindle on onto of fun if he's in blessed ended huytler tiffany gabon conference was johann defined. That's often of suzanne dickey belinda. Who may add. Were artie nasty. For title they get as as lovie candy. Hicfa biden mentioned on come on but as assad regime to love on fossils catan via an anguished attended napperstat and sazonon to conference funded h dot Meter are patient on your oscar. Dodge viper puts is to see how it octave often. Increasing it lifan diehard indeed suspending ministerial in often ex partner in bush symptom mexicana ship wounded start and allowed antonio heckler and koch offense by thousands experts sweaters. And nine me. It's few thousand stronger on superior to ashley. Snag anemic gong in warwick on expert. Spy by ordonez doesn't noise into lancaster shortcuts of avante staff or towed as million or watch tuft silom comments team of inva- hester. Let's who you buddy revealing. That suv will the opponent of china. John's recent podcast is took. Were not empty putschist many years in myanmar on von and amir. It's not mentioned. Kuta taboo is darkish. Vardon dusty virat gigi before along. It's a noise. Level is cut violence is mentioned in looking across involved in cups. Desire dot have changed whatsoever shocked. Kim netzer modern on a skop oughta hunger does minute here. By vin and blue house foggiest defy. Autobahn hurts me and my ex patent on kansas for ought it's gotta is seattle dutch halloween. Halloween harlison not input trauma. Demilitary us yet still at since coppola up the leaked was was wounded and medicinal divide. Excess hisen divide distinguish. The antics party. Dismally tear crashed on the sits. These protest needed so schlongs along. This business spoke ticklish. Off gupta on is the script receiver regime at medina. Sean yet saint long enough gupta fans and On democrat tea of info smith so tone d democratic activists in myanmar yet soup of africa Guinness detail here. Forbidden visited these mid eastern on neutrons as few circa start indecent for cash dash said feeney's in google creek hundred does go to divert does not inflect but these military honest On diese folks. At sits hoffman diese. Mindy heighten amine From din of sean argued conduct doc- hayes volume boy. We just could not ask. Things are is not percent on enclaves of infrastructure. Such steps into this does In dinghies beaten deserve pains and activists and on tosh look On as awful nor on tusla's london does the strongest series lloyd to Twenty van food in often come He had set the out west pollutant. Biden's soon conducting mom mr de internet's another mitroff. Then it's shown. Divide in time as this shop for garmin tog nfl van devoted among in front in addition Doit leash on hard. It took skopje. Al-sham johnson set and say Offset and set was is is an instrument and customer not Get snuffed de ends present. Some beer and globalist often embargo alex. Ima let them susan. Moss is but what town awesome ostlund. Didn't change shambolic nests also shine bizarre us nash. Sue gifford Ted guinness for for congress on and skintight.

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"myanmar" Discussed on Quick News Daily Podcast

Quick News Daily Podcast

03:49 min | 8 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on Quick News Daily Podcast

"Sunday <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> with chris wallace. <Speech_Male> That was not <Speech_Male> can be an easy task. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Not by <Music> a long shot <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> that is going to do it <Speech_Male> for the news here today. <Speech_Male> Thank you again <Speech_Male> so much for listening. <Speech_Male> I do want to direct your <Speech_Male> attention to the <Speech_Male> the sources hyperlink <Speech_Male> in the show <Speech_Male> notes in the episode <Speech_Male> description. There <Speech_Male> that's where. I put all <Speech_Male> these sources that are <Speech_Male> used for every show <Speech_Male> and it even <Speech_Male> includes articles <Speech_Male> that I don't <Speech_Male> actually use in the show. <Speech_Male> But i think you <Speech_Male> know are borderline <Speech_Male> but this <Speech_Male> is supposed to be all about <Speech_Male> what you need to <Speech_Male> now. Those are ones that <Speech_Male> usually. Don't quite make the cut <Speech_Male> but if you want <Speech_Male> more to read or <Speech_Male> think that the news is a <Speech_Male> little short for the day. <Speech_Male> Go check those out. <Speech_Male> Maybe there's a <Speech_Male> sort of a funnier <Speech_Male> story in. There <Speech_Male> may be a more <Speech_Male> active <Speech_Male> story. I don't like to do <Speech_Male> those too often. Like you <Speech_Male> know what could be happening. <Speech_Male> Like for instance. <Speech_Male> There's a couple <Speech_Male> articles in there about <Speech_Male> how biden <Speech_Male> thinks that he can get gun. <Speech_Male> Control measures passed <Speech_Male> in some senators. <Speech_Male> Who've done it in the past <Speech_Male> talking about <Speech_Music_Male> it. But i <Speech_Male> believe that stuff. When <Speech_Male> i see it so go. Click <Speech_Male> on that link and <Speech_Male> find all the sources <Speech_Male> that a us and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> more and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Read up if you have <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the time or want to know more. <Speech_Male> I do also <Speech_Male> take this time <Speech_Male> to thank our contributors <Speech_Male> our producer. <Speech_Male> Cathy <Speech_Male> and executive producer <Speech_Male> gwen for supporting <Speech_Male> us via patriots. <Speech_Male> Steady pay <Speech_Male> pow <Speech_Male> however you would like <Speech_Male> to. It does <Speech_Male> in fact help out the show <Speech_Male> you can find <Speech_Male> for that as well <Speech_Male> in the episode description <Speech_Male> but within <Speech_Male> stay <Speech_Male> safe out there <Speech_Male> practice your good social <Speech_Male> distancing <Speech_Male> and other covert preventative <Speech_Male> measures for <Speech_Male> what seems like <Speech_Male> just a bit longer <Speech_Male> since we are getting <Speech_Male> those vaccinations <Speech_Male> going get vaccinated <Speech_Male> when it is <Speech_Male> your turn when you are eligible. <Speech_Male> It seems like quite <Speech_Male> a few people are eligible <Speech_Male> now. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And i will plan <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on seeing you

"myanmar" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

04:12 min | 9 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Which is that Tatmadaw is a brutal control organization and the icj shouldn't have any problem in the gambia argument. Accepting the claim that such organization would and indeed did carry out genocide about the role of anchoring suci herself. She fronted the delegation presumably from her car position. She would no longer be able to take part well. I can't i can't given her current situation. I can't imagine she'd have any role indicates going forward unless there's a extrordinary reversal within myanmar In terms of the political situation but this points to the other big questions that the coup raises. I think which are will. Myanmar even continued to participate in the case So that's a big question in some ways the mr was. I wouldn't say praised exactly. But i think it was seen as a good thing that myanmar did show up for the provisional measures hearing is engaged in the case is there to defend itself. It's always a bad thing in my view when when a state decides not to appear at the ic j. or in other high profile interstate arbitrations so the most famous examples of that at the ic jr. the are relatively old now but the tehran hostage is case back in nineteen eighty And then the nicaragua case in the nineteen eighties where the. Us chose not to appear. After they lost at the jurisdictional phase and in both of those cases the those states ended up losing on the merits whether or not that's because they decided not to appear. His is a different question. But i can't help them but it is important maybe for listeners to understand that unlike in some domestic court systems where a doesn't appear you have a relatively straightforward path to a default judgment a judgment against the non appearing party. It's not that straightforward at the ic j. So the icy jay can still if an. Marta said not to participate going forward..

Marta Tatmadaw nineteen eighties nineteen eighty Myanmar both gambia suci myanmar tehran nicaragua
"myanmar" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:20 min | 10 months ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KCRW

"Go Slash black freedom. It's 8 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm the wheel King. Good Morning, Me and Mars Military ruled that country for almost 50 years in 2015, a Democratic election brought on song Souci, who'd peacefully fought against military rule to power and then this week, the military took power back in a coup. And Souci has been detained. Aaron Connolly is an analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. He's on the line with us from Singapore. Good morning, Aaron. Good morning. Well, were there any warning signs this coup was coming about a week ago, The military started to make threats that if the civilian government didn't take its issues, with November election for which it had provided no evidence More seriously than it would consider taking power. It seemed to step back from that threat on a couple of occasions, and then on Monday morning, it arrested key civilian leaders. But it was really only about a week ago that most people in Myanmar and most Myanmar specialists overseas started to believe that the military was serious about taking back power. What is the military claiming happened in this election? They claim that there were irregularities with voter lists in the election, particularly in ethnic areas, and that if the election voter lists were scrutinized more closely than that, they would have had a chance of winning more seats in the national legislature. But again they haven't provided any evidence for those claims. Okay, So you're skeptical of the claim that there was something wrong with the election. What's the relationship between Souci and the generals who now detain her? It's been a touchy relationship over time. Of course, they detained her for many years from 1990 until 2011 releasing her on a couple of occasions. But then she appeared to be trying to build a more solid relationship with them. After she took power in 2016, at least control over the civilian government military maintain control over the three key ministries, the Ministry of Defense Home Affairs Order affairs and also all the security forces. At times, she appeared to be trying to build a working relationship with them. But ultimately that foundered when they refused to respect her ambitions, particularly to become president, which they had outlawed under the Constitution that they wrote in 2008. Okay, so she lost the General's has she also lost the civilians? What, to ordinary people there. Think of her Well. She won the last election. Her party that nationally for democracy, won the last election in November in a landslide. She remains incredibly popular in Myanmar. And that's likely to continue. There's no change to that. What do you envision will happen over the next couple of days and weeks? Will there be any kind of push within the country or outside the country to release her to end the could give power back to people have been democratically elected? It's still really unclear. There was one statement that was released on one of her Facebook pages yesterday that suggested that before she was detained, she had called people out onto the streets. But then there were other members of her party. You said that that statement was inauthentic. There are some who would prefer to see street demonstrations against this. They believe that that might reverse the result of this coup. On the other hand, there are those who remember what happened in 1988 when people came out onto the streets following a military coup, then on hundreds, possibly thousands of people died in the violence. After the military sought to suppress those demonstrations. Myanmar was ruled by the military for decades. Is there a fear that the country could be headed back in that direction? Yeah, Absolutely. The military says that it's only going to take back power for one year and then it's going to hold elections and return power to a civilian government. But it might not necessarily adhere to that timeline. It believes that if it removes on since achieve from politics that it could begin to win elections again, But it's not really clear that that's the case and it's not clear that people will cooperate. Participate in a semi democratic system that excludes on San Souci, or the National League from Democracy. What are the implications outside of Myanmar in Southeast Asia more broadly well yesterday, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, which is the regional block in this region. I'm in Singapore issued a statement calling for return to what they said was normalcy and number of Southeast Asian diplomats have said to me on background that, but they're looking for his return to the status quo as of Sunday evening, That's a relatively strong statement for as Ian And the U. N Security Council is scheduled to hold a meeting on the situation later today. The UK is currently in the presidency of the Security Council and has tended to focus on me and Mara issues when it's held the presidency. So I would anticipate quite a bit of international pressure both from within the region and around the globe on the military to at the very least, truncate the period in which it intends to hold power and perhaps to shape the nature of the government that would follow after the military hands back power. Aaron Connolly of the International Institute for Strategic Studies and Singapore. Aaron. Thanks for being with us, thanks to will Hmm. This week. Brian Sick, Nick.

Myanmar Souci Aaron Connolly Singapore International Institute for St Steve Inskeep NPR News San Souci Ministry of Defense Home Affai Facebook Association of Southeast Asian Security Council Southeast Asia UK president analyst Brian Sick National League from Democracy Mara U. N Security Council
"myanmar" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:51 min | 1 year ago

"myanmar" Discussed on AP News

"Thousands of people in the area of western land mall where there have been clashes between the government and ethnic rebels have been fleeing from the villages often evacuation order from officials in all the last Tuesday residents were told to stay away from their homes due to military plans to conduct a clearance operation against rebels clearance operation is Myanmar military language the counter insurgency action the exodus for more than 40 villages is going ahead almost a week later even though the world was revoked last Friday the government has been embroiled for more than a year in an intermittent conflict with the Arakan only a well trained and well armed guerrilla force representing members of the areas that keen ethnic group I'm Charles the test my

Charles Myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So is Myanmar conducting a genocidal campaign against for him to Muslims a court ruling this morning in the Hague is the net is the next step toward answering that question the international court of justice heard a case brought by the African country of Gambia on behalf of an organization of Muslim majority countries that accuses Myanmar of committing genocide and let's turn to reporter Michael Sullivan who's been following the story for some time he joins us from Thailand hi Michael David so can you explain this court decision in the Hague to us and and what it means well first of all I think we need to make clear that this is in no way a final decision on the allegations of genocide that could take years but this was about provisional measures requested by Gambia basically a restraining order compelling me on Martin not to abuse the roving to remain in the on Mars were kind state and the court granted several of those measures today and said that the real hang out in the end mark are still in danger and should be a protected group so these measures will apply in theory to the couple hundred thousand Rohingya denied the most basic freedoms including freedom of movement many living what amounts to detention camps and also compelled Myanmar to preserve evidence of any alleged crimes committed during the two thousand seventeen accidents including rape murder and torture measures don't really help the roughly seven hundred and forty thousand row and go who fled the brutal Myanmar military crackdown in twenty seventeen and are now living in camps in Bangladesh and probably will be for quite sometime so this this ruling today comes just over a month after Myanmar's defective leader uncensored she went personally to the Hague to to defend our country and its actions I mean did did did that just not have any impact on on the court as they thought about what they believe is happening here it didn't seem to I mean she went and in fact I asked them to drop the case claiming that no genocide or genocidal acts had taken place she did admit that in her words a disproportionate military force may have been used against the roving bands of billions killed which basically said our government was investigating these claims and ask the court to allow that process to play out and in fact earlier this week the Myanmar government panel appointed to look into such allegations basically came to the same conclusion probable war crimes committed by the military but no genocide well I mean is name are likely to go further and comply with whatever provisional measures this court is is calling for given that Myanmar has his stone walled in the past when it's come to this yeah a good question I mean ended knowledge is the authority of the court and therefore is obliged to cooperate and the time frame is four months to comply if that doesn't happen the matter could be sent to the UN security council for further action but Myanmar has a friend there China which would probably block any effort to make Myanmar comply even if it wasn't satisfying the terms of the provisional measures that would so taking all this together I means is today's ruling just mostly symbolic or or is there more to it I think it's a little of both I mean you have to remember the international criminal court is also looking hard at several senior members of Myanmar's military for their role in what happened in twenty seventeen now you've got this case with the international court of justice in this proceeding and measures are being taken to address the plight of their hang up so that's progress yeah reporter Michael Sullivan thanks so much Michael.

Myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on KCRW

"And defended Myanmar's army against allegations of genocide state local news coming up at six thirty two Y. Bernie Sanders has withdrawn his endorsement of a candidate to fill the seat of a former representative after this from NPR stick around live from NPR news in Culver city California I'm door holy site cow tell the trump administration says it reached a phase one trade agreement with China and peer skull Horsley reports the deal avoid another costly round of import tariffs which were set to take effect this weekend both sides were under pressure to cut a deal and avoid terrorist that would have hit another one hundred sixty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports including popular consumer items such as cell phones laptops and children's toys the trump administration has agreed to suspend those terrace and cut the terror of rate on some other Chinese imports in exchange for what the president calls massive purchases by China the farm goods energy and manufactured products from the United States so far those massive purchases have not been quantified the US is also not spelled out the structural changes that expects trying to make Chinese officials say both sides have agreed to work quickly to put the deal in writing before a formal signing ceremony it's got worse the NPR news Washington in Belgium's capital European leaders congratulated Boris Johnson on his landslide victory in yesterday's general election but teri Schultz reports they're also telling Johnson that it's now time to begin working and negotiating on a post brexit trade deal the E. U. has given the UK three extensions on brexit because the British parliament wouldn't pass the agreements negotiated by either former British prime minister to resume or Boris Johnson but now you leaders warn Johnson they expect him to meet the January thirty first deadline to leave the block after that comes negotiations for a new trade agreement and that could take months or even years let's Terry Schultz reporting from Brussels in New Zealand today police divers resume their search for the last two victims from Monday's eruption at white island also called for cari on Friday six bodies were recovered and later transferred to Auckland to be identified you're listening to NPR news yes and this is Casey R. W. news on Larry Perella Friday December thirteenth here's what's happening at six thirty two Bernie Sanders has withdrawn his endorsement of Jake Yugur in the race to fill the seat of former representative Katie hill of Santa Clarita you has made crude integrating comments about women Jews Muslim and black people in the past KCRW siris castle with more a backlash among Democrats offended by users comments led you here to say that he would no longer accept endorsements that prompted Sanders to withdraw his support but continue to praise you ger Sander said quote Jane has been a longtime fighter against the corrupt forces in our politics he continued quote junk today said he is rejecting all endorsements for his campaign and I retract my endorsement you is vying for the seat along with Democrat Christy Smith former trump adviser George Papadopoulos and former representative Steve night a Republican who was ousted last year by Katie hell that is KCRW siris castle.

Myanmar
"myanmar" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"myanmar" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm Carol hills. Two Reuters journalists are released in Myanmar after spending more than five hundred days in jail for their reporting on the Rwanda crisis. This activist is familiar with the prison where they were held and he's not like the prison in Europe oriented state. It's also how the documentary surviving R Kelly encouraged many Ethiopian women to speak up about the abuse. They suffered from the older men in their lives. Water pick some stories that we got as bid people or they're on coal or someone who's twenty thirty four years older than them. Plus the enduring legacy of Argentina's Abe Perron on the one hundred anniversary of her birth. Those stories and more ahead on the world. I'm Carol hills. And this is the world thousands of prisoners were released from jail in Myanmar today. It's a custom around this time of year when the country celebrates its new year among the people released were to journalists for Reuters while loan and Chow so who were arrested in two thousand seventeen for breaking Myanmar's official secrets act I'm so happy for them. However, we also have to remember that from the first place this journalists should not be arrested, and they shouldn't spend more than a year inside the prison. That's Rohana activist way way new will hear more from her just ahead while loan and chose imprisonment drew attention to the ongoing persecution of Rohingya Muslims that began in two thousand seventeen the world's Patrick win explains. How the reporters got in trouble with Myanmar government day helped to uncover a massacre? Ten Rohana men were killed by soldiers and villagers and dumped into a grave on these two journalists help. To expose that it made the army look bad. And so then they were contacted by someone within security forces. Who said, hey, I've gotta show you something. They went out to meet that person, the person handed them a sheet of papers. And then within minutes, they were arrested for having secret documents in their possession and these two journalists Wallone, he's thirty three choice. Oh, ooh. Twenty nine. What is behind these releases the court said you're pardoned, but it didn't say you're innocent. And I think there's a really big difference there. I think what me and Mars government is looking for from. This is a big hug, you know, something to look like they're sticking up for human rights. There are dozens of other journalists and bloggers still in prison under baseless charges in also the government of Yanmar still thinks in general journalists should apologize for the way that they've covered the brutal ethnic purge of this Rohingya minority group one of the most persecuted groups in the world, they think that the way the journalists have covered this. Atrocity has been unfair. So I I don't necessarily see a big turnaround in the government's disposition towards journalist or the situation as a whole who are these six thousand five hundred twenty prisoners who are being released today. I mean, what do they represent their from all sorts of walks of life. This tends to happen. Every year every other year and Yanmar they'll do a mass pardoning of prisoners normally people who are in there for more garden variety crimes. So, you know, you'll have this mass outpouring of prisoners, and it makes the government look good, and they probably need to release the strain in their prisons. Anyway. Should we assume that unsung Succi is behind it? I mean in terms of the release of these two journalists, I don't know exactly what prompted these guys to make the list of the pardoned. I can't tell you that there's been enormous pressure. These two reporters recently got the Pulitzer prize even in the US State Department under President Trump, you don't think of them as pushing hard for the rights of journalists. But they have spoken up about these two journalists Mike Pence has brought this up to the government. Nikki Haley, the former US ambassador to the UN. She has pushed back on this. What is actually the sort of twisted catch twenty two?.

Myanmar Carol hills Reuters Yanmar Wallone R Kelly Rwanda Europe Mike Pence Pulitzer prize Nikki Haley Rohana Abe Perron US State Department US UN Argentina Chow Patrick