18 Burst results for "Musicnet"

"musicnet" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:02 min | Last month

"musicnet" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Over the years the village of stones field england has seen its pubs slowly disappear sold turned into homes or redeveloped until there was only one and then a few months ago the white horse pub was put up for sale for three hundred and ninety five thousand pounds while some community members are keen to prop up the bar so their fundraising to try to save the pub by offering people a chance to own a part of it and they've just extended their deadline after a surge in new support. Steve callaghan the chair of the back. The white horse campaign. We reached him in. Stones field steve. Just how close are you and the others to actually being able to save the white horse pub well We all doing really ready. Well it's It's beyond our expectations. Ready how the communities got behind and We've had jeff fails from six hundred people now. Bullets shares in the she's amazing Not one of them from stones either. We've stopped shelves from all around the world. Which is unbelievable. And you're trying to the price. The sale price of the pub is three hundred ninety five thousand pounds which is about six hundred and eighty six thousand canadian dollars. So that's a lot a lot of little shares and you've you selling these shares for fifty pounds a piece right. That's right yes. Fifty pounds. the peso's restarted but we We've got some people who are spending tens of thousands of pounds on shave so we've got a whole range. How much money have you raised. You think well we to outrage rounded out the asking price now but we've got As i say still a long way to go they'll be all expectancies with phase and we've got taxes to pay and also anywhere we want to do on it. We were planning to stop the fails yesterday. But we've actually extended. That's almost christmas and we're hoping to get the rest of the white is so important to you and the others that To keep this pub as a pub to keep it open we we feel the every day the prob. It's the hub of the community is where people go and get together. If you already know anybody in the local area you can go to the pop into your bump into somebody and meet people that way and people go that often they've done things like Kind of sport or imus dramatic so that goes on in the age natural thing often needs to go to the top. Have a debrief and very important. Okay so and also there are those real estate reports that you actually real estate values of village. Go down when you lose the pub. So that's an important true Because there are lots of villages around here and when you go milk. I know myself and i i kind of look at these finished twenty five years ago when i moved here. You look for the pub in the school. I'm a shop and this village is making any of those things it's It's quite a big thing you know if you milk. He doesn't wants to know how the shop if you've got us look into the local school and if you want a good community you need to pa. There are the british pubs closing everywhere right. They're up for sale. They're being made into condos or or leveled for other kinds of buildings because they're usually in pretty good locations and so i know that the pandemic has certainly cut into Into business but why is it. Why are the pubs failing in britain. Well the trouble is pops Amount earned by pop coz they will company and they they charge a big rent and i also charged a lot of money for the bad. They stay insists that top company sells and they're bad as named fight your price so A freehold like the one that way buying we can go anywhere from the bail to by By the bay from the same company chief of the tenants could which crazy. Now you have confidence. This sales go just The new york times did your story. The story of this pub on the weekend said that the pub owner john. Lloyd didn't think that you were going to raise the money and he already had a buyer and he was ready to go with this with some a property developer. So you're confident that you're going to be able to john. Lloyd is going to sell you this up. Well we're hunting If we can lace the money Than any property developer. Who wants to buy the pub would have a problem because he would then not be able to prove to the council that The pop was no longer viable which is requirements. If you're going to have a change of us so if you want to change it into a house you'd have to say well. This doesn't work. Nobody wants to buy it. They can no longer do that. So it is quite difficult thing to change the last pub in the village in any village into into houses. What's the white horse like. Can you describe it for us. Yeah smoke building it's it's been Setting based in eighteen fifty three. The oldest parts of the building is probably older than that stone and brick built building. It's very traditional. It's a lovely place. Bit tacky needs a bit of work. That's very today it. What are your memories of going there. I guess for a pint after work more than that have been just so many parties that people have had no big birthdays. That they'd be musicnet. Fantastic times some in the garden based that'd be nice finds in the garden as live music music and that sort of thing. It's a lovely place to be. What do you think is going to be like if i am. I going to say if you are are when you actually acquire the white horse. What's that reopening going to like. Oh i think we might have been thinking that we'll pump because many people involved in it. Now let's see what are you planning. What's the party. Do you think it's going to be like on your opening night. Oh i'd say mattie messy carol and there's a local band called the village idiots i suppose. They'll be performing. Oh we hope so. You're to have the video. Ready ready. could find well best of luck to you. Then thank you very much. Thanks for having me on. Carol steve callaghan is the chair of the campaign to save the white horse pub. He was in stones field england. And if you wanna read more about the fight for the white horse go to our website at cbc dot ca aih..

white horse pub Steve callaghan pop coz england jeff Lloyd steve john pa britain The new york times mattie Carol steve callaghan cbc
"musicnet" Discussed on Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson & Darius Miles

Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson & Darius Miles

02:11 min | 7 months ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Knuckleheads with Quentin Richardson & Darius Miles

"But. I had a house before the storm, and then I know who get at home in North Carolina and waking up and looking at the news like my mom. Like, we're looking at the news that what was going on man. We up relocating Oklahoma for two years coming back so. I know that city is the most resilient city of you ask me. When he was with the Hornets. You played in that the series against the Spurs. And you notice the Almighty Spurs. And how do you play? How just? Just how you play, do you feel like sit? Here here like I know you know you. You can play on level, but to get in the playoffs, said in play against all mighty spurs and do your. I was that. Day I keep telling Ya. May I ask questions if people don't like, this would be talking about like my family. I is crazy, so that was the first time I made it to the playoffs right seventy. In so we play against Dallas at first round, and I had to play against Jay key and at the time we Time Nj kid had a little beep. On whatever right so then we get past them when we get to the spurs the MODU. This season that. I think I'm. GonNa. GET MBP. season. In like we had been picked to finish like low last. Whatever in the weather? Was Nice I mean every night was we was hoping? We ended up finishing that season fifty six to twenty six. And I never forget the big light musicnet we have before the playoffs started and one of the vets. I can't remember who was on our team. He stood up in. We borrow Scott dinner before the playoffs started, and we have the guys on the team and your girlfriend, your wife and all that everybody got to say something, which is still funny to me. Now my girlfriend at the time. And she living in all. But they went around and everybody talk. On girlfriend was my wife now. Ask.

Spurs North Carolina Oklahoma Hornets Dallas Nj Jay key Scott
"musicnet" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

12:20 min | 11 months ago

"musicnet" Discussed on TechStuff

"All right now. Let's get back to napster all right. So so to thousands come and gone into two thousand and one and napster receives an order to shut down This is an order in the court order. Quarter to shut down. Its services because the R. I. Double A. Has said that Napster is complicit in copyright infringement suits. It's not just that it is a service. It is actively helping people copyright. That's essentially what it would have to be for it to get around this whole. Dmca SAFE harbor issue. And that's a debatable thing but the judge kind of sided with the music industry There was a stay in the order two days later in fact I think was enacted right. So they didn't have to shut down immediately however not that much longer they would get another order to shut down and they actually would have to do it and they received right around the time. During the day they received a sixty million dollars investment money from Burson Bertelsmann of course being a giant multimedia company in fact owned a bunch of the companies that were participating lawsuit against Napster. So you have to understand okay. So Berlesmann is this mega multimedia company based out of Germany. All right and it owns lots and lots of stuff. Lots of different divisions and these different divisions don't necessarily talk to each other so one division sits there and sees napster and sees lots of potential in it has turning it into a revenue generating service another division. That has nothing to do with that first. Division is seeing Napster as the pirate that is killing its business and it needs to go after it. Well I think that really I mean I think it's extremely staff at Bertelsmann to be investing in them at the time because they were looking at it and they were going. This is potentially the future. This is how they if you know what they're doing right now is crappy for us but if people people are excited about music and that's great. I think we can monetize that. I think Bertelsmann would argue that retroactively. It was not a savvy. Move at all. Okay well sure but but you know they saw the where the future was going unfortunately was the wrong time to implement. Yes because it just turned out that the the the Hornets nest that had been stirred up so great as to totally derail any efforts interning napster into a quote unquote legitimate revenue generating service installed Conrad Hilbers as the new season. Berry steps aside and a meanwhile like just just as Conrad Hilbers was taking over Hank. Barry had just gone before Congress and asked Congress to to form some sort of industry-wide license agreement for Internet broadcast similar to what radio has right and his his argument was that really. We're just another distribution platform just like radio so really we should. We should have the same opportunity to license music. The way radio does the problem with Lice. The problem with establishing a license for every single file is that it's impossible to do because take take take a typical album then album might have multiple producers on it and each producer has some level of ownership of the tracks that are on that album. Then you have the artists and they also have some ownership on the tracks on that album the composition of actual performance rights so securing a license from every single cup like everyone who owns part of that content. It's impossible he. He was saying that for one album. You might have to secure hundreds of licenses just to be able to have that one album. Then you multiply that across the hundreds of thousands of albums that have always existed in the new ones. That are coming out every year and you have an impossible situation. There's no way to legally follow. That rule so needs to happen is a new legal way. He wasn't arguing sure. He wasn't arguing for for piracy. Who was just arguing for a new legal means to license music and that was getting really bogged down in Congress. So then he ends up stepping aside and and Conrad Hilbert's takes over. Conrad didn't have a whole long time to operate napster before it got shut down. That was on June eleventh. Two thousand one. When Napster shut off at service it's still existed as a corporate entity right and it started to really concentrate on finding a way to create a legal music distribution service and I say legal with air quotes around it because napster again would be arguing that what the legal wrong harbor right only connecting people to do illegal things right and that that wasn't even the purpose of napster the purpose of sharing music. And that that you know it's the fact that people were using it to share music illegally. That wasn't Napster's fault and you can argue whether or not. That's naive or sincere. That's not really our place to do that. I mean you could certainly you certainly could have used napster in a perfectly legal means if an artist had given fullish permission. I want this. You can distribute this any way you like. I have no. I release all claim to it. Otherwise I just want my music out there then it would have been perfectly legal to distribute that across napster. It was the pro- the problem was there. Are People doing that with stuff where they didn't have permission? Yeah now you could ask. How is this different from taking my copy of CD that I've bought making a copy and giving it to warrant? All I've done is just changed the way that Lauryn has has received that music. And is it my fault that Lauren? And maybe two point four million people. I don't know God that music track I don't know So it God really complex. Yeah Yeah So then the the next minute that I have is in two thousand and two The you know the company was still shuttered but but working and they entered into a Beta test of secure file trading network that January. Yeah and and that was it was something. They were really seriously working on at the same time as trying to figure out a way to stave off the the growing financial problems they were facing as a result of these lawsuits. Yeah they were so serious but As of February Bertelsmann just kind of offered to buy the company I think for for like like twenty million like not not a whole lot. It was it was yeah. In addition addition in addition to the money they had already invested into the company. So quickly eighty-five million. I think I could be. I could be you know a lot of interesting reports on this so it kind of hard to follow. Yeah a little bit timing whining exactly whibley wobbly in May two thousand and two Shawn Fanning and Conrad. Hilbers both resigned right. This was a John. John Fanning you know kind of tried to organize a coup from the way that I read it. He was trying to Hummer tank Berry and all the venture capitalists and and there is all of this infighting within the company going on Fanning eventually filed a lawsuit to have Burien Hummer dismissed from the board of directors. Suit was thrown out of court. But but but yeah as of May things have gotten so bad that Shawn fanning he quits. Yeah yeah another interesting note. Is that Shawn Fanning. Apparently never drew more than just a regular like paycheck Yadda yeah his paycheck was just. It was like a middle of the company type. Paycheck after founding. He worked as he worked as a grant. Kotor in fact. He apparently started getting into trouble because he was getting so many requests for interviews back when Napster was really in the news for this legal battle stuff. He was getting so many requests for interviews. He wasn't able to meet his his Coding responsibilities and he started getting in trouble from his boss keeping in mind. He's who built the tool. He's he's the guy who kind of technically hired his boss so You kind of need to To get back to work buddy. Yeah but but so so Napster denied this sale to Bertelsmann And it kind of just sort of dies from their collapsed. Like a flaw in a cupboard. Nice at that. It was like a Muffin bath at that point They're also the the major labels were trying to launch their own services. One of them was called press play which was launched in. I think around two thousand two and it ended in two thousand three another one. That's called musicnet which was also a failure and the problem was that buying music from these services was often more trouble than what people thought it was worth again. It was not. It became easier to pirate music than it was to buy it. And if it's easier people will do it and other companies like a Kazaa and things like that were popping up. Yes so you had new tele as well. You have other file-sharing services out there. There were picking up where Napster had dropped off. And so there were. There were a lot of casualties in this whole rise and fall of napster or keep in mind this is just nineteen ninety nine to two thousand two and yeah that happened. I had no idea when we started doing. This had happened. That because there's such a huge name right and you just expect it had at least a decade worth of life and of course we'll get into what napster is now in just a minute but besides the fact that you had fanning who never drew anything more than just a regular salary I lean. Richardson had a huge career setback. Businessweek ran an article that essentially said that all of the legal problems were mainly due to the way. Richardson was running the company which was not entirely accurate. And I'm very fair to her house. She was running the company and how she was marketing. Everything because she was she was very like free love about the music but apparently that that that hit her pretty hard. Yeah and also the Bertelsmann. Ceo Thomas Middelhoff was was replaced. He was replaced by another. Ceo when that napster deal went so Sour and plus the economy itself. Janet really crumble because keep in mind. This is post dotcom crash and the ramifications of that are still unfolding in two thousand two. So you've got the The company just completely languishing. There's there's very little of it left up going into chapter eleven bankruptcy and then there's a bankruptcy auction held in two thousand and two. This is still happening like right. After another and company called Roxy Auto purchases the assets of Napster in an auction in two thousand and two they also that same company purchased that Failed Music Service called press play in two thousand three and so they decided to use the the kind of the cachet of Napster's name and the foundation of the press. Play Service and combine them together to form voltron except by Voltron. I mean a legal music service that everyone knows the name of because everyone's heard the name Napster. Yes so they take some time to develop this and the reason why it took so long is that they had to establish those licenses. That napster never could get hold up They had been napster but trying to do that. For especially the last two years of its existence and failed and so and yeah and meet meanwhile companies like rhapsody which was another wasn't a file sharing thing but it was a music music subscription plan. We're starting to you you you start to see some early examples of other music. Subscription Services Rox would take years to develop. This would actually not be until two thousand six. So this is four years after they bought the assets of Napster that they launched the Free Napster Service the they they place Chris Garage the chairman and CEO of Napster. And that time what Napster did was it used ads to support a free web based streaming experience..

napster Bertelsmann Shawn Fanning Conrad Hilbers Burson Bertelsmann Germany Conrad Congress John Fanning Berlesmann Conrad Hilbert Failed Music Service chairman and CEO Ceo Thomas Middelhoff producer fanning
"musicnet" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"musicnet" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Truth directed it gets louder so the documentary rock guitarist I love so much but for inside bills bills brain he had just total access to bill and Melinda Gates for about two years. It's a really deep look at gates his personal history his relationship his family. It's also has a really interesting structure so we got into that. This is a really fun conversation with a great filmmaker but how he does what he does and what he learned Bill Gates. Check it out and Davis Guggenheim David Hi Convergence. It's really nice to be nice to meet you ne- life yeah so I i WanNa talk about inside bills brain which a documentary just made from net flicks but I can. I I tell you that you made it might get loud which is one of my favorite documentaries of all time because I just love people like using the tools in that is it's just a bunch of wild guitar players using their tools. Thank you I. It was really fun to make it. Did you notice any like to Jack White. Bill Gates have any similarities like let me think about that because it Michael Bano. I'm sorry it was the edge Jack White and who's third person Jimmy page any page. Tell tell me if there's any similarities between those three Bill Gates Jack White I would say well actually all three I would say extreme focus all three of them but especially edge you could go it'd be filming with edge and if we stopped to move a lighter a camera he would just start working start working on his guitar or fiddling with gear and and you could just let four hours pass and he wouldn't his head would become an if you give him a free second edgewood just go right in and start doing doing what he does the same thing with bill we were we're shooting in. Hood Canal and we're in this little cabin. That's an episode to WHO said Hey we need five minutes to move at light and and he walked outside and just open the book he was reading this red standing up with one foot on his knee so standing on foot reading a book meaning. If you give him a free free second he wants to engage his brain again and I I would say that other lifestyles very different from Jimmy Page Bill Gates for sure you're again imagine not a Lotta scarves in the in the in the documentary that I watched with Gates Worship of the occult either that's Great Inside Bills Brain three part documentary. Nfl I just watched it this week. Tell me how this project got started because you have you got a lot of access to gates and it's obviously Dan netflix unusual structure. You know three one hour episodes. Don't tell me how it came together so I was making the film waiting for Superman and we were almost it's done but it felt like he was missing. Voice and waiting for Superman was about public education's like how does this sort of failure of our public schools effect business and you know what better the thing to talk about. Someone who's in Silicon Valley or at least the business of Silicon Valley. He's obviously in Seattle but what does that do to growing the best business in in in America. How do you find talented educated. People had at his failure of our schools of some of our schools. I should say many are do really well but how does that effect are growing economy in in in the tech business. So I went up an interview bill. He was so great and so surprising that that I was like wait a minute this this person the needs to be reconsidered a because to give us the backstory. I was a I got a Macintosh nineteen eighty-four. It was the first person in my dorm Brown to get one. I think it was like ten had arrived at Brown in everyone of my floor huddled around this magical computer so I was a Mac. I was an apple guy and I always thought Steve Jobs is cool and Microsoft was just like for the business people and so I sort of held Bill Gates in my mind at arm's length that was like he just business guy. Maybe he's a monopolist. Maybe he's not but but you know I like. I like Mac and so what I finally met him. I was like wow. There's something he's doing right now. That needs to be understood. He is he's really changed his public image and I don't WanNa get into into that part of it because the weight inside bills brain is structured literally inside of every episode. It's almost like a thriller of the project that the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is doing doing whether that's toilets or nuclear energy or vaccinations then there's like the history which is what most people kind of assume you're going to get right. We're GONNA GONNA tell the story Bill Gates from start to now but there's this like thriller component of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation happening inside of it. How did you decide to like like musicnet structure. Go started filming and I actually got lost. I don't know how to make this because a lot of the work. They're doing a super complex. In also initially dramatically. It's not just add water in the story tells itself right and so I was experimenting with this kind of way of cutting back and forth between his biography in the work that he's doing and the first time it worked was when I in its in episode two I think is when he's trying to figure out why cases of polio keep popping up all over Nigeria in Afghanistan Pakistan and why past efforts was it failed and how he used sort of his brain had he delvin to sort of like crack that because people been trying for years they thought they were getting close and then it doesn't work it. Would I thought I'd do is show bill in the early days in highschool cracking the class schedule. It's sort of a famous story where his private private school asbill a sophomore. I think ask him when he's a software and then he does it in his junior senior year but they say you're. You're good at this computer thing. You know there's a famous terminal school only one terminal any school in State of Washington say. Hey you're good at this coatings and can you code the class schedule at lakeside aside and so he and Paul Allen Staple night figure out how you know because his lakeside had merged with girls school so they had all these different classrooms different for campuses and Bill Paul us sort of their brains and they're sort of algorithms to cracks in the same way he cracks the algorithm or tries to crack the algorithm for a radical polio he did things like digital mapping in predictive analysis on where cases of polio would show up so the story telling the whole story retelling for all three episodes follows that one example where we cut back and forth between something some way in which his brain worked or or something revealed in his character actor is historical story with what he's doing now to reveal how his brain works and how you know how he solves problems so you obviously got all this access testable to Melinda. You got a bunch of archival footage. I guess you would call it of them. When they were young when they were dating there's Video Ville hugging kids when they're babies as which broke me like you don't ever see that side of him. How did you go about getting access to build. The product was kind of the condition that I make for any movie. When I flew complained to commit to page talk him into doing it might get loud. It was like if we're if we're GONNA do this. You got to open up to me. I won't ask any questions to ask. I will put everything on the table because that's you know that's what if you're going to do a movie forgot to go make make that effort you open yourself up and the same thing. I did with bill and I have to save all the people I've ever made a movie about. He was the most open in the least concerned about Oh. Don't go there. Don't get this right. I mean I went. I went right into you. You know the depositions for the case. You know there's pretty harsh stuff in there about how the world sees him and I put all if even if you go and watch the trailer of the trailer in the opening of the move of the series is is this guy a good guy bad guy you know one. One voice calls him the devil I really wanted to say I want to put it all table. Say who you know. Let's let's put everything on the table and let's let's consider this man. Today did bill get any edit control. Do they get to say they didn't want anything in there. Now what I do is for every movie all when I get a cut that I like I'll go show it to people so I showed to Jimmy page edge or anyone else or Bano or Malala just because I wanna make sure that I didn't miss something or it didn't miss categorize something and often in every case you sort of. They say oh well. You know what there's another another piece that story that entail you and usually gets better but nothing was. I didn't take anything out that I didn't WANNA put in so there's sequence your time in the antitrust apiece. There's a sequence where you ask him if he was arrogant in step position. This is great because you know. This is a heavy topic now. We actually talked about it on this podcast. All the time like like are these companies to powerful should get broken up. Microsoft was arguably the first the current president of Microsoft Brad Smith. He's just read a book about basically asking being the government to regulate tech companies. It's very interesting but it he bill gates was the first as you note in the documentary. He's he stepped back from the operations operations of Microsoft to handle trial he gave this famously bad deposition and you ask him if he's arrogant and he he was like well look when you're a twenty year old billionaire. Maher sometimes when when you were getting answer. Did you sense that he was that he was shading or was he just telling you what he thought. Who's absolutely shading you. You Watch it. What's what's fun about watching. The movie and we put the full answer in is that he didn't WanNa say he was hacked arrogant. The Fun thing about making a movie is one of my agree. Teachers taught me this about storytelling is that you know that the filmmakers job is to plus two. The audience's job is for that sounds like a really pretentious film film school way of saying it but the idea is I ask if he was arrogant. He gives an answer. It's up to you and the audience to say and decide whether he's arrogant or not so I like to put that in there and let the audience decide for himself or herself. Do you think that arrogance however he wants to think of it is an asset to him and his current work. That's a good question. That's a really good question. I'd have to let him answer that. I mean I think intense focus. I think being very certain I think maybe with a touch arrogance. Get to this place where you're cutting through a Lotta bullshit so that is an let me let me qualify this answer by this is my answer not his answer but I do think that affect of people in the world have to cut through bullshit they have to cut through group think in their own group in their own company they have to cut through how the bureaucratic nature of a big company slows things down so if arrogance Y- like five percent or twelve percent arrogance and certainty and bull headedness it is effective. I wouldn't mind that I think sometimes a director of documentaries has to be bull headed and arrogant sometimes but then you have to sort of you know put guardrails ells on yourself. You have to have a few on that so that you don't go too far and I think clearly see footage in there. From the early days of Microsoft will they'll clearly went too far. Your gifts and that's actually the one the one piece of documentary that I I don't know how interesting it would be to everybody. I kind of understand why it wouldn't be there but it's very interesting to me is Microsoft soft was a ruthless company with gates at the helm and you you wave at it a few times right by their competitors date they crush them obviously netscape and eh interest trials there but there was lots and lots of other stuff they did to ruthlessly destroy their competitors along the way and that was all bill. was there a moment where like. I need to focus on that that stuff more or say. I just need to say at once and move on. There's other stuff. That's more important you I mean the the the the focus of the series is really not about that. I put enough enough in there to acknowledge it and say this happened but it wasn't an expose of the tactics. Microsoft in this period of time and so did just like the movie doesn't get into who all the details of the entrust case it doesn't get into all the details of why bill thinks that they were maligned nor does it get into all the details of why people think Microsoft is wrong. That wasn't the focus of the series. The focus of the series is a character study of a guy in in what is he doing with his life. The most interesting part of the entire thing is when you are alone with him during his think week and he's alone in the house and he's reading books and it over time you see the Diet coke cans pilot again. I I have spent time with Bill Gates. He's he's actually been on on this show before I've never seen the richest man in the world open a candidate coke..

Bill Gates Jimmy Page Bill Gates Microsoft Bill Gates Jack White Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation polio Bill Paul Jack White Hood Canal Davis Guggenheim David Superman Seattle Michael Bano Nfl Silicon Valley Brown Mac Dan netflix apple
Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

The Vergecast

09:47 min | 1 year ago

Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

"Bills Brain three part documentary. Nfl I just watched it this week. Tell me how this project got started because you have you got a lot of access to gates and it's obviously Dan netflix unusual structure. You know three one hour episodes. Don't tell me how it came together so I was making the film waiting for Superman and we were almost it's done but it felt like he was missing. Voice and waiting for Superman was about public education's like how does this sort of failure of our public schools effect business and you know what better the thing to talk about. Someone who's in Silicon Valley or at least the business of Silicon Valley. He's obviously in Seattle but what does that do to growing the best business in in in America. How do you find talented educated. People had at his failure of our schools of some of our schools. I should say many are do really well but how does that effect are growing economy in in in the tech business. So I went up an interview bill. He was so great and so surprising that that I was like wait a minute this this person the needs to be reconsidered a because to give us the backstory. I was a I got a Macintosh nineteen eighty-four. It was the first person in my dorm Brown to get one. I think it was like ten had arrived at Brown in everyone of my floor huddled around this magical computer so I was a Mac. I was an apple guy and I always thought Steve Jobs is cool and Microsoft was just like for the business people and so I sort of held Bill Gates in my mind at arm's length that was like he just business guy. Maybe he's a monopolist. Maybe he's not but but you know I like. I like Mac and so what I finally met him. I was like wow. There's something he's doing right now. That needs to be understood. He is he's really changed his public image and I don't WanNa get into into that part of it because the weight inside bills brain is structured literally inside of every episode. It's almost like a thriller of the project that the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is doing doing whether that's toilets or nuclear energy or vaccinations then there's like the history which is what most people kind of assume you're going to get right. We're GONNA GONNA tell the story Bill Gates from start to now but there's this like thriller component of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation happening inside of it. How did you decide to like like musicnet structure. Go started filming and I actually got lost. I don't know how to make this because a lot of the work. They're doing a super complex. In also initially dramatically. It's not just add water in the story tells itself right and so I was experimenting with this kind of way of cutting back and forth between his biography in the work that he's doing and the first time it worked was when I in its in episode two I think is when he's trying to figure out why cases of polio keep popping up all over Nigeria in Afghanistan Pakistan and why past efforts was it failed and how he used sort of his brain had he delvin to sort of like crack that because people been trying for years they thought they were getting close and then it doesn't work it. Would I thought I'd do is show bill in the early days in highschool cracking the class schedule. It's sort of a famous story where his private private school asbill a sophomore. I think ask him when he's a software and then he does it in his junior senior year but they say you're. You're good at this computer thing. You know there's a famous terminal school only one terminal any school in State of Washington say. Hey you're good at this coatings and can you code the class schedule at lakeside aside and so he and Paul Allen Staple night figure out how you know because his lakeside had merged with girls school so they had all these different classrooms different for campuses and Bill Paul us sort of their brains and they're sort of algorithms to cracks in the same way he cracks the algorithm or tries to crack the algorithm for a radical polio he did things like digital mapping in predictive analysis on where cases of polio would show up so the story telling the whole story retelling for all three episodes follows that one example where we cut back and forth between something some way in which his brain worked or or something revealed in his character actor is historical story with what he's doing now to reveal how his brain works and how you know how he solves problems so you obviously got all this access testable to Melinda. You got a bunch of archival footage. I guess you would call it of them. When they were young when they were dating there's Video Ville hugging kids when they're babies as which broke me like you don't ever see that side of him. How did you go about getting access to build. The product was kind of the condition that I make for any movie. When I flew complained to commit to page talk him into doing it might get loud. It was like if we're if we're GONNA do this. You got to open up to me. I won't ask any questions to ask. I will put everything on the table because that's you know that's what if you're going to do a movie forgot to go make make that effort you open yourself up and the same thing. I did with bill and I have to save all the people I've ever made a movie about. He was the most open in the least concerned about Oh. Don't go there. Don't get this right. I mean I went. I went right into you. You know the depositions for the case. You know there's pretty harsh stuff in there about how the world sees him and I put all if even if you go and watch the trailer of the trailer in the opening of the move of the series is is this guy a good guy bad guy you know one. One voice calls him the devil I really wanted to say I want to put it all table. Say who you know. Let's let's put everything on the table and let's let's consider this man. Today did bill get any edit control. Do they get to say they didn't want anything in there. Now what I do is for every movie all when I get a cut that I like I'll go show it to people so I showed to Jimmy page edge or anyone else or Bano or Malala just because I wanna make sure that I didn't miss something or it didn't miss categorize something and often in every case you sort of. They say oh well. You know what there's another another piece that story that entail you and usually gets better but nothing was. I didn't take anything out that I didn't WANNA put in so there's sequence your time in the antitrust apiece. There's a sequence where you ask him if he was arrogant in step position. This is great because you know. This is a heavy topic now. We actually talked about it on this podcast. All the time like like are these companies to powerful should get broken up. Microsoft was arguably the first the current president of Microsoft Brad Smith. He's just read a book about basically asking being the government to regulate tech companies. It's very interesting but it he bill gates was the first as you note in the documentary. He's he stepped back from the operations operations of Microsoft to handle trial he gave this famously bad deposition and you ask him if he's arrogant and he he was like well look when you're a twenty year old billionaire. Maher sometimes when when you were getting answer. Did you sense that he was that he was shading or was he just telling you what he thought. Who's absolutely shading you. You Watch it. What's what's fun about watching. The movie and we put the full answer in is that he didn't WanNa say he was hacked arrogant. The Fun thing about making a movie is one of my agree. Teachers taught me this about storytelling is that you know that the filmmakers job is to plus two. The audience's job is for that sounds like a really pretentious film film school way of saying it but the idea is I ask if he was arrogant. He gives an answer. It's up to you and the audience to say and decide whether he's arrogant or not so I like to put that in there and let the audience decide for himself or herself. Do you think that arrogance however he wants to think of it is an asset to him and his current work. That's a good question. That's a really good question. I'd have to let him answer that. I mean I think intense focus. I think being very certain I think maybe with a touch arrogance. Get to this place where you're cutting through a Lotta bullshit so that is an let me let me qualify this answer by this is my answer not his answer but I do think that affect of people in the world have to cut through bullshit they have to cut through group think in their own group in their own company they have to cut through how the bureaucratic nature of a big company slows things down so if arrogance Y- like five percent or twelve percent arrogance and certainty and bull headedness it is effective. I wouldn't mind that I think sometimes a director of documentaries has to be bull headed and arrogant sometimes but then you have to sort of you know put guardrails ells on yourself. You have to have a few on that so that you don't go too far and I think clearly see footage in there. From the early days of Microsoft will they'll clearly went too far. Your gifts and that's actually the one the one piece of documentary that I I don't know how interesting it would be to everybody. I kind of understand why it wouldn't be there but it's very interesting to me is Microsoft soft was a ruthless company with gates at the helm and you you wave at it a few times right by their competitors date they crush them obviously netscape and eh interest trials there but there was lots and lots of other stuff they did to ruthlessly destroy their competitors along the way and that was all bill. was there a moment where like. I need to focus on that that stuff more or say. I just need to say at once and move on. There's other stuff. That's more important you I mean the the the the focus of the series is really not about that. I put enough enough in there to acknowledge it and say this happened but it wasn't an expose of the tactics. Microsoft in this period of time and so did just like the movie doesn't get into who all the details of the entrust case it doesn't get into all the details of why bill thinks that they were maligned nor does it get into all the details of why people think Microsoft is wrong. That wasn't the focus of the series. The focus of the series is a character study of a guy in in what is he doing with his life.

Bill Gates Microsoft Bill Melinda Gates Foundation Bill Paul Polio Silicon Valley Superman Seattle NFL Dan Netflix Brown America MAC Apple Washington Steve Jobs Nigeria Jimmy
"musicnet" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"musicnet" Discussed on THEMOVE

"Guys and Gals who were sort of just sick of eating the same old thing day in day out you can actually go to the feed dot com I and curate your own musicnet. Music is the bag that this one years hand up his Georgian. I know very well you. We curate those bags. It'd be like today a snickers bar Gimme no telling what would end up in those bags. Well not really but these guys have this one hundred different brands. You can go any completely. Select your own your own box and curated a box over there for ourselves. It's the move box <hes> one another thing and I and I saw this on their website so not just nutritional stuff food and drink. They have a lot of other different stuff stuff gear separate the body. I found this again this is this is not just shows you how the Yeah I've found this thing on the internet once a collapsible foam roller like I love foam rolling but I travelled much in this shit popped up on the Internet this collapsible Foam Roller House. I gotTa try this. How can that work? The thing works company how brazen but anyways they also over defeat pretty awesome but I I mean when I love about the feed is like they've got their ear to the ground. They know that in fast changing world of nutrition they're they're getting the best stuff in there and it changes all the time time you you may not find that you're going to find that in your grocery store yet right aside from stuff. They also have power cuts got amp human. They got all these things that we love so much honey Stinger <hes> even have tetons. We've been talking a lot about it's crazy like we we just touched on keystones the other day and now there's like two thousand articles on the keystones in the Tour de France. Even the writers will talking about them yeah <hes> so they don't answer but anyways I have curated. This box has all the stuff that I'm going to use to take this man down and Allen's by the way I'm waiting for my box for the twenty eighth the feed you make your own box anyways Goto the feed dot com slash the move to see what I'm gonNA use to take this man down and get twenty five percent off the feed dot com slash the move all right..

Allen twenty five percent one years
"musicnet" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

The Story Song Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"musicnet" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

"In this song jumps all over the place because the nets they all that up to that point all we know is that she's been taken out of school because there's some issues and she likes to listen to rock and roll music all that could lead to us like figuring out exactly what's wrong with her song? Long is essentially like season one of loss twist on top of twist twist. Yeah Yeah let's do it because it's going to. There's smoke bombs during the next. The next Verse Starts Lovers Appear in your room each night and they were all across the floor. Now as Michael Beliefs said in the beginning that she it's imaginary dancers that she's just dancing herself like in in in Love With with the Music Chore Dancing Around to The Music with lovers that you can't say because he's creepy girl who has no room to be pulled out of school I now now. Let's just say even a normal teenager listened to a lot of radio When I was a teenager and there definitely were times where they were imaginary women who were a- gobsmack by amazing dance and also the fact that I could totally hit the hacky exact twenty five times in a row? Yeah and they you know was basically a panic attack. You talked to Mike. You like that baby amount that so are you both in agreement that you think that that's what this is well I. That's what I'm assuming you're listening to it with virgin the era. That's what you're assuming you're listening to start to finish. I think at this point yes. It's it's her escaping into the world of music if I'm listening to the song and no one has had sex with my ears. Here's yes when I heard this and maybe it's just the fact that we heard we hear lovers so much in songs that it makes it all to you. Bet She's getting boys or climbing into a room she lost are now on the door and they fade away. Yeah but I mean that fading away obviously she might. They're not real. That's like I assumed it was. I WANNA say the opposite of Michael Jackson's black or white yes exactly. We're seeing the video from the album. Version sound the kids like listening to music partner like knocks on the door and he's like turned down the music and and I think that's what it is. I mean he he doesn't he just goes crazy and he's like no. I'm GonNa play the song he plays it in the Michael Jackson Anyhow I think it's she's she's getting lost in the music. And then her father the Knox endorses darn time for bed. And she says Oh came turns on the musicnet then then everything fades away and she's alone shots the sad without the music without the rock and roll radio. All right bye guys music Peter. Don't don't you dare Peter our. Don't you do it all right so fair enough. So Dad says teleradio good night. 'cause Mommy and I are going out for drinking. I think the strongest certainly trying to point you in that direction get wants you to think. She's a little crazy. Listen to the radio all night. And she has these imaginary people in her room right but she's dancing with. I'm not I'm not feeling crazy and feeling lonely. Talk Take your tonight. We take you out of school because you're not reminding from society because they're a little low actually. That's probably the opposite of what people I would think. I'm lonely good. We got to be more. You don't know alone today. It's like the old days when your dad call smoking cigarettes. He'd clock you in a class yet as a whole car. We'll show you what a loan is. Well I kind of forgot about. Oh come smoke with me. We'll.

"musicnet" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

The Story Song Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"musicnet" Discussed on The Story Song Podcast

"In this song jumps all over the place because the nets they all that up to that point all we know is that she's been taken out of school because there's some issues and she likes to listen to rock and roll music all that could lead to us like figuring out exactly what's wrong with her song long is essentially like season one of loss twist on top of twist twist yeah yeah let's do it because it's going to there's smoke bombs during the next the next verse Starts Lovers Appear in your room each night and they were all across the floor now as Michael beliefs said in the beginning that she it's imaginary dancers that she's just dancing by herself like in in in Love With with the Music Chore Dancing Around to The Music with lovers that you can't say because he's creepy girl who has no room to be pulled out of school I now now let's just say even a normal teenager listened to a lot of radio when I was a teenager and there definitely were times where they were are imaginary women who were a- gobsmack by amazing dance and also the fact that I could totally hit the hacky exact twenty five times in a row yeah and they you know was basically a panic attack you talked to Mike you like that baby amount that so are you both in agreement that you think that that's what this is well I that's what I'm assuming you're listening to it with virgin the era that's what you're assuming you're listening to start to finish I think at this point yes it's it's her escaping into the world of music if I'm listening to the song and no one has had sex with my ears here's yes when I heard this and maybe it's just the fact that we heard we hear lovers so much in songs that it makes it all to you bet she's getting boys or climbing into a room she lost are now on the door and they fade away yeah but I mean that fading away obviously she might they're not real that's like I assumed it was I wanna say the opposite of Michael Jackson's black or white yes exactly we're seeing the video from the album version sound the kids like listening to music partner like knocks on the door and he's like turned down the music and and I think that's what it is I mean he he doesn't he just goes crazy and he's like no I'm GonNa play the song he plays it in the Michael Jackson anyhow I think it's she's she's getting lost in the music and then her father the Knox endorses darn time for bed and she says Oh came turns on the musicnet then then everything fades away and she's alone shots the sad without the music without the rock and roll radio all right bye guys music Peter don't don't you dare Peter our don't you do it all right so fair enough so dad says teleradio good night 'cause mommy and I are going out for drinking I think the strongest certainly trying to point you in that direction get wants you to think she's a little crazy listen to the radio all night and she has these imaginary people in her room right but she's dancing with I'm not I'm not feeling crazy and feeling lonely talk take your tonight we take you out of school because you're not reminding from society because they're a little low actually that's probably the opposite of what people I would think I'm lonely good we got to be more you don't know alone today it's like the old days when your dad call smoking cigarettes he'd clock you in a class yet as a whole car we'll show you what a loan is well gee baby kind of forgot about come smoke with me we'll.

"musicnet" Discussed on The Dog Show with Nick and Joe

The Dog Show with Nick and Joe

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on The Dog Show with Nick and Joe

"So now, they're nutrition you knows Dowd. And now they're getting constant exercise, which is good for the cardiovascular just like people all those things you can get him in swimming thing that I like in Joe loves to get him tracking. Now why really like track? Cking for dogs is it's kind of catering to both things mental and physical stimulation. They're doing mile plus tracks. And they're kind of pulling you the human alongs, they got some kind of weight while they're doing it. And they're being mentally stimulated because there are discounting odors as the track goes on and processing odors and thinking so that would be my vice as insure your foods doubt in. That's the first step. Just like a person you can run ten miles a day. But if you like shit doesn't matter and then once you have that dialed, and then I would say get with your vet about like what's safe for this dogs exercise like running a mile daily just find out what the safe balances. And that would be the best thing. Joe? I agree. And then one more question we had homeschool on. Jessica says is it okay? For a dog to obsess. My dog would literally jump off a cliff for a ball. Once you show the ball. They will focus on nothing else. That's ideal. Jessica, I will tell you this as a lot of trainers in the world that spend thousands and thousands of dollars to get a dog like you just described including myself and Joe controlled obsession. Hello. What I would recommend doing is since you know, your dog loves that find a way to manipulate that. So it benefits both of you such as tracking doing detection or knows work with your dog. So now, you're controlling it. And in a fun motivating physical stimulating mentally stimulating waivers. Just here's the ball. Go. Get it in the truth is your dog would rather work for that ball. Then just be given. You know, I if I'm I'd have to assume that your dog is randomly come up to at some point in just had the tennis ball in its mouth. And then just dropped it on your lap went into a sit and stare at you. Right. Because it wants you to throw the ball. So we can go work for it. So use that to your benefit when training I do all the time it it's like it's like an extra bonus when we get like board and trains in and they have a massive ball drive. It's like all God. Let's I said like always loves almost like cheating. Yeah. It is. Because you're then you can manipulate their drive for that ball or the tug or whatever it is for it to benefit you, which in turn benefits them as well. You know, like I was just out in Vegas with Cameron Ford. And he's like it's a really good way to look at it. And I was telling him like, I always tell my trainers. Anything you make hard for the dog. You're just making hard on yourself and anything you make easy on the dog. You're making easy on yourself. So if I can use the dogs ball as a motivation in obedience, it's learning quicker because I'm using it as a positive enforcer or musicnet, you know, to shape them into position that's making it easier on them, which makes it easier on me, which in turn also makes it easier on them. So yes, ounds like you have an amazing dog. And now, you should just find ways to maximize that drive for other things. Whether it's tracking detection, whatever the cases in dawn wanted to know if we have like a regular schedule that we do the show neck. Oh, no. We don't unfortunately done. Because a lot of the reason is I travel a lot as you guys. Probably know if you're on my Facebook or Instagram so lot of it's like, okay, I'm in town from the twenty six to the twenty eighth right now, Joe using those two days that I'm here which days better for you. So lot of it's kinda like that a fine tuning that kind of happens at the last minute Michigan the schedule. So we just kinda we try to get it in at minimum. Once every couple of weeks, we try to do once a week of Nixon town. So you'll definitely get to a month. But you know, subscribe on I tunes as the best way to get notifications..

Joe Jessica Dowd Cameron Ford tennis Michigan Facebook Nixon Vegas Instagram two days
"musicnet" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Business Wars

"Avoid licensing them to Napster. Instead they lineup to newbies services press play and musicnet, but these subscription services have tons of restrictions high costs and few fans Napster fan. Fans turned to new and improved pirate services that have learned from Napster's mistakes, some new Tele let users download programs and then bowel out to avoid keeping any evidence showing knowledge of piracy others like kazaa base themselves offshore where US courts can't go or they do both. It's now clear that piracy is here to stay. The labels have won the battle. But they're losing the war smarter untouchable upstarts grabbing a huge number of former music buyers. Suddenly making a deal with doom Napster seems like a good idea to the labels. Tilburg manages to negotiate tentative settlement in licensing deals with EMI in O ell's Warner Music, but when middle Hof asks the Bertelsmann board to approve the payouts to settle the lawsuits against Napster. The directors bald they refuse to spend more money on Napster when Sony and universal still suing. Hilbert's tries again for a packed with everyone since Napster's headed toward bankruptcy. He's willing to give a lot and a lot is what the labels demand two hundred fifty million dollars which will have to come from Bertelsmann to wash Napster clean of its past sins again, the German company revolts, but by now middle Hof has a new plan buying Napster outright. He tells the board that without the pirates service operating Bertelsmann won't be shouldering any new liability Napster's down. We can do this ourselves come up with a legitimate service on our own take all the profits. And that sounds good Hilbers. It's a perfect flag in the ground of a major distributor of media. Bertelsmann's board goes along this time offering just fifteen million plus forgiveness of its previous loans from Napster's perspective. Bertelsmann's offer is the only one on the table..

Napster Bertelsmann Tilburg US Hilbert kazaa pirates Sony two hundred fifty million doll
"musicnet" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Play these absolutely hideous services that only had half each the labels kinda split up so two of them or whatever had each one couldn't even get a full catalogue for me to them if you wanted to full catholic described to both they had something like i think it only listen to like twenty five songs a month or something insane like that it was just awful and i but at the same time there was something called rhapsody that was pretty good it was kind of like spotify bor before spotify which but the issue was back then there were no smartphones so so the in between step then became the item store and the ipod and that kind of forestall stuff for awhile is that does that similar to you yeah mean looking back that's what that's what it seems like i mean at the time when the store came out at sea like this revolutionary crazy thing like oh my god we're going to be able to ninety nine cent tracks and that's the future and how's that gonna change everything we're going from selling fifteen dollars cd's to to selling ninety nine centrex that's gonna destroy the industry but you're correct when you look back in retrospect it seems like the transition to the streaming world actually in sewing my age here in two thousand and two i wrote a piece in which i reviewed rhapsody musicnet and press play for entertainment weekly and musicnet at that point was nine ninety nine a month familiar sounding price access is limited to one hundred downloads one hundred streams you could only stream hundred songs and it only had three of the five major labels the coolest part i wrote at least they're trying also the software is still in betas prone to crash impact with infuriating bugs the organization of the music is poor and the limitation of one hundred dollars and streams is wrongheaded press play had three or the five major labels they had unlimited streaming and you could have ten portable downloads a month and i said the microsoft digital rights management software that comes with the services problematic when we try to recently the deer prevented us from hearing any music at all that's probably a bit more security than they had in mind.

spotify microsoft one hundred dollars fifteen dollars
"musicnet" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"You know when when cd sales were offended i was just looking at the figures for how many cd's were sold in nineteen ninety eight which was twenty years ago and it was five hundred seventy eight million compared to last year the us which which was eighty nine million but i mean back then that was the only model the record business head and all these executives and williams and everybody else just wanted to protect that that's all they wanted to do is sell cds everything was going so well suddenly you've had nassar pop up which was a pirate service it wasn't authorized and it allowed people to share files for free over the the you know the internet which was this new fancy thing that was confusing to a lot of people and fry from that moment when napster functional it created this world in which you could essentially think of the name of the song type the song and hear this song and the record industry's sort of mistake or whatever was thinking they could in any way forestall that future once we got a glimpse of that we were never going to go back right that's right that's right the record industry tried to stop it instead of saying i mean there were some efforts made to make a deal with napster and that's a whole complicated story we both reported on that in his fascinating and then it it could have happened they could have had a a world where they sort of made a deal with napster and we had legalized streaming in nineteen ninety eight imagine that that that could have happened they were talking about tethered download from nassar there's all sorts of things that could happen instead but so a few things happened before i tunes launched this ancient history now steve what people probably don't remember now is there is this period between roughly ninety nine and two what you're did i tunes launch two thousand three yes so during that period there was very little ability to legally get music he couldn't even legally by downloadable tracks really there was we'll go back to musicnet and press.

napster musicnet williams steve twenty years
"musicnet" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Consisted increase it still a blip it's still very small sales in the proportion of things but what's happening streaming is taking over the world in in the business and you know i wrote that book in two thousand nine so really ten years ago and back then it just seemed like everything was dying you know there are no more sales napster and and tyre c was killing everything everybody was sad there layoffs everywhere you remember but now it's happy times are here again you know i talked to a top attorney not long ago who said you know the grammy parties in the record is now we're getting pretty sad there for a while but they're they're coming back they're bigger again i'm very happy for the for all the record exacts as but one of the things is that it's not like it was a secret in two thousand nine or in two thousand six or even earlier that streaming was probably going to have to be the future there was a road to this there were a lot of people who knew that that had to be the place that things were going i remember actually in the late nineties people were talking about the celestial jukebox that was spotify the idea of the celestial jukebox was every song available at any time and what it took to get there was i think essentially the smartphone because before that i was i attempted to be an early adopter of streaming which was not easy back in the day there were these horrible services music net and what was the other one that's a real trivia question steve can you do the music end what's the other one play are you killed it so musicnet and press play i think especially young people are probably not aware the the record industry post napster and in fact let's take a step back so that the really funny thing is as you will know in the late nineties we had the celestial duke box on our computers it was a legal and it was called napster read steve that's right yeah nassar was a pirate service i mean back in nineteen ninety eight.

attorney steve napster spotify ten years
"musicnet" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

Under the Skin with Russell Brand

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Under the Skin with Russell Brand

"You know that daiwa in of were vulnerable on inefficient or even as you have said let says smaller week a guy like that they see something that still relevant to me learning it because leka as we have discussed went up in having the personal sessions is like for me is about accessing and aspect of myself of not being comfortable accessing before it seems important the within this forum the superficially could be seen as being about strength domination control vulnerability is a a significant aspect of it live that's continued now talk a lot about how the more you learn the more you realize how much you don't know very sold the vulnerability the moment you step on this map in this room you're you're verdant honorable which is why i guess everybody in the world is not walking into a did you to school because they fear you know maybe being embarrassed or being injured were being you know overpowered so the vulnerability it takes a lot to come in here and once you do come in here and start to really work on that feeling of vulnerability they think the possibilities are and with you in particular as you're learning that the what we felt is that will show you a technique let's say a technique only requires ten percent of your strength and energy in that particular situation as someone who's newer to do to you do what most the everyone does which is you put one hundred percent of your strength to accomplish something that only requires ten percent of your strength and we'd laugh about it but it is true and then when you get it all decisions you realize that and he said this to musicnet i'm i'm overreacting to the threat stimulus here because that's all i've ever done my whole life is where there's a threat or an uncertain to alan comfortable or it's it's fighter flight i fight you know i go one hundred percent in response to it and and i think that you're making a lot of discovery for yourself as we're doing this and say well how why am i death grouping him right now when he just told me that i can do it with ninety percent less energy and still be effective why am i doing that.

daiwa alan one hundred percent ten percent ninety percent
"musicnet" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

Say Why To Drugs

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Say Why To Drugs

"A typically speaking it's a lot of what we're using right now is i'm western classical music mostly wordless on at the epa musicnet said i'm finepotentially fascinating so you were running an experiment way you were getting people to bring a narrowing music for our smokingcessation protocols we decided to um come let people bringing some about an hour's worth of music on their own just to see how that impact in them and you know some people decide not that they don't really wanna bring anything um and other people you know this becomes a priority to match it um so yeah i'd say it's spin interesting to see that differentiation in in the way that people respond to that sealed presenting at this conference tonight in a session called for psychedelic rene songs in addiction treatment i guess i just wanted to notice that of what what are you going to be presenting about indeed think that this time psychedelic rene saenz do you think that's quite accurate i yeah i think so i mean there's been a lot of interest over the last 10 to 20 years in revisiting these substances as uh both a powerful tools for understanding the nature of mind uh brain and consciousness in the way those things in a relate and at a more pragmatic level as i'll potential medications or therapeutic medic medications basically therapeutics that we can sort of use within interventions to help people when they're having a struggles with a variety of different mental health issues and so near that spanned as i said it our laboratory uh about twenty years or so um and you know over that period of time there's just been more and more research and interest franz von inviter and his laboratory in zurich have also been working over roughly the same span of time and have produced a prodigious amount of research um and you know more recently there have been um people working at the university of new mexico um new york university uh university of alabamabirmingham imperial college london is doing a tremendous amount of of a fascinating work particularly focusing on the niro substrates executive like experience.

epa rene saenz franz von inviter zurich university of new mexico york university uh university executive twenty years 20 years
"musicnet" Discussed on Aeschbacher HD

Aeschbacher HD

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Aeschbacher HD

"A court he'll magnate this show for me it was whole also if peadon guixi meet them to man that it been in the industry to far on dan meet the folks mazique on land the stupid as this instrument what do you have any me they are so first instrument austin yet me make them othman the bothers me ten if he left about musicnet when he sort of care tom on very show mean launch feet the undersea cities cut scenes from antics eight finance kamasi now six duty loubna the finger discounts for cnn's clinch de leads to importers from from kirk through the tactical stepped onto the clung onto f volatile somehow be fee if loose afrikaans now thrones expected him to be was a sees plans to match this week conduct flush bc from scholes did oxide say tatum after took on this fear concept meet them accord the on the roof there's a crash that on cassim was he could magassa sacking not lead the loaf behavior the at twenty thousand grouped with us for luckily our group philly nick does this sean it's all does here yet on top of me to onto taipei moslem on over one was target nick c two weeks dear heightened colombia compare with no middle their own fat the keep mancini peoples if it is an on skin look out that have rain delay and could also be unleashed of elated he it's no sh beat phoned thus supermodel kate yet height and dumped hundreds and take a look at for the for the fast flat as how as a full full and yet we eamon dunphy thin platinum price deals you should see at wagner would in you that mentioned it my mozarts contact not astle sees shut specific though it doesn't seem in no safety eludes us its own debate the create kemal dervis vote the it's the meat.

austin tom cnn kirk tatum cassim kate wagner dan nick colombia mancini eamon dunphy astle two weeks
"musicnet" Discussed on Aeschbacher HD

Aeschbacher HD

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on Aeschbacher HD

"A court he'll magnate this show for me it was whole also if peadon guixi meet them to man that it been in the industry to far on dan meet the folks mazique on land the stupid as this instrument what do you have any me they are so first instrument austin yet me make them othman the bothers me ten if he left about musicnet when he sort of care tom on very show mean launch feet the undersea cities cut scenes from antics eight finance kamasi now six duty loubna the finger discounts for cnn's clinch de leads to importers from from kirk through the tactical stepped onto the clung onto f volatile somehow be fee if loose afrikaans now thrones expected him to be was a sees plans to match this week conduct flush bc from scholes did oxide say tatum after took on this fear concept meet them accord the on the roof there's a crash that on cassim was he could magassa sacking not lead the loaf behavior the at twenty thousand grouped with us for luckily our group philly nick does this sean it's all does here yet on top of me to onto taipei moslem on over one was target nick c two weeks dear heightened colombia compare with no middle their own fat the keep mancini peoples if it is an on skin look out that have rain delay and could also be unleashed of elated he it's no sh beat phoned thus supermodel kate yet height and dumped hundreds and take a look at for the for the fast flat as how as a full full and yet we eamon dunphy thin platinum price deals you should see at wagner would in you that mentioned it my mozarts contact not astle sees shut specific though it doesn't seem in no safety eludes us its own debate the create kemal dervis vote the it's the meat.

austin tom cnn kirk tatum cassim kate wagner dan nick colombia mancini eamon dunphy astle two weeks
"musicnet" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"musicnet" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Thirty when a pair of tickets to one of the most cherished american musicals of all time musicnet and he's not sure music theatre june six through the eighteenth for schedules showtime's visit n s in p dot org rob witschge you if you're lucky caller number ten that's a great show it's a great venue it will be a great price to win skoda glenn in brighton hey glen how're you well i get the same voice you have i need a new meeting i think it could be to such a quick a quick change i know it at the changes season sometimes it affects me but i'm powered through atlanta and you will as well so we are you willing to accept the results of the fbi investigation now headed by robert muller as i told rob brooke say i'm a trump supporter but at this point i just wanted oval if if if he if he's done something wrong and they got opd jim then hey hold on my head i mean i like trump that it intent to and his anti he can't but had side if it can affect what happened in our country will survive wistrom today we give us of credit for i agree with you i mean we wouldn't it clinton we think about the nixon presidency think about the clinton presidency yeah a subsidiary subsidiary stuff that we've we've witnessed the old days when when you and i are in school the only impeachment than we had ever heard about was the andrew johnson impeachment right at across the johnson was impeached and he survived the trial in the senate just like bill clinton and that was each history to us and then we we watched it evolve with richard nixon's resignation nixon was never impeached he resigned before he was impeached he could peter the writing on the wall he figured that one out of the game was up so you're going to accept it you no matter what yeah i will be to digest it dominating everything you know we have to move on we have to move on i mean i wanna trump to bring jobs back and bring our health insurance down but he doesn't do either those two beginning to think that can happen and he's got.

glen atlanta robert muller trump wistrom senate bill clinton richard nixon health insurance skoda brighton fbi rob brooke andrew johnson peter