35 Burst results for "Music Business"

Madonna to direct biopic about her life

Steve Cochran

00:36 sec | 3 d ago

Madonna to direct biopic about her life

"Madonna is now directing and screen writing for the time being. On Tuesday. Actually, Universal Pictures announced that she is set to direct an auto biopic of her onion told life Journey to the auto biopic will include areas of her life from her early days in New York City to be coming an icon of the music business, the Madonna that we all know and love, and not only is she directing, but she is co writing the screenplay. After winner Diablo Cody. So I mean, no better person to tell your own story than yourself

Madonna Universal Pictures New York City
Revenge, Best Served Loud

Your Brain on Facts

05:28 min | Last week

Revenge, Best Served Loud

"With, arguably one of the greatest opening riffs and Classic Rock Barracuda was written by Anna Nancy Wilson together with Guitarist Roger Fisher and Drummer Michael Derosier. It was written at a time when there was friction between the band and their label to put things mildly. The song appears on the album little queen their first album with CBS. Portrait. Records. They'd left their old label mushroom records after a contract dispute and mushroom was none too happy. Because according to mushroom heart owed them a second album. They not only sued the band for breach of contract and try to block the release of the CBS album but released magazine an album made up of songs that Hart had recorded but didn't think we're good enough to release as well as some live recordings needed to get it up to album length. The dispute dragged on and eventually the court decided that heart was free to sign with a new label but mushroom was indeed a second album. So. Heart went back to the studio to rerecord remix edit and re sequence the magazine recordings in a marathon session over four days. A court ordered guard actually stood nearby to make sure the master tapes weren't being erased. Heart eventually came out on top. As not only did the album little queen outsell magazine by a wide margin. The debacle gave the band the distinction of having all three of their albums on the charts at the same time. The court case wasn't the only reason. The Wilson Sisters in company were mad at mushroom records. After the first album became a million seller mushroom took out a full page ad in rolling stone touting the band's success using the headline million to one shot sells a million. No problem so far. The AD looks like the front page of a tabloid newspaper and included a photo from the Dream Boat Anne album cover shoot. The caption read. Hearts Wilson Sisters confess it was only our first time. Implying the sisters had an incestuous lesbian affair. Shortly. After this ad appeared a Detroit radio promoter asked an Wilson where her was. She assumed he meant her then boyfriend band manager Michael Fisher. But when the reporter clarified, he was referring to her sister Nancy and was understandably outraged and retreated to her hotel room to write. When she related the incident to Nancy to was outraged and join an in the writing session, contributing a melody and bridge. Nancy puts suitably angry music to the word to complete the song comparing the sleazy side of the Music Biz to a dangerous ill like fish. The song became an enduring classic and Barracuda remains one of the band's signature songs. Vera Khuda was test to another incident of severe irritation for the Wilson Sisters at. Against in two thousand eight. During that year's presidential campaign the song was used as the unofficial theme song for Republican Vice President Nominee Sarah Palin. The ALASKAN governor had apparently earned the nickname, Sarah? Barracuda as a high school basketball player for her competitive nature. The day after the song was played at the National Convention Anna. Nancy Wilson issued a statement reading. The. Republican campaign did not ask for permission to use the song nor would they have been granted that permission? We have asked the Republican campaign publicly not to use our music. We hope our wishes will be honored. Their wishes were not honored. As the Republican campaign pointed out, they had obtained the proper performance rights to the song from the record label and were under no obligation to get any further permission to use it. The Bar for performance rights being somewhat lower than the bar for commercial or video rights. With no legal recourse. The Wilson Sisters retaliated in the media telling entertainment weekly. Sarah Palin views and values in no way represent us as American women. We. Ask that our Song Barracuda no longer be used to promote her image. The Song Barracuda was written in the late seventy s as a scathing rant against the soloist corporate nature of the music business particularly for women. While, heart did not and would not authorize the use of their song the RNC. There's irony Republican strategists choice to make use of it. They're. The. Songs Co writer Roger Fisher was also anti Palin but he saw things differently telling Reuters. He was thrilled that the song was being used as it was a win win situation. He explained that while heart gets publicity and royalties the Republicans benefit from the ingenious placement of a kick ass. Song. He added that he would use some of the proceeds in a donation to the Obama campaign and thus the Republicans are now supporting Obama. See Kids. There's always a silver lining if we look for it.

Anna Nancy Wilson Sarah Palin Roger Fisher Heart Wilson Nancy Wilson CBS Barack Obama Michael Fisher Detroit National Convention Anna Basketball Vera Khuda Michael Derosier RNC Reuters Band Manager Hart Reporter
BTS become 1st S. Korean artists to top Billboard Hot 100 with new song 'Dynamite'

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

BTS become 1st S. Korean artists to top Billboard Hot 100 with new song 'Dynamite'

"A global phenomenon that has just at the top of the billboard hot one, hundred charts. Korean pop K pop isn't new though just new to the top of the American charts worldwide it is a multibillion dollar industry marketplace Jasmine gars reports. And with that Korean, boy band bts knocked Cardi B. and Megan the stallion off from their perch at the top of the billboard hot one hundred it's the first time a K pop song takes number one keep up has been taking over the world for a long time remember. The growth is no coincidence. The Korean government has been aggressively exporting culture for decades as an economic strategy whether it's soap operas film or Tape Hop Professor Young to real at the University of Michigan says the Korean economy is very much excavate economy since the nineteen sixties and culture is for the hot item of the twenty th century in two thousand nineteen report the Korean Ministry of Culture Sports and Tourism said the country exported six point three, billion dollars worth of cultural content about. Five billion of that is the Music Jeff Benjamin writes about K pop for billboard. He says, you can hear it in the music it's made for export. Almost every K pop group has a singer has a rapper has a main dancer. They really try to make sure that all areas of pop music are hit within one song. Also, it's bt his first song entirely in English, which makes it Super Stream -able and music business getting almost all its revenue from online platforms. That's what counts. With all the K, awesome Bob News who doesn't need a little Cape Pop dynamite in their lives I'm Jasmine Guard for marketplace.

Korean Ministry Of Culture Spo Cape Pop Korean Government Jasmine Gars Jasmine Guard Cardi B. Jeff Benjamin University Of Michigan Megan Bob News Professor
Breland Talks Country, Hip Hop And Protests

Here & Now

04:26 min | Last month

Breland Talks Country, Hip Hop And Protests

"The music video for the hit song. My truck starts off like mini country music videos, country star Sam honey with a wide brimmed hat walks through a cloud of dust. Yoke and drank my leg. Come you. Can Take Mama and Yuka small. Schools these horns you can say you hate me you. Down to my truck. Then a young black man appears wire brimmed glasses and a huge grand shoves him out of the frame. Out. At the start of this year, he was just a recent college graduate trying to break into music then truck up and the song hit number one on spotify viral fifty chart back in February. The music video now has over twenty four million views and counting religious music defies definition. He's country trap hip hop aren be and so much more, and he joins us now from his home in Nashville to reflect on his music and his life as part of our series on how artists are reimagining and reflecting the current moment in their work. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having such a glowing introduction to bring you with me everywhere now. Oh Yeah I'll do it. So you're a recent college Grad, writing songs trying to break down the doors of the music business, and then all of a sudden you're going viral with this country song what what was it that actually got you to try your hand at Country Music Just. Always trying to do things that I think can can push the boundaries. I don't like to feel stagnant. So this was kind of came about kind of a challenge show in the studio with with some friends of mine, and we were kind of talking about the new wave of. Country Crossover records that had been that have been coming out like Old Town road and I was just like I feel like I can make a song like that and it would be pretty dope and they were like Nah man you can't make like that and I was like, okay challenge accepted so. Just started. Working on it and was able to come up with something. I guess that that stuck with people you've mentioned other artists like a little gnaws, of course, with Old Town road We also know though about the massive debate over what country is and who country belongs to. What is country to? country to me is a genre of music that is really just defined by strong songwriting and storytelling I think anyone can can make it. I think anyone can you know their based country music stars who are from? Other countries you know between. Fine and have been there some others, and then it really just comes down to the music and then whether or not people accept you I want to deepen that a little bit though because the New York Times reports that my truck isn't really picking up steam on traditional country music stations which are known to be pretty conservative. Do you even about that? I mean it would be it would be nice to have gotten more country radio support I. Think like Sirius Xm, the highways played it a lot. But in terms of traditional country radio, I don't think we got any spends I was hoping when I put Sam Hi on the remixed that would have probably validated it a little bit but it wasn't quite enough and I I understand it though because if you listen to country radio, it's. Tends to be wide dudes over forty so. For me to be a twenty five year old black dude. I, have a song, eight hundred weights and like hip hop production on it like it would've been a lot different than what was currently being played. My thing is if all of these country music fans are these a lot of them who are under thirty for example, are also listening to like drake and Migos, and even like our day and those cat, why do they have to leave the genre to get their fix of like bars and like hard beats like I feel like? Especially, with after after my truck came out I, realized that audience needs music and I know how to make it and I can I kinda stand in my in my own lane and help carve out a sub genre of music that speaks to the millennial modern country fan

Sam Honey Yoke Sirius Xm Yuka Small Nashville Spotify New York Times Drake Migos
"music business" Discussed on The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

05:49 min | Last month

"music business" Discussed on The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

"Slide my mind right now but the idea is to get it out there. It's seen as many times us on his main platforms as possible, and that's definitely something musicians Wanna be doing and I think. In the more. Broader markets for a long time now is just NPR's to realized that they need to do it and they have opportunities to do it in other areas. Good point good point you can work there's things I mean I don't WanNa. Give talk a lot of advice today because. I want to cover this but you know something like maybe working with Gamer I don't know could be something some way to kind of cream start start that relationship get your foot in the door I mean when everybody talks about videogames music, the first thing I. Now this game is no longer popular, but it was really popular by ten fifteen years ago guitar hero and there's a lot of music that people had forgotten about the kind of started getting bumped just like just like the GEICO commercial with rat I have an example they be the. Songs like more than a feeling and you know these journeys. Bought to God custody example got. Bit defended the Bay of Cape Yourself. Life by Kwena. Matt. Thanks. So now, Kate yourself alive is an interesting one because vice at the start of that career crane released. Kate yourself alive as a single repeatedly. Did it first of all in the first album and bombs had been selling directly business soul and so if it was tendencies of Rye was the first single. So then when it got around to an is at the opera when they're starting to really get a night really again. We've exactly the same results they could give it away. So, every time that tried to release Kate yourself alive the single did nothing and there's no other songs ended up making air, and then finally after against someone gets a hero and so many people realize this great. So go keeps off life by quick. Been Live staple as half but it just it just not as a single forever reason. Yeah Sometimes. It's just. Time and place. You know the you know when? We just aren't ready to hear it or whatever but So I sort of see that as kind of an always I think pop musicians rock musicians have always had a sense of fashion sense of style. You know one of the reasons we love these folks because they are sort of fantasy characters to us. So the idea that they show up in movies video games get associated with different youtube channels or whatever. To me is like a no brainer and so you should be thinking that of I think the indie musicians and and you know I wanna just want to touch us because we've talked about this before in the past bike sometimes our little reticent. To embrace that fantasy aspect of themselves but we all want that from you know what I mean I. I mean I like the fact you show me your studio and you work on stuff and everything. But also when I see your album cover man, I, kind of want to be transported you know what I mean when I hear your music I want to be I want to see you as a little larger than life you know because you're doing some out how? To do and it's a mystery to me and it's really cool and I was cool like you and we all want those folks and I mean, that's what that whole adolescent fascination with rock music in the seventies and eighties was all about was these coal. You know they got girls. They looked cool and they played loud guitars and they were giving the middle finger to. The man or whenever. So so whatever the thing is, I people want that's don't shy away from doing that and if you can if you can work, I mean.

Kate WanNa NPR GEICO youtube Bay of Cape Rye Matt
"music business" Discussed on The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

05:36 min | Last month

"music business" Discussed on The Loudini Rock and Roll Circus

"From the late sixties, seventies and eighties excetera and I feel that. Some of these artists have screwed them up a bit by adding extra tracks. So you go on spotify and there's the rerelease of WHO's next I know that album sideways is one of my favorite of all time and I pulled it up on spotify couple years ago Oh. Yes I'm just in a mood to listen to this chilling out having a drink and the finishes more songs keep playing. These songs aren't on the what what like big finish and then like it keeps like, no, it's done stop. So that's an example of like how you can over do it. Make everything count even if it seven songs or whatever it's going to be just make sure that they are absolutely killer and we did a a podcast. Key Joe and carrying are actually going to create a course space around this on how to do like a year cycle to take to get the out on how to do it in the right way. So you make sure that you really a fans engage. We'll get to that. Also I wanNA kind of like throw on not I'm not. I don't want to comment too much in his but just say that. Albums aren't really gone because vinyl is back and it's not back the way it was in the seventies but people are getting into people are getting into vinyl and and it sells very very well. So I'm not so sure that we are that albums are going away so. Okay nine so. The marketing guys got to say something as far as the album's go. There are so many albums that I don't get it like you listen to the album you listen to one song and it's about this and it's know someone trying to make enough money on you know on law and they're trying to light. It's it's it's lobby Dhabi. But at the same time, there's some there's some struggle in it, and then you go to the next song and then you go to the next song that's like they don't like Jive. Altogether and a lot of newer artists like you said, you just don't do that with ai you can go on and ask or certain mood shirt certain in like an environment and I don't do it because I don't spend my time on this stuff like you guys do.

spotify Joe
AMCs deal with NBCUniversal could bring new movies to viewers homes in 17 days

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:31 min | Last month

AMCs deal with NBCUniversal could bring new movies to viewers homes in 17 days

"AMC which is a big theater chain in big trouble because of the pandemic was in trouble before now it's much worse trouble. made a deal with universal studios and the deal breaks the window that all the movie owners have been trying to preserve because they feel as essential to their business I mean, the previous window was ninety days in this deal. which is so striking seventeen days. The universal has the option to take these movies and put them on premium video-on-demand like they did with trolls, trolls movie recently like they did with Staten Island, the Judd appetizer movie, and they have to charge you a minimum of twenty bucks but seventeen days is so much shorter than anybody had ever imagined. I think other theatre owners are just like sort of stunned by the steel and another theater chain owner. The CEO said, we do not see any business sense in this model. So let's break this down and figure why they did this. I, mean first of all, the theater chains are extremely challenge right now they have no product they have nothing to do and I. Think this is a catalyst for what a lot of people have said was going to eventually. Happen is that the theater chains we're going to have to succumb on this windows issue and get the movie studios to essentially cut them in on a portion of revenue for premium vod. So that means if universal has a movie after seventeen days, three weekends, they can put that movie on vod charge a premium for it, and they will have to cut in the movie theater chains on this. So essentially, they're sacrificing this window exclusivity for a piece of what? They see as a growing potentially transformative market. Yes. As You well know Matt the danger here I mean with the big movie with one of the fast and furious movies that costs a fortune and needs to grow fortune. They will never get there even if they charge you a lot of money for that premium video on demand thing they the calculation is they can't get there and they would leave those movies in theaters longer but if there are certain movies. That they put in. So quickly after seventeen days are we not training the public to say, I. Don't need to go to the movie theater just wait. Yeah and the question is was that happening already or is this going to be the spark that Burns down the theatrical movie business and I and I think there's room for debate there because we see the trends we see in the movie business are that people show up in mass amounts for the a-list. E ticket ride movies like avengers and fast and furious but increasingly, the middle ground of movies and below that are not alluring people in theaters and we've seen example after example of this at the same time as streaming services are going nuts on their film offerings. So is AMC getting out ahead of this and saying we got to throw in the towel and least we will get a cut of this I mean think about what happened in the music business the music business was essentially destroyed by streaming and then slowly but. Surely. It was brought back by streaming because the consumer was trained to pay the services got great and now the music business is doing great because of streaming and I think ultimately that's likely going to happen here in the movie business and AMC is getting a piece of this and negotiating to be part of that future rather than continuing to hang on to the past model. Yeah. I mean I think there are a couple of really big questions. Can you have movie theaters when they're on a steady diet of gigantic movies? There's that sustain them that can keep them in business and the other big question is it really can AMC survive long enough to see the whatever fruits this deal might yield because. Is Teetering on a precipice. That's why they did this deal by the way. NBC. announced. Results they're they're getting hurt badly too but. AMC This is a lifeline they hope and We'll see whether AMC lives long enough to try this and if it really does. Kill. Movie theaters were one early indicator that is not dispositive here is that the stock went up when this deal was announced AMC. So clearly, investors are seeing down the line and saying, Hey, you know what we may be on something here.

AMC Universal Studios Staten Island CEO Matt Nbc.
"music business" Discussed on Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"music business" Discussed on Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

"The history of it was also. Get back to that that thread where people went attacking a history of it was not to come in when it was band situation. And you were fixing something. So the guy's either drugged out or the guys got too much alcohol or maybe he just doesn't have the ability that was one of my favorite things to do when the guy didn't have the ability and not knocking it but it was saying, okay what belongs here for the song but then at the same time what belongs here for that, this guy eventually can reach. In a short amount of time I'M NOT GONNA go I'm I I'm starting to get to that point beyond the confidentiality agreements expirations and Yada Yada would end the as and Blah Blah Blah and I'm not going to sit here listening down I'm not gonNA list a number of the guys that I know that we're actually the drummers bass players in the guitar players on tracks, but the point is They got the Gig not just because they were good but because they had that detective skill of not saying, okay. What not just what do I think should be on this but what should go here that this person can eventually get to be able to do was a particular Obama came out in the nineties they were really set on this drummer and they want him to be a part of the band. He couldn't play it. couldn't play it out on the on the album they brought in high echelon way above my pay grade session drummer who signed to be a ghost drummer and it clearly not him. Still. The guy he was he was teaching the he was teaching the real drums of the session. Go Strom was teaching the real drummer how he was doing this parts. He became an instructor and a couple months later, the humility of this particular drummer who yeah, his feelings were hurt he couldn't play on the album. It wasn't him. He was written. It was him. He had to go out there and say out was him but it wasn't him. But he had the humility to just get there and get it done and build up to be able to do that. Now Titus to your messaging. Or there's certain people that are coming in. They're trying to set up your branding, your messaging, your marketing in a voice that has nothing to do with you not in your harmony or not in your song. That's where the comparison in the parallels come from. So in that story of some of what my favorite things to do back then as a ghost drummer and even today doing the messaging was to figure out the story of the song of the band of the ability. Now, there are certain cases where it's you're playing for an individual artists and it's not really a ghost situation. It's what do you think goes here what would you play here? What would you play here for the song? And don't get me wrong I. Hear some amazing drummers out there I mean these these cats on instagram they circle around me when I was at top shape of any drumming, I couldn't touch half these cats. But at the same time, chops is not always where it's at. Knowing what's going to work for the song?.

instructor Obama Strom Titus
Warner Music Group prices IPO at $25 a share to raise $1.925 billion

Balance of Power

02:34 min | 3 months ago

Warner Music Group prices IPO at $25 a share to raise $1.925 billion

"That time now for our stock of the hour it is Warner Music Group which went public earlier today it's been held off for a day or so it's gone public and then the price is actually gone up since it started trading we are joined now by kill whites to take us through the Warner story yeah David started trading just over half an hour ago right now the stock up the better part of six percent trading around twenty eight sixty one a share that's after it priced at twenty five dollars this morning the midpoint of the marketing range raised about it one billion one point nine three billion excuse me in the listing which which I should point out I was actually up size seventy seven million shares up from just seventy million makes it one of the biggest offerings we've seen so far in twenty twenty and values the company at nearly thirteen billion dollars of course even as you alluded to this was delayed from yesterday to observe the music industry's blackout Tuesday to support the protest against police brutality in fact it was really delayed about three months because of the pandemic so the fact that the company now has come public we're seeing it being taken pretty well by the public markets sends a pretty positive signal about potentially renewed strength of the U. S. offerings after we saw those really put on pause for a while because of this pandemic David yeah exactly I wonder whether it says more about the history of the equity market which is really on its way back with that says more about the state of the music market is the music market sort of stay at home kind of business well it's a little bit of both isn't right we've seen obviously increased demand for risk on the part of investors and it's not just a big week for Warner music we're about to see six point four billion dollars in IPOs total this week some definitely revival of companies coming to the public markets but on your point about the music industry of course is really is a lot about streaming Warner music especially is very catered towards streaming about seventy percent of its revenue comes from digital sales Spotify apple for example account for about twenty seven percent of revenue be looking at the last fiscal year in fact that is everybody is home bound we can't go out to concerts etcetera to get entertainment lately is giving an added boost to Warner music here yeah let's be honest Kaylee I've downloaded more music club and stuck at home that you have to do so maybe it's Happy Days are here again for the music business which let's be honest has really gone up and down down initially string was not too good for it yeah absolutely there's been a lot of back and forth for certain and not only is this good for the music business I would point out to you that the man who really is making all the money from this IPO land blah blah Finnick excuse me I'm totally butchering that name you do a far better job job but he actually is getting eighty five percent of economic interest in this ninety nine percent of the voting right is basically all of the proceeds from this IPO are not going to Warner music they're going to

Warner Music Group
Blackout Tuesday marks day to reflect on racism in America

Elvis Duran Presents: The 15 Minute Morning Show

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Blackout Tuesday marks day to reflect on racism in America

"Absolute black in this is signifying today our friends in the music industry. It's blackout day. What does that mean in response to the deep racial unrest, and after a recent deaths of George Floyd Brown Taylor and The countless other black citizens by the hands of police. This initiative started from our friends at the the music. Business Def Jam interscope Columbia Records Island records, Sony Capital Republic Warner BMG you, MG. Empire all of them. and. That's what they're doing being strong. This being strong and saying. Hey, we hear you you. Know it's? It's interesting because I was looking I was. Looking down instagram in. It's just it's look it's. Black pains, more and more black pains. Of Black. And It's speaks loudly as simple as it is,

George Floyd Brown Taylor Sony Capital Republic Warner Columbia Records Island BMG
Maya De Vitry's "How to Break a Fall" Track by Track

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:54 min | 5 months ago

Maya De Vitry's "How to Break a Fall" Track by Track

"Hello and welcome to folk where we have honest conversations with folk musicians. It's Cindy House Here we are is a great to be here. Thanks for listening I am pumped about our guest today. Mike vitry she has a new record out and she's going to do a track by track for us Which we will get to very very soon. I will tell you a little bit about my victory. If you do not know she used to be in a band called the stray birds and she is not in that band anymore. The band originally from Lancaster Pennsylvania. Maya lives in Nashville these days and she has quietly released one of the best records of the year back in. March the album. How to break a fall on the podcast today? She goes through the album track by track with us. The record ranges in sound from Gazi beauties too sick grooves to jagged rock. Bangers there are a lot of themes on this record. Like celebrating women and reclaiming your own self and your body. It fully acknowledges past Traumas in Unique Metaphors for instance. There's a song called baking bread for the circus. It's about survival in an abusive situation. The circus being like the show where there is darkness behind the stage and the bread is whatever you need to do to survive the circus. Maya breaks down this and all of the tracks in insightful and entertaining conversation. She was one of my favorite people and musicians. Everything she creates and says totally blows me away. And I'm so glad to get her back on the podcast and if you haven't listened to Maya's first appearance on basic folk. Make sure you go back. She's on episode eleven. I've linked it on my website Just want you to be as obsessed with my individually as I am. Listen on and I guarantee you'll be all about this amazing person. We get a track by track by Maya Dimitri on Basic Bob. It's so funny. 'cause like doing like social distancing. I feel like really sick of myself and like not amused with myself. So like digging into your record and hearing about all the themes was made me feel like maybe. I'm just being just a little judgmental on myself but I'm happy to I'm happy to like dig deep into your album. It's really it's really good. Thanks so the record is called how to break a fall. It was released on March thirteenth. And so there are a lot of themes. On this record celebrating women women reclaiming their own selves and their own body so before we dig deep into like what each song his is about. I was wondering if you could talk about like what your feelings on being a woman are like. And maybe how has your relationship with your gender changed like if it changed at all after this album? I think the album was my way to process on things and so yeah I think it is different now. I think it was a lot of the album is like a self examination and excavation and you know holding myself accountable to have deeper self belief and kind of letting go of a lot of these paradigms and belief systems and things that were really internalized and really ingrained in me not necessarily from any specific person in my life but just over time like our culture and media and then different relationships and I think a lot of a lot of it is as a as a woman like holding yourself accountable as a woman and to know that a lot of a lot of our strength comes from reorganizing our interior and knowing knowing that that is that work is up to us. And it's very private and it's very it can be shared and it can be a collective kind of thing but instead of like instead of leading with like some kind of outward anger or rage I think my process has been yet to just reorganize kind of from the inside out and and that's a personal journey but I think it's. It's also in this record in on these songs. It's something that I was exploring like from other perspectives to and other other stories of women in that process and Like a lot of female artists in that process. And what that. Just look what that kind of thing feels like to live through a. Can you talk about the different perspectives? You're taking into account. Yeah so one of the perspectives. One of the The people who I don't personally but this author sue monk Kidd really influenced this record. She wrote a book called the dance of the dissident daughter and this book is about her journey. She was For a long time she was like a writer in basically just An a Christian tradition and she had this epiphany and the middle of her life in the middle of her career about the fact that she didn't have any any feminine divine presence to Lean On. It wasn't like any and so even if even if Basically she was she was realizing that there is something deep within her kind of embedded from the Christian tradition to lean on and look for approval from the cultural father. Whatever that is and whether that's like a a you know a man or whether it's just Some kind of male dominated culture or space. That women are not in Lake not even not invited or welcome but just like not present because of the because it may be as space that hasn't traditionally been open to women and so so that I was I was reading that and I was processing a lot of my own and kind of unpacking a lot of my own experiences in pleasing the cultural father and what that meant for me and whether it was people I had worked with in the music business so far people I had played music with And then people like even not as close to me but you know some random guy and and feeling that I needed to have some kind of approval or some kind of you know that I needed to be okay by that person and that was this conscious thing that had been running through me for. I don't know how but it was. It was really unsettling and and when I started to read her book and it was like you know it's like if you find a book that is like kind of you could use it as a map for your own thing. At that time it's very it can be really unsettling and so that's one person in in

Maya Dimitri Mike Vitry Cindy House Gazi Sue Monk Kidd Lancaster Pennsylvania Writer Nashville
The Speaking Opportunity We Have Right Now

RED - The Marketing Podcast For Experts

09:30 min | 5 months ago

The Speaking Opportunity We Have Right Now

"Right after I released the last episode that is when Corona Virus. Hit the reason you haven't heard from me on this follow up episode was because I wanted to wait just a minute to get a feel for what was happening because it seems like what's happening changes daily. I can't give you a lot of accurate information. As far as how corona virus will affect your business other than sane. Things will come back around. They might be different but they will come back. Eventually we will start getting together again eventually. People are going to want that human connection they want it now. But we've got these substitutes. We've got podcast like this one. Like your podcast. Maybe blog post email newsletters but speaking at least in person that is not one of those things that we have now however because it is coming back. If you're ready for it you are going to be in great shape. So let's get you ready. I want you to think about the stock market in the nineties. Everybody was making money. But you had to have money in order to make money. If you weren't able to invest in the stock market in the nineties you couldn't take advantage of it and in order to invest. You had to do the work before the thing hit. They didn't know it was going to hit like it did. And that's what I'm trying to get you to do now. You can't remember the nineties. Maybe you weren't born yet thinking about real estate over the last few years the boom boom that we've seen in real estate over the last few years that same type of boom is going to happen for live events and speaking like. I said we're going to be ready to get out wherever you ready to see. People again and when that switch is flipped. You'RE GOING TO BE READY FOR IT. On the last episode grant covered a lot of ideas regarding speaking. And he's certainly done a lot more speaking than I have because speaking was his job for me speaking his way to spread a message. It's a way that I built my company. It is a way for me to get information out to people that I want them to know so I want to share some big ideas on speaking there from a little bit of a different perspective. This is from a guy who had a business has a business and uses speaking to grow that business built connection with people and to make money sometimes directly through the speaking sometimes. It's something related to the speech that I'm giving. Maybe I'm getting business directly from that speaking in. Sometimes it's just to expand my authority because when you come in like an expert you don't have to market as hard people come to you and you are able to charge more when you were seen as a celebrity in your business. So here's some big ideas on speaking from that perspective. Somebody who does speak a lot but does speak on a regular basis. By the way I had about four events cancel within a week after Corona virus hit a road warrior. But I'm doing this on a pretty regular basis and have been doing this for awhile and that brings me to my first big. Id Ah you need to jump in with speaking and the way that you may be able to do that now just to get that training be ready for when that switch flips and we're ready to go back to live. Speaking is doing it via online broadcast via live broadcast that could be via zoom. Something like spreaker. If you're more of an audio person that lets you distribute your message live just like a broadcast radio show. And here's the point of why you WanNa do that. The only way for you to get better in front of a live audience is to get in front of a live audience. I started doing radio in nineteen ninety one and when I started it wasn't live on the air. I wasn't a jock. I was a production guy. I was doing documentaries. I was doing stuff where I will go out. Do Research Comeback to the tape room and it was a tape room. It was literally magnetic tape that I had to slice with a razor blade. Taped back together with tape. I was doing much like I'm doing but the process took a lot longer. I will go out into the field with Marantz tape recorder like a cassette tape recorder and it was good but it was still on cassette comeback. Put It on a real. That's when I would chop it up. Get the edits in anyway. It took a while for me to get that content out the content wasn't live but it did get me used to speaking. So if you're doing a podcast even if it's not live while the best way for you to get used to speaking is live the skills you are developing by doing something you edit later. That's still going to help you. But it's not a replacement for getting out and doing it. Live the transition for me to doing live. Eventually I moved up. I guess it was move up to live on the air. Play music going in and out of tracks. Sometimes I would do interviews but not like. I'm doing now so that was a different skill. Had the live thing but it didn't have the long form content that I'm talking about now with either speech or doing something like a podcast and that transition continued with getting in front of a live audience like where I could actually see them was getting on various panels. I was flying around the country going to a lot of music marketing events. This is back in nineteen ninety-five in the late nineties tons of panels. Sometimes I moderate them. Sometimes I would just beyond them and I did dozens of these things from south by southwest in Austin Texas to see him Jay in New York to really anybody who would have me. I remember doing at least a couple of events in Athens Georgia Indianapolis. There's something to West. Virginia I was going anywhere and everywhere that would have me and for me. That was easy because I was able to bounce my message off of what somebody had previously said or more or less conversation with the people who are on stage with me. If you've got a podcast you might be able to relate to this because a lot of beginning podcasters what do you do you have a co host. Yeah people that you're interviewing you like to bounce your message off of other people and it's not all on you to have one hundred percent of that content and that'll help you for eventually getting in front of a live audience but if you WanNa get good doing something in front of a live audience one. You've got to do it. You're probably going to fail. It's going to at least be a little bit rough. It's got to be just you the very first speaking presentation that I had. I think it was the late nineties. Remember it was in. Philadelphia is an old theater on arch street again. I was used to doing panels but I had one of these independent music events. She said why. Don't you come on up here? We're not doing panels? But you can speak and I think the reason why she did that was because she didn't want to fly a bunch of panelist in imagine this. You've got five or six of these sessions. Each of them has three. Maybe five people. You've got to fly those people and you've got coordinate with them first of all you gotta find him. Even that can get complicated getting somebody to fly across the country just to sit on a panel for one hour so she wasn't doing panels and you'll see this with a lot of live event. It's much easier to fill in event with single speakers. Then it is panelist and I never done. Solis Behemoth Four. But I've been on panels before and I've been doing conference calls. We used to do this thing via the phone. I will get on speak much like it was a radio broadcast people who are calling in also via the phone. They would listen to me at a book. At the time I was very familiar with the content but on the other hand I had no idea what I was doing or what it was actually going to be like and this event. It wasn't really organized. She didn't walk me through the process. I was good at the skills that I had. The event promoter just assume that I was going to be able to get up there and speak by myself. I wasn't luckily a friend of mine. The air guy named Eric Sievers. You may have seen some of his. Ted Talks read some of his books. He was in the music business with me at the time. So he and I got in front. This group together heeded the heavy lifting and by that I mean he shared the stage with me. I was doing as much talk in his Derek. Was We're going back and forth with each other? It was a cool event. It wasn't like I was just hanging there in the sidecar but having him there enabled me mentally to organize my thoughts. It gave me more confidence because there was more or less like a panel. And tell you this story to say this if you are nervous about getting in front of a crowd. This may be an option for you since that time. I have organized and promoted a lot more events than I've spoken ad and I can tell you that this happens all the time. People want to come in as a package deal. They want business partner. Sometimes they'll won a spouse. They want somebody up there with them on stage. It also happens on radio. People are nervous about their voice going into the airways. The are nervous about people hearing them and sounding like an idiot. So they'll bring in a friend. Hey I can bring in a band with me. Hey could bring in this guy that I'm working with. He's got an interesting story does it lend me your option somewhat. You're going to a live event. People might not want to fly in the second person. You might be on your own for that but it is an option it will get you in the game and it may build your authority in a different way than you could do it on your own

Marantz Virginia Eric Sievers Athens Georgia Indianapolis Partner Austin Texas Philadelphia Ted Talks JAY New York
Lean On Me singer Bill Withers dies at 81

Jim Bohannon

00:33 sec | 6 months ago

Lean On Me singer Bill Withers dies at 81

"NO sunshine when she bill withers wrote and performed songs in the nineteen seventies that will last a lifetime his first album came out in nineteen seventy one and eight no sunshine put bill withers but it was lean on me released in nineteen seventy two that became an international anthem of friendship and continues to be sung to this very day by people dealing with the corona virus withers withdrew from the music business in the mid eighties but the songs still shine

Bill Withers
Bill Withers, legendary singer behind "Lean On Me" and "Ain't No Sunshine," has died

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

Bill Withers, legendary singer behind "Lean On Me" and "Ain't No Sunshine," has died

"KNX were this morning legendary R&B singer songwriter bill withers died today here in Los Angeles of what his family says was heart complications his career lasted just fifteen years but at least three generations of fans know his biggest hits not with them by heart songs like lean on me eight no sunshine just the two of us in nineteen eighty five bill withers he had what he called a conflict with a record executive he quit the music business never looked back is twenty fifteen induction to the rock and roll hall of fame it was a rare public appearance forum Twitter

KNX Bill Withers Los Angeles Executive Twitter
Lean On Me, Lovely Day singer Bill Withers dies at 81

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

Lean On Me, Lovely Day singer Bill Withers dies at 81

"The existing bill withers has died just as it did in the nineteen seventies the song lean on me bill withers and from to love friendship and support resonates to this very day recently healthcare workers choirs musicians and others have posted renditions of the song online as the world bands together to fight the corona virus pandemic but with those stirring voice and songs about life almost did not become part of our collective sound tracks he was a stutter as a child but overcame that to create some amazingly relatable songs including ain't No sunshine grandma's hands and lovely day his career was brief you left off in the music business in the mid nineteen eighties but not before earning three Grammys and a spot in the rock and roll hall of fame his family says weathers died from heart complications he was eighty one years old I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Oscar Wells Gabriel
How Long Does It Stay on Surfaces? How Long Can We Rely On Amazon Delivery?

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

15:59 min | 6 months ago

How Long Does It Stay on Surfaces? How Long Can We Rely On Amazon Delivery?

"From the weekend. Our young ace symptomatic cases the key to spreading the virus. Should we rethink the conventional wisdom around facemasks? How long can the virus stay on surfaces? And how long can we rely on Amazon delivery? As of last night known cases of Corona virus in the United States exceeded thirty five hundred spread across forty nine states prompting the mass cancellation of and the reordering of American public life the CDC is recommending halting gatherings of fifty people or more throughout the US for the next eight weeks if implemented fully that means all sporting events all concerts all conferences. All parades all weddings. Almost everything done for eight weeks. Bars and restaurants are closed in New York City beginning tomorrow. Tuesday at nine. Am takeout and delivery orders? Only New York City schools have closed. Ohio has suggested schools might remain closed in that state for the remainder of the academic year but Ohio Massachusetts and Illinois have gone the France route as well. All bars and restaurants are shutting down statewide quote. Delay means more people will die Ohio governor. Mike DeWine said these states are the first states to take the steps toward Italy toward a complete shutdown of public activities except for food medicine and other essentials it is unlikely they will be the last the CEO of universal music group Lucian Grange. Perhaps the most powerful man in the music business has been hospitalized after testing positive for Cova nineteen apple CEO. Tim Cook and Apple Services. Chief Ed Eq- attended granges sixtieth birthday party. Two weeks ago in shocking news. But I guess we can't be shocked anymore by anything as it's all probably going to close down. Mgm Is Shutting the following Las Vegas Properties beginning March Seventeenth Aria Bellagio excalibur. Look zoar Mandalay Bay. Mgm Grand Mirage New York New York Park Mgm and Videira. So that's basically the entire Vegas Strip. Other companies closing stores or reducing hours Nike Worby Parker all birds urban outfitters Apple Patagonia and Glossy Walmart is partially shutting down twenty four hour locations which will operate six. Am until eleven pm until further notice starbucks is moving to what it is calling to go only model. You can still walk up an order at the starbucks counter or via drive thru or delivery. But you can't stay and sit in the cafe or Patio Areas French luxury company. Lvmh said figuring it's cosmetics division to only produce mass quantities of Hydro Alcoholic Gel in order to give it to French health authorities. More people have now died from the corona virus outside of China than have died inside China since the disease. I emerged airline Cathay. Pacific is adding flights from US cities and London to Hong Kong because since the disease seems to be relatively under control in Hong Kong at the moment some people are seeing Hong Kong as a safe haven and are rushing to travel there a mere seven weeks ago. Hong Kong had implemented travel restrictions because of its proximity to mainland China. Italy reported three hundred sixty eight deaths in a single day yesterday. A twenty five percent increase making this the deadliest twenty four hour period thus far worse than the deadliest day in Wuhan's outbreak. Italy has reported two hundred deaths for each of the last three days. Italy only had its first. Colonel Related Death three weeks ago now. More than eighteen hundred people have died because of overloaded hospitals. The fatality rate and Lamberti is nine percent in the rest of Italy. The fatality rate is five point one percent Spanish health authorities reported two thousand New Corona virus cases in twenty four hours on Sunday bringing the total in the country of Spain to eight thousand cases with two hundred eighty eight deaths as the number of people who have died of the virus more than doubled in twenty four hours as the Spanish death. Toll was up from one hundred thirty six a day earlier. That is an increase of almost one hundred percent. Spain is clearly on. The Italian trajectory is France. Next it certainly seems to be going that way quoting the New York Times. France announced the closing of all non indispensable businesses including restaurants bars and movie theaters after a sharp uptick in corona virus cases. The number of French cases past five thousand four hundred twenty on Sunday with one hundred and twenty seven deaths on Saturday. Three hundred corona virus patients were in critical condition half of them under sixty years of age on Sunday. Francis Transportation Minister said the country would begin reducing plane train and bus services between cities and quote. I'd like to end the segment with some potentially good news from Italy Adrenal Aguzzi. A professor of neuro pathology and Switzerland just north of the troubled Italian region of Lombardy tweeted a chart this weekend that showed that even with the surge in deaths in Italy over the last few days the death rate is deviating ever so slightly from exponential growth. It's early days. But the lockdown might be beginning to work linked to the chart. I'm referencing in the show. Notes and Chen He wa. The European Bureau chief for China Daily tweeted this quote. Just read that Chinese medical team sent to Italy to fight Kovic nineteen comprises mostly experienced doctors from Sichuan Sichuan folks still remember how an Italian rescue team during the devastating. Two Thousand Eight Wenchuan earthquake saved many lives. The world needs more of US helping each other and quote. There has been a lot of justified. I think hand-wringing about the scenes of people going to bars and restaurants even to Disney world. This weekend seemingly unworried about anything that is going on. This is obviously a problem for one. Big reason potential transmission from people who might not know they already have the disease indeed. There is increasing evidence that it is young people people without symptoms that might be the key driver of the spread of Corona Virus. Even more so than we realized quoting. Cnn New Studies in several countries and a large corona virus outbreak in Massachusetts Bring into question reassuring assertions by US officials about the way the novel virus spreads it appears that a Massachusetts Corona virus cluster. With at least eighty two cases was started by people who are not yet showing symptoms and more than a half dozen studies have shown that people without symptoms are causing substantial amounts of infection several experts interviewed by CNN. Said while it's unclear. Exactly what percentage of the transmission in the outbreak is fueled by people who are obviously sick versus those who have no symptoms or very mild symptoms? It is becoming clear that transmission by people who are as symptomatic or mildly symptomatic is responsible for more transmission than previously thought and quote. Indeed scientists seem to be coming to the conclusion that this is what makes corona virus so insidious it can spread far before it even sickens both mergers and SARS tend to be only spread by symptomatic people. But if you get cova did you might have spread it to fifty other people before you even know it. Add to that what we've previously discussed about how scientists suspect that you're more contagious earlier. On in the disease in a study of twenty four passengers who had just flown from Israel seven tested positive for corona virus of which four had no symptoms and the viral load of specimens from a symptomatic patients was higher than from the three patients. Who had symptoms thus the global move toward social distancing? Stay home stay out of large crowds status small crowds. There's a link to chart in the show notes that shows the difference between two towns in Italy. The two are Bergamo and loyalty. Loyalty actually had the first cove in nineteen case reported before Bergamo reported. Its first but Loki. Shut down their town February. Twenty Third Burgum. Oh waited until almost a week later by March thirteenth lucky only had around a thousand cases of corona virus and those case numbers seem to be leveling out while Burgum oh has seen case numbers shoot up to two thousand five hundred and young people. I'm talking to you. Data from South Korea where they test everyone they can is suggesting that. Thirty percent of the carriers in that country where aged twenty to twenty nine. If that's not enough to convince you let me point you to an actual animation. It is literally just balls. Dancing around and environment randomly representing infections over time. Look at what happens to the infection curve when only a quarter of a population continues to circulate and three quarters of a population practice social distancing. The infection rate is significantly slowed and with extensive distancing with seven eighths of a population staying home. The infection curve is stopped almost in its tracks. These are powerful animations but they are only animations only simulations made to educate on a concept. The concept is however. This is joke. If you can stay home let me quote. The last paragraph from the story accompanying the simulation quote in one crucial respect. These simulations are nothing like reality. Unlike simulations cove nineteen can kill though. The fatality rate is not precisely known. It is clear that the elderly members of our community are most at risk from dying from covered. One thousand nine hundred quote if you want this to be more realistic. A scientist was quoted after seeing a preview of the story some of the DOTS should disappear and quote link to the simulation is of course in the show. Notes questions are being raised as to whether or not more of US should be wearing face masks. Even if we're not showing signs of corona virus infection authorities in China already mandate the wearing of masks in all public places whether or not people are sick or healthy quoting from ink stone since late January Chinese authorities and major cities have enforced rules on wearing face masks in public spaces including detaining. Those who tried to use public transport without a mask and quote in South Korea and Japan is also required. That mask be worn by healthy people in crowded places but in much of the rest of the world including here in the US. It's advised that only people displaying symptoms should wear masks as just mentioned the possibility that corona virus can be spread by a symptomatic. People is causing some to argue for more widespread use of masks quoting again from ink stone. A symptomatic transmission has been reported in multiple countries in which a spreader is responsible for sickening others without knowing it in January at cluster. Thirteen infections was believed to have started with a British man who contracted the virus during a trip to Singapore and spread it to others on a skiing trip in the French Alps and back home in the United Kingdom all the while showing no signs of infection himself quote researchers writing in the Lancet suggested that in light of this current national advice may need updating to deal specifically with Ron Virus quoting from the peace. If everyone puts on a mask in public spaces it would help to remove stigmatization that has hitherto discouraged masking of symptomatic patients in many places. Furthermore transmission from asymmetric infected individuals has been documented for Kobe. Nineteen and viral load is particularly high at early disease. Stage masking as a public health intervention would probably intercept the transmission link and prevent these apparently healthy infectious sources and quote. All of that said as of right now. The advice remains to only wear a mask if you are displaying symptoms helping to conserve the mask as a resource masks are in short supply and are needed for medical practitioners. Who them more than the rest of us. In order to safely treat people not get sick themselves and thus stay on the job. A new study has revealed the length of time that Kobe nineteen can remain viable on common surfaces. The study so new that it is yet to be. Peer reviewed found that Corona virus was most stable on plastic and stainless steel with viable virus being detected up to seventy two hours on those surfaces after application it can also remain viable for up to twenty four hours on cardboard and up to four hours on copper. The researchers noted that these decay timings were similar to those found with the two thousand and two two thousand. Three SARS virus suggesting that quote differences in the epidemiology of these viruses likely arise from other factors including high viral loads in the upper respiratory tract and the potential for individuals infected with cove nineteen to shed and transmit the virus while a symptom matic and quote. There are presently two hundred and seventy four surface disinfectants approved by the EPA for use against Kovic Nineteen Link to the list is in the show notes at this point with store shelves increasingly bear. I'm sure a lot of us are continuing to rely on delivery especially Amazon prime delivery to keep ourselves stocked up with everything we need so that we can shelter in place. Avoid going out to stores as much as possible and just generally socially distance well an article and vices motherboard talking about the broader strains to workers in the sorting facilities and also the people who have to deliver our stuff makes the point that maybe our delivery systems are endangered as well quote. Motherboards spoke to Amazon Logistics Labor experts. Who say it's only a matter of time? Before Amazon's prime signature two day delivery promise serious delays mistakes and widespread shortages due to increased demands from consumers also pressure on workers to meet rising production quotas restrictions on trade and the possibility of fulfillment centers being. Shut DOWN AS CORONA VIRUS SPREADS. Amazon's warehouse workers. Say they're already seeing increased workloads while fewer of their colleagues are showing up to work. According Labor organizers already Amazon's white collar workers have been asked to work from home. But that's obviously not an option for warehouse fulfillment workers and delivery drivers quote. It seems really likely that. Amazon's prime delivery system will falter Daniel flaming president of Economic Roundtable and an author of the two thousand nineteen report on Amazon's economic impact on southern California told motherboard. One day deliveries may not be made within one day if the workers who do show up to warehouses are more stress given bigger routes and are possibly less experienced incorrect deliveries will be made. The last mile segment of the delivery is very labor intensive and quote flaming ads. That were likely to see a close parallel of what happens in Amazon warehouses. During the holiday rush increase delays mistakes and bottlenecks. It would seem to me. Most likely that we'll see a drop in reliability and timeliness and quote but more than that the fear here is the same with the health system basically if too many people involved in the Amazon delivery chain are even temporarily sidelined by the disease at the same time. It's possible that even Amazon delivery could go down to say nothing of the potential disruption to the supply chain I e if even Amazon can't source enough goods to

Italy Amazon United States Ohio France China Spain New York City South Korea Scientist Starbucks MGM Hong Kong Bergamo Walmart Lvmh New York Times Ron Virus Tim Cook
The Big Three Record Labels are Now Stronger Than Ever

Business Wars Daily

03:04 min | 6 months ago

The Big Three Record Labels are Now Stronger Than Ever

"And listening to your favorite music right after you listed this episode. Of course today. It's all about the music business. That is remember not too long ago when it was commonplace to complain that the Internet was killing the music business. Turns out those complaints. Were wrong really wrong. American streamed one and a half trillion songs last year. The Wall Street Journal reports. We can't get enough of post Malone Billy eyelash Taylor swift apparently and are voracious. Appetites are paying off the companies that own. The huge music libraries were listening to Universal Warner and Sony. The so called big. Three record labels are making an average of one million dollars every hour from our listening habits. That's according to an industry. Publication called music business worldwide. Which did the math F you're asking hold on? Did I hear you right? Yes you did? Every hour the three biggest music companies are earning a million dollars largely due to fees. They receive when you an ice cream songs. Streaming made up about eighty percent of all revenue earned from recorded music last year. That's nine billion dollars by the way and also including things like downloads vinyl records and it's not these sales that are all that unusual no sales of recorded music have been expanding for four straight years. The Wall Street Journal reports. That's about the time that subscriptions spotify other streamers started growing rapidly so much for predictions of the industry's passing however. Don't talk to a musician about any of this stuff. You may get a completely different story. Let's get back to the record. Label shall we universal the top dog in its brethren can thank spotify apple and Amazon for growing their subscriber basis more than a million people paid for new subscriptions to a streaming service last year? Universal Warner and Sony provide their catalogs to streaming services and take a cut of all those subscription fees now the growth in the hot steamy streaming market is slowing somewhat. But it's still robust so robust in fact that Goldman Sachs predicts the market will be worth forty five billion in twenty thirty. That's more than double. Its value today with streaming subscriptions growing year over year. You know the big three music labels are singing some very happy tunes so happy in fact they both. Warner and universal are contemplating going Public Warner the smallest of the big three filed papers with the SEC on February sixth although now it says it will delay its IPO because of what else the corona virus according to Reuter's Among Warner's artists are Liz. Oh Neil Young Madonna and METALLICA. According to The Wall Street Journal

Universal Warner The Wall Street Journal Public Warner Spotify Sony Goldman Sachs Neil Young Madonna Malone Billy SEC Metallica Reuter LIZ Taylor Amazon
"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

02:07 min | 7 months ago

"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Beckham? The <Speech_Female> autobiography <Speech_Female> of Buck Owens <Speech_Music_Female> is published by <Speech_Female> Roman and Littlefield. <Speech_Female> Please <Speech_Female> support our show <Speech_Music_Female> by ordering via <Speech_Music_Female> the Amazon referral <Speech_Music_Female> link on our website <Speech_Music_Female> let <Speech_Music_Female> it will podcast <SpeakerChange> dot <Music> com. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Hey <Speech_Male> this is Brad page <Speech_Male> from the. I'm <Speech_Male> in love with that <Speech_Male> song. Podcast <Speech_Male> inviting you to <Speech_Male> join me. As <Speech_Male> we explore a <Speech_Male> different Song. Each <Speech_Male> episode <Speech_Male> discovering. What <Speech_Male> makes <SpeakerChange> these songs <Music> great? <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> The performances <Speech_Male> arrangements <Speech_Male> and the production <Speech_Male> tricks and techniques <Speech_Male> are all part <Speech_Male> of creating those <Speech_Male> magic moments <Speech_Male> to turn a good <Speech_Male> sawn into <Speech_Male> a great one <Speech_Male> on this podcast. <Speech_Male> We take <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a deep dive into <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> each song listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to all those <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> nuances <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> came together <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to make it a <Music> <Advertisement> great song. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Our journey takes <Speech_Male> us across <Speech_Male> the musical map <Speech_Male> from the Beatles <Speech_Male> and the stones <Speech_Male> to you aretha Franklin <Speech_Male> and Tom Petty <Speech_Male> Kiss <Speech_Male> the cars <Speech_Male> Todd Rundgren <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and Roxy <Speech_Music_Male> Music <Speech_Music_Male> from bad <Speech_Male> finger to Al <Speech_Male> Green. Stevie <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wonder David <Speech_Male> Bowie <Speech_Male> from Aerosmith <Speech_Male> to the zombies. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Music_Male> listened to it <SpeakerChange> all <Speech_Music_Male> on the. I'm in love <Speech_Music_Male> with that song. Podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> you may be <Speech_Male> unfamiliar with <Speech_Male> some of these songs <Speech_Male> and some of them. You've <Speech_Male> probably heard <Speech_Male> a hundred times <Speech_Male> but I bet if <Speech_Male> we listen closely <Speech_Male> we can <Speech_Male> discover something <Speech_Male> new so <Speech_Male> join <Speech_Male> me on <Speech_Male> the. I'm in love with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that Song podcast <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and let's listen <Speech_Male> together <SpeakerChange> because <Speech_Male> I think you're gonNA love <Speech_Music_Male> to songs too. <Music>

"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:02 min | 7 months ago

"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"You know I mean to me reading about Buck Owens. It's just the only contemporary of his. It's a musician that's comparable assembly like Dave Clark who ended up who owned his masters from the beginning. You know and ends up buying Tv shows archives. As well. And so. I just I'm trying to find a way to express the audience. Just how incredible Bucks Business Acumen was. Yeah well I think someone who's comparable is Garth Brooks. Today's world for sure you know who who who thinks of Garth Brooks is being a hard headed businessman but garth brooks got his masters back And he did it because Buck said do it at. They'll give them to you because record labels are stupid and they did But what buck was going for was Ages like I say. He just seemed to intuitively. Know that that these things had a value which capitol records didn't think they did capital was was a label that was looking at the immediate future. Not Way down the road and in fact when he said. I WANNA buy my master's essentially five years after my last deal expired. They were thinking all that stuff will be so old by then it'll be out of print. So what are we care? And and they couldn't have been more wrong because they didn't take into account that right around the corner is going to be a whole new format of music. They didn't take into account the day would come when a music supervisors would want include bucks recordings in TV shows and in movies and in commercials and so all these avenues of income existed and buck new the the about film and TV in commercials. So I I think he knew that there was going to be something here That would be of value down the line. I don't think that He had any conception that something like a rhino records would come along and suddenly The reissues would become such an important part of the industry and that he'd be in the dead center of it With with Rhino doing box sets his works and and Sundays reissuing every single album individually as says so it all worked out because it worked out but but I you know it's funny. I I think that buck I think the thing that the this the conundrum about Bucko isn't what makes him. A fascinating character is the buckhead skills he wasn't supposed to have you know when we think about great musicians great songwriters great artists. We also think in every case but buck really lousy business mean look at the Beatles look at Lennon and McCartney just did the shittiest publishing deal of all time The horrendous record contracts And and you know I. It's just the way it was. I mean the stones making Keith would have gone down the same road. Were it not for Allen Klein there to to to pull them from that abyss? But the thing about buck was buck. Just he had he was left brain right brain and and very good it both things somehow and speaking of being good at at two things. Let's hear book and the bunkers live at the London palladium in nineteen sixty eight? Doing Chuck Berry's Johnny.

Buck Owens Garth Brooks Buck Dave Clark Chuck Berry London Allen Klein Bucko Beatles Keith Lennon McCartney
"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:01 min | 7 months ago

"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"He haw happened it was such corn and and and I mean I let me just see if I if I can find some some way to compare I mean. Pick your favorite act of all time and imagine whoever that is put on a pair of overalls backwards in going on TV and acting like an idiot his grass. But that's exactly what he did. He just went from being this bad. Ask country superstar to the this hillbilly And and it. It made no sense it. It was hard to grasp why he would do that to himself. And that was the one time that the money won out over the music in a major way. Net It on the tapes he. He justified the early years because he was also the basically the music supervisor at the very beginning and so he was the one that first year of Hee haw that got johnny cash and Rural Haggard. Loretta Lynn and all these big names. As the the musicians the guest musicians who appeared on the show but very early on it went from being a mostly music in some comedy to about happen. Half music and comedy to then mostly comedy and bad cornball comedy at that and so you know we just watched this man go. Go go from being this. This Amazing Country Act The biggest act of the entire decade of the sixties to this parody. And that was a shame but yeah. That's exactly what happened and it's clear not a biography that he was aware of the rescue is taking that he knew that kind of over exposure in that kind of branding was going to damage. Damage him but the the money was just too good to walk away from. I think it was like four hundred thousand dollars a year to start with which sixty eight dollars has several million now so and also to me looking back at his career. In retrospect especially you know he didn't know don rich was gonNA pass away but but once on rich passed away. His great fire was really. Kinda out so he was a good way away for but to stay in the public eye. I keep busy and keep make money while his music career was kind of on. Hold in a way so sort of reconcile myself twohey haunt. I've come to love the show. In retrospect but it sure putting on bucks. Let's let's hear some. Pk Arab Buck and and get that taste out of our mouths. This Bucko Tiger by the tail.

supervisor don rich Loretta Lynn Rural Haggard Hee
"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

11:06 min | 7 months ago

"music business" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"And that was the first country charting. Single Second Fiddle One where he had sort of. Seize the means of production and and got Kim Nelson the producer to dispense with the backup singers and produce Not Quite the full on Buck. Route freight train sound. That's GONNA come later. But but a a country single that hit the charts and got success and one thing that strikes me writing about reading this autobiography of Buck Is. This is a shrewd dude. This guy very quickly figured out Song publishing started his own. Signed a contract. I believe Akin Nelson's Producers Publishing Company although I didn't know it was can Nelson's company when he signed with it all also is a guy signed him to it but very quickly formed his own production company negotiates with capital so that some of his songs can be assigned to his own publishing company and later sides Merle haggard and others have shrewd businessman. Was Buck Owens Woah. Really hard worker. And he just had the mental skill to come up with how to do this business. The Right Way I I think it was really kinda intuitive and instinctive on his part. It's not like Buck Owens was someone who sat around and watched a bunch of other musicians and songwriters get screwed. You know. He wasn't in a situation to be able to see that happen. Peterman sitting in the middle of Nashville and watching what was happening to other artists signing these seven year recording contracts and these indentured servants publishing contracts if it'd be one thing but but he wasn't someone who had experienced those things just intuitively. He knew to protect himself and he figured out where the money comes from and the money comes from bureau songwriter. It comes from the publishing recording artists. It comes from controls. The masters That you've recorded and so he. He was just yeah. He was shrewd. He was smart and when it came to business for some reason I mean the man you know never got out of High School. But for some reason he had the the the mental and the mathematical capability to know how to put the business together how to handle it and he ended up having his own publishing company He ended up signing other riders. If he was recording a song he would do what he could to get the publishing from the the song writer. Or his Co. riders or whomever and A and later years. He learned to get control of his master's he also Instead of continuing to go down to Los Angeles to record at Capitol Studios Knee said. Why am I doing that when I have my own recording studio in Bakersfield? So he did that too. I mean it was. It was just brilliant stuff business wise and he had a business manager. Jack McFadden that was with him from very early on his career started out as as booking agent and then became his managers. Those two stayed together the whole way. How important was Jack McFadden to the whole Bucko and success machine? Yeah I think the Jack He's he deserves more credit than he's Gotten A. Although he was he became pretty well known in Nashville and other people were using him. But but buck Bound Jack or vice versa. And and the two of them did work together for years. They created a company called Olmec Which was a booking agency in a management company so in addition to having the Publishing Company And and that aspect he also he a buck and Jack Manage a number of artists. Susan Raye and Freddie Hart the Bunch of others and also book them and Would put them on tours on package tours with buck and and so they had. They had quite an industry going In Bakersfield because they were about the only ones with the those those business skills in Bakersfield when everybody else was doing the same kind of thing in Nashville and an additional team on the business side. He had an incredible team of musicians that he worked with principally don rich whose land all rich buck actually named him. Don Rich renamed him tell us about that bond between Bucking Guitar. Stan rich who you know had many offers to leave and go solo and never did was was content to be bucks number two. Yeah well done was no. He was the secret weapon. Buck met him when he went down was a teenager up in Washington. Buck had moved away from Bakersfield. He was frustrated. This is very early on this was before the the second fiddle that you played Very early on in his capital career. The the first couple of records that came out which he didn't have creative control over Flopped and so he went up and became a disc jockey at a radio station up there and and had a band up there and a dusty. Rhodes who was one of the band. Members came to two bucks that I found this kid that plays the fiddle and He's GonNa be in the band and Buxton. Well I gotta hear him Birch and he was knocked out by him and Donald only played. The fiddly also played guitar But the thing I think that was every bit as important as Don's Guitar playing was the harmony vocals that he came up with when he and buck were singing together and that to me was the magic of that sound was it was very much like the. Leuven brothers or the Everley brothers or or any other brothers act that could do those kinds of harmonies Ah Tell you if you go to youtube and you watch some of the old Buck Owens. ranch hours shows that are on Youtube and see songs being sung by the two of them together. It is an amazing thing to just watch visually because they are identical. They're completely in lockstep with each other. When it comes to the vocals is. It's an amazing thing to watch as well as the year. But Don was as important as they came don began to emulate bucks a guitar playing style and Buck always been the lead guitarist in all of his bands. And in fact it's been a lead guitarist in capital as a studio musician pretty much let don takeover the league hardee's because he became that good and So Don was was the lead guitarist. Don Sang harmony vocals. Don was also the the pretty much the manager of the band he was in charge of keeping keeping the act together and and he was kind of you know honestly buck soulmate They they just work together So perfectly That when there was no more done things were never ever the same for bug. Personally really yeah. There's a poignant bit towards the end where bucks talking about Don who died in a motorcycle. Accident in the early seventies they said I've started to wonder if there really is such a thing as reincarnation because if there is there's no doubt that Don were brothers in another lifetime. We weren't just brothers. We were twins. We had a sort of telepathic Telepathy with each other. Well that's what it was with me don musical telepathy and no matter how. I searched for another person who could read my musical mind the way he could read mine and I could read his. I couldn't find anybody else like him and he just went to. You know bucks not a very emotional person. He he about multiple divorces and difficulties with this new losses. Numerous family members pretty restraint ways but when he talks about losing don rich he's pretty open. This just absolutely shattered him. Yeah I mean. Imagine listening to that cassette. It was heavy it because I like I. I'll tell you this I met Buck Owens. One time in my life. I was in Nashville at the Loews. Vanderbilt Hotel And that Attorney I mentioned that I had called to ask about a buck book The that attorney was standing with Buck Owens in the lobby there at the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel and and I. This was twenty years ago and of course dying to meet. Buck and so I got the attorney to introduce me to him. Buck was a very tall guy. Surprisingly Tall And a kind of aloof until I told him that I had actually done a reissue of one of his albums and suddenly we were best friends. But my my soul experience with buck was this guy. That was eh yet. You know a nice to meet you in the looking over my head to see who else was in the room to suddenly being interested in me when I realized I had made him some money right. So it's a buck I knew in a microcosm in in a two minutes of talking to the Not a really emotional guy not a really warm guy but to listen to those cassettes and hear him talk about dawn He became the other side. Of Buck Owens. I I learned there was a very warm side to the man at a very emotional side to him and that I don't think he'd ever been closer to anybody. Then he was to dawn and and so it was a very very special relationship. And you know it's it's hard to fathom when someone That close to you his just gone and so quickly. that I can see how the damage was permanent to him. And let's see here another ten. This is a fairly early. Bucko and song one that kind of obscure one. I hadn't heard until recently this is a cover of dot promises and Mort Shuman. Save the last dance for me which was immortalized by the drifters this. Bucko into the buck. Ruse take on dancing.

Buck Buck Owens Don Don Rich Nashville Buck Owens. Bakersfield Song publishing Akin Nelson Don Sang Jack McFadden Producers Publishing Company Bucko Merle haggard Publishing Company recording artists youtube Stan rich business manager producer
Vivendi Teases Universal Music IPO

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:24 sec | 7 months ago

Vivendi Teases Universal Music IPO

"The resurgent music business maybe prompting a turn around of a different sort eighteen months ago the French media conglomerate vivendi said it would look for buyers for up to fifty percent of universal but now Dow Jones indicates vivendi is looking to cash in after ten cent holding struck a three billion dollar deal for a ten percent stake in universal music now vivendi says it's looking to take that company

Vivendi Dow Jones
Expelled Recording Academy CEO Says Grammy Voting Process Is Corrupt

WBBM Late Morning News

03:35 min | 8 months ago

Expelled Recording Academy CEO Says Grammy Voting Process Is Corrupt

"Just days before the Grammy awards are set to air up right here on CBS the recently suspended CEO of the recording academy is making some very explosive claims in a forty six page discrimination complaint Debra Dylan says she's being retaliated against for reporting misconduct including what she calls corrupt voting practices and a rape allegation very serious stuff Dugan started the job just six months ago Jamie you causes in Los Angeles with more on the story Jamie this is a big bombshell how's the economy responding it absolutely is scale in a statement the academy is going after their CEOs credibility calling it quote curious that miss do get never raise these grave allegations until a week after legal claims were made against her personally hi everyone I'm never do again two months after Dever Dugan help unveiled this year's Grammy nominations she's pulling back the curtain on what she calls a boys club that puts their financial interests above the academy's mission in the X. Huang is Rolling Stone senior music business editor says a lot basically that says the economy this represented itself to the public to its voting members and also to her when she came in some of Dugan's most damning claims involve former CEO Neil Portnow who was criticized for comments he made in twenty eighteen about the lack of female winners saying women who want a bigger role in the music industry need to do one thing to step up he later apologized in the complaint Dugan says she learned of foreign recording artist Hey cues Mr Portnow of raping her following a performance that you gave at Carnegie Hall this is the first time that anyone in the in the media has read or seen any allegations about this particular incident you can bet that that's going to cast a pretty big shadow over the recording academy for days if not weeks or months to come the complaint also includes an email do you consent to human resources and what she alleges she was sexually harassed by the academy's general counsel Joel Katz in a statement his attorney tells deadline Mr can't categorically and emphatically denies her version of that evening the academy also put out a statement saying Dugan's claims come only after a female employee alleged ms Dugan had created a toxic and intolerable work environment and engaged in abusive and bowling conduct it says it immediately launched investigations into both her allegations and her alleged misconduct and that she was placed on administrative leave only after offering to step down and demanding twenty two million dollars Dugan's lawyers refuted that claim Tuesday saying it was the academy that offer Dugan millions of dollars to drop her allegations and leave it seems pretty clear that the relationship between Deborah do again and the recording academy is fraying right now and there's no putting it back together in an easy way Dugan further alleges the Grammy voting process is white with corruption saying that the board uses secret committees to push forward artists with whom they have relationships she says this year thirty artists that were not selected by the twelve thousand voting members were added to the possible nomination list and if she's right about that then that's something I'll have resonance far beyond just this year's Grammys alone now for now has not returned a request for comment in its statement the academy says its loyalty belongs to its members and regrets that music's biggest night is being stolen from them by miss Dugan's actions they say they're working to resolve the matter as quickly as

CBS CEO Grammy
New Grammys head put on leave just 10 days before this year's show

KNX Evening News

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

New Grammys head put on leave just 10 days before this year's show

"Seven the recording academy his place its president and C. E. O. Dever Dugan on administrative leave just ten days before the big awards shows held in Los Angeles the board of trustees made the decision due to serious concerns on in a formal allegation of misconduct and they've also hired independent investigators to look into the allegations Los Angeles Times music critic ready Lewis says the industry did not see this company pull in the music business are are pretty stunned by it it's kind of come as quite a shock because there was a lot of anticipation expectation as to what she might bring to the organization and how this might change the shape of the wave the Grammys or determine who gets nominated or who gets voted on to win they're going to sell the position since last August becoming the first woman to lead the recording

President Trump C. E. O. Dever Dugan Los Angeles Lewis Los Angeles Times
Overcoming the Impostor Syndrome

The Product Podcast

08:40 min | 8 months ago

Overcoming the Impostor Syndrome

"Everyone my name is kwami. And I used to work in Mexico in product and I recently joined Verizon media about three months ago so putting you to the bay area objects just moved Jeff So the topic that brings us here. Today is a side. Just I used to be something engineering. I moved from sucking can humans product so What brings us here? Today's topic so comments up big from engineering to product overcoming the impostor syndrome Come out generally like to be a conversation on talk so I tried to prepare a few slides as possible so that it can be more conversation. input as well so going forward. This try do that. It's It's going to be a fun all right. So the agenda sell I I. I'd like to talk about next contacts about me What is product management? My jeans product Imposter Syndrome can start Just taking game looking what it is in in some fact surrounded and then some challenges I face and then five issues. I've picked up as more by on the issues that I picked out just Regards which gusset imposter syndrome and then how. I overcame IMPOSITON. Hopefully it'll who can it. It will be useful to you and then some key takeout takeaways that out like you to Renewed Aachen in Tacoma right. So start right with some fun facts about me So I'm originally from Ghana West Africa and I I actually grew up in South Africa. Small country called Swaziland. The Kingdom of size is one of the last remaining market in the world And it has about one point. Four million people so from very small tastes in Africa so I grew up in a family of entrepreneurs by parents. Aaron started off as teachers and I had the I guess I was fortunate. Watch them set up the own businesses whilst they were teachers indeed My Mom's side of the retail business. My Dad started my dad and my mom together started a consulting business in on. I was the African parents that to gifted children involved in your businesses so I I was involved in various aspects sometimes running by MOMS retail business. When shows away in my dad's business As dry vice over as Within the office realm so give me some good experiences. I was growing up so that I started my sneak of business so my mom used to as to start her business she should bring home some goods loss us as you said. Travel there on Welsh because back in she brings him good spots in for me. It was necas most of the time and I used to go to school. So Primary School in high school in I'll be walking. People become mention my sneakers and it took me a long time. Jackie free to create. That can actually make a business again. Why I'm wearing? I can actually bring to the people make some money so I sent it to source some sneakers locally inside. I got them for about twenty dollars. I got the start up capital from my mom I got them between Dawes. in-and-out seldom for about sixty dollars. So I mean some good profits in good the public money off that business I did that for a few years. And then I ventured into music so music writing music producing music. And I'm I'm doing the Polish Abang concerts and stuff like that so Figuring out how the music business works in that giving another arm armaments to learn how to build a business to learn how to make money radium. Each I moved here to the US. When I was nineteen I move for school? ooh And I studied computer science It was very interesting because I actually. I wanted to study business but I remember one time whereas Doing my assignment a friend of mine. Who Mentions me till this day your side Vm? He he told me hey. I think you'd be really good at computer. Sciences should try it out and I tried chided up and I never looked back. Site initially went there to study business and I change into computer science I studied in the smell coach. Westminster College in Fulton Missouri every small casing but again heavy time. GimMe opportunity to focus and to build myself as an engineer Either back on payments in the payments industry so I started off my sophomore year. Interim Mastercard work through software engineering in Minnie eventually a fulltime start working for them within biometric authentication. So that's been my core experience in fulltime. So that's been fun and lastly ask you Just recently moved to the bay air so the months ago I moved here actually three days ago as exactly three months. Oh still new to the area. I'm looking forward to exploring the era meeting more people right so this is just like A visual of my journey so the first one obviously a very happy mander was a struggle. School is struggling computer science met. That's what I studied in the struggle by that was the stock to Mike On right side Suicide my former company mastercard. I was basically working with the team on pitching a new product. And then on the bottom. NAFTA's about two weeks ago at my company Verizon media where I was lunching my product media commerce across Fanti company so that was finding new and in the middle was before I left mastercard. I didn't own your career panel where talking about the importance of knowing you are in making taking that risk to do exactly what you'd like to do in which for me was moving from software engineering product which is really fun. And then on the Bottom Reich. Mike is Me and Harvard. Business School with few Khalid's their house. Basically doing some diversity recruiting which something really passionate about in I still I don You're doing that for her as needed right so started. So what is product management. And so this is the industry definition. I have watched hundreds of Product School Jones and I always see this. Come up all the time if you go if you do a quick. Google search is the same as an intersection said a defining part on the intersection of US tech and business and then in the middle of magic you there. That's what they call the product management. What I agree with this Sunday by actually like using take a few aspects is a big element that's missing so this stakeholder management basically between us experience on January and business which could be marketing in sales and so forth? But there's no immensely add tate's the product manage. I feel like being being a product manager. Also it means that you need to manage yourself so I think that's using here so my a different version. I think it's missing you as a product manager. It's a big element there and you'll see wise relates to imposter syndrome and then there's some other Aspects that could doesn't actually say what you do as a product manager doesn't indicate why you do what you do and then how you GonNa do those things knock greedy evidence within the diagram so wise park management so I think I believe park management basically communists to things. So it's the why and the watts. That's what the product manager owns to the Y.. is going to be the traffic strategy. And then what is is going to be the product roadmap that you define based product strategy And then basically across this you're GonNa define what commensal wet solvent that always problems to solve in product management by product manager. It's your job to kind of define on actually decide what's important to solve in prioritize and in all this is brought together by the product. That's the bottom so this is my definition of park measuring

Product Manager Verizon United States Business School Africa Primary School Swaziland Mexico Aachen Jeff Impositon Ghana South Africa Aaron Nafta Jackie Google Mander
"music business" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"music business" Discussed on Planet Money

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> I <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> don't mind lets it play <Speech_Music_Male> for a minute or two <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> turns it off <Speech_Music_Male> everybody applauds <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and then <Speech_Male> mind gives <Speech_Male> us a sample <Speech_Male> in terms of <Speech_Male> the mix like the bass <Speech_Male> sound a little muddy <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I think he just wanted to <Speech_Male> try to bounce the <Speech_Male> baseline <Speech_Music_Male> and the kick <Speech_Male> drum because <SpeakerChange> a lot <Speech_Male> of the feedback was technical. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> what kind of monitors you got <Speech_Male> <hes> Yamahas <Speech_Male> but I got the eighties <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> I would. <Speech_Male> I always suggest having <Speech_Male> this <hes> and this <Speech_Male> is kind of what I expected <Speech_Male> but what's <Speech_Male> really surprising to <Speech_Male> me. Is that ill mind <Speech_Male> also gives a <Speech_Male> lot of basic <Speech_Male> business advice. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> isn't just Polish <Speech_Male> up. Your beats meets with beat <Speech_Male> making pro. This <Speech_Male> is how to <Speech_Male> make it in the music <Speech_Male> business. This whole shit <Speech_Male> that China do <Speech_Male> here <Speech_Music_Male> is just <Speech_Music_Male> like become successful <Speech_Male> right and the <Speech_Male> only way to do that is to get <Speech_Male> to know people <Speech_Male> out there that are mediocre <Speech_Male> that no <Speech_Male> everyone and <Speech_Male> they're really cool <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> there's <Speech_Male> executives that like <Speech_Male> being around them <Speech_Male> and they're getting every <Speech_Male> opportunity <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> it took them. 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Don't mind thought <Speech_Male> immediately <Advertisement> of <Speech_Male> that track that had started <Speech_Male> with the piano piano <Advertisement> loop <Speech_Male> those producers he knew <Speech_Male> had sent him. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> He <SpeakerChange> emailed it <Speech_Music_Male> off and heard back <Speech_Male> like a week later. <Speech_Male> Jay Wants to <Speech_Music_Male> use this on his next <Speech_Music_Male> album <Speech_Music_Male> L. mind <Advertisement> and the producer <Speech_Music_Male> who sent <Advertisement> him the piano <Speech_Music_Male> loop in <Advertisement> the first place <Speech_Music_Male> both <Advertisement> got credited <Speech_Music_Male> as <Advertisement> producers <Speech_Music_Male> and writers <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> which means <Advertisement> they get <Speech_Music_Male> royalties <Advertisement> appears <Speech_Music_Male> the song. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> It's a really special <Speech_Male> songs so <Speech_Male> it's called Love Yours <Speech_Music_Male> here. It is <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> love your <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> love <Speech_Music_Male> yours <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> no sustain <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> bang as <Speech_Music_Male> life <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> though says things things <Music> like <Speech_Music_Male> love your <Speech_Music_Male> night <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> noces <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> there. It is <Speech_Music_Male> love yours budget cool. <Speech_Music_Male> That's your <Speech_Music_Male> song. It's mostly <Speech_Music_Male> twenty <Speech_Music_Male> twenty minutes <Speech_Male> in the studio just <Speech_Male> making music freely <Speech_Male> with no intention <Speech_Music_Male> and having fun <Speech_Music_Male> which <Speech_Male> eventually got <Speech_Male> me a grammy nomination <Speech_Male> in and <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Music_Male> couple of bucks. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I love <Speech_Music_Male> your <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> night <Speech_Music_Male> the <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> but the point is <Speech_Music_Male> it wasn't just twenty <Speech_Music_Male> minutes in the studio. <Speech_Music_Male> It's what he's been working <Speech_Music_Male> on his entire <Speech_Music_Male> adult life

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"Fun really fun jam a little bit more have on that we were like that in college more we've just jam out a little bit try it i mean you have nothing to gain the great it could be fun can be really fun so what are your plans from we didn't talk about the legends cons about that a little bit because i was really cool that was incredible keith urban about forty thousand fans out there i think that was one of your largest i was so nervous too because it soundcheck you look out and it's like oh man that's a big incident over there field i hope we're talking about at the indianapolis motor speedway they have a concert the night before the five hundred and they call it the legends concert and it's usually of the country's on and you were there for that show we were there last year and it was just incredible it was the time of my life the indianapolis five hundred people i can't think them enough for allow me to be on it and all the all the nice things they did for me and and help them you know a lot of social media and a lot of cool things and but to get up there on that stage and look i was so nervous that no one would show up early you know skis not gonna play for another a little bit we'll have our fans out there but our fans is going to be really small people i hope she came back he's gonna come back since we made the big stays he might oh she has come back to when i laugh every time you give her the from afar not good see again but no so it was fun it was just so fun it was just so fun it was we actually we got a lot more time i thought we might get like forty five minutes i thought they might give twenty minutes and we'd be off the stage but they gave us forty five and it was phone pat got up there and choked beer which mcafee yes yes absolutely crazy awesome because we had a heck of a time out there that your everybody was camping inside last year that's a whole home i'm glad they didn't do it.

pat indianapolis forty five minutes twenty minutes
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"Taylor swift what i'm shake it off no it's like you know even her even her they were after she did that things stevie nicks right did not go so well tv people were bashing her nashville saying she doesn't write her own songs she'd can't do this this and this and she just went out and gave everybody the big oh yeah so also you a marketing genius doc about a girl that knows how to do it and she has control over every aspect of her career it's pretty cool i respect her some respect that too we play like a snippet i always did the song that white gotta be so mean go into that for more my songs and this girl came up ever she's like if you play that town nobody's gonna give you anything like your saas stupid and like the never mind about nashville nashville can be so stupid the smallest big town ever can't it's like high school but i mean it's all about relation and that's what i the discouraging part is is that you just try to anymore i've tried to change my attitude of like all right not what can they do for me but what can i do for them and and try and just to be more positive and you know 'cause everybody's knocking at their door everybody wants something it's it's i mean we can get it a lot of like man can you help me out can you help me out can you help me out and sometimes it's like i mean just to be honest and completely open it's like two i'm still trying to john mellencamp still trying to get his next thing everybody's trying right never until you retire and say i'm not chasing it anymore you're still you're constantly out there hustling and trying to get your next next meal next bone or whatever you wanna just saw jimmy buffett week ago or so and i have to tell you we were there i was there early you know that thing works you know go and tailgate and i was kinda nervous for him a little bit because it didn't look like it was going to sell out now it did fill up later and it was obviously it was a great show but i'm thinking of jimmy buffett can't sell i mean he ended up selling it out i'm pretty sure he did if he didn't it sure like i said it.

Taylor jimmy buffett nashville john mellencamp
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"Oh i would say dallas davidson probably him or him or a again scooter crusoes his pen name isn't it ruins travis field but traffic scooter crusoes slash travis he'll wrote my favorite kenny chesney song so in the mon meghan maui back clevedon sued that i hope he wrote that song and joe when i was talking about like guys who can just pull things and i took him an idea one day called only to borrow and man it's still my favorite song i've ever written and it seemed you play it for of course i care of course i came to here so i'll write only to borrow well this is a treat clayton anderson getting ready to play a song for us how exciting sometimes sometimes i we went to that we went to there's a key west our special that they put on bmi puts on and i've been down there to it before and i had i was oh i don't know i was up there with guys that have multiple multiple number one hits you know and i'm sitting here going oh man this is gonna stink because it's kind of over theater that shows like you had to buy tickets for the show and i feel bad for you guys guys we don't have one hit but but they're gonna be but they're gonna be so they everybody got chuckle and and i save this song for last and we got the biggest we got the biggest ovation out of any of any of them so that's that's when you know a songs so great.

travis joe dallas kenny chesney clayton anderson one day
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"It no no no no no that touch that part let's touch this other part so as sometimes iran them all by myself but most of the time it's a collaborative thing getting in a room with some good riders wake up in the middle of the night and you dreamt a song oh yeah yeah honored percent if you can't get it i mean like if you just can't get it out like right gone forever thank god for iphones remember what what poor paul mccartney had to like grind it down or something he couldn't you know i have to remember it in his head us that's what's so impressive to me about the beatles and listening to i i really i li i like the i'm only always lack the beatles lot but when they had that xm channel i started to be it blew my mind you didn't take the beatles course donut i you know i never did oh my gosh i just went to a one of his lectures recently gone the professor's name is escaping me and i feel really bad i'll add it in the show notes but it was fascinating i had no i'd you hear songs now and you hear him in a totally different way they were so smart i mean it was it's genius it's literally musical genius that it just came to them it was see i'm going to have to pull the oh look it up we'll see when the classes and just seriously it would be worth it i bet you would it's fascinating it really is if you really listen to their stuff in like it's it it's just i'd like to see the class because i'm sure i'd even helped me pick up even more things i'm like who do we there's people who can't even do that today yeah and they were doing limited equipment yeah anyway we digress no we don't because you can never digress talk about the beatles they're amazing but i just think it's great that for songwriter like you it's.

paul mccartney beatles professor iran
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"It was is really neat and then we we just kept playing kept playing kept playing kept playing kept playing how many songs how'd you written by that point i think we have like five original song okay one was was our i almost pretty good we still get requests for we still get requests every once in a while we're in bloomington we'll get this request because it was more about bloomington that was fun and and it's still fun to get them i'm like all right you've been with us for a while but yes we just kept playing and then two thousand nine showed up and i was like man we need to go down to nashville 'cause 'cause the end so the end of the tour was in like kenny's tour was i think in he ended actually in indianapolis that years later on in the fall in the fall sometime and whoever got to you know it was like whoever they picked grand prize winner that gets it open last three shows that we we didn't win some banned from nashville and think of playing anymore yeah it's like me i think being frankie ballard or the only one still playing frankie's doing pretty good but everybody else i don't think fizzle down yeah it's tough it's hard it's hard so we i went down to nashville with me and my guitar player who was originally from down there and we took our manila envelopes and went around nashville and everybody's smiling thank you very much yeah.

bloomington kenny indianapolis nashville frankie ballard
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"Of the time they so they did these competitions all over the country and for every kenny chesney up which was a brilliant marketing move he has a marketer you know brilliant he got an extra sponsorship out of it may talked about him a lot and you got dummies like us and let me so excited so he's going to sell tickets you know it's gonna move some more tickets but we got really lucky because every other one you did it the night before and then you played the next day we have like a month and a half two months to milk this thing oh so we went back we went into my our basement i bought it the my drummers basement and like probably about like something like that like this thing this machine he has its recording this pockets and it had like maybe six inputs and we recorded song original song that that got us into the thing and try to make it a little better and we sent it to that radio station and we worked him so hard that we actually were on like a i don't know what their affiliate was but they were i mean there were top they're like they're like the big they're one of the big country stations around so it was pretty a pretty funny to hear this crappy original song it was pretty i mean it's selling yourself so short i'm sure it wasn't crappy or you wouldn't have one well the song was okay the recording wouldn't i mean it wouldn't quite up to up to par guess what you can do with these little machines these days though is true okay so go back to the winning this contest did you get to open for kenny at the show then when he performed cincinnati yeah we got we got fifteen minutes of fame over that river being amphitheater not a great venue more fun hanging out backstage booking the boaters partying craze that then you i saw steely dan they're a couple of years ago awesome yeah but that would have been cool and yeah it was it was just it was in the i mean we drive in we don't even know where we're going with all these big turbo buses and and we take our little chevy suburban and trailer and back in them up and into this i'm like oh my gosh this is so.

kenny chesney cincinnati chevy fifteen minutes two months milk
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"Country music fan will i've always loved country music i was more into the nineties rock and roll okay oh like the cure and stuff like like well maybe late let's see like like lit and okay so low harder yeah a little heart like i like to cure i like like oh maybe early two thousands maybe like the killers matchbox twenty counting crows so i was really into that oh who's at mama on allison road every time i get on and ville road for some reason i think this guy's dallas no it was it but it sounds exactly like that they probably ripped him off actually anyway i can't think of that because elvis costello has a song called alicea that's oh jim lawson yes yeah yes jimbo awesome yes man they probably ripped him off actually because i sounded really yeah i like the gym blossoms to hate jealousy great song great so incredible so i was i was just loved that i really was into that music at the time and then an kenny chesney and which at the time all my country friends recalling the abercrombie cowboy because he had him cutoffs for the first time like white necklace thing but man i loved it i got into it and and him and tim mcgraw and so but when i.

dallas jim lawson kenny chesney tim mcgraw elvis costello
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"This memorial day holiday weekend but it was for a young man who's going to you and a lot of the kids they're already attending purdue and they wouldn't get their picture taken on the green screen with the i you back we do that i go come on it's just a picture that's how that's how seriously no i had no idea they're just freshmen have been there one year come on how what did you major when i first started going there a store i wanna be a car practice so sort of getting into chemistry but i was stupid and no one told me not to take early morning classes so i had like a seven thirty am biology or chemistry lab and when i started getting hooked into music which was about that time playing staying up late strumming on the couch you know i mean we were having some epic couch concerts i wasn't going class so that quickly changed so then i got into marketing and ended up getting over there and it yeah but it was just cool because i use it i mean you know i'm always constantly trying to figure out how to market myself and and promote ourselves to despite cast it's right how you going to be that system new people so it's pretty cool and actually it's crazy crazy how these podcasts are blowing up right and you've done a lot i mean you've done the big you've done pat mcafee is your your real involved with the ball barstool sports guys i know that you're good friends with them and that couldn't hurt you obviously but if you always been a.

pat mcafee purdue one year
"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"music business" Discussed on Kristi Lee Uninterrupted

"I forgot about me so i got in with some new friends and hanging out with some different people that didn't necessarily always hang out with growing up so couple of those guys play guitar and we'd why would saying i was like man is so stupid like somebody needs to start saying because i couldn't bo heard of of instrumental so i was dummy that that was start singing and i don't know then we i went off to you and a bunch of those guys what to do and and didn't have i didn't have anybody play guitar for many more so had friends anymore because we all know that hoosiers and boilermakers can't sit in the same room together without there being a fight exactly exactly and i didn't wanna go up there they always wanna come here's the here's what i here's what i think can well i don't know what the word i'm looking for but here's here's the reason why indiana university is better than purdue university is because all my friends always wanted to come die you all my friends always wanted to come down i you and you never want it to go up to joe ever never party at purdue campus i can't say anything because i went to you for a semester but i'm loved the purdue campus and my uncle worked there and night love mitch daniels and look what he's doing so i'm kinda torn i'd be a halfandhalf house without but we got to have both yeah got boat i hope the rivalry keeps getting stronger the basketball teams both look like throwing on the way up it was pretty cute i was at grad party yes yesterday sunday whenever we were just talking about how the days are all confused because of.

indiana university purdue university purdue campus mitch daniels boilermakers joe basketball