18 Burst results for "Museum of Modern Art"

"museum modern art" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Ghost Town

"Landing happy. Wow I love a good moniker. Like a little. Like mysterious fake name to this reminds me a little bit of D B Cooper which. I was just reading about where it's like a lot of specifications in kind of a similar like aim in way of communicating. Well D B Cooper was supposedly successful. Right yes in theory under no true but in theory he's successful as far as anyone knows the law is he's successful. Yeah yeah this case is well. We'll see the way that it goes but it is very unique very interesting enterprise. More people don't talk about it based on what? I'm going to tell a little later on so this is from damn interesting. This is the graveyard shift supervisor. At Harvey's quote. I don't think it belongs here. That was assessment of Bob Vincent so we refer to a note just outside the telephone of Quiroga employees only portion of the second floor of the hotel. The it was a curious piece of equipment of unknown origin loitering. Yeah like a weird tarp with a fake. Id M Logo. Congratulations in a cramped side room. It was a metallic box about the size of a desk. The smaller box tash the top near the rear right corner the front face. The smaller box was an incomprehensible control panel by twenty eight metal toggle switches which is really kind of bars to look at because all the switches earn one direction except for one. So that is the creepiest thing. You've said all during this episode. I was looking at some photos and I was watching a video listening some interviews and just looking at that photo. It almost looks like art. You may see the Mu Metropol Museum. Modern Art yeah had that kind of very. What's it has a kind of a almost like a very sterile mechanical but beautiful. Yeah because you know we. All go wonder goes one direction and said the one person who goes against social comment. Yeah they're like no. This is ominous the technology which bomb explodes but also the danger of despite that one is clearly definitive and important. Don't fuck with it. They're in neat. Rows labeled with numbered sticker. All of these were situated in the down position except for number twenty three. Oh boy which was.

Cooper Mu Metropol Museum Bob Vincent supervisor Quiroga Harvey
"museum modern art" Discussed on Making Gay History

Making Gay History

08:45 min | 3 months ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Making Gay History

"I remember being handed a leaflet and the leaflet said no matter how you look at it. Da Gov analyst was pushed. And that's when I put two together. When I realized the political impact of a social event that in fact he was pushed that window. He was pushed by society. That if he didn't have to be so scared of being deported he wouldn't have jumped and so for the first time. The organized response reached me on a gut level and that was the following Thursday. When I went to my first gay activist lines meeting. So then you were involved in activist activities through the early Seventies. What was happening by nineteen seventy one? Seventy two seventy three was that I was in graduate school in cinema getting a masters in film At the same time I was working days at the Film Department Museum Modern Art and I was heavily involved with the GAY activists alliance so those three facts sort of conspired to make me realize that I wanted to write a readable accessible book about the history of the ways in which lesbians and gay men have been portrayed on the screen especially in mainstream movies which reach most people. Because I felt that our image was at the root of Homophobia that people will be taught that the things about us as gay people. That simply aren't true when they were being taught this by the Mass Media. Buy Movies by whatever and that. If I could address that that that would be what I can do to help. What was the reaction? The book was published. I heard comments from people in Hollywood. Who say you know? This is a very important book. Because what you've done here is you've illuminated the ways in which we have not dealt with this subject dealt with whatever and. I wonder often I mean I have no way of perceiving whether or not the book did any good in terms of its actual impact on movies because I still see most mainstream Hollywood films. As homophobic history has brought us to a point where AIDS suddenly intervened and AIDS has thrown a monkey wrench into any progress. That Hollywood was making in the seventies and now people adjusts a scared to deal with the subject at all or be homophobic in the extreme. And you just can't go to a movie in which they don't slip in some fad joke. I mean a great film could be made about the tragedy and drama and the courage this community in the face of a fatal disease in my life. I've never seen such courage the way people are bearing up losing their friends. There's a story there. There's a movie there are many movies. They're they don't WanNa make you know because it's not happening to the real people the general public heterosexuals When did you become aware of the issue of as now? Let's talk about you personally. Affected you in quite dramatically yeah and I- steering territory. That WanNa talk about this new problem telling me In retrospect now that we all look back on it because of probably geography and Politics. I was and my friends probably knew about AIDS before most people in the country because of where we are placed there were a group of people who knew each other from fire island. I had met a guy named Nick Rock. We play cards occasionally and like myself was a collector of films. Nick was probably the first person I knew who died of AIDS. But we didn't know that that's what the disease was at the time. And it was only nineteen seventy nine. We were told that nick died of cat. Scratch fever which does not kill you. You know it's just not possible. The fact of the matter was that he had no immune system the dive cat scratch fever. It was about eighty two or eighty three when I really. The bulk of the bad news came to us and then my boyfriend got sick. And that was the beginning of an even more intimate involvement from me. Four of eighty four eighty five again. Jeffrey got sick and wanted very much to be in San Francisco. Geoffrey Geoffrey grew up in. Pittsburgh went to San Francisco state and loved. San Francisco. Didn't WANNA leave their and our relationship we've lived together for five years. We moved back and forth. Been Jeffrey got sick. He wanted to choose to be sick in San Francisco. And so I got a job at the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and I lived in San Francisco Jeff. Jeffrey was sick for a long time. A year and a half. I didn't know what to do to save him. You know when you love somebody you always feel like they're not GonNa die as long as you're with them you know I mean if you stay with them and you take care of them that they won't die and I really felt like you know against all rational truth. I could save him. Jeffrey became at the end. Very unmanageable emotionally. And psychologically. He was very difficult to live with and I was sick myself and so became a constant battle of how much stress I could put myself under. 'cause I was ill and eventually I had to go to Australia. I was booked to do a lecture at a Gay Film Festival. I was on my way home. They couldn't reach me. I was on route from Melbourne to Honolulu. They didn't know where to reach me. He was dying. He was in San Francisco. General and I couldn't get a flight out of Honolulu for twenty four hours. There was no space and when I arrived in San Francisco he had died the night before the last time I saw Jeff. He was in a drawer at the morgue. Nee opens it out. And they showed me him and I spent a few minutes him and I held his hand and said goodbye devastated by the fact that I wasn't with him and couldn't reach him and didn't see him before he died and also and I miss him terribly. I mean just terribly. He's been gone almost three years now and I'm still sick. I'm very lonely. You know it's hard to live alone and be sick alone and as many of your friends as you have and I have good loving friends and a great support system people cannot be sick for you know and they can't suffer you and they can't be with you all the time. Jeff had you during the time he was able to do and he did. Have someone fulltime you. I took him to the hospital and I took him to the doctor and I fed him and I cooked. I mean I. I did what I wanted to do but then Jeffrey was gone and I was alone and you get a cat by herself and there was nobody takes care of me who the hell is going to get into a relationship with somebody WHO's probably. GonNa die soon you know they don't WanNa put themselves through that. Most of the people who my friends are dead. Most of my friends are dead and at this age. That shouldn't be on forty two. Yeah and it's not natural by any definition of the word natural. It's natural at this age to have lost most of the people love. And so you throw yourself into politics. The images I've seen of you in the last couple of years. Why senior on television. I seen you in a very very activist. Roy Yes so it's been a hasn't been aged Has I was One of the people along with Larry Kramer and Vivian Shapiro and Tim Sweeney and a couple of other people who founded act up which became a whole new phase of activism. Not only for me but for the community in general and it's a new kind of activism because it's created a coalition which we would never able to achieve in the seventies stacked up is composed of gay people and straight people women and men black and white you know and effectively act up has been a very interesting experience because all these people have one thing in common and they want to put it into the AIDS crisis when by any means possible. How do you see your role in and act up in the future? It's difficult to say because At this point my priority is my survival and my health and very often. I have to take long hiatus from act up because it's emotionally and physically exhausting for a person with AIDS to go out there in the streets at seven. Am in the freezing cold and blocked traffic. It's really just get sick from it. I feel like my function and my.

San Francisco Jeffrey AIDS San Francisco AIDS Foundation Jeff Hollywood Nick Rock Film Department Museum Modern analyst Honolulu Geoffrey Geoffrey Australia fire island fever Pittsburgh Melbourne Larry Kramer
Revisiting the Archive: Vito Russo

Making Gay History

07:42 min | 3 months ago

Revisiting the Archive: Vito Russo

"So then you were involved in activist activities through the early Seventies. What was happening by nineteen seventy one? Seventy two seventy three was that I was in graduate school in cinema getting a masters in film At the same time I was working days at the Film Department Museum Modern Art and I was heavily involved with the GAY activists alliance so those three facts sort of conspired to make me realize that I wanted to write a readable accessible book about the history of the ways in which lesbians and gay men have been portrayed on the screen especially in mainstream movies which reach most people. Because I felt that our image was at the root of Homophobia that people will be taught that the things about us as gay people. That simply aren't true when they were being taught this by the Mass Media. Buy Movies by whatever and that. If I could address that that that would be what I can do to help. What was the reaction? The book was published. I heard comments from people in Hollywood. Who say you know? This is a very important book. Because what you've done here is you've illuminated the ways in which we have not dealt with this subject dealt with whatever and. I wonder often I mean I have no way of perceiving whether or not the book did any good in terms of its actual impact on movies because I still see most mainstream Hollywood films. As homophobic history has brought us to a point where AIDS suddenly intervened and AIDS has thrown a monkey wrench into any progress. That Hollywood was making in the seventies and now people adjusts a scared to deal with the subject at all or be homophobic in the extreme. And you just can't go to a movie in which they don't slip in some fad joke. I mean a great film could be made about the tragedy and drama and the courage this community in the face of a fatal disease in my life. I've never seen such courage the way people are bearing up losing their friends. There's a story there. There's a movie there are many movies. They're they don't WanNa make you know because it's not happening to the real people the general public heterosexuals When did you become aware of the issue of as now? Let's talk about you personally. Affected you in quite dramatically yeah and I- steering territory. That WanNa talk about this new problem telling me In retrospect now that we all look back on it because of probably geography and Politics. I was and my friends probably knew about AIDS before most people in the country because of where we are placed there were a group of people who knew each other from fire island. I had met a guy named Nick Rock. We play cards occasionally and like myself was a collector of films. Nick was probably the first person I knew who died of AIDS. But we didn't know that that's what the disease was at the time. And it was only nineteen seventy nine. We were told that nick died of cat. Scratch fever which does not kill you. You know it's just not possible. The fact of the matter was that he had no immune system the dive cat scratch fever. It was about eighty two or eighty three when I really. The bulk of the bad news came to us and then my boyfriend got sick. And that was the beginning of an even more intimate involvement from me. Four of eighty four eighty five again. Jeffrey got sick and wanted very much to be in San Francisco. Geoffrey Geoffrey grew up in. Pittsburgh went to San Francisco state and loved. San Francisco. Didn't WANNA leave their and our relationship we've lived together for five years. We moved back and forth. Been Jeffrey got sick. He wanted to choose to be sick in San Francisco. And so I got a job at the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and I lived in San Francisco Jeff. Jeffrey was sick for a long time. A year and a half. I didn't know what to do to save him. You know when you love somebody you always feel like they're not GonNa die as long as you're with them you know I mean if you stay with them and you take care of them that they won't die and I really felt like you know against all rational truth. I could save him. Jeffrey became at the end. Very unmanageable emotionally. And psychologically. He was very difficult to live with and I was sick myself and so became a constant battle of how much stress I could put myself under. 'cause I was ill and eventually I had to go to Australia. I was booked to do a lecture at a Gay Film Festival. I was on my way home. They couldn't reach me. I was on route from Melbourne to Honolulu. They didn't know where to reach me. He was dying. He was in San Francisco. General and I couldn't get a flight out of Honolulu for twenty four hours. There was no space and when I arrived in San Francisco he had died the night before the last time I saw Jeff. He was in a drawer at the morgue. Nee opens it out. And they showed me him and I spent a few minutes him and I held his hand and said goodbye devastated by the fact that I wasn't with him and couldn't reach him and didn't see him before he died and also and I miss him terribly. I mean just terribly. He's been gone almost three years now and I'm still sick. I'm very lonely. You know it's hard to live alone and be sick alone and as many of your friends as you have and I have good loving friends and a great support system people cannot be sick for you know and they can't suffer you and they can't be with you all the time. Jeff had you during the time he was able to do and he did. Have someone fulltime you. I took him to the hospital and I took him to the doctor and I fed him and I cooked. I mean I. I did what I wanted to do but then Jeffrey was gone and I was alone and you get a cat by herself and there was nobody takes care of me who the hell is going to get into a relationship with somebody WHO's probably. GonNa die soon you know they don't WanNa put themselves through that. Most of the people who my friends are dead. Most of my friends are dead and at this age. That shouldn't be on forty two. Yeah and it's not natural by any definition of the word natural. It's natural at this age to have lost most of the people love. And so you throw yourself into politics. The images I've seen of you in the last couple of years. Why senior on television. I seen you in a very very activist. Roy Yes so it's been a hasn't been aged Has I was One of the people along with Larry Kramer and Vivian Shapiro and Tim Sweeney and a couple of other people who founded act up which became a whole new phase of activism. Not only for me but for the community in general and it's a new kind of activism because it's created a coalition which we would never able to achieve in the seventies stacked up is composed of gay people and straight people women and men black and white you know and effectively act up has been a very interesting experience because all these people have one thing in common and they want to put it into the AIDS crisis when by any means possible.

San Francisco Jeffrey Aids San Francisco Aids Foundation Jeff Hollywood Nick Rock Film Department Museum Modern Honolulu Geoffrey Geoffrey Australia Fire Island Fever Pittsburgh Melbourne Larry Kramer NEE ROY
"museum modern art" Discussed on Personology

Personology

08:57 min | 4 months ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Personology

"Was devastating for her. To be with somebody else she becomes involved as you mentioned earlier with. Marvin Israel very highly successful really artist but one who developed other artists and he is incredibly supportive of her work and in fact formative in terms of talking with her about her work and what she should be doing or could be doing. She is sexually involved with him but he has married. He will not leave his wife and this is very difficult for her because he's essentially not really available even though he's in and out. Yes these two most important man in her life. Allan rbis Marvin Israel or in a way opposite Poles Allen doesn't really divorce himself emotionally from. Diane in fact their closeness continues right up until her death. Marvin whom she was involved with for ten years is a much different kind of person. He's pushing her to transgress. Actually and as you say he. He was married to another psychologically fragile artists who also had periods of of not leaving the house so Marvin's first allegiance was to margie his wife and this became increasingly painful for dm because as you said he was not available to her when she felt that she needed him and she and she became needier a needier and in addition some sort of relationship went on between her daughter. Dylan and Marvin Israel. Yes so again. We don't know precisely how that affected Deanne. It seems at least plausible to me. That Deanne was involved in engineering relationship. But Friends of the Ns told me that they felt that even if she had helped engineer this relationship a sexual relationship sexual relationship between her lover and her daughter that it proved to be much more painful to her than she might have anticipated in the way that she wouldn't have been disputed. The pain that would be caused by Allen's departure to Los Angeles and she was a woman in her late forties. She had to serious ballots with hepatitis. She was definitely looking older. She was always somebody who looked white young. As in the power to seduce in her mind at least may have been being diminished by these physical frailties as evidenced perhaps to her of Alan moving to California and Marvin staying at the end of the day with his wife and even being willing to get sexually involved with the daughter who would be then just a younger version of dion but I think it was more that she just knew that she was not his first priority. That is what aided her that there was another woman who took precedence over her Richard Avenue. Big Show in. Minneapolis and Marvin who's very close to design the show. More G didn't go with Marvin for that opening so he went with Deanne so she was for once the wife. I mean they could spend the night together. They you know they could share. You Know Hotel Room and it was after that coming back to New York and once again being the other woman the other woman yeah that launched her long and final depression. Her final depression obviously a severe depression. It seemed almost as though she were actually even no longer excited about taking photographs. I mean that her work wasn't stimulating. Her these relationships or lack thereof certainly also impacting her mood. She was aware and express being aware that ending her life would raise. Her profile would probably raise the value of her work. There was this vicious circle. She was depressed. She could no longer photograph people who were looking back at her and she had taken strength from that reciprocal gays so as she got more depressed. She was photographing people. Like those developmentally disabled women who did look back at her but it was not the kind of look that you could get sustenance from. She became interested in photographic perhaps sleeping people. She photographed blind people. It's fascinating to me to see that. She was looking for subject. That couldn't look back at her. At this point she did a a forget of an empty movie theater so she had done something at the very beginning of her career when she quit. The fashion business also photographing newspapers blowing down the street and now she'd returned to that desolation right around this time forum put her on the cover. They never done anything on a photographer before at all and they put her on the cover of the magazine and at the same time. The curator of the American pavilion in Venice at the Venice Biennale and he wanted to include Deanne in that exhibition which had not been done with the photographer before and all. This made her extremely anxious. She complained about this also to her psychiatrist. Now the people want things from her that she can't so. This death by suicide was not a gesture this was planned when no one would be around when no one would find her. She marks in her journal. A reference to her last supper and takes barbituates slits. Her wrists gets in a bathtub and is not found for two days. Marvin is one discovered the body and she knew that Marvin would discover the body because he had a key to her apartment in in West Beth. Here in Greenwich Village So Last Supper I've interpreted to refer to two things one is that she did take veteran slash her wrists so it is a little bit. Like Christ saying this is my body and this is my blood. And IT'S A. It's a kind of communion wafer and wine also at the last supper. Jesus also said one of those close to him would betray him and so I think she did feel betrayed by Marvin in various ways but but primarily that he wasn't there for her. There are many things contributing demands depression. But I think that that note last supper suggests that the thing at the top top of her mind. Was this sense of betrayal by Marvin. Dan's work was instrumental in changing. How we recognize photography as an art form. Something that we should understand a more creatively complex level than merely the taking of a picture like everything. I think she was very ambivalent about her fame. She did want recognition. That's for sure. And she did get it after her suicide. The show at the Museum. Modern Art that was done as a memorial. Retrospective was incredibly. Well attended if people were lined up in the street to get in and it was a huge phenomenon. There have been previous photographers for sure. People like Walker Evans. Who'd had one man exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art and others ansel Adams who were Revered RBIS did a couple of things I mean one that that has not been done before. Perhaps she reached a much wider audience because the pictures had psychological power to them that made them riveting so people who weren't otherwise interested in photography would be transfixed by these pictures and have powerful reactions to them. Even Walker Evans at Ansel Adams. They were great photographer. But but you don't have that immediacy of feeling that you do in front of an Orbis picture which I argue is enhanced or in part created by the formal ingenuity and artistry that is also in those pictures. They almost sucker punch you you. You don't expect the more time you spend with them. The more you see in them other people can't take pictures like this because they don't have that complexity Johnson Kofsky. He was the director of the Photography Department at Museum of Modern Art. He said after Dean's Death. When she suddenly became very famous people would come in every week with pictures of taking people up against the wall thinking that they were these close ups of people that they would be like DNA service but they were not like the pictures and people can do that. It was her so I think yes what happened very soon after her death. The Art Market for Photography Develops and people now see these. Photographs is being art and being perhaps on the same level as painting and sculpture a creative.

Marvin Israel Deanne Museum of Modern Art Poles Allen Diane Walker Evans Ansel Adams Venice Allen Ns Johnson Kofsky Jesus Minneapolis New York Dean Dylan Greenwich Village engineer Los Angeles Alan
"museum modern art" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

Marty Smith's America The Podcast

09:18 min | 9 months ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Marty Smith's America The Podcast

"I said earlier I blocked war or I put it in back on the exciting to come back to go to university to complete my education? This is really great and education was very important to me because I I came from a background of immigrants and my father was a coal minor in a shoemaker. First Child that went to college only because of football and it was a opportunity for me to have oh better life and I appreciate that and so I took it seriously and it was very important to me. Important to me is important to my family. Did I succeed at something. Eighteen and and I didn't realize until many years later I have a lot of intellectual curiosity and the university diversity is an environment that I loved the environment. I love the differences. The different disciplines and meeting different kinds of people and that kind of stimulation was invigorating to me. We'll get into computer animation in a moment but so many of your generation the greatest generation who fought so selflessly for our freedom have passed on. And they I don't have a voice anymore. What would you say about you and your brothers in that generation and the sacrifice that you guys has made to go over there and fight for America and the allied forces well? I'm not sure I knew how to answer. That question is answered different ways. I'm here for all those ways you answer. I think that the idea of democracy was so prevalent and sort of part part of our psyche so to speak that. When we got the call to go to war we accepted it? We didn't resist the way that for instance people resisted the Vietnam War. That kind of thing. The problems I had there you were told to go to war. This is your duty. The and series you win. You're accepted it and and we understood that 'cause we were fighting fuller it just so I kind of worked out. What's the value freedom? That's too complicated. Dance with the value of freedom. Ah The freedom to do what you want to do freedom to speak what you'd like to speak to live. The kind of life you'd like to live is very precious to have some privacy's precious. I can't imagine living in society. I I was told to do everything in a certain way I would be terrified of that kind of society. I probably would rebel but I don't know which way I might not. I might submit. I don't know but I hate the thought of something like that. Don't you understand that it. If you and so many didn't go fight that war so selflessly that might be where we live now. In in hindsight yes I understand but I did. I didn't realize I was young to realize the full implications of what I was doing. Twenty years old. ooh What do you know when you're twenty very much if you think you. Do you think you know everything. Would you don't really know much about life. It's it's it's miraculous to me and I don't know I don't know how I could begin to articulate. How humbling it is to have the opportunity to chat with you about it? Because I personally don't believe that we as a people respect freedom freedom enough respect the opportunity that we can walk out that door every single day and go do and be an aspire to be whatever the hell we wanna do be an aspire. Well I thank the many people in Europe who have discovered democracy Eh sometimes understand it better than we do. Because they've lived with fascism communism and they know that the ups and downs of those societies and appreciate what it means to have freedom. Sometimes we forget I think in this country we're living in a time of many people will have forgotten what that really means and the implications of what could be coming down the road. If we're not careful what do you think you were able. We'll start discussing the war after all those years of compartmentalizing elsewhere. I think partly because I've watched what's happened to our society to our country country the politics of country. What's happened to different administrations? The kind of decisions made the kind of conflicts it's was created for people to simply become learn interested in politics and I was when I was young. That's nothing real complicated about it. All right how would you describe your impact on computer animation. I don't know I I know when I made uh-huh Hummingbird I didn't I was thinking more in terms of making an animated film that nobody ever made me for the idea of character. Character animation was an alien concept. At that time I saw. Gee wouldn't it be fun to make a drawing of a bird and see if I could do something to make it look like it. Flies were moves in space and I had available to me the resources to try that and so for the fun of it had decided. Well I'm going to make this film but I'm going to pretend that the computer is an intelligent machine and that it draw the bird. I this is what hummingbird film starts out and a museum. Modern Art picked up on that and it showed in two thousand seventeen in the minute exhibition called thinking machines but the idea was to let the computer I like. The idea of science fiction quality about him is a little bit of that not very much but just a touch of it and and then I tried to do what I could with the tools that I had available to him which we're not pretty primitive at the time said at least and then use later. As as I got more involved with the computer I began to understand its implications in other areas especially animation and I started one of the first two or three companies in the world in computer animation here in Columbus Ohio and we had an momentary success then collapsed because of many factors but I did not realize how important it was really at the time I started. I didn't I didn't I didn't have the vision and see where the next step was. Because I didn't I couldn't anticipate the kinds of software development. I knew what was needed but I didn't realize realize how things would work out. What was the hummingbird project? First computer character animation probably was ever done and I know the Russians made the claim that they did it in nineteen sixty eight when he was nine hundred sixty seven and uh it's It was significant because it demonstrated the potential of computers to do animation Asian. Well did understand all the details of what would be involved. I anticipated that this play an important role in society city in fact my first. NSF grant one of the reasons I got it was because I could see many implications other. The people could not see in education in communication in animation. And things like that. I made a huge difference. What do you think about the Smithsonian his own IAN magazine calling you the father of digital animation? I find it strange because I think well I can make H. Some claims But the feel of computer technology is so complex. It's hard to say one person did it. ooh I think I would say I'm part of a small cluster of people that were involved with computer animation and I don't mind the title of father of computer animation. It sounds good. I don't know if it's true or not but I liked the idea told you this interview. It was amazing. WE'RE GOING TO GET RIGHT BACK TO MR Surrey. And his amazing story in just a few moments but.

"museum modern art" Discussed on The Digital Story

The Digital Story

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on The Digital Story

"Lynda dot com is still there and <hes> all my titles are still there but <hes> clearly lincoln is starting in to move in the direction other lincoln learning site and you can see all of my stuff there as well in addition to all the other creative stuff in addition to all sorts of stuff that isn't on linda business stuff and so forth and if you wanna take a look you can try it free for thirty days. Just click on the tile. That's it's on all the pages of digital story and you know take a look at it. If you're interested in brushing up your skills on anything creative stuff business stuff need to finally learn powerpoint later. It happens to be quick on his style. Give it a world so low virtual camera club business a big. Thanks to our inner circle members the folks that support this podcast <hes> through their membership to the inner circle and <hes>. I thank all of you so much. <hes> i have some new content. That's going to be going on our patriot on site <hes> scheduled for a september so if you're an an inner circle member keep an eye out. You should get an email no so i probably something new there and just know that i thank you so much for being a part of this effort i so appreciate appreciate it and also we have tiles <hes> from being h and amazon and lincoln learning and other sites <hes> there on on the digital story if you are going to make a purchase especially if i talked about like the g. five x or whatever on either being amazon then if if you cook on those tiles i <hes> it really helps support the site <hes> we have tile for audio. We have <hes> a tile for lavar. <hes> you know you can pre the order lumina four now. We have all sorts of stuff on there. <hes> check it out something that grabs you click on it and take a look and then finally a huge. Thanks thanks to our friends at red river paper. I'm working on an article right now. I'm hoping we'll be up by the next podcast. <hes> where i'm talking talking about fine art red river paper i test four different grades and then i'm using eleven by fourteen taper because it's almost almost a perfect match to the dimensions of a microphone third sensor and you know that whole thing <hes> fascinated me and the eleven by fourteen prints are nice size. It is a cool article and i'm doing some fine art stuff with it so i'll let you know and that's up but again you know my partnership with red river paper made all of this as possible <hes> they have amazing paper. I mean this is museum. Quality paper that i'm testing this archival stuff you could go to the museum modern art in see this kind of paper you know hanging on the wall there <hes> they have to toils they have reviews everything you need to get your printing going red river paper and have terrific facebook page at facebook dot com slash over paper right. It's gonna do it for me this week. Thank you so much much for joining me. I'm glad to be back northern california a bit more to my liking headed great time favorite really happy the race stuff for next week. Come back and join me until then have a great week by <music>..

lincoln amazon museum modern art facebook california lumina thirty days
"museum modern art" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"This is ninety nine percent invisible. I'm roman mars. Don't trust anyone who doesn't love a good map even something as everyday everyday in basic as rand mcnally road atlas could occupy me for our first in the backseat of a hot car but if you want my eyes to literally dilate with excitement segment show me a three d. physical scale model of a city. There's one of these in san francisco a forty one thirty seven foot scale model of the city that was created created in the late nineteen thirties and then lost for decades. It was recently unearthed refurbished in distributed in pieces to neighborhood libraries. I had heard what about this crazy model years ago. Some cryptic allusion to it may be in the chronicle. They just said there was this enormous normal scale model of san francisco that once was on display briefly and then vanished the idea that there was a miniature world. There's something just so irresistible. Your child like brain. This model of the city is a tangible three d roadmap through time and space triggering stories. He's from san francisco's past realities of the present and visions of the future. These stories were collected by the kitchen sisters. David nelson n. nikki silva in produced houston into the gorgeous audio collage. We're going to play for you today. Here's nikki solo our story begins with this gigantic handmade model made up of over six six thousand tiny carved buildings and bridges forgotten for almost eighty years it involves artists curator's poets planners and a mega collaboration between s._f. Moma and twenty nine branches of the san francisco public library this abject has become the catalyst for over one hundred public programs throughout san francisco. It's activated bicycle tours. It's lured in thousands of locals and tourists than historians triggered people's oppose memories and generated questions and ideas about how we can go forward as a city keeping dynamic and diverse and justin hospitable biddable protecting the environment a pretty tall order for an object welcome to san francisco stories from the model city. The nineteen thirty eight model was made to the scale of one inch to one hundred feet from fun where considerable carving was required poplar sugar pine were the woods used list shrubbery growing on the map is made of wire wool pieces of sponge and beat seeds and stella lachmann associate for public public dialogue at the san francisco museum modern art and the current keeper of the model three quarters of a century different keepers for this thing. It's a very very big object to keep the entire model when it's reassembled is almost forty by forty feet absolutely colossal. I'm dr gray bracken geographer vert u._c. berkeley. I was alerted that this model existed by some of the custodians of the u._c. Warehouse fortunately blue dumpster it the reason for building owners to put a lot of people to work during the depression twelve hundred men months of labor according to the w._p._a. Records about thirty five people working every week for two years. The other thing was to create this this model as a planning and educational tool that would always be on public display. This took place during the nineteen thirties when the city was being completely transformed harmed by the new deal public works projects the two bridges the eastshore freeway the airports treasure island this model. It's a three dimensional freeze frame of what the city was like at the time of the treasure island world's fair just before pearl harbor at the time of the world's fair the model city featuring every every single structure in every single neighborhood was still under construction but there's a photograph of eleven women wearing ingrid bergman style hats and capes lined up along a finished portion of the model on display for the first time and one thousand nine hundred thirty nine on treasure island. I hear green come through the golden gate international exposition on man made pleasure island treasure island is a artificial lila and named after the robert louis stevenson island made by piling up sand and rocks in the bay created for the great international exposition. The world's fair of nineteen thirty nine nineteen forty sort of a u. n. like feeling the brotherhood of pacific nations and i'm gary camelia author of cool grey city of love forty-nine views of san francisco marin reflections bring beauty from the sky the the whole world's fair concepts were kind of psychedelic fantastic made up architecture an enormous courts incredible lighting up model would be a perfect fit for treasure island the whole city in one room angel.

san francisco treasure island san francisco museum modern ar rand mcnally David nelson n. nikki silva ingrid bergman stella lachmann golden gate Moma berkeley gary camelia dr gray houston robert louis u. n. forty one thirty seven foot ninety nine percent one hundred feet three quarters
"museum modern art" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Fifty and it is time to talk about the warriors or actually, their house or arena. Tonight's game six the NBA finals against the raptors, we know there will be no more basketball played there after tonight. But what happens for the arena to discuss? Us. Join studio by KCBS chronicle insider, Phil matere. What are they going to do with the place Ville? Well, it's interesting. Keep going on. I mean I understand that. It's maybe not going to have the name oracle because that probably goes with the warriors, it's not going to have the glitz of the new chase center address for the warriors arena in San Francisco, it's not even gonna have pieces of art from the museum modern art or a restaurant by Michael many in the area. But one thing, it does have is parking. Still an attraction for big event arenas. It sits there in the East Bay. It's readily accessible. It's mortgages, virtually paid off the Oakland Alameda Coliseum authority will continue to roll on, and they'll continue to be having shows there that I think are going to continue to attract people going to be interested in Phil in reference to those shows when it comes to acoustics, if you've ever been to concert not going to name names, but it's the rain in the south bay. Are awful? They're so it, it's on the new chase arena and how they're just don't know musical acts may end up, preferring going to Oakland. We'll see it's going to be interesting because, like I said, it does a lot of the first wrung out of the center, it's big it's big Rollo. They've got everybody from selene Dion too. Join everybody's passing through there. And the oracle people know that they know that there's going to be a euro to where they're going to see you know, straight up. But like I said, they're going to sit there and go okay, but we have parking, so a lot of this is going to depend on how well chase works out on the arena here, but also look there's still a need for the various concert events space. It's not just concerts. They'll bring in Reno football that could bring in some college basketball games. There's a lot of different tournaments. There's a lot of different things that can go in to the spaces like this is also interesting that people say, well, okay, what's the long term long term? Is that building is standing, and it's going to take a lot of money to bring it down. And if you look at the as who are looking to acquire half that site or possibly the whole site of, of the Coliseum complex for their develop their development so far, at least the sketches we've seen include the arena, so that's there. And they also include the raiders. Her stadium there, or at least part of it because that takes breakdown. So we have the cow palace that didn't go away with all these new arenas coming in the SAP center didn't go away or it's still there. And I think the oracle arena will be there as well. The warriors they but the arena will be this, you'll have cows at the cow palace. I'm looking forward, of course, fill to the flea markets and the monster truck polls. That's right. And well where there is an event. They'll be a place to put it on. So we'll see what it is. Thanks, a lot will catch up with, again, tomorrow, at the same time, KCBS news time seven fifty four. Checking financial news Jason Brooks. Joining us from the KCBS super micro Intel many desk, Susan mortgage rates are closing in their lowest levels two years. Freddie, MAC reported that the thirty year fixed rate remained unchanged.

raptors KCBS chronicle cow palace KCBS Phil matere oracle Oakland Alameda Coliseum selene Dion raiders NBA East Bay San Francisco Oakland basketball Jason Brooks Freddie Intel museum modern art Reno Michael
"museum modern art" Discussed on The Digital Story

The Digital Story

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on The Digital Story

"And a part of the peel was the way that they were cropped he most of them were cropped as squares or just slightly off square. So they're mainly shoulders up so their head and shoulders portrait's in a lot of times, not always, but a lot of times the face was, you know, angled directly at the camera or slightly off axis from the camera. So as you're looking at these things, you just boom feel like you're right there in one of the things that I've learned with Instagram over the years, is that the images that just really jump out of. That square frame are the ones that often have the most appeal for viewers. In other words, you know they don't have to search through all the little elements in the frame. There's this a couple major items here going on. They can digest it quickly, there, usually scrolling through the images quickly, they can digest it, and then appreciate it, and then, of course, move on. And I think that, that works even beyond Instagram. I think that can work in other as and even prints, and as I was looking at these big prints that, you know, crop tightly and squares frames that were hanging on the wall. I just could just take them in so easily. And at the same time, I really felt like I could pick up the vibe of the subject. You know, I didn't really have to, to search through it. The fact that there was repetition of this. I think that contributed to it. And of course, this was his style. So I'm not saying that. You know, suddenly I'm going to start cropping all my images, this way are making all my portrait's this way. But I like the idea of having them accessible and with a certain sense of urgency to them. I thought that was pretty cool as something that I had reserved a mainly for my Instagram work, but now, you know, who knows I may broaden that scope to other areas as well. So those were my five takeaways from my visit to San Francisco museum modern art hanging out with Andy Warhol art is what you can get away with the photograph doesn't need to be the end. Product repetition, can be interesting. Be bold with color and take an Instagram approach to your portrait's. Tell you. I'm looking at some of those shots where I've played with some of these things, maybe a phase who knows. But right now I'm having a blast with them. All about image quality size and resolution for publishing your gallery online. So this is a piece of got off the portfolio box blog that I thought was really interesting. You know, when I was the moderator for the skyline Facebook, public photography group. One of the questions got all the time. What's the best way to prepare my images for display online? And, you know, so they always wanted to know things like, you know, the dimensions was the best dimensions, because there's some compression, that's going to happen. And, you know, does DP I make a difference daas per inch does that make a difference, you know, stuff like that. So that was something that I answered a lot. And then I start thinking about, well the portfolio bauxite, what's the best way to prepare my images for that? So I found this article that I like and. By the way, this information most of the information, be helpful regardless, if you're publishing to portfolio bauxite or not. I hope at some point you do because I think you'd be really happy, but let me give you some of their tips. This is from them telling you how to best prepare your images for portfolio box galley, or basically any other gallery. All right. First of all, DPI dots per inch only matters when it comes to printing or scanning and lot of people cannot get their head around this DPI value has no effect on the quality of the image. Viewed on a screen or uploaded online for this sort of thing. Now, if you're printing, yes, it, it makes a big difference, but for displaying online, don't worry about it. I just have some standard setting on expert three hundred PPI or something like that. It's not something that you really have to worry about okay? At least according to these folks, and that has been my experience. As well. Now before uploading your images online, rather support folio box or anywhere else. Make sure that the color profile is s RGB..

Instagram Andy Warhol San Francisco museum modern ar Facebook
"museum modern art" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

"The design of business. The business of his iron is brought to you by mail chimp mail chimp gives you way, more than male. They help you grow your business with E mail ads, postcards landing pages audience management, tools, automations reports and more you'll know your doing marketing, right? Create a customer list connected. Online store test an Email variation or analyze marketing report growth looks different to everyone. So mail chimp helps guide you to make the right marketing decisions for your business. Learn more at mail chimp dot com. You and Todd are unique to a certain degree in that within this century. Basically, you've built one of the great buildings of New York. The American folk art museum and seeing that building demolished essentially, what's it like to sort of like have inaugurated the American Museum of folk hard see it alive and thriving. And then now have just exists as a memory. There must be is it upsetting is a bittersweet is at devastating. What's it like? I would say we're still angry, but we are trying to be at the time. And I think now also a little sanguine I keep telling Todd it's not a child, and certainly I think it was a huge disappointment. Because the museum of modern art has an architecture department. And they've never acknowledged in any way that anything was wrong in tearing down the building, which I think I would have understood although still been upset. I would have understood it it had been a developer watts of buildings if they were Jason to the museum modern art that they wouldn't think of tearing down whether or not they were officially landmark. But something about the relative newness of that building must have given people someone the idea that you could do it with impunity. Right. It just has to do with. It's not a judgment equality. Expe-? It was about expediency right in a certain way. Expediency is a good word. I think it's harder work to understand something that's existing and to understand how you can nit things together. It's easier to tear it down and build something new. So. You know, I feel that the architecture department the design department at least should have honored the presence of that building that was there before. And I'm not saying that, you know, curator's can stop what aboard wants to do or what the head of museum wants to do. But there was never an acknowledgement. For instance, they never have asked us for drawings or for models. It's as if this never this building never existed, and it seems so corporate in a way. Yeah. Now, you have a project perhaps your most visible or consequential one rising in Chicago in Hyde Park, which is the Obama presidential center. Do you remember getting the call that you were being considered for that project? Well, first of all, you know, they put out a general call and everybody sends in their credentials, and you know, you can imagine everybody just sweated over every single word. So he's over every single word. And then we found out that we were one of seven, and we were invited to the White House to have a conversation with the Obamas. And you know, I both was excited and dreaded it because it was so scary, and it was only on weekends because all meetings never took place during a work week. You know, there's so much integrity there. So we could have meetings on weekends or after five so it was on a weekend, and he knew sort of walking into the Oval Office and already. Hello. This is what do we stole? Obviously still pressing the president. And they were lovely people have always said, you know, you can talk to them and you can feel comfortable with them. And you know, was surprisingly true. But what we said in our presentation, and I went to go back to the idea about sharing values. We talked less about the architecture and more about the values. We thought would be important in bringing to this project to remember what values you you raised. Well, we use these two words and noble and enable certainly in his early work as a community organizer as a president. And she to they've enabled so many people to sort of grow and become who they are. And and noble, you know, in many ways, he has a noble, this idea of civil service of kind of sense of of potential dialogue. Of the presidency itself. And so using those words we talked about the idea of a campus rather than an object and how to make this center, and it's actually center because education will not it's not a lie. It's not a presidential library, quote, unquote. It's not per se a library, although there will be objects and material from the archives the physical archives will be stored off site and have been digitized. I mean, it was interesting because I just read a a memoir by Carro about going into the LBJ library, and he talks about being faced with these bankers boxes. Thousands and thousands and thousands of pages. But you think about it? And with Obama really being the first really digital president a lot of the spanker spock's is don't even exist because you know, they're not everything was on. Paper. So it's a very different idea of what a library is. But there will be classrooms. There will be broadcast studios like the one we're sitting in. Now, they'll be an editorial a productive garden a teaching kitchen. The whole idea is about teaching young people from the neighborhood from the country and from the world about civic engagement and how to help to change their world. Are rock Michelle Obama like regular clients, you show him things, and they say I like this. And I don't like that.

president Obama Todd American folk art museum museum of modern art Michelle Obama American Museum of folk museum modern art New York White House Expe developer Oval Office Chicago Jason Carro Hyde Park
"museum modern art" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Off rations conversation starts off the fishery about design store, and how it was created. But pretty soon you're gonna hear about maggie's quest to find the world's most perfectly crafted toilet brush among other things. It was a delightful chat. And I hope you enjoy. What's your name? Am what do you do? My name is Maggie berry. And I am the associate director of marketing for moment. Design store at the museum of modern. Art MoMA design store is it's the museum store. Right. Well, part of it's the museum store, and then part of it's the design store. Those things different the way we like to think about it is the store within the museum is a museum store that would act as a traditional museum. Shop is cells are reproductions. It sells postcards. It sells many publications about artists within the museum's collection. And then we have designed stores we have two in the city, and we also have designed stores licensed in Japan, and the design stores are something that's much more unique in different than your average museum gift shop it sells furniture. It sells lighting it sells design objects paper goods, jewelry accessories, and a whole slew of other objects that you wouldn't necessarily find a regular museum gift shop, and which of those operations is actually more important at MoMA, which is the one the kind of command your his attention. I mean, they both really command the attention. But I think we like to think of it as the design store, and you know, the store that we have in SoHo or the store that we have. Across the street from the museum is sometimes the first entry point for people to the museum modern art. So the museum has about three million visitors each year and are designed stores have over four million people come through its doors each year. So sometimes those act as an entry point to MoMA design stores. You mean, the ones that are in the city or in Japan, not in the museum itself that not they actual proper museum store that number is inclusive of people at the proper museum stores. So but still it's a lot of people people another way to ask question is of the two which ones cut the moneymaker like which one can you talk about that? The I hate to say, but they both make a ton of money for the.

museum of modern museum modern art MoMA Maggie berry Japan associate director SoHo
"museum modern art" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"It's interesting to me though, Lloyd because you're talking about in this day and age where there's so much content. And there's so many choices that you would you'd think brand named like trauma, which has a built in fanbase a built in brand name would be a no brainer to either beyond all these platforms or even for you to sell it to somebody bigger with the trauma names, still staying intact. Again that wonderful question. Chris the thing is they want to own the content they own everything. And also, we the only movie we've made money on recently is return to nukem high volume one with what's been we were partners with a vassal of a major company of liberty. Is it was a vassal of liberty, which is a huge cable company with stars SDA. Right. Af they they they allowed us to make a tiny profit. And they also didn't censor. They they knew agreement was they couldn't make any do anything to change the the movie on site had. Directed once. I had finished the movie. Yeah. So so that that was okay. And we will. But the point is what did we make ten percent of the half a million butts to how many you know, three or four years of work. Right. They want they want to own the movie they wanna either own or if they don't own them. They dump them. And I do say Chris that thanks thanks to competition, and and Netflix and Amazon did create competition to the cartel. There's no question. There's great great a movies and television on Amazon net. Netflix and even on the a major conglomerates television that way so there is better thanks than competition is better of material. But I don't know how much of it is going to change the world. I mean Black Panthers. I mean, I haven't seen it. But some all I don't think it's going to be around in thirty years the way the tops of injuries right years. I don't think the people who made big pool thirty whoever is gonna make the equivalent of. Dead. Cool. They're going to cite Black Panther has a big influence like maybe a bad tool or James Gunn, the of the galaxy guy or Trey Parker and Matt the people who've been influenced by trauma. You know? Our movies are playing all over the place thirty years later, even though museum modern art just called this. They just played Romeo and Juliet twenty years after his make in the Shakespeare festival, and they just asked us to reprint of a story of a junkie, which the MTA totally disemboweled over there. Double standard censoring tricks, where they you know, again, they don't censor the the. The media. Violence, but they censor the independent violence, totally double standards. So we've had I mean, I've had a good run made movies with fifty years with. No, nobody is telling may or Michael hers the trauma chain what to do which is pretty good. But now, it's basically impossible than I do masterclasses and make your own damn movie master, clay. Yeah, I tell the young people if you want to make money, you must ally himself with some major nominee in some way, Basle of one of those companies, and then you're gonna have to fight for you or just freedom of the mainstream. People are getting artistically them in good to them. But I don't have the ability a lot a lot of that have that are influenced by by you and your movies. You mentioned, you know, Quentin Tarantino you mentioned James Gunn Eli Roth is one of those guys. I mean, there's a lot as a whole pantheon, Trey Parker and Matt stone talking about doing things your own way. And I saw the trailer for return to return to new compliance class. Trauma over the top crazy characters lots of good sex, crazy deaths. How did you come up to how did you create this trauma style? Like when you see trauma on a movie for you know, what you're gonna get. How did you end up with that that way of making movies in that mindset?.

Trey Parker Chris Netflix Black Panthers Amazon James Gunn Matt stone Lloyd Quentin Tarantino museum modern art MTA Eli Roth Michael Romeo Juliet thirty years million butts twenty years fifty years ten percent
"museum modern art" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Store, but has this aspiration to be a world famous designer is discovered by photographer, sir, dip, it Asli, and then is transported off to Rome to become a famous model. But with again, a love story attached to it as she becomes involved with a politician. Who's literally ready to lead the people and create change in. The community was Billy Dee Williams. It was Billy Dee Williams. And so the combination of both this story of her finding her creative voice. And the story of you know, what it means to be in community was it. But it also was important to me because the vision of this idea of her ambition was inspiring. Yeah. That movie was also transformative for me. I think I'm just a little bit older than you. But it was something that captivated me. Just the way she was able to draw those beautiful beautiful outfits that she was designing the way she used Inc. In her drawings was mesmerizing TIMMY, no one had also it's what of course, vented my love of fashion. It created for me, a whole sort of style goals of the highest level, and it really, and so many ways was an incredible way where began to understand ideas of black beauty. Now. I believe that you began. Planning your career in the art world following a sixth grade art history class, can you tell us about what happened then well that art history class was the moment in which I understood that art could be studied, you know, to that point. I take an art classes and understood art making was in vested in the idea of self expression, but studying our history and understanding the way in which the study of art history was really a study of history study of culture fascinated me. And I had an incredible teacher Lucille ball who taught us art history. Very formally and supplemented that with those fantastic visits to museums. And I began to understand that what we saw on the walls. The museums was created by someone I didn't know the term curator at that moment. I didn't understand the actual job trajectory, but I did understand when I went into museums that somebody made that possum. And I began to think what could it mean. Or what would it mean to work in a museum my first encounters with museum professionals were museum doses? And I thought that perhaps was the job, you know, when you go to a museum, and it'd be fantastic people mostly women who would give tours, but do it in such a way that really brought you into the art into the moment. But as I moved through elementary school into high school, I had the opportunity to intern at the Metropolitan Museum, and that one I fully understood all of the different jobs that were existed in a museum and really decided then that I want that's what I wanted to do. I know that you were also captivated by the museum guards. And you've said this about the experience, I was deeply nurtured by museum guards who were incredibly gratified to see me, a young black woman in those museums. Many of those men have passed on now but early in my career, they all still worked in music. Liam's and saw me become a curator. I was invisible in the museums the patrons, but the guards would come around the corners film. I understand that. That's how you discover Jacob Lawrence's migration series. Is that correct? Yes, it was through a guard at the museum modern art guard who'd been there by then already twenty years when he retired from museum modern art he'd been there for forty years, but was someone who saw me often there, but then took it upon himself to point out the works of art, very significantly by African American artists, and very particularly made me understand the genius of Jacob Lawrence and the masterwork that that series is and that really began my understanding of art history. I and how art history is written through these various artists voices. You mentioned getting a job as a high school intern at the met had us one gogo getting an internship as a high school student at the met the. Politics Ziam like so many of our great cultural institutions, including the studio museum.

museum modern art Billy Dee Williams studio museum Metropolitan Museum Jacob Lawrence intern Rome Lucille ball used Inc Liam twenty years forty years
"museum modern art" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Of shopkeepers. There, you know, you're right. And so he wants to just show the depiction of war via land of by sea and by air, which I think was a daring conceit to do to your point about the characters in the heroism. I understand what you're saying. I mean, I guess his point was that you should care about them because human beings like us, nothing makes a hero aerobic. It's just that they are the fact that there present the fact that Mark Rylance who embodies that good guy father next door. We're going to Dunkirk the elegant simplicity of that sentence like, well, of course we have to do this to get in our boat. We have to save these soldiers period, and I think he was trying to elevate the working class through that model speaking with Adnan Virk about the sorry state of a movie industry right now, I understand that you got a chance to attend the kademi awards or is this one hundred? I one hundred. I can't remember the ninety. First. I should say something like that. It was the ninetieth academy and by the way wings which one the first best picture ward back in. What was that. Twenty seven. He's underrated what I wanna do is to Sinophile silent films podcast you I'm already outlined that would be graduates talking about Lillian Gish and start getting into those. Why met Lillian Gish you're not gonna be I met Lillian Gish when I was a kid. I want to hear the story. He's thinking I make up. I did. So my grandfather was a TV producer. He used to produce these like cultural specials for children. And one of them there was like Leonard Bernstein one. And then there was one that was shot at the museum modern art. Now I remember I've got a picture of me and Lillian Gish circle nights, seventy eight seventy nine, tremendous one of America's original cinematic sweetheart. It's true. It's true. You know, it doesn't go back that far and what I was a kid. You know, I used to go see all the Buster Keaton stuff and the chaplain stuff, and I was really partial the Keaton again. Why don't they? Why don't we have performers like that anymore? Why is there no talent anymore? Yeah. I mean, listen BUSTER, Kate. The all the mkx shocking to say Ryan Gosling and LA La Land is the equivalent of Buster Keaton, but you're right. The originals are great. And what I do completely agree with you on this when I'm always fresher, but people who don't know those movies who don't of as references might ask you once they go, how do you know this stuff? And I'm with you, listen, it's just like sports. If you're a sports fan, berry bonds, you seeing who are the other sluggers new book used to read about Babe, Ruth, Hank, Eric cetera, see the movies if you liked LA La Land, you go, what are some other great musicals the pass Nelson. You're watching meet me and Saint Louis in your learning, Vincent Minnelli and you go from there. So I with you. I always surprised by people who do not have not seen a movie prior to when they were born like Neil Evert was always amazed by me because I can't believe how much you love score says he and movies of the seventies considering you're born in seventy eight. And I said, well, I wasn't alive for the bills, but I'm aware they're pretty talented, right? Yeah. Yeah. And you're Canadian Mary Pickford by shut up Mary Pickford by the way. One of the all time greats Mary Pickford, of course, was married to Douglas Fairbanks, senior, and they had a mansion. Fair, but I do believe is a kid. I'm not making this up. I met Douglas Fairbanks, junior ones. That's pretty cool. I mean, I'm telling you the lineage of this. It's very good for let you go. One question. It's always bothered me. Okay. Victor Fleming same year, right directs gone with the wind and wizard of is nobody talks about him as one of the great directors of all time. Why not? First of all, you're right because those are two absolute monsters. I mean, how in the world get your top to the greatest of all time in the same year? And the reason why fashioning is just with the twenty fifth anniversary Schindler's at the Tribeca film festival, and they asked Spielberg if ninety three is the greatest year by directories, it's not for me to say, but of course Jurassic Park about that summer and Schindler's List in December, see, right, Fleming and Spielberg on the very short list of making to ECOMOG films the same year and you're right. You can't compare Jurassic Schiller's this to wizard of Oz and gone with the wind. I mean, that's that's about as good as it gets. And it's funny ryen russillo Yunan expect to be gone with the wind fan when temps had to be. That's a great movie. And I said, really because it's a little long, but how can you deny? That's a great movie. And I said. All right. If I were silicon gone with the wind, frankly, my dear. I don't give a dam for me as a kid. You know, I got to watch a lot of the the great new wave of French cinema stuff. Photo me is the guy who. Just got the the natural innate ability to make something real on screen in it never feels artificial. Is there anybody like Truffaut today while the four hundred blows is obviously a classic. You know that freeze the movie, it feels so as you said, naturalistic and honest pure by the in the French new, I was always a dark fan, but I think if you know my Elkin I would be more leaning towards Dr, but there's no question Truffaut surveys, but you know what I went. I went back recently watched breathless I gotta admit, no, I thought it was terrible. No prefaces icon IQ. No terrible, terrible. It's like conic. But it's terr-. It's it's innovative. Yeah, it's innovative. It's French Seeburg the whole thing. The Herald Tribune shirt. Yeah, but it's it's totally phony. There's nothing naturalistic about it. It doesn't feel like real life. It feels like a send up. Well, that's because he's. Plan, Oman guy. He loves Bogart, it doesn't. It doesn't feel authentic in any weight, any emotional level. It's classroom cinema. This has to be the headline on this podcast is posted. Dancy shop takes shots at Goddard and breathless. I'm appalled right now. But an answered your question. The guy that love today, Paul, Thomas Anderson to me is one of the great filmmakers. There will be blood is one of the best films of the decade. I love everything about that movie is tweeting vision spectacle. I thought phantom thread was great, phantom thread was great. That was unbelievable. And I remember watching it thinking, I don't know how many people will appeal to people like me, adored that film, the music, the costume design, Day-Lewis performance, and it's and it's so funny that with ring humor of that movie, you don't expect that PT Anderson's one of the few guys that can do that with gothic, Roman, what we're the caddy awards is horrible to attend his most award ceremonies. Are you know what it is? It goes by swimmingly well, the whole issue always Germans. You know when it becomes predictable if everyone if everyone knows that Gary always gonna. I'm best actor and paints doors to win best actress than right away people. And by the way, those are the later awards early on you kind of trying to build up some juice with the other awards, tactical categories and excited about production design, visual effects it. It's not as labored when you're there. I'll say that when you're at home, you feel like God another musical formats. Let's go when you're there. It's good, but a little unpredictability goes a long way. All right. We've been speaking with Adnan Virk. I think you've lost if you had any respect for me before this interview. Clearly it was lost on the go. Dr discussion want to have that one back then Virk is the host of Sinophile the Adnan Virk movie podcast show that seems like too long title is that, you know, that's intentional. Just make it kind of silly long movie podcast show. Now it should just be Sinophile but itself indulging. So wanna include my own name in there because I've been doing so much radio here and TV for eight years. My name will never be included in a title. You'll never have baseball tonight. Without nimberg, you'll never have sports. So I said, the hell of it, I think that could happen. I think that could happen. I've genuine competent to give to you. You know. Canadian, as you know, I worked at TSN behind the scenes first job and Mark milley air who is an odd cat. Let's say he wants his teaching us production assistance about good television, and he said, and he showed a clip of you can't remember the interview, but by killing wasn't the Bobby Knight stepped which I'll get to the second. But he said, you know, this guy because the way he writes, he was just like his dad, dick Schaap. It's one thought percents, if I can teach any of you guys when you're right for television, it's one thought percents, listen to the way he speaks and it's all because of the way he writes, it's critical. That's really nice every time I see. I always think one, five percents. It's amazing. That's all I can handle. It's really, it's really simple math. The brain pan the brain pans only contained so many thoughts for sentence, but I do appreciate that's very, very generous thing to say. Thank you. Add in really pleasure having you on the show. My pleasure man. I'm Jeremy shop and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time.

Adnan Virk Lillian Gish Buster Keaton Mary Pickford Douglas Fairbanks Mark Rylance LA La Land ninetieth academy Victor Fleming Truffaut Leonard Bernstein TSN dick Schaap Ryan Gosling Oman Jurassic Schiller Sinophile Vincent Minnelli ESPN Spielberg
"museum modern art" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Many apple is it hasn't been too long it's too long it's been it's been never actually as as far as our show is concerned this is the first live from here from this half of the twin cities we site we seem to spend most of our minnesota time in in that other one fraternal twins must be one has a thriving restaurant scene coffee shops that could be mistaken for modern art museums boutiques that could be mistaken for modern art museums modern art museums major league baseball nfl football nba nba basketball teams and the other one is saint paul i kid i love seeing i love it this week both cities or the recipients of a cheeky ten inches of snow the the kind of snow i imagine that prompted prince to sing slow zafy.

apple prince minnesota baseball nfl ten inches
"museum modern art" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Apple is it hasn't been too long it's too long it's been it's been never actually as as far as our show is concerned this is the first live from here from this half of the twin cities we psyched we seem to spend most of our minnesota time in in that other one they're not very like each other fraternal twins must be one has of thriving restaurant scene coffee shops that could be mistaken for modern art museums boutiques that could be mistaken for modern art museums modern art museums major league baseball nfl football nba wnba basketball teams and the other one is saint paul i kid i loved seeing love it this week both cities or the recipients of cheeky ten inches of snow so some.

Apple minnesota baseball nfl ten inches
"museum modern art" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on Inside of You with Michael Rosenbaum

"And it's all unvarnished truth you'll learn more you learn how we do special effects we raise money i we do everything it's all in those documentaries and i would say poultry in motion or apocalypse soon which is the bind the scenes of citizen talk see that trend hey go or farts of darkness behind this is truth you're going to see truth real question here yes this has been fun interview because i'm really getting to know you i like to go everywhere and i i'd like i'm getting to know you and what you just see your vision i see i'm getting to know lloyd cop seeing lloyd kaufman come out and so many different ways did you when you first met l raw when you met matt trey and matt when you met james gunn even trent hague who's up in the ranks you say did you really did you think these guys are nothing's gonna happen with these guys guys aren't too or did you think these did you envision the success that they've had where you surprised honestly by the slightest not in the slightest james gunn i get a lot of resumes and i needed an assistant of whatever it was and and i got his resume and it said performance artist obama's onstage that's our ettler i that was it i knew he was special and then when we worked together is the nicest guy in the world he used to riffing and tro juliet is proof right a three hundred and fifty thousand dollar budget that movie would be twenty million if it was made in nineteen ninety four with with a union crew and it's it's a wonderful film museum modern art just put it in their shakespeare they had three movies for romeo and juliet zefferelli basel and and and julius issues fart on on bosnia or not buzz that puzzle movie was awful he's a very good director leonardo dicaprio does i don't think he can it didn't even know what shakespeare is the only one in that movie who had done any shakespeare was the british guy and zeffirelli's was except for the one second of libya breast that's also a very exploited data version.

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"museum modern art" Discussed on KBNP Radio

KBNP Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"museum modern art" Discussed on KBNP Radio

"We are going to line in completely center in manhattan cory town feeling i had a glass want to get it right rating did you yeah we're last week he was at that can you have the with oakland live from a together if you feldman incident rebuilding for announcement at to sell nothing like mixing great are great that's what he can happen okay because museum modern art and he two thirds michael and remain is the man for some and my director at the ten minute restaurant here on thank you welcome is about and for those who nowhere announced he is a global because he might not really really with the the standing when you meet in of margin of victory for the and and in a problem about them and to me and the restroom rizzo has been open for with ten years with an of three is known between and you shifted producer spinning a terrific job and the new pointer to new gm and face you should've been it's a pretty feel some of these pitchers who has to be some condon second like sort of pitcher the fantastic location what average parts of an entre was place when you have to really of the should've been when the eighties the throw to do so and then you have the done in on a defeated three of those so good we'll see that in his like solely but if available catcher so those thoughts the problem with the one right you use you can have the most expensive stuff in the world but you can't have the cheap drunk right mckinnon i could have been two what are you trying to do it's really looking terms one that arrived at the video when windy so but it sounds addiction and was in the in the front row two to three slauson fan so we do cov anything from and why a go to in the thirty used to it thousands of.

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