36 Burst results for "Museum Museum"

Ancient tablet acquired by Hobby Lobby going back to Iraq

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 10 hrs ago

Ancient tablet acquired by Hobby Lobby going back to Iraq

"An ancient tablets acquired by hobby lobby is going back to Iraq it was looted from an Iraqi museum thirty years ago now thirty five hundred year old clay tablet discovered in the ruins of a library of an ancient middle eastern king is headed back to Iraq the relic is known as the Gilgamesh dream tablet officials believe it was illegally imported into the United States in two thousand three then sold to hobby lobby and eventually put on display in its museum of the Bible in Washington federal agents with homeland security investigations sees the tablet from the museum in twenty nineteen the artifact will be repatriated at a ceremony at the Smithsonian's national museum of the American Indian I Walter Ratliff

Iraq United States Washington Smithsonian's National Museum Walter Ratliff
Fresh update on "museum " discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "museum " discussed on AP News Radio

"An ancient tablets acquired by hobby lobby is going back to Iraq it was looted from an Iraqi museum 30 years ago now 30 500 year old clay tablet discovered in the ruins of a library of an ancient middle eastern king is headed back to Iraq the relic is known as the Gilgamesh dream tablet officials believe it was illegally imported into the United States in 2003 then sold to hobby lobby and eventually put on display in its museum of the Bible in Washington federal agents with homeland security investigations sees the tablet from the museum in 2019 the artifact will be repatriated at a ceremony at the Smithsonian's national museum of the American Indian I Walter Ratliff

Iraqi Museum Iraq Museum Of The Bible United States Washington Smithsonian's National Museum Walter Ratliff
Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I'm sure you've seen one of the Jurassic Park movies or even read the book many years ago, but it looks like a similar situation to Jurassic Park could becoming a reality, not necessarily a theme park, but there are some scientists who want to bring back woolly mammoths. Now it's not really going to be a woolly mammoth. They're going to use woolly mammoth DNA and mix it with African elephants to create kind of the chain between the two. They're the closest living specimens to a woolly mammoth that's been gone for what 3000 years, they're claiming this new woolly mammoth type creature could help reverse climate change. Is it a good thing that we want to try to take, recovered DNA and mix it with a current animal to create a new breed of animals? Yes, it could be very good thing, or it could be just like the movie Jurassic Park, a very scary thing. It's only in the talking stages right now and we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars to do that. But to bring back the woolly mammoth, something we've never seen just in museums could be happening.

Jurassic Park Kevin Mason Nasa
Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I'm sure you've seen one of the Jurassic Park movies or even read the book many years ago, but it looks like a similar situation to Jurassic Park could becoming a reality, not necessarily a theme park, but there are some scientists who want to bring back woolly mammoths. Now it's not really going to be a woolly mammoth. They're going to use woolly mammoth DNA and mix it with African elephants to create kind of the chain between the two. They're the closest living specimens to a woolly mammoth that's been gone for what 3000 years, they're claiming this new woolly mammoth type creature could help reverse climate change. Is it a good thing that we want to try to take, recovered DNA and mix it with a current animal to create a new breed of animals? Yes, it could be very good thing, or it could be just like the movie Jurassic Park, a very scary thing. It's only in the talking stages right now and we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars to do that. But to bring back the woolly mammoth, something we've never seen just in museums could be happening.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Jurassic Park Nasa
School Starts for 1 Million NYC Kids Amid New Vaccine Rules

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

School Starts for 1 Million NYC Kids Amid New Vaccine Rules

"Classrooms are open for about a million New York City public school students today in the nation's largest experiment of in person learning during the pandemic unlike some schools across the country there's no online option masks are mandatory for students and staff back scenes are mandatory for teachers and there won't be a test out option however the teachers union got exemptions for some help and religious reasons also starting Monday nearly all of the city's three hundred thousand employees will be required to be back in their workplaces in person most will either need to be vaccinated or undergo weekly cobit testing to remain in their jobs and the city starts enforcing rules requiring workers and patrons at restaurants museums gyms and entertainment venues to show proof of vaccination Julie Walker New York

New York City Julie Walker New York
A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:13 min | Last week

A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

"The good vibrations antique vibrator museum is about the size of a living room. And in glass cases around the walls arranged in chronological order are about one hundred vibrators dating all the way back from the late. Eighteen hundreds up to the early nineteen seventies and some of them are these beautiful lustrous jewel toned pieces of plastic others not so much they were super steam punk looking in the early twentieth century in and before they were definitely little machines. This is our tour guide carol. Queen carroll is the museum's curator has a phd in sexology and has worked at good vibrations for decades for a first stop on the tour. Carol wanted to introduce us to one of the oldest vibrators in the museum's collection. It's called the v. d. vibrio tori massager. And whether it was supposed to make you think of venereal disease. I don't actually know that's lost in the midst of time at least as far as my information. Sources are concerned the v. is old school. No batteries no electricity. It's got a hand crank. It kind of looks like an egg beater. If i'm honest and the museum has an old photo of a doctor holding a similar vibrator using one hand to operate the crank and the other depress the applicator end of it against a standing woman's back. Yes her back. In the late eighteen hundreds most people would have come into contact with vibrators in the context of a doctor's office in the vibrators early days it was seen as this kind of cure all for all kinds of medical problems and it was used at first in the doctor's office and then later in the home there is an nineteen teens book that was published by the hamilton dietsch company. Yes the same company that makes the blender that we make our margaritas on friday night which made vibrators and was one of the major vibrator manufacturers. There were many but they're one of the major ones in the nineteen so hamilton beach made a vibe and they published a book called health and how to get it

Queen Carroll Venereal Disease Carol Hamilton Dietsch Company Hamilton Beach
September 11: We Will Never Forget

StoryCorps

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

September 11: We Will Never Forget

"For years. Now story core has been working with the national september eleventh memorial and museum to record and catalogue the voices. You're about to hear voices that captured the lasting toll of nine eleven. What we know in case you just joining us just after nine. Am that day. United airlines flight one. Seventy five crashed into the south tower of the world trade center. Here's the tape. You see the play coming in from it. Looks like the east side and goes into the building and it was widely captured on video because tv cameras were already trained on the north tower. It had been hit by american airlines flight. Eleven twenty minutes earlier credible pictures. These happened just moments ago and one of the people watching tv. That morning was stacey threatens mom to call me at work she said stacy. How are you watching. Tv the trade centers has been hit. And we were commenting on that. Oh my gosh you know what could we do. We were talking. Maybe they could go give blood. Her mom said or drive up to new york and try to help. It was less than four hours from the dc area where they lived. And where stacy's mom cheryl worked an administrative assistant for the us army and her office was in the pentagon and she said. Stacy i've gotta go and fairly sharp tone to her voice and she hung up the phone on me. I tried to call my mom's office back and nobody answered the phone. The hair stood up on the back of my neck. And my co worker. At the time said the pentagon's been hit stacey coulter sisters and they all met at their parents house. They spent that night calling. Area hospitals trying to find cheryl and he couldn't and late that night her father pulled up alone. He came in the house and everybody else was upstairs. And it was just he. And i and i said dad finder and he just looked at me and he started to cry and he put one hand on either side of the hallway and sinking into his knees and he sustained. She's not coming home. This is it.

Stacy United Airlines World Trade Center American Airlines Stacey Pentagon Cheryl Stacey Coulter Us Army DC New York Finder
The History of US Presidential Transportation

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:21 min | 2 weeks ago

The History of US Presidential Transportation

"First us president of any sort to fly in an airplane was theodore roosevelt. It was rather short flight as airplanes at the time didn't have a very long range and it was probably one of the more dangerous. Flights ever attempted by president sitting or former come over after this short sightseeing flight. Us presidents didn't do any flying. It would be another thirty three years before an actual sitting. Us president would get on an airplane. The first airplane designated for presidential use was purchased in nineteen thirty three it was a douglas dolphin amphibious aircraft and it was operated by the us navy as there was no air force at the time. The co name. It was given was r d two. It could seat four passengers and there was a small sleeping compartment. The interior was custom made for presidential use with leather seats. It was stationed at the anacostia naval airbase in washington. Dc until nineteen thirty nine and during that time it was never once used by the president to be fair. Fdr was in a wheelchair and getting in and out of an airplane especially a small amphibious plane was probably something that he wasn't keen to do however he did eventually take a flight the very first airplane flight by a sitting. Us president took place on january. Eleventh nineteen forty-three when franklin roosevelt flew on. The dixie clipper was a commercial boeing. Three fourteen clipper which was operated by pan. Am he flew fifty five hundred miles to the casablanca conference in morocco to meet with winston churchill and charles de gaulle. The flight was done in three stages any flu rather than took a ship because it was considered safer than risking german u boats in the atlantic after the trip the army air force didn't want to rely on commercial airlines for presidential transportation. They proposed the president. Use a modified. C eighty seven liberator express heavy bomber. The plane was dubbed the guess where to when the secret service reviewed the safety record of the plane. They rejected it. For presidential use. The plane was used for carrying the first lady. Eleanor roosevelt however on a trip to latin america. But it never carried the president. The secret service then approved a douglas. C fifty four skymaster which was a transport plane used in the war. It was named the sacred cow ended. Had sleeping quarters are radiotelephone and a lift for getting roosevelt in and out of the plane in his wheelchair. The only time you used it was to travel to the yalta conference in february of nineteen forty five. This plane is on display at the museum. At the wright patterson air force base outside dayton

Anacostia Naval Airbase United States Theodore Roosevelt Us Navy Army Air Force FDR Franklin Roosevelt Charles De Gaulle Winston Churchill Boeing Washington Morocco FLU Atlantic Eleanor Roosevelt Latin America Douglas Roosevelt Wright Patterson Air Force
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"The museum features much shorter informative taxed in three languages finnish swedish and english. As the finnish industry has changed so have the exhibits. Giant machines used for forestry and mining. Sure the open. Circular space with the tiny cell phones made by the finnish firm nokia and interactive touchscreen exhibits that teach the basics of computer programming visiting the museum in twenty twenty one. The no his cell phones look impossibly out of date in the way that history tends to compress itself. A phone from fifteen years ago looks almost contemporaneous to a tv camera from fifty years ago. But it wasn't that long ago before. The arrival of the iphone seemed like nokia phones. Proudly designed in finland would continue to be ubiquitous. Everybody had an care phone at some point and that all the movies were. I remember when the matrix came out and they had they had their their phones and everything that it was like It was everywhere. And i think we're sort of still in that mind frame. Even though nokia has kind of declined from that but the way the museum approaches the gulf between past current and future technology is fascinating..

nokia finland
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

04:53 min | 3 weeks ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape each episode ever longer long fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Nineteen sixty nine was a banner year for technological advancement for one. It's the year humans. I walked on the moon. It was also and this is not unrelated to the technological advancement right in the middle of the cold war naked sixty nine. Finland was kind of a fraught time politically in a way that it was still the era of the cold war and we're right next to russia so our political relationship with russia has always been kind of tightrope. We've always gazed eastwards with with care and especially at that time. This is mattie hinton service coordinator at the museum of technology in helsinki finland. Hello my name's madonna and right now. I am the service coordinator here. In the museum of technology in helsinki finland. The museum of technology was founded in that banner year of nineteen sixty-nine by heads of finish industries. The idea was to make a general technology museum in finland. The point is that it's not silo d- by industrial sector. I think that the global sort of zeitgeist the technology of the time was taking massively forwards. So that time there were these. Let's say there was a coalition in a very loose meaning of the word of these gigantic and finished scale. gigantic industry. Had sort of. Let's say the forest industry which in it has always been massive and then there was the medal industry which includes the mining industry and and the chemistry industry thinks like this who felt the need for some kind of preservation because they started to in their respective fields notice that things are changing and a lot of the old sort of wisdom. A lot of the old ways are getting put behind us in the past. I feel that is very unique in a way or very nice in. That sense is that they actually came together and made the decision that we will make sort of generalized museum of technology instead of making a forestry technical museum or chemistry museum or stuff like that it was a cooperative mission so to speak so that. That's actually how i are. Collections started to build. We got these big donations from different fields industrial fields. That are still big parts of our collections. The newly founded museum decided that with us. Finland's first water purification plant built in eighteen. Seventy seven as its main exhibit building. It's delightfully squat. Round building that used to be filled with sand that the water filter through water. That would eventually be used for drinking or firefighting house..

museum of technology finland ian elsner mattie hinton helsinki russia archipelago madonna
Martin Luther King, Jr. Fortnite New Game: I Have a Dream Speech

NPR Politics Podcast

01:30 min | 3 weeks ago

Martin Luther King, Jr. Fortnite New Game: I Have a Dream Speech

"Epic games the company the developers behind fortnight have done something kind of interesting it also kind of ties into what i cover for npr. So i thought it was really interesting. It is as we pointed out in the last segment. It's the anniversary of the march on washington. And dr king's i have a dream speech and they've worked with time studios in time magazine to create this experience called march through time. Players can be teleported to what they're calling. Dc sixty three which is like this kind of a reimagined alternate universe. Washington dc built by users. And you can actually take your character and traveled to the lincoln memorial and the national mall. And here recordings of dr king. Giving the i have a dream speech. There are also like many games that you can do. Yes are you doing the usual fortnight stuff while you're there like my question. This is my question to an eye full disclosure. I have not gotten a check out this experience myself yet but a really smart gaming journalist. I follow erin ashley. Simon actually did you can find on twitter. She put up a four minute. Video of what people are doing. And yeah there's some of the emotes as they call them of people dancing and things like that but you can also hold up signs at the rally. There are collaborative experiences. That are sort of educational. There were puzzles. So yes some of the traditional fortnight stick. But there's also kind of a learning angle here too. I see people describing it as like an interactive online museum.

Dr King NPR Time Magazine Lincoln Memorial Erin Ashley Washington Simon Twitter
We Need to Look Beyond the Holocaust and Celebrate Israel

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:27 min | Last month

We Need to Look Beyond the Holocaust and Celebrate Israel

"My question to you is no you weren't. You're answering straight on. I was saying that you're having a problem with it. The holocaust is presented without The good news on the other side. Which is the founding the miraculous after two millennia. Founding of israel's is an astonishing thing however you look at it but the story. I mean look this goes back to aristotle when you're talking about plot or anything that you know that the worse something is the i it makes the story better and you have nothing worse really in history than than the holocaust and so But it are you saying that it's just that people only focus on that and that they don't come out on the other side to the founding of national israel yes i is in essence. That is where you know. My father used to joke. Always don't put the emphasis on the wrong celebral and You know this we say ourselves to This is what it is. It's a. The emphasis was wrong. From america's perspective i hear the jews telling they have one shot at the mall in washington right. They're not going to give us another museum. We're going to tell the story of the jewish people. And i'm thinking of kids who come from. I don't know anywhere denver. They come from indiana. Come to the come to the center of of this magnificent country where you have the air and space museum and you have the national gallery and where you have the lincoln. The i don't have to tell you. How splendid washington should be people what it should resonate. And what did the jewish people decided to place there. A holocaust museum. We should have put up the bible museum. If we're going to put up a bible museum but we put up the holocaust museum. Now i can understand. Let let me just say i understand. I knew l. e. l. very well and i know almost everyone i grew up with was a survivor of one kind or another. I understand the impulse of it. Jews have to carry this. Have to mourn this and have to be with it forever but if one was going to bring a story to the world then the story should not be of the nazi victory which is really i would say that. Part of that is the triumph of antisemitism. I mean that's what. The holocaust museum displays the triumph of antisemitism. What else is it

Israel Washington Holocaust Museum Denver Indiana America Lincoln
Voice Technology Provides the Near-Equivalent of a Hospital Room at Home

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:04 min | Last month

Voice Technology Provides the Near-Equivalent of a Hospital Room at Home

"I'm so glad to be part of this opening message at the voice of healthcare to try connect the dogs across the voiced technology community and if your healthcare provider if you're a hospital administrator if you run an emergency department or physicians gruber perhaps an insurance payer. There are solutions now. That are ready now. They can work today. That can deliver the very near equivalent of a hospital room at home thinking that real time vinyls like you just saw ability to deliver virtual video telehealth solutions and if it's a real emergency with just their voice they can be connected to first responders can deliver them to the living museum within ten minutes for emergency triage to that is available now during the pandemic and we need our the voice communities partners on the event today and out there watching could be part of that solution so we hope to connect with you about amazing care

Gruber
Jen Psaki Pushes Back on Reporter Who Claims Americans Are 'Stranded' in Afghanistan

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:52 min | Last month

Jen Psaki Pushes Back on Reporter Who Claims Americans Are 'Stranded' in Afghanistan

"Think it's responsible. Say americans stranded. They are not. We are committed to bringing americans who want come home home. We are in touch with them via phone via text. The email the anyway that we can possibly reach americans to get them home if they want to return or no. Americans is the white house's official position on what's happening museum calling you out for saying that we are a stranding americans in afghanistan. I set when we have been very clear that we are not leaving americans who want to return home. We are going to bring them home. And i think that's important for the american public to hear and understand. I'm gonna give you a scientific analysis of what you just heard from the white house. Press secretary off peter. We're not stranding them. They're stranded but we didn't do the stranding that's what that woman stood there at that podium with the big you know in the big the big blue backdrop actually said. We're not stranding them dummy they're stranded because they're stuck because a terrorist organization called. The taliban has taken over the country. Because we didn't have a plan we're just yet to troops out and said to the taliban have had it kind of what we do at the border. We tell illegals. Come on in because there's no plan. That's the way the bible administration roles. That's how they do things come on any illegals bring your head. Bring your baggage. You're probably a good person. Come on in come. you wanna come on. Come on come on. Forget i forget border patrol agents. Forget law enforcement. Come on and come one come all

White House Afghanistan Taliban Peter
Italian Alleged Mobster Linked to Stolen Van Goghs Is Held in Dubai

America First

00:41 sec | Last month

Italian Alleged Mobster Linked to Stolen Van Goghs Is Held in Dubai

"Most wanted men has been arrested in Dubai. Italian police say the alleged cocaine traffickers suspected of having bought two stolen van Gogh paintings on the black market was arrested on August 4th. Rafael in pity. Allah is being held in the United Arab Emirates, while Italy's Justice Ministry completes extradition procedures. The 46 year old is an alleged kingpin and the Naples based camera organized crime syndicate. Wanted in Italy for alleged international drug trafficking and money laundering. In 2016 to then go paintings that had been stolen in 2000 and two from an Amsterdam museum were found stashed in a farmhouse on property in Italy, owned by MPD Ali.

Justice Ministry Van Gogh Dubai Italy Rafael United Arab Emirates Naples Amsterdam Museum Mpd Ali
Make It a Quest: How to Reconnect With Your Creative Self

Before Breakfast

02:22 min | Last month

Make It a Quest: How to Reconnect With Your Creative Self

"Tip is to make it a quest beginning the day or the week with a goal you want to reach by the end of it can make time feel different memorable and possibly more fun. Today's tip like another. This week comes from jeffrey davis's book tracking wonder which will be published. This fall tracking wonder is all about how to reconnect with your creative self. Much of adult life can go on autopilot after a while you do the same thing day after day an end the day much as you started it there is nothing wrong with routine but when we do the same thing. It's easy to think the same things doing things. A little differently can sometimes spur different thoughts. Enter the quest. When i say this word i think of nights the hero on horseback goes out to slay a dragon find his way through a dark forest and save a princess. It is a pursuit. a search a journey. Think finding three clues so you can solve a riddle while we are not knights on horseback or detectives solving case we can adopt the quest mindset for daily life to just think of a series of different things. You could figure out to find a set period of time. Perhaps you would like to get to know a few more people at work. You might go on a quest to have a conversation with five new people over the course of the work week or maybe it's saying hello to five different neighbors in a similar quantity of time. You could go on a quest to find all the buildings done by a local architect. You could go on a quest to take photos of thirty different depictions of flowers in art at a local art museum. These quests don't have to be profound at all.

Jeffrey Davis
We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

02:06 min | Last month

We Need More Honest Teaching of America's Painful History

"Bryan stevenson. Thank you very much for being on the podcasts. For having us down here in your offices at the equal justice initiative here in montgomery alabama. Thank you. It's great to be with you so before we get to the reason why we're actually down here. I want you to define a term that you see when you go to the legacy museum when you go to the national memorial for peace and justice and that is racial terror. Lynchings have that right. Yes that's right so what we're talking about our lynchings. That were designed to terrorize people. Based on their race. I think popular culture. We have a notion that lynchings were what happened when someone was hanged. And of course lots of lynching victims weren't actually hanged. They were drowned. They were beaten to death. They were shot. they were burned alive. And so when we talk about lynchings we're talking about a category of crime. Committed by groups of people and racial terror. lynchings Are murders crimes committed by groups of people of african americans to terrorize the african american community. there was mob violence. There was frontier justice in many parts of this country where there was no functioning criminal justice system. If someone did something violent or broke the law group might come together to exercise punishment against that person and that respect you would see white people hanged. Ut other kinds of people hang but they weren't trying to terrorize the community. It was typically for a well known violent crime around which there was some group consciousness that someone had to be punished. Black people were typically lynched in communities where there was a functioning criminal justice system. There was no need for frontier justice and in fact hundreds were pulled out of jails and courthouses to be lynched and these lynchings were violence directed. Not just at that individual. But at the entire african american community

Bryan Stevenson National Memorial For Peace An Montgomery Alabama
What Is the Tapeworm Diet?

Interesting If True

01:55 min | Last month

What Is the Tapeworm Diet?

"The tape firm diet. Oh don't be real. Oh yeah see. The tapeworm diet works by swallowing a pill that has a tapeworm egg inci when the egg eventually hatches the tapeworm will grow inside your body and eat. Whatever you're eating the idea is you can eat whatever you want and still lose weight because the tapeworm is eating your quote extra calories. No no mall of that hasty lights. Yeah there's a few different times of tapeworms but it's the beef tapeworm or the tena saginaw data. oh good. it is usually used for these sort of quick weight. Loss schemes envy late. Nineteen th and early. Twentieth centuries advertisements touted quote easy to swallow sanitized tapeworms as a weapon against fat quote the enemy. That is short your life. Oh god as one to add recently showcased by the national women's history museum's website reads where things. Yeah that's super gross. Did they also cover the tapeworms and radium so you could find them in the night. Ooh you have like cool little disco parties in your belly. The nineteen teens truly the peak of human. Nope now this is the yeah. The nineteenth and twentieth century. That's still that's still that's reason. Yeah no no good can possibly come from any of this. Don't give yourself tapeworms. i can't believe. I have to say that out loud. So capsule solden pass by snake oil huckster and online today likely contain the microscopic head of the tangent. Saga gotta when people would order from snake oil medicine. It would typically be the head of this gross little tapeworm and it would develop into a thirty foot long tapeworm in your body. Oh that's so gross and not okay. It's not little hooks on its head and it would grab onto your intestines and start growing no and technically this is a parasitic infection called tan tan isis. It's called having well. It does actually cause weight loss. I bet because you have a huge worm inside your intestine eating all your food.

National Women's History Museu
The Show-Stopping Perseid Meteor Shower Is Here

Morning Edition

01:58 min | Last month

The Show-Stopping Perseid Meteor Shower Is Here

"For space enthusiasts and skywatchers. That means one thing you can step outside, look up at the nighttime sky and see some fireballs. Those fireballs come from the Perseid meteor shower. Even NASA says it's the best meteor shower of the year. And Jackie Parity who's an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, does not disagree. Yeah, This is my favorite of all the meteor showers. She's been a fan for years. You never know when one of these fireballs is going to shake you to your core. So if you can spare the time late at night, head for a rooftop or open space and just look up, I can tell you that you maybe you'll get one a minute like the average or maybe you're going to get a really bright one or a really nice, colorful one. Depending on the chemistry of the dust, Faraday says. Sometimes you get really lucky. The unexpected thing is what you should be hoping that you're going to get which is a nice big Bright one that's going to outshine all the stars that's going to look like It's gonna scare you. Although it's a rare spectacle that's completely safe. All of the things that are burning up in the upper upper atmosphere like higher than planes fly. Are flecks of dust, which can burn up so bright that it causes you to react with excitement and joy because it looks like fireworks. But there's nothing large coming down at you were not getting hit with a bunch of big rocks. Fair T is a pro. So what's her best advice? The one thing that I always recommend that everybody bring with them when you watch a meteor shower. Is patience and of quiet contemplation isn't really your thing. Charity suggest bringing your friends or family. It's not going to be like home. Sorry. I was so engaged in our conversation. I didn't notice that gigantic fireball that just streaked across my face, you'll catch it. And she says, you will not regret it. Mhm.

Jackie Parity American Museum Of Natural His Nasa Faraday New York
Q&A: How Can I Launch a Set of Unique Enamel Pins?

Side Hustle School

02:41 min | Last month

Q&A: How Can I Launch a Set of Unique Enamel Pins?

"Is the most effective way of launching by enamel brain pins wholesale and getting them into the right hands at museum and hospital gift shops nationally. The pens are high. Quality enamel designed by me manufactured. In china they are loved by neuroscientists neurologists psychologists and others. Who work with the brain or people who have brain injuries or illnesses. I thought about emailing links and sending samples in fun and different packaging. Or i'm also wondering if i should go the more traditional route of the big expensive gift show. Thanks so much for all you do to help all of us out here. it's invaluable. thank you so much laura. you're awesome congratulations on going fulltime. I think you said you're doing that this month or soon. At least i'll listeners. I want to encourage you to check out laura's site one because we want to support her but also because it's a really good example here. Laura bundesbahn dot com. Bunsen be indy. Espn dot com and my first comment here before we talk about the new line of products. My first comment is i really respect her pricing. Like laura's work is not cheap. She's doing some really beautiful art. A lot of it has mixed media and it sells for a good amount of money. Like i'm looking at these pieces on the site. And i'm seeing eight hundred dollars nine hundred and fifty dollars thirty six hundred dollars. Three thousand six hundred fifteen hundred dollars etc so some really beautiful art and she's not afraid to sell it for a good price so good for her. She probably wouldn't be able to go full time. She was selling this work for fifty to one hundred dollars each also. This kind of pricing allows for some investing in marketing and some experiments especially when it comes to launching a new product line like launching these new enamel pins and so my that was my first thought about i respect the pricing. My second thought. As i heard the question was have you tried exhibiting and then at the end she mentioned the big expensive gift show you know. I think it's a risk. Nothing is guaranteed but might you regret it if you didn't try and if it were me in this situation i think i would which would tell me. Oh i should definitely try it. I think this is the time in which you invest it in which you are willing to do. Some more extensive experiments reaching out to her target market and sending physical samples. So i think she mentioned something about that. Kind of outreach. I would send physical samples of the pins not just a link or i might email and ask if i could send a physical sample just so a bit. More of a relationship has been established since it's ultimately a physical product. She wants to sell. And i assume it will be a lot lower price than the handcrafted one of a kind art that she also sells probably gonna help to see it in

Laura Laura Bundesbahn Bunsen Espn China
Barack Obama Wants a Presidential Center Despite Local Citizen Concerns

Mark Levin

01:35 min | Last month

Barack Obama Wants a Presidential Center Despite Local Citizen Concerns

"Then there's this piece in the daily wire. Former President Barack Obama dial back his plan. 700 Person birthday Dash. Yeah, right To what 500. Obama is using his birthday to raise funds for his planned presidential center, not Presidential Library and foundation, a presidential center because monarchs need such a thing. A monument to the man and his legacy that is scheduled to break ground as soon as this month on Prime Parkland in Chicago. Critics say the project is brazenly violated the policies and philosophies that Obama spent his presidency perching on others in ways that will permanently harm the environment and the city of Chicago. Obama wants to cut down nearly 800 trees. Indirect four buildings, well, nearly 20 acres inside Chicago's Jackson Park, which is on the National Register of Historic Places and includes waterways connecting to Lake Michigan. He wants to build a palace to himself. You see? The proposed buildings, including 235 Ft Museum Tower, a conference center and athletic center library. 400 CAR garage, Though former presidents often create presidential libraries. This is not a library because it is far more elaborate than what is permitted under regulations governing presidential libraries. Now he hasn't been criticized once by the national media. In fact, they haven't even gone to the location where they're going to break ground in this city Park Jackson Park. You hear nothing about this? Not a

Barack Obama Presidential Library And Found Prime Parkland Chicago Jackson Park National Register Of Historic Lake Michigan Park Jackson Park
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

04:47 min | 6 months ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Rights had been really the purview of only people like call. You know not even women at that time and certainly not at the african americans whom were considered property and sort of denied all humanity. Like we're talking about even in the records. Like their their tally marks. There may be a age or agenda. And i can show you some ways that we've worked against that but speaks to that. One of the interactive exhibits is 'cause log book about the people. He enslaved represented by tally marks and business records but the grove museum uses the interactive to focus on their humanity. So like for example. This family here starting with tom. Happily we've been able to trace their family up into the president. I mean there's president living people who were in contact with who are descended from tom diana happily so that's like that genealogical role that museum complied. Select thomas thirty four. These are children and the bank owned them as property at the time. Kind of a complex thing. But we've we've been able to take a document like this and then jumped to different documents. And make connections to like living people right who are who are increasingly the tools that we have through databases and things like that enable us to do this genealogical research so people all around the country finding out things they had no idea about the museum presents this house and even the land it sits on as a witness to all of this. The very presence of this place on the landscape is directly related to the forced removal of indigenous people from this area. So we wanted to bring in that because call got his start as a soldier. Fighting against the creeks the seminoles and so he's literally you know as we know about kind of colonialism this dropping onto this place of an entirely different way of land use politics culture etc that swept generations of the indigenous. People that have that lived here. They were in the process of being removed by the american government from this area just as hall and his associates were coming here so it was very active process but there were culture is that had all the land here successfully and if we were tell that same to the people who actually colonized the americans colonized it they would have thrown. It out is ridiculous. They knew the cultures and society. That had been here. They had actively wage war against them and they knew it was about expanding slavery into this area right and that these red hills of tallahassee where agriculturally going to be very productive so it's strange how we then tell these different stories because we we don't wanna engage fully with the removal of indigenous people. And we don't want to engage wet slavery like as a as a system that was you know. The value of the land was not as important as literally the value placed upon those bodies. That were put to work and should be shaping. The and people don't want to deal with that. What's unusual is the grove. Museum does deal with it. Most institutions in tallahassee simply daunte the mascot of florida state university. Right down the street where grandma got a degree in indigenous history is still as of twenty twenty one a representation of a seminal indian. The grove museum was able to build on the work of local black museums and archives. Some of which have been featured on previous episodes of this show. I would say like for a museum like this in tallahassee scene. And i know you talked to mrs barnes. So like if ultimas barnes hadn't created the riley house and hadn't created the florida african american heritage preservation network and if professor yvonne and created the black archives..

thomas yvonne tom diana barnes florida tom american government tallahassee florida african american indian professor One of the twenty twenty one americans african americans exhibits thirty four riley house ultimas university
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

02:45 min | 6 months ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Line simply put. That's not what happened after leaving. The governor's office lea collins was appointed by president johnson in nineteen sixty four to direct the community relations service under the civil rights act and so he was present in march nineteen sixty five in selma alabama to negotiate on behalf of the federal government. So the marchers are attacked on march. Seventh collins comes in on march ninth. They negotiate this sort of settlement. They progress past selma that go onto montgomery but this photos taken and this becomes like the number one piece of like anti collins propaganda right. So he's with john. Lewis andrew young and dr king and coretta scott king and ralph like the main figureheads in the civil rights movement. He runs her senate in nineteen sixty eight loses the election and it's really tied back to him being at selma. He was too liberal. He was associated with the civil rights. Activists and that blowback in the south is really pronounced during that nine hundred sixty eight election collins went from receiving new nine percent of the vote share in tallahassee in nineteen fifty four when he ran for governor to forty eight percent in his nineteen sixty eight senate race again. The museum uses his story as the opening act presenting collins preserved and then old timey tv playing videos of his speeches alongside the most detailed account of the tallahassee bus boycott and backlash that i've ever seen. But here's where the museum really opens up. Remember when i mentioned that. The house was built by richard keith. Call so when we take people through the tour we sort of give him that story arc but then we jump back in nested all within the fact that this was a plantation that bonds people who reclaimed as the property richard. Keith call build the home and like you can reach up and still touch the physical fabric of the home that they laid into place the bricks or those floor joists or whatever the number one artifact that speaks to african american history here is the house itself and it's the positioning of credit. Who built the home right. Enslaved people built the house right. We get this telling of american history where it becomes call built the house which we know is maybe not in all cases intended to erase the people. It's our manner of speaking right. It's kind of the way that we conceptualize this history of broader level. So even the position the credit back to the crafts people that built the house was vitally important and putting this museum together because when we come when we bring people in the space and say think about collins in that civil rights era and then jump back one hundred years and what this property would have literally been witnessing on a day to day basis..

nine percent richard Keith selma march ninth forty eight percent ralph civil rights act richard keith march nineteen sixty five president Lewis andrew nineteen fifty four one hundred years lea collins montgomery coretta scott king march dr king alabama
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:25 min | 8 months ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started to lose. France has many memorials covering hundreds of years of history. there's a statue of joan of arc. There's monuments to the soldiers of the franco prussian. War memorials to the dead of world war. One but look closer and you'll also find sites covering a very specific slice of history the years between nineteen forty and nineteen forty four. The period of nazi germany's military administration of france. There's the building where the gestapo secret police made their local headquarters. There's a monument to the glory of the resistance. And there's the shoah memorial the hebrew word for the holocaust that honors the jews. Who were deported and killed during this period to lose on a gallon. Gal i in black to lose during world war two was originally stone. Herb in the south of france a lot of resistance fighters came to to lose to former. Is you need and many then left for the rest of france or pain. A number of escape networks. Beginning to lose and took english airmen for example or is he stops fighters across the beauty. Nate london or the united states is it has unique. This is your home blah sean. Speaking french blah. Sean is the head of the museum of resistance and deportation in home france which is right down the street from many of these memorials into loose. The museum brings together these sites as well as artifacts stories and witnesses from across the region and oliver france both war drama pendulum. My name is jalen bless sean. I am in charge of the museum of lizzie. Stockton deportation in a gallon. Foss the museum actually in nineteen seventy seven. It was first a community museum. The museum was initially a community museum. Set up by former members of the french resistance and in nineteen ninety four. It became departmental which is to say it is now funded by the regional government into three themes of the museum. Engage collect transmit. We collect to store and transmit this memory of our ancestors from our elders to future generations. Memorials that defend. The memory of the resistance gives us access to people who have objects in their homes and documents and some of them and trust them to us. The museums focus onto loose and the surrounding region is not just because it's under the authority of the regional government. It also reflects the uneven an ever changing military administration of france under nazi germany until november. Nineteen forty two. The nazis only had direct occupation of part of the country. Mostly the north of france including paris and the western coast. The south of france was under the jurisdiction of the vichy regime. An independent ally of nazi germany which promoted anti and practice collaboration with the nazis. Most specifically by deporting jews to concentration and extermination camps so when it comes to the fighting this regime the resistance. It's tempting to present history. Like story with clear cut intentions and the simple narrative but the history of the french resistance was anything but simple. It's not like there was a single unified resistance with one single outcome in mind in episode fifty one of this show. We examined another collaborationist regime bulgaria in the early nineteen forties by visiting the sylvia. Jewish museum of history. Today one the galleries there is named the holocaust and the rescue of the jews in bulgaria. Which even the museum staff say as an overly simplistic title khuda visitor in your at many visitors are in fact unaware of this fragmented structure of the rizzi stats. We the gaullist on one side and communists on the order so in the museum we do. Indeed present. The different forms of lizzie stars to present the complexity. The museum of resistance and deportation focuses on presenting objects gathered from witnesses. These include resistance newspapers of various subgroups and photos and testimonies of those who are fighting whether with acts of sabotage by providing shelter to those who needed it or even through building the logistics of feeding fighters in other parts of france. There's also catalogs names and photographs of people deported and accounts of reprisal attacks against resistance fighters and collaborators alike as control of the territory ebbed and flowed la la brea delayed gambled do period of world. War two is quite complex to explain to the younger generations who often have a rather manichean view that is to say in black and white. You are either busy. Saas fater or a collaborator povey. She nazi that's it. You are either a good guy or bad guy who she says. Only on air mission. The museum was closed for an eighteen month renovation from two thousand eighteen until twenty twenty the renovation modernized the museum and also reflects. Our moment in time was fatigued. Amisi today these type of museum has a new dimension we the disappearance of the last witnesses since they can no longer testify in front of students scholars and the general public. So it is our mission to transmit this memory to do so we have collected and we continue to collect objects and especially testimonies. Actually timonium the renovated museum features. Two floors of permanent galleries and space for temporary exhibitions. Special programs are available to school. Kids who are encouraged to question the sustainability of the spirit of resistance the current struggles for the preservation and extension of rights and freedoms and the fight against inequalities today. It's no longer a museum. Run by former members of the resistance but instead it's focused on being the transmission to new generations. lead oldwick at the weaknesses are now ninety or ninety five years old and we continue to collect the testimonies and to project broadcast and recalled these testimonies in order to get her their precious memories and transmit them to new generations new belgian jassem. This has been museum archipelago. Full transcript of this episode as well as shown notes and links visit museum archipelago dot com museum archipelago is supported by listeners. Like you joined club. Archipelago club archipelago members. Get access to a bonus. Podcast where we've been doing. Indepth reviews of how museums are portrayed in movies tv shows and even video games if you can't get enough of how museums shape our lives. Join club archipelago. Today by visiting joined the museum dot club. And if you don't feel like it that's totally cool to thanks for listening and next time bring a friend..

ian elsner eighteen month Sean Two floors museum dot club world war two paris Saas fater Each episode fifteen minutes Today jalen nazi germany november today first nazis early nineteen forties a gallon hebrew
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to Museum archipelago I'm in Elsner. Museum, Archipelago Guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So. Let's get started. John, Gilmore Riley was born enslaved on the Tallahassee Florida plantation in eighteen fifty seven John Gilmore ride into slavery about three blocks from here after slavery ended each owns education for career and became the first black principle of the nick of high school that was built to provide an education for newly freed slaves and their descendants here where we're sitting in right now is the John G Reilly House and museum in what is now basically downtown Tallahassee and this is Alpha means barnes the founding director of the museum. The My name is Al to these farms and the founding director of the John Gilmore Rally. Research Center and Museum. The Executive Director and I've been that for twenty four years the John G Reilly House a handsome two story Wood House sits in the same neighborhood as the older well-kept plantation homes Tallahassee. Eighteen fifty seven was the center of Florida's plantation economy assistant built almost entirely on enslaved labor enslaved people outnumbered white people three to one of the two, hundred and seventy nine white families living here in eighteen sixty, nearly two thirds owned at least. One person wants the slavery system down was eliminated in the area. A lot of the properties remained a part of that establishment and a lot of the blacks worked on the plantation remained in the area over time of the blast mood Dan. So ultimately, it became this African American enclave call it, and it's swear over eighty families settled around the eighteen seventies. The families had stores, they had churches, they have school that operated out of. John Ame Church, they had a with yard. It was a pretty much self sustaining community. They had pretty much everything that was needed, which was important because it was during the days of Segregation Vedra segregation. So they were limited in terms of of they could go to shop ready to could go for entertainment what have you and during the period of crow and black codes this neighborhood, this enclave became known as smokey hollow why the name smoke our younger. we have among the fact, but smoke Allah grew out of the fact that okay. It's an all black community. So a lot of the more out say undesirable elements ended up in smoke hall. So you had the electric station, the first electric building, the incinerator were all decisions trash was.

founding director John G Reilly House and museum Tallahassee John Gilmore Rally John G Reilly House John Gilmore Florida Archipelago Guides Research Center and Museum John Ame Church Segregation Vedra smoke hall Elsner John Gilmore Riley Executive Director Al Wood House
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"This episode of Museum Archipelago is proudly sponsored by a beautifully foolish endeavor, a brand new book by Hank Green Ivan, following green for over a decade I on his excellent WLAC, brothers, Youtube Channel, and now on his podcast, attracted by his humanistic approach to the world and to science education, a beautifully foolish endeavor is a sequel and conclusion to his first fiction book, an absolutely remarkable thing, which is the story of a young woman thrown into fame during the global crisis of. Of contagious streams and mysterious Robots Library Journal's review said through this adventurist, witty and compelling novel Green Delivers Sharp Social Commentary on the power of social media and both benefits and horrendous consequences that follow when we give too much of ourselves to technology. The book is out July. Seventh Twenty Twenty in physical audio in the book form wherever books are sold, or you can just go to hankering dot com, thanks so much hankering, and a beautifully foolish endeavor for Sponsoring Museum archipelago. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at Museum archipelago dot Com Museum archipelago is supported by listeners like you who have joined club archipelago on Patriot. If you can't get enough about how museums shape, our lives join now for two dollars a month. If this is your first episode, subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcast player, and if it isn't leave us a rating review. And next time. Bring a friend..

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Chris Newell Remembers Visiting the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor. Maine as a kid, his father was hired to put on educational performances to perform songs about their past Mikati language, history and culture at the need of market and the native American Festival hosted by the museum. So every summer, the family would drive the two and a half hours from their home in MMG, Look Newell, look forward to it year after year with an almost giddy level of excitement, but even as a young person, Newell could clearly see the difference between the surrounding events like the native market and the festival, which will run by members of the WAB, Inaki nations and the museum. which was not back then the Abbey Museum was more traditional ethnographic collection, a lot of weddings and things like that, so when it came to the museum itself, and did feel very much like inclined museum was Barbara Institution not necessarily allow mackey institution, so I definitely felt a lot more connection to things like the vessel, native American festival in those, because those were neater run and be supporting them, although I knew what. I knew the special collection I knew the shredder, and they have as far as the history of mind. People's by able as well as I keep. People's in general, always been attracted to wise available in the Abbey. mcdonagh's as a child I felt it was different spaces today, Chris Crystal, a possible quality citizen is the first member of the watanake nations to lead the Abbey. Museum high money. My name is Chris Lual and I am the director of Education for the. Educational Initiative also CO founder and I'm also the executive director and senior partner. Donations for the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor. Chris! Co founded the ADAMO. Educational Initiative in two thousand, eighteen with Donna Spears DNA ob joy, chickasaw Choctaw and Dr Jason Man Cheney Agamal is a pass quality word for the snowshoe path at the beginning of winter. The snowshoe path is hard to find, but the more people pass along and carve out this path through the snow during the season. The easier it becomes for everyone to walk together on episode sixty eight of this show we interviewed spears about how the initiative was born out of their experiences seen colonial museum practices across present New England. So, what do we mean when we say colonial museum outside the context of Colonial Williamsburg of course, this kind goes off of my colleague Don from. Who was on the museum archipelago before museums are colonial artifacts. The idea of a museum comes with colonization and tribal museums, even in their own right are using that colonial artifacts. As a way to present her native histories, only doing different in tribal museum in a non tribal museum, largely consists of the American conservation movement which started in the nineteenth century, and when came to museums, and especially the way museum content was created colonial museums would oftentimes focus on tribes that they felt at the time were less impacted, which would have been Western plains tribes in South Western tribes so if you go into a non-tribal museum that. That has native content Colonia Museum. Then what you typically see is a presentation of native cultures through the Lens of anthropology and archaeology and a lot of those voices, ninety nine percent of those voices, especially in the past were non native voices that were framing that lends and hot of you are cultures, and so it's not uncommon to see things that out place, so to go to northeastern museum that has a collection and to see only planes. Or only question. Pari and no Wolpe Martino. Ashland basket is really kind of an old fashioned way of presenting things that goes back to a motive, thinking really originated in the idea that native people were going to vanish at one point and that we needed our history saves by an outside force, and that's literally well. The Columbia Museum represents is that mindset and the Abbey Museum is rooted in that. Mindset opened in nineteen, twenty eight. It housed the collection of native American. Objects gathered by radiologists Robert Abbey in a purpose built building. Newell was hired to lead the Abbey Museum in February twenty twenty. Four lockdowns due to cove nineteen began, but the decolonization process had been going on at the museum for the past five years. The Abbey Museum has gone through the fast five years under the previous executive director. The President CEO at the time cinnamon. Caitlyn the good I the colonization, process and car that. Not just in the content of the museum, which centers need voices now, but also in the structure of the way the museum is run in the has overtime restructured as board to become a majority Ebina Keyboard so Columbia Museum that Presents Lab Aki history. We are probably the only museum that has a structure where the voice of the people that we are representing is now centered, and is also governing the institution itself when the change of directorship happened, the museum changed the title from President and CEO to executive, director and senior partner to the watanake nations as part of this decolonisation process and the shift of power the. Tribes today are five times asking. Scott. Avenue tribes in the history. There was over twenty drives at one point, but currently there are five tribes. Nike is an over arching for the cosmetology of the peoples. Tribes in the beliefs and stories. Of Being Liska created on people from Yash reason gave us the name weapon. Aki, which is the anglicized version of impassioned twelve naccache wish would translate to the people of the dawn collectively. That's how we see ourselves. We we understand that we are the easternmost tribes on the consummate, and.

Abbey Museum colonial museum Columbia Museum tribal museum Colonia Museum inclined museum Chris Newell Bar Harbor Educational Initiative executive director Robert Abbey Abbey Colonial Williamsburg Ian Elsner senior partner Donna Spears Nike Chris Lual Maine President and CEO
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

16:51 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Yet fail to engage with what is really at stake, namely identifying acknowledging and removing endemic structural problems of racism in repair to form a suggestion. By more than a few people is museums wind up? The statues of problematic people in museums is the bottom of the harbour, really the right place for Statue of Colston. Of course, these questions tend to ignore that the bottom of the ocean is the final resting place for hundreds of actual. Thrown overboard from Colston's chips because they were deemed a poor investment for Colston's company on the Zeke Appel go. We've investigated what various Eastern European countries are doing with old statues of dictators like Lenin and Stalin. Monica, notice interviewed on episode. Five of this show describes how her family's native Lithuania removed. It's ubiquitous Soviet statues from city squares all across the country. The removals were events that helped build the young nation, but once the statues were removed from their original locations. No one knew quite what to do with them. Many of them ended up at something called Curtis Park a kind of half theme park that includes a massive statue garden. The statues are presented simply and somewhat randomly each has a little description of the city and square where the statue used to stand many Lithuanians and the Lithuanian government have criticized the uncritical approach to the parks laughed. Visitors are free to do whatever they want. I guess like once you got into the actual dash you. It's Kinda funny because you can do whatever you want. So like planning on top of London installing, picking their nose Tottenham on the head. Doing whatever you want but I like to think that I have some sort of connection. Some sort of understanding that spews images might have been both sterry inspirational different times. Somebody's life for me. They've always been images. That were bad like no like I. Feel like throwing I always do that. Lenin Stalin phase like these are the faces of terror that drove my grandparents out of. Yeah but. Interact with them on this like humorous level is really interesting. The situation at Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia is somewhat similar. The outdoor sculpture garden is littered with statues. Commemorating Soviet power placed wherever there's room I visited many times, and I'm never quite sure how to react. There's a lot of power in deliberately taking these statues out of the context they were made for what once may have been in imposing statue, underscoring who's in charge in the public square is now just two key, leading impotently outer Rosebush in Eastern Europe the statues of. Of Lenin and Stalin and others were erected during the communist times and were swiftly removed when the system fell in the West statues erected more than one hundred years ago. Still stand without context Washington's next. Because the money he made from owning working in selling people isn't a footnote. It's the reason he was the first president. Even at the museums of Bristol Website Colston is identified as a revered philanthropist slash reviled slave trader in that order. As if the money he gave away to the city of Bristol wasn't violently extracted from the people he enslaved. It's not a sufficient answer to simply put these statues in the museum I. Don't know if there's enough museum space for all the confederate monuments in the American south or enough museum space for all the statues of King. Leopold in Belgium, but more importantly political exercise in selective remembrance neatly packaged as an unbiased archive. That statues represent is the same exercise that museums represent. Represent museums and statues are bridged together. Many of these statues are right in front of museum entrances, priming visitor for what they can expect to find inside statutes, museums share centuries long history of supporting white supremacist colonialist, racist ideologies, helping them flourish providing the evidence for them, and under girding them through their placement through their air of authority and through their supposed neutrality. The statues of American football players at American universities helps me think about this because the stakes are so low, the rivalry is so clear. Our football team has heroes and the long legacy, and it's telling that the two tools that were employed to make that point are statues and museums. This has been museum archipelago. Haven't checked out club archipelago. Now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our museum movie. Review Series archipelago at the movies is now completely free joining Rebecca. We've deny as we break breakdown two thousand four's national treasure, discussing the tropes of museum films. Now Museum Exhibit Design is reflected back through popular culture to listen for free and hopefully find a little distraction. Could the Patriots Dot Com Slash Museum archipelago and look for the episode on national treasure. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at museum, Archipelago Dot Com. Museum archipelago is supported by listeners like you who have joined club archipelago on patriotic. If you can't get enough about how museums shape, our lives join now for two dollars a month. If this is your first episode, subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcasts player, and if it isn't leave us a rating reveal. And next time. Bring a friend..

Lenin Stalin Colston Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Com Slash Museum Archipelago Dot Com Bristol Website Colston Museum Exhibit Design Zeke Appel Lithuania Lithuanian government Bristol Curtis Park Eastern Europe Monica Sofia president London football Tottenham
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So, let's get started. The statute appeared in two thousand eleven on the path of my daily Commute to the University of Florida. Where I was a student, it was a statue of football player named Tim Tebow, and the strange thing about it was that Tim Tebow was still around. In fact, it was just a few months after he graduated, and it was commemorating events like touchdowns that I remembered seeing I remember seeing him around campus, and now I was looking at him houses statue, but it wasn't. Wasn't just a statue behind the statue was the entrance to a hall of honor which featured football trophies, but the space was not just a room with trophies. It was a story about the football program where trophies were an inevitable consequence. In short, it looked like a museum reader, rails and old pictures of the early days of the program were presented alongside pigskin football's from the nineteen thirties with lighting, but this wasn't just one university all across the football conference. These trophy rooms looked like museum spaces. At Florida State University just a few hours away. The trophy room begins with artifacts from and descriptions of the seminole nation. Even though these are tellingly light on the details, the point was to tie the athletic program success without a historical figures fighting a US invasion. It's all done very deftly one minute. You're looking at a map of what is now Florida? Drawn by US general and the next. You're looking at a tattered Football Jersey the next, a bronze statue of the stories heroes. There's a bridge between statues and museums. They feed into each other. So why do athletic programs adopt statues and museum like spaces because they want to sell us? A selective account presented as a neutral archive of.

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So, let's get started. The statute appeared in two thousand eleven on the path of my daily Commute to the University of Florida. Where I was a student, it was a statue of football player named Tim Tebow, and the strange thing about it was that Tim Tebow was still around. In fact, it was just a few months after he graduated, and it was commemorating events like touchdowns that I remembered seeing I remember seeing him around campus, and now I was looking at him houses statue, but it wasn't. Wasn't just a statue behind the statue was the entrance to a hall of honor which featured football trophies, but the space was not just a room with trophies. It was a story about the football program where trophies were an inevitable consequence. In short, it looked like a museum reader, rails and old pictures of the early days of the program were presented alongside pigskin football's from the nineteen thirties with lighting, but this wasn't just one university all across the football conference. These trophy rooms looked like museum spaces. At Florida State University just a few hours away. The trophy room begins with artifacts from and descriptions of the seminole nation. Even though these are tellingly light on the details, the point was to tie the athletic program success without a historical figures fighting a US invasion. It's all done very deftly one minute. You're looking at a map of what is now Florida? Drawn by US general and the next. You're looking at a tattered Football Jersey the next, a bronze statue of the stories heroes. There's a bridge between statues and museums. They feed into each other. So why do athletic programs adopt statues and museum like spaces because they want to sell us? A selective account presented as a neutral archive of.

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Yet fail to engage with what is really at stake, namely identifying acknowledging and removing endemic structural problems of racism in repair to form a suggestion. By more than a few people is museums wind up? The statues of problematic people in museums is the bottom of the harbour, really the right place for Statue of Colston. Of course, these questions tend to ignore that the bottom of the ocean is the final resting place for hundreds of actual. Thrown overboard from Colston's chips because they were deemed a poor investment for Colston's company on the Zeke Appel go. We've investigated what various Eastern European countries are doing with old statues of dictators like Lenin and Stalin. Monica, notice interviewed on episode. Five of this show describes how her family's native Lithuania removed. It's ubiquitous Soviet statues from city squares all across the country. The removals were events that helped build the young nation, but once the statues were removed from their original locations. No one knew quite what to do with them. Many of them ended up at something called Curtis Park a kind of half theme park that includes a massive statue garden. The statues are presented simply and somewhat randomly each has a little description of the city and square where the statue used to stand many Lithuanians and the Lithuanian government have criticized the uncritical approach to the parks laughed. Visitors are free to do whatever they want. I guess like once you got into the actual dash you. It's Kinda funny because you can do whatever you want. So like planning on top of London installing, picking their nose Tottenham on the head. Doing whatever you want but I like to think that I have some sort of connection. Some sort of understanding that spews images might have been both sterry inspirational different times. Somebody's life for me. They've always been images. That were bad like no like I. Feel like throwing I always do that. Lenin Stalin phase like these are the faces of terror that drove my grandparents out of. Yeah but. Interact with them on this like humorous level is really interesting. The situation at Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia is somewhat similar. The outdoor sculpture garden is littered with statues. Commemorating Soviet power placed wherever there's room I visited many times, and I'm never quite sure how to react. There's a lot of power in deliberately taking these statues out of the context they were made for what once may have been in imposing statue, underscoring who's in charge in the public square is now just two key, leading impotently outer Rosebush in Eastern Europe the statues of. Of Lenin and Stalin and others were erected during the communist times and were swiftly removed when the system fell in the West statues erected more than one hundred years ago. Still stand without context Washington's next. Because the money he made from owning working in selling people isn't a footnote. It's the reason he was the first president. Even at the museums of Bristol Website Colston is identified as a revered philanthropist slash reviled slave trader in that order. As if the money he gave away to the city of Bristol wasn't violently extracted from the people he enslaved. It's not a sufficient answer to simply put these statues in the museum I. Don't know if there's enough museum space for all the confederate monuments in the American south or enough museum space for all the statues of King. Leopold in Belgium, but more importantly political exercise in selective remembrance neatly packaged as an unbiased archive. That statues represent is the same exercise that museums represent. Represent museums and statues are bridged together. Many of these statues are right in front of museum entrances, priming visitor for what they can expect to find inside statutes, museums share centuries long history of supporting white supremacist colonialist, racist ideologies, helping them flourish providing the evidence for them, and under girding them through their placement through their air of authority and through their supposed neutrality. The statues of American football players at American universities helps me think about this because the stakes are so low, the rivalry is so clear. Our football team has heroes and the long legacy, and it's telling that the two tools that were employed to make that point are statues and museums. This has been museum archipelago. Haven't checked out club archipelago. Now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our museum movie. Review Series archipelago at the movies is now completely free joining Rebecca. We've deny as we break breakdown two thousand four's national treasure, discussing the tropes of museum films. Now Museum Exhibit Design is reflected back.

Lenin Stalin Colston president Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Bristol Website Colston Museum Exhibit Design Zeke Appel Lithuania Lithuanian government Curtis Park Bristol Eastern Europe Monica Sofia Rebecca London Tottenham football Washington Leopold
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

13:28 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. He's never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. There's a way to look at history that focuses on the events themselves. And then there's a way to look a history that focuses on the fallout in the Fourth Century. Bc. E So Lucas. Who's one of Alexander the great successors and Chandra Gupta who is the first Moyen Emperor in northern India met for the first time by the banks of the River Indus and there they had some kind of military encounter? What kind of military encounter? Well we don't really know what we do know is that following the encounter. Greek ambassador megacity was sent to the Indian Interior for the first time and he wrote an ethnographic cool the indicate and it described India for Greek Odeon based on personal observation. But also that you need this. Lots of strange storytelling as well. And this particular tax reform the foundation of Western knowledge of India for generations. And you can just imagine that. Soldiers and British soldiers in the nineteenth century took translations of this particular taxed with them to north west of India when they were exploring. So it's a very long life and it's particularly that that continues to resonate. This is Dr Shushma John. Sorry Tabor Foundation Curator of South Asia at the British Museum. I'm talk to central Michigan. Sorry on the Table Foundation Creator South Asia at the British Museum. And when I'm not at work I welcome my podcast which is very much a passion project and this is called the Wander House will get to the wonder house in a minute because it's an excellent podcast but I a doctorate at University College London. Jane sorry studied this ancient encounter of which only Greek descriptions survive. That moment of meeting in connection has been completely transformed it was transformed cleaner period by British and Indian scholars have precious scholars saying. Oh you know so. Give Woman's warned. He defeated this Indian general whereas the Indian scholars right the the complete opposite that take gender. Gupta defeated this incoming European and he became a great leader and ruler. So actually I think because of this uncertainty. I think it tells us a lot about the time we live in right now. And how may have been transformed in the past so that Doesn't it doesn't bother me in the sense that we will never have this Tonic truth because you know we're never going to get that what we can study is the fallout. How people interpret these historic events and how that reflects on the moment. They're living in now and of course what better way to see in the form of a building how people interpret historic events than a museum itself. This is why the whole idea of decolonizing museums and collections is so important. Because I think up. Till now we've all been complicit in telling partial stories under the guise of trying to be neutral and as we know that neutrality is quite problematic and it tells very very partial truth or partial version of a story. Museums are great way to see what historic events meant to the museum. Builders and I can think of no clearer example than the British Museum. We have reading credible exhibitions on. Say you know when you're thinking of ancient South Asia? They're often on Buddhism or Hinduism organism. So they have a very close religious fakers but will they don't tend to address very rarely that I've ever seen anyway is today's collections. Arrive here. What was the clinical interest in that material? How has it been interrupted? How's it been presented at also? Why why Nice particular ways? How how has that changed over the last century or so it? It's too easy to present a cycle neutral view the ancient Pau of ancient religions. But I I don't think that's particularly ethical. I think if you're going to be doing that you need to be telling that full story in episode thirty nine of this show. We examined Hand Sloan and the origins of the British Museum. Funded in large part by his marriage into the enslaving plan Takeuchi of Jamaica and aided by Britain's rising colonial power global reach. Sloan assembled an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects from all around the world that became the basis for the world's first public museum the British Museum. A place where anyone could freely enter to see the glory of the British Empire the empire and fuses pretty much every aspect of life life in the UK. Whether we're all aware of it will not in a weather. It's the names of the streets. We walked down the the museums that were founded the collections. They hold the structures. We still all inhabit when you look around at the museum's mice museums I'd say UK. They hold the contents of empire objects collected around the world by client officials by soldiers by Salas people. Working Abroad Uber. Count disentangle the two. When you are telling a story you need to be honest. And tell the whole story or at least as much of it as you can possibly share. Because otherwise you're telling a very very partial one. That often overlooks the violence of an object's collection and the situation and circumstances it was created taken purchased and brought him to the UK to be held in a museum today. Sorry is the first curator of Indian descent of the South Asia collection at the British Museum. In the past Tracy Tell Dighton. Do you think about it very much. I think he's signing when I look at my couture practice and how I approach my role. The collections who. I want to work with and how I realized that actually there is a difference between what I do. And what's other people in a whole range of institutions? Bring Two zero and at first. I was really uncomfortable about that. I thought my goodness unit is it. Just because of who I am and what I am. What about you know? My academic side Olifants might use skills knowledge but actually. I think it's my ability to do my job. Is it somehow rich? I bring a slight different perspectives. We'll say in how I do it. The South Asia collection at the British Museum is so enormous that it can capture the sweep of history of South Asia from the Paleolithic period. To the present day. The gallery opened in two thousand seventeen before that it was last refurbished in nineteen ninety. Two it just happens to be the largest gathering the museum so hey no pressure looking say. Try Not to fail on your first go. It was it was really tricky. We started by thinking about who actually comes to the museum and seventy percent of our audience comes from outside the U. K. And if those people a huge proportion than not very well versed in the history cultures religions of South Asia. So how'd you present your collections in a way that shares this really incredible to the world with people who'd About it and so. We decided to have a chronic thematic kind of approach. We started with the Paleolithic. She's about one and a half million years ago and ended at the present day and the encyclopedic collections at the museum permits us to be able to do something like that. As part of that isolated wet on the ancient to medieval sections. Which is the collections? I cover along with the bulk of the anthropological collections. And also the textiles it. It's got a mammoth collection. The Dakota but as Powell fat I was very keen to introduce moments were slightly unexpected stories and people what presented so for example in the main oil. You walk down. One of the first sculptures you encounter is the modern line capital which takes about the first century day and it was actually excavated and request to the museum by South Asian Collector Pokharel Energy on. I put a portrait of him on that label as well as little bit attacks expanding it because I wanted people to be confronted by South Asians in South Asia Gallery. It's not enough to display their culture of their collections in their history. I think it has to be a shared enterprise and an in another section for example in the Janus in western India the Medieval section I included fate graphs of the Jane Temple from less. Which is where I'm from in the UK who wanted to show you know the sculptures on display. They are just as much positive. British culture as it was back then in the medieval period. It's not just a alien religion in Asian culture. It's our shed culture now. I think it's really important to connect the dots so you do. Share this broad sweep of history and culture but then you want to intersperse it with these other reading important moments linking in a WHO and what you might see around you as you get your everyday life in the UK linking it with with the pastas. Well I asked John. Sorry if she's noticed changes in who visits the gallery and how much time they spend there since the update very interesting. Hughes how they engaged with different displays how it can sort of tweak them to make more engaging annoy definitely notice that there are more South Asians in the gallery space the South Asia section. Anyway this is a really tricky one because I hope that a museum is for everybody. The reality is that as you say. A lot of people don't feel that the museum is for them and it's it's terrible because obviously the museum is for everybody but once again when you have very neutral displays and people aren't addressed people aren't consulted people you want working with members of the community. I think understand why they might feel somehow excluded from these spaces and we've all had moments have been chatting to people may assume that museum is not for them it somehow seen as a very different other ring space. A when you see the workforce inside the museum also predominantly white and. There are very few members of your black and minority ethnic stuff in the museum's once again. What sort of message are you trying to share with everybody else? You're saying hey come come to a museum but you can't work How how'd you change that? And I think it's not just one not tweets. I think it's a fundamental reimagining of what exactly a museum is exactly. This museum is full. I'm not sure that we have these answers. But what I think is really really important. Is that we start having these conversations. Are We start experimenting? And this is one of the reasons why John. Sorry started the wonder House podcast. The podcast which is completely independent of the British Museum is away again. Sorry to share the most innovative contemporary approaches to decolonization and so I got in touch with some people whose work I really respect and I asked them if they were willing to talk about their work what they learn what they what they thought didn't work quite so well and share their stories and experiments with decolonizing where they love about. The wonder house is being able to listen in on these conversations. That might not be happening in museums themselves but are happening at coffee houses and pubs nearby and the show explores the scale to you here. John Sorry who works at one of the largest institutions in the world in conversations with people who might be their museums only curators. I worry that the decolonizing museums incredible energy that it has right now. It's quite easy for that. To evaporate every single a movement has its moment and unless we embed this kind of knowledge and approaches it's it's going to evaporate and that that's one of the things that worries me. Most I not just the collections but also you know the the simple fact that many of us who work in museums you often one of the one or two Black Amano. She ethic people in an entire institution. That's not easy. Sorry studies the ancient world. But now she is at the forefront of modern museum interpretation printing not just the event but also how the event ripped through history remember the story about Salukis and Chandra Gupta from the beginning of the episode. The Indian interpretation of that moment has worn out. And actually if you read historical novels modern comics if you watch Indian films and in TV series. That's exactly the vision of John. Goto that we have now and you know what it's evolving over time you know days of being shaped and reshaped day by day at the moment and I think that's.

British Museum South Asia Dr Shushma John India Chandra Gupta UK Tabor Foundation Curator of So Table Foundation Creator South River Indus Ian Elsner South Asia Gallery megacity foundation of Western Asian culture Michigan South Asian Collector Pokharel Alexander Wander House
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Sense and. I'm sure you can. It's that when it's sort of misused or thoughtlessly used leeann results are bad. We can't just so glibly and unthinkingly employees something like a push button as we did before and I am honestly. I don't know that that's a bad thing. Because then it sort of forces us to think. Well how could we provide a satisfying experience in? What are the interfaces or other kinds of opportunities that we could provide them with you? Carry the content that will carry the emotional ideas that we want to carry across in episode. Twenty seven of this show. I get that. There's a certain type of content. That digital media is best suited to system simulation understanding concepts like climate change requires thinking about how complex systems interact with one. Another and computer simulations allow that type of inquiry. It's almost like a video game. Visitors tried to find the edge of the rules of the world except in an exhibit about climate change. Those rules are the rules of atmospheric and Oceanic physics. Right now the best understood and most common interface to digital media is a touchscreen. There is a certain segment of people who love their touchscreens. They're museum with touchscreens. They would do it. I'm agnostic touchscreens. In touch tables they're amazing tools but now we have to be realistic. So now you're gonNA bring somebody into a new museum and asked them to crowd around with several other people and poke at a touchscreen after what has just happened in the world. That's a that's a that's a toughie interfaces allow visitors to interact with digital media without a touchscreen and without requiring the vizier to touch anything with their hands. And if I think for example of a large floor projections system where you could even just tap with your foot to control some different parameters or different people may be on the different corners of this huge. You know large projection could be controlling in real time different parameters could imagine that actually being positive and a worthwhile experience that still takes into account a social aspect but also social distancing aspect as well as you know something that is sort of full body doesn't involve people touching their hands on that you don't have to sort of sanitized floor because people are tapping it with their feet and doing things in his most optimistic moments or sally hopes that the new approach to hands on exhibits can bring Universal Design Front and center flexibility or control with something like tapping of foot which could easily also be. Somebody wheeling their wheelchair over the active area too. I mean I think this brings the notion of universal design to a different place in a positive place. You know these these limitations in this triangulation between posts Cova nineteen perception and the notion of universal design. I'm going to be optimistic. Maybe that puts us in a better place in a more thoughtful place in more satisfying place alternately in terms of interactive experiences for visitors which. I suppose is really what the sort of all boils down to how supported our museums as institutions in various countries or parts of the world where they exist or how resilient are particular museums or museum structures that led them withstand the sort of events. But they're sally sees a silver lining an end to all those mini grocery store exhibits at children's museums. Finally be a good reason for all the children's museums in world to get rid of those horrible mini grocery store exhibit small room filled. With lots of tactile objects kids are just constantly pawing over and checking out and throwing into their many baskets and then they get put right back on the shelves already already. It's a gigantic entropy experiment. So if you're gonNA keep that experience after everyone has touched something. Hundreds of things. White and disinfect. Them all and then replace them for people to just do this. I think constraints are good thing for creativity and now we've just been thrown some public hell in perceptual constraints. We have to think about that because certainly our visitors are going to be thinking about that. If we don't show that at least we're sensitive to that our visitors could rightfully think that we are insensitive. Not only to those design constraints in those design considerations but insensitive to them as people who want to have fun and want to be safe if you haven't checked out club archipelago now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our Museum Movie Review Series Archipelago at the movies is now completely free. Join Rebecca we've seen and I as we break down two thousand four national treasure discussing the tropes of museum films now museum. Exhibit Design is reflected back through popular culture to listen for free and hopefully find a little distraction the Patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and look for the episode on national treasure. This episode of Museum archipelago is brought to you by pigeon by S- recess a real time intelligence platform that uncovers the power of way finding for your museum enabling your visitors to maximize their day at your venue using pigeon. Yes like the navigating bird. The museum's management can gather real time data for managing space effectively in relation to visitors while improving their Roi through marketing. Automation and using pigeon visitors can navigate the maze of museum with ease conduct automated and personalized tours based on their interest. Rsvp for events and get more information about the exhibits right in front of to find out how pigeon can help your museum visit. Pigeon that's recess dot com slash museums. That's G. E. O. N. Dot S. I. R. S. Y. S. Dot Com slash museums things? So much to pigeon for. Supporting Museum archipelago. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at Museum Archipelago Dot. Com Archipelago is supported by listeners. Like you who have joined club archipelago on patriotic. If you can't get enough about how museums shape our lives join now for two dollars a month if this is your first episode. Subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcast player. And if it isn't leave us a rating review and next time bring a friend..

Museum Archipelago Dot Supporting Museum archipelago Museum archipelago Com Archipelago sally G. E. O. N. Dot S. I. R. S. Y. Cova Rebecca
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. He's never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started a few months ago before reports of a new form of crony virus now known as Cova Nineteen started appearing in the news. I visited an exhibit called outbreak epidemics in a connected world at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington. Dc The exhibit laid out the coordinated. Detective work that public health workers and many other professionals do as identify and respond to infectious diseases. Such as HIV AIDS Ebola virus and influenza. There was even the touch screen game. That invited me the work cooperatively with other visitors to contain an outbreak before it spreads further. So the funny thing about public health and a lot of the scientists that contribute to the to the knowledge that public health workers use. Is that if you're doing everything right. Nobody realizes that you're doing it right. It's kind of the opposite of a glamorous job this is raven forced who scelzo a professional science communicator and writer who works as a content developer and production assistant at the Field Museum in Chicago and hosts the excellent science podcast tiny vampires. Hello my name is Raven Forestry Scelzo I am the host of tiny vampires podcast and my day job is at the field museum here in Chicago so public health is a little bit of a complicated thing because there are a lot of people who do public health that maybe people don't consider them to be public. Health workers forced through scelzo lays out three broad groups of people working in Public Health. Scientists public health workers and clinicians the scientists generate new knowledge. The public health workers apply that knowledge by creating plans to prevent disease and increase access to treatment and clinicians carry out those plans by directly treating people as a science communicator. I think one of the issues between scientists or health workers and the public. Is this thing that we say. Insights communication called the information deficit hypothesis. Which is basically. We're assuming that people don't know things and if only we could just give them the information then they would know and understand using that model which is basically how most science has been communicated in the past. It causes a lack of trust because it's kind of this assumption that on the scientists standpoint that other people are ignorant and we decide what information they need that that has created this massive rift this massive trust issue because the public doesn't trust the scientists because the scientists are assuming that they're ignorant and the scientists are not trusting the public to understand with healthcare in particular. There's there's a lot of emotions. People are afraid of getting sick and they also have a lot of their own personal experiences that they're trying to incorporate into what public health officials are telling them and this is where museums come in so museums. Which I think is something that you've talked to a lot on your show about is that they have a lot of trust. Their credibility is really high. There's a lot of information there about disease and different public health aspects. That are kind of all over the place for example burning burning tick with a match. So when you when you have an exhibit about why it's important to remove take with forceps tweezers instead of burning it with a match if public health worker tells them that they might be skeptical about it. This is the way that my family has been doing it for years and years whereas with a museum they have that credibility and they have that ability to show in more detail in in in a lot of different ways. Why that's important. People will take that information and internalize it more than with with an organization that they might not trust as much. One of the advantages of presenting. Public Health within the museum is simply the context. A lot of museums are starting to do exhibits that not only incorporate what we know but also how we learned what we know and that really increases people's trust in that information because if. I just tell you a fact you might be skeptical. You should be skeptical and at WANNA look into that deeper but if I tell you fact and then explain to you how we got that information your your ability to trust that information vastly increases. I think a lot of exhibitions and a lot of museums have started to put a priority on that and I think that's really important because you know museums in the past have done and said some really terrible things and we're constantly trying to acknowledge and move past that or at least at least the field museum is And I think one of the ways of accounting for that is telling people is starting to tell people how they know what they know because if that was the philosophy of museums back when they were presenting a lot of racist information they would not have been able to support it with scientific information or scientific research. Because it's not there. You know the new way of doing things is you can't just say things you have to back it up and and I think that is a really really important way of accounting for the past. There are a number of museums that present public health topics either as outreach or by focusing entirely on the subject of public health there are actually a few museums. That that's all they do There's a public health museum in Massachusetts. And then the CDC actually has a museum of their own museums. Really have the ability to make a large impact when they do public health sorts of exhibits or incorporate public health into their existing exhibits so a good example of that is at the field museum. Part of our ancient America's exhibit is about the smallpox transfer from Europe to the Americas and how that impacted the native people of South and Central America. So that's not what the exhibit was about but it is incorporated into it so another great example is the northwest African American Museum in Washington. They did a really cool exhibit. That was about five diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect the African American community and there are a lot of art museums around the country. Who HAVE ART therapy programs? That aid people who are being treated for Mental Illness. So there there are a lot of different museums that are starting to think about what their role is when it comes to the health of their community. The outbreak exhibit at the National Museum of Natural History Opens with of planes taking off and landing at various airports around the world underscoring one of its main points that the world is connected as I was walking through the exhibit and I can't stress enough how abstract the threat of viruses seemed to me at the time I was suddenly aware of walking through the gallery with a crowd of people reading about infectious diseases on the graphic panels. I was less eager than usual to use the touchscreen exhibits with my bare hands. It it really is a testament to the to the power of the exhibit when you when you kind of your pulled out of the exhibit and then realize that what it's about is something that you're currently Participating in right. I think that's where that's where museums really fit in. Because they have so much experience in helping people to understand complex ideas and using lots of different types of media to make that happen. We're broadcasting during this pandemic the end of March twenty twenty almost all of the themes presented in the outbreak exhibit. Seem relevant today. The diseases aren't quote exotic in other words. They don't all arrive from distant places that the connected world has advantages even during a pandemic but as forced scelzo points out the fact that the National Museum of Natural History is physically closed because of Cova nineteen and so is the field museum. And every other museum we've ever featured on the show is telling in itself so museums closing. I think is a really important statement that they're making that they trusted the scientific information that is being put out there There's a lot of scientists who work at museums but that does create a gap museums are where people get a lot of their scientific information and like US especially adults and once once you're out of school they're there really isn't as much access to scientific information a lot of it's behind pay walls so museums are institutions that the public is relying on cove nineteen as really changed. My View on how important digital media is to how the community how how the museum is interacting with the public on her podcast. Tiny vampires forced through scelzo avoids the assumptions of the Info deficit hypothesis as she communicates science to her listeners. Each episode is instead guided by questions sent in by listeners about insects that transmit disease and the scientists who are fighting them and like a good museum exhibit. The question is answered with background information and the story of how scientists were able to shine light on that particular mystery. People are far more intelligent and far more understanding than the scientist public. Health workers of the past gave them credit for this whole concept of Talk to people like their fifth graders. I is exceedingly condescending. Like we're we're we're all in this together regardless of our educational background or anything. So yeah it's it's definitely a were all figuring this out and just being good stewards of the information and having really good communication.

Field Museum National Museum of Natural His African American Museum Cova Washington Elsner Chicago CDC raven Massachusetts Central America scientist African American community writer America Europe
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started in the middle of Bulgaria not far from the crumbling boozers monument why as the town of gap reveal situated in the Valley of the Balkan mountains the city prides itself on its unique brand of humor. Many local jokes are self deprecating about the gap ravine obsession with frugality and entrepreneurship and center around the comical links. The townspeople go to save money. The Mascot of the city is a black cat without a tail. It said the bruins prefer cats without tails because then they can shut the door faster when they let their cats out saving on their heating bills. This used to be the kind of humor that exist in data in the region around gobble not owning governable but then abrazos abuse were smart enough to brand it as there's best the entrepreneur does entrepreneurial course this is Margarita Sheriff's. Go hello my name. AMY'S MARGARITA DOT COM. I'm curator by profession and I'm director of the Museum of Humor and sat are based in Gobble Bulgaria. The museum was founded founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy two before the wall fell. This location was known as the Communist capital of humor extending its reach across eastern bloc countries and and also into certain circles in the West. I visited gap radio because I wanted to find out how this political humor and Satire Museum could have started here during Communist Times yes and how the museum is tackling. The global memed driven culture of the world today. There are a couple of precursors that we have to go through to understand how the Museum of two things one is the governor of jokes so someone announced a competition in the newspaper that the municipalities paying certain amount for each job that gets druid into a collection of the jokes so they collected a lot of a lot of these jokes made a book and this book was this absolute bestseller. It was immediately translating of course in the Russian those who in different languages like French English German and it started selling L. Inc very very well and the other thing that happened was car narrowed the Ghabra Carnival which was restarted in the sixties this and it is typical for being a carnival a with a lot of political humor and satire the people running the Carnival and later the museum were experts at walking up to the line without crossing it when we speak of political satire do not imagine that the general secretary of the of the part to being saturated it was very clear to what level of satire can reach so satire was an instrument in the hands of good communists to fight. Dole's who abused power but to certain level so talk to maybe your local exactly exactly 'cause very clear you're aware to set our can reach as to the governor will joke. They're not political they deal with the economy with them and tolliday of the of the local people combining the two or maybe more realistically using the Gabar Vo Jokes as a Trojan horse to present more political satire was what led some entrepreneurial Gab ravines to open the museum typical will style day didn't Butte a new building Aberdeen refurbished old leather factory so the building we are in name is a former ladder factory for secrets cheaper second it could go slightly notice because you don't need the same kind of permissions nations to build and to refurbish and if you wanted your out of the mainstream project to succeed in Communist Bulgaria asking for permission was not the way to go. The museum started to put on. BNL's festivals held every two years which featured invited Western guests. The first was in nineteen seventy three. They immediately started with the bi-annual. The first edition was dedicated to Kerr tools and small satirical sculpture. It was international and they brought in the jury amazing amazing names like amazing petunias international out so how could how could that exist well. If you ooh think of that time most Tunis in the Western World would be critical. They'll be leftist so they'll be very welcome in Bulgaria and that indeed the gathering place for people from East and West but there was a problem with that first biannial the jury selected for first prize a cartoonist from Turkey Berkey a country on the other side of the Iron Curtain Director. Oh well what we did and they started asking themselves between never asked for permission mission to make that make an international together. All these people are going to be a huge problem. What are we going to do and then he thought okay don't think I can do is go straight to the monster. So the museum's director went straight to the daughter of the general secretary very with Mela Sheesh Cova who would later become Bulgaria's minister of culture. She was she was good enough to listen. She was smart to pursue seve good ideas and support them. So it worked she came she opened the be annual. Antidote went to on well and they never gave award award having more to a cartoonist coming from a country. That's the initial. The museum and the bienial kept growing until communism collapsed in one thousand nine hundred nine nine thousand nine hundred nine. They had more than eighty four in guests artists jewelry coming in for a new and that was massive after eighty nine was the collapse indeed at that time there were more than one hundred people working king house of Humour Mark. Because if you think of all the different departments cinema literature folklore it was big enterprise. We need a lot of events tweets amazing executions when I look at photos from exhibitions from the seventies and eighties. I'm absolutely astonished by exhibition designed. You see it's it's amazing. It's so well done. I don't think anywhere in Belgrade Bulgaria exhibitions were so good. After the collapse the museum staff shrink to a skeleton crew as you can imagine until one thousand nine hundred ninety nine my colleagues would insist that humor is juniper very so that whole human being laugh and humor is omnipresent than Union for so and so on the first fight I short of had to have with the team when I came was to say I'm sorry but humor is not universal. Humor is so culture based. It's totally coacher base. Of course it's safe for into say humor is universal and not go into political humor. It's safer but you don't do your job. Our mission needs to be very very timely to very actual to show things that are happening today from their museum can do that. Who else would be able to do that while it has improved over the past decade in Bulgaria. Media Freedom is declining most of the press has been purchased by the guards and corruption and collusion between in media and politicians is widespread. You know there are issues with freedom of expression in Bulgaria Freedom Media media media ownership and so on so at least a museum should be some sort of outlet the museum addresses the Civic Space in Bulgaria with a new temporary Rachel exhibit called Garden Town. The charming subtitle is where mischief has a happy end motive of town where the different neighborhoods address different issues such as you know graffiti. You're invited to draw or voting over. Dare the place where you go by a yourself and it's accidentally a toilet but also voting rule then we have some guerrilla gardening making bumps of seeds leads and then finally is the park where kids because they usually come in groups. They are invited to sit down and have a discussion and reach a decision to give them some advice about how to have a discussion and also explain how they could reach decision like tossing a coin or consensus. ASSOC- or voting or you know different offices including anarchy. It's really something to see how far the museum has come from starting within the Communist system to reinventing itself to remain relevant in ways that are crucially important to a modern Bulgarian audience. The roofs good mitts that the next stage of reinventing interpreting interpreting humor on the Internet to an audience that lives mostly online hasn't happened just yet the first big challenge. I could think of when I I when I learnt that. The museum is looking for director aching to retire looked at it. I was really impressed and then I told okay. How can you change this place. What can you do about it. And how can you make it really fun when all the funny near is on your phone you know you can just scroll. Oh for hours and you wouldn't stop laughing. So what can museum do about that. Are we supposed to show the same things. No I mean you don't go to museums due to look at something that you see on your phone. Internet certainly has changed humor a lot and this is an exhibition that we've been planning for ages and we're trying to to find the right research team to prepare that means different. Thank fully games. It's really interesting to see how Internet has been changing humor and where are we at now. The way that jokes jokes developed in Gabarevo where people told slightly different versions to each other and in the process carefully distilled the most sharable essence of the joke mirrors. Here's the way that memes are forged in online communities constantly morphing to get more attention. Maybe the best chance we have of interpreting communities. He's on line and off comes from a humor museum. The Gabar Vo Museum of Humor and satire which has already morphed through twenty years of communism and thirty years of democracy accuracy is a good place to start. Just close the door quickly when you let the cat out this has been museum archipelago the you'll find full transcript of this episode along with shouts at Museum Archipelago Dot Com Club archipelago members get access to the bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary into the main show fund extras like stickers support the show and join club archipelago today today the two dollars Patriot dot com slash museum competitive. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend..

Bulgaria director Gabar Vo Museum of Humor Museum of Humor Satire Museum Museum Archipelago Dot Com Clu museum archipelago Museum of two Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelag general secretary Gobble Bulgaria Margarita Sheriff Bulgaria Freedom Media bruins BNL Communist Times Tunis Belgrade Union
"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"museum " Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started people of color. Specially people have African descent have been fighting for museums to be more -clusive over fifty years ago. It's the reason why institutions like the studio museum in Harlem was rated at the reason why mocha the museum of Chinese in America. Also New York City was created El museo de Badio all these institutions came up, because of the lack of inclusivity within these institutions, what we've seen today is not actually a shift in inclusion in white mainstream museums. But a kind of two tiered museum, which is still the white mainstream museums and the development of these culturally specific institutions. And so it's important for us to realize that there has been need for institution building for people of color, but also these white mainstream institutions at hold a lot of our cultural heritage. You have to also include us into the scope and the framework of their institution, become more inclusive, as well a twenty eight teen survey by the Mellon foundation found that eighty eight percent of people in museum leadership positions are white. This imbalance continues through museum visitor ship numbers, even though many museums are within communities of color or within states that have high populations of people of color. Stephanie Cunningham has a clear answer for why these white institutions aren't changing, when you've been practicing exclusion for so long you can't change overnight. And that's one of the reasons why she cofounded museum, Hugh. Hello. My name is Stephanie Cunningham, I am the co founder and creative director of museum, Hugh and arts organization that works to increase the visibility of people of color, working in arts and culture in museums in particular. It's really important that we begin to think, more critically on how to change this how to shift this. A make museums more innovative inviting that will attract more people of color, and also be very honest about their history and their conflicting provinces as well within the institution. Stephanie Cunningham, co-founded museum Hugh, with strategic director Monica Montgomery, in two thousand fifteen the organization began in New York City as a collective of people of color working in museums and other cultural spaces. We realized that we really needed a safe space, a space, where we can have psychological safety where we can be ourselves talk about our experiences, working within cultural institutions, whether it be micro, Gretchen macro, Gretchen or racism and talking about hap- some best practices of the things that were also going well for people within institutions as well museum Hugh began infiltrating spaces with programs like he's Eum tours, which the organization leads in art museums and other performance venue. News. The tourists started in New York City, but have since branched out to different parts of the country. We go to an institution about teams of thirty deep and we'll have a conversation focusing on an staff and artists of color, and also narratives color as well, because what we also realize is that a lot of the narratives, within museums and cultural institutions don't reflect people of color. And so we kind of invoke, and incorporate those within our own tours and presentations within the spaces. The Huseyin tours are one example of museum Hughes focus on the Fenton participation within the arts world. Another is jobs. Particularly jobs in creative and leadership roles at the heart of the issue is not a lack of qualified creatives of color. But instead, that the doors of museums and the surrounding ecosystem are largely closed off to people of color through extending museum, Hughes Network and by pipeline ING. People of color in the museum and cultural fields Cunningham has seen how a mostly white cultural institutions desire to be more inclusive is necessary, but not sufficient when it comes to actual inclusion, and that's why last year museum Hugh became a membership based organization last year we decided to become a membership based institution, and this came out of our fellowship at race forward racial equity in the arts organization about fifty or so institutions throughout New York City were invited supports and we all had our own platform in ideas. But the basis was for all of us to create racial equity framework. And so we decided with the museum he membership that we can focus on institutions that are willing and wanting to work with us in changing the framework of their institution, making it more inclusive of people of color. So we've been able to facilitate a lot of opera. -tunities a lot of jobs for people of color within these museums, and also worked with them in trainings on cultural competency, because we know that these conversations, although well intention, they can fall short. And so we need institutions take action steps in so action steps, look like creating real policy and also procedures in ways that they are accepting people of color in allowing them to have a seat at the table. A railway looking at their board. And so looking at railways that we can begin to focus on the framework of the institution and working on them from the inside out in episode forty eight of museum archipelago, the whitest Q podcast. Co host Arianna Lee makes the point that many museums can claim by verse workforce's, if you take into account people of color working in the museum's janitorial services department, but less. So in the seats of power to that end museum. Hugh created an internal, sir. Survey that any, cultural or museum related institution can use to develop an assessment of their current staff, and institutional attitudes towards inclusion and diversity. This isn't a change that happens overnight, because you've hired people of color. We want it to be a core part of the foundation in the structure of the institution. So in order to do that, we have to think have to encourage them and support them in thinking about this more critically it's been a real blessing that story institution country have wanted to sign on with us. It's about over eighty and so we're looking at different ways to support them in creating the toolkits, and creating more towards and not just focusing on our as usual members will also mostly on people of color in the field as well. Coming hymns focus on Ziems and other cultural institutions comes in part, because museums can be more resistant to change than some other parts of society. And in the case of museums that resistance has knock on facts. Many people of color have the needed qualifications in many of our fields, but yet don't see them represented. And so we have to realize that there's a real epidemic that have people of color, not represented in leadership, or given opportunities. And so for me tackling museums. Number one for me is, is my focus because, you know, I have a degree in our history and cultural, heritage preservation, and also think that museums for whatever reason within the grand scheme of society, that's, that's been changing isn't a seen as a place of importance for the to be racial diversity. I think it's needed in all industries, but especially in museums when we're talking about cultural heritage or talking about artistic freedom of expression. It's incredibly important that we begin to look at museums I because. Museums create a narrative that we see through our, our landscape. And so it's important that people begin to see people of color representing history in our because that then opens up a new lands, and recognition of cultural contribution that people of color, do not get in this country. And so for me museums have to begin to create a lane that is really much more inclusive than they actually are for museum. Hugh increasing the number of people of color at museum leadership, levels begins to shift, the framework, not just of that institution, but of the entire museum ecosystem, for example, there is a very prominent I won't say, the name at sedition design company that works with so many using EMS throughout the country, and they went to meet with a museum that they were baking with to begin to work with on. Exhibition design and during the meeting, they were asked by the person that they will working with a person represented by items EM, who was a person of color, axe them. Do you have people of color on your staff? And they for whatever reason had not even thought about this. They're like, well during exhibition design. Why does why does this matter? But it does matter because perspective and cultural differences in understandings are also needed, and so they, you know, reached out to museum here because they were like do you know of anyone exhibition design that, you know, can can possibly work with us? People of color are also going to begin to ask these questions of companies that they're working with as well. And having companies think about this issue because it's gonna affect their bottom line museums. I have incredible cultural power, and most of it is on checked, Cunningham's point. Is that without serious change that cultural power won't last forever wisdom? Hugh is just, you know, working to change that. And to utilize our collective power in our voices to call out issues and help usher in a change. That is constant not a change that is dependent upon the funding that institution gets for diversity, and inclusion, but something that is a core part of museums, and other cultural institutions, because I honestly believe if museums do not change, become more inclusive. Expect obsolescence expect museums, shutting down, expect museums continuously become relevant for the greater public coming him also hosts an excellent podcast called black visually past guests have included Blake Bradford, who. Also featured on episode forty three of museum archipelago as the director of Lincoln university's museum studies program. Bradford also sees a pipeline of black students, exposing them to career paths that are largely closed off to people of color museum. Hugh has three different membership types. One is an institutional membership for organizations to align the diversity and equity efforts with museum, Hugh, and also to advertise job openings through museum, Hugh. Another is the heures membership for people of color interested in the museum, Hugh platform, and finally, the allies membership for those looking to support museum Hughes mission. You can listen to black visually and learn more about Cunningham at Stephanie, a Cunningham dot com. You can find more information about museum, Hugh and sign up by going to museum. Hugh dot com slash join when a person is being colonized

Hugh Stephanie Cunningham color museum New York City museum of Chinese museum Hughes end museum director Harlem Elsner Mellon foundation El museo de Badio America Blake Bradford Hughes Network Gretchen Arianna Lee Ziems Hughes mission Eum