6 Burst results for "Museum Exhibit Design"

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Yet fail to engage with what is really at stake, namely identifying acknowledging and removing endemic structural problems of racism in repair to form a suggestion. By more than a few people is museums wind up? The statues of problematic people in museums is the bottom of the harbour, really the right place for Statue of Colston. Of course, these questions tend to ignore that the bottom of the ocean is the final resting place for hundreds of actual. Thrown overboard from Colston's chips because they were deemed a poor investment for Colston's company on the Zeke Appel go. We've investigated what various Eastern European countries are doing with old statues of dictators like Lenin and Stalin. Monica, notice interviewed on episode. Five of this show describes how her family's native Lithuania removed. It's ubiquitous Soviet statues from city squares all across the country. The removals were events that helped build the young nation, but once the statues were removed from their original locations. No one knew quite what to do with them. Many of them ended up at something called Curtis Park a kind of half theme park that includes a massive statue garden. The statues are presented simply and somewhat randomly each has a little description of the city and square where the statue used to stand many Lithuanians and the Lithuanian government have criticized the uncritical approach to the parks laughed. Visitors are free to do whatever they want. I guess like once you got into the actual dash you. It's Kinda funny because you can do whatever you want. So like planning on top of London installing, picking their nose Tottenham on the head. Doing whatever you want but I like to think that I have some sort of connection. Some sort of understanding that spews images might have been both sterry inspirational different times. Somebody's life for me. They've always been images. That were bad like no like I. Feel like throwing I always do that. Lenin Stalin phase like these are the faces of terror that drove my grandparents out of. Yeah but. Interact with them on this like humorous level is really interesting. The situation at Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia is somewhat similar. The outdoor sculpture garden is littered with statues. Commemorating Soviet power placed wherever there's room I visited many times, and I'm never quite sure how to react. There's a lot of power in deliberately taking these statues out of the context they were made for what once may have been in imposing statue, underscoring who's in charge in the public square is now just two key, leading impotently outer Rosebush in Eastern Europe the statues of. Of Lenin and Stalin and others were erected during the communist times and were swiftly removed when the system fell in the West statues erected more than one hundred years ago. Still stand without context Washington's next. Because the money he made from owning working in selling people isn't a footnote. It's the reason he was the first president. Even at the museums of Bristol Website Colston is identified as a revered philanthropist slash reviled slave trader in that order. As if the money he gave away to the city of Bristol wasn't violently extracted from the people he enslaved. It's not a sufficient answer to simply put these statues in the museum I. Don't know if there's enough museum space for all the confederate monuments in the American south or enough museum space for all the statues of King. Leopold in Belgium, but more importantly political exercise in selective remembrance neatly packaged as an unbiased archive. That statues represent is the same exercise that museums represent. Represent museums and statues are bridged together. Many of these statues are right in front of museum entrances, priming visitor for what they can expect to find inside statutes, museums share centuries long history of supporting white supremacist colonialist, racist ideologies, helping them flourish providing the evidence for them, and under girding them through their placement through their air of authority and through their supposed neutrality. The statues of American football players at American universities helps me think about this because the stakes are so low, the rivalry is so clear. Our football team has heroes and the long legacy, and it's telling that the two tools that were employed to make that point are statues and museums. This has been museum archipelago. Haven't checked out club archipelago. Now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our museum movie. Review Series archipelago at the movies is now completely free joining Rebecca. We've deny as we break breakdown two thousand four's national treasure, discussing the tropes of museum films. Now Museum Exhibit Design is reflected back.

Lenin Stalin Colston president Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Bristol Website Colston Museum Exhibit Design Zeke Appel Lithuania Lithuanian government Curtis Park Bristol Eastern Europe Monica Sofia Rebecca London Tottenham football Washington Leopold
"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Audible Insights

Audible Insights

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Audible Insights

"Everyone welcome to another episode of the audible insights podcast. I'm david paul. Ceo of engages. And we're coming to you. From the floor of the insights associations corporate researchers conference in orlando. And i have the pleasure of being joined for this conversation by steve august. Steve was the founder of revelation and later served as chief innovation officer and chief marketing officer for focused vision. Steve thanks so much. Thanks for having me david. Great to be here. It's great to chat with you so for those who don't know your story. Take us through your journey through the market research industry sure I like to say. I play my wife for the whole whole adventure because i came into market. Research is a lot of people do almost by accident and my wife was actually the real researcher in the family. She was the one with master's degree in consumer behavior and she had her own consulting business. And when in two thousand and two when our daughter was born We had a choice. I was working at a job Museum exhibit design of all things that was wonderfully safe but didn't pay very well and so we decided to make my wife's business the family business and so i started supporting her. In the business and kimberley's specialty was ethnography and in homes and in-depth call. And so i see her a going to people's houses in advance they would they would create these paper. Diaries like to see what was going on while she wasn't there so that she could be better informed about what was going on when she was there and i was looking at this and it was around two thousand three two thousand four and said well we have these things called blogs. They're kind of like web. Diaries web diary paper diary. Maybe we could this easier because you see. All the efforts is going to kinko's at the time. And creating the booklets and sending them out fedex and then had all this information at the.

Steve steve august david orlando david paul two two thousand kimberley fedex researchers Ceo one four
"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Ponderings from the Perch

Ponderings from the Perch

11:18 min | 1 year ago

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Ponderings from the Perch

"He helps founder scale and realize their full potential. He's a serial entrepreneur entrepreneur. He's a digital artist and a maker with two successful exits. And you're going to hear a little bit more about that. Story is pretty awesome but he has experienced the highs and lows of startup life. Can I get a name in there. He's taken into around the C.. Suite and he continues to explore ideas that basically. Don't let them sleep at night. Also he's just a very cool guy. So welcome to ponderings from the purge Steve August thanks for so yeah. It's been fun getting to know you and and actually through who A lot of colleagues that we had in common we. We didn't really figure out how we hadn't met each other yet. It seemed really odd. It's like how how many times must our paths crossed. You know without like two ships sailing with night without actually thinking and and starting to interact. But I'm glad we have. It's been been really wonderful getting to know you. Yeah absolutely and we. We did have a good time recently with the backdrop of the beautiful harbor of Boston. We did it was a great great nephew. View was just absolutely spectacular. So well what's really fun is that I talked with a lot of people. Market Research Talk with a lot of people in marketing but a lot of times I get calls or emails about the About the PODCAST and people really want to hear more from entrepreneurs in that startup. And even you know we've had people on about the exit plan and and and selling in and it is really a topic of interest so we're going to dig into a little bit of that about your story and of course we'll end. We'll tell people what you're doing right now with the coaching and and really the vision that you have for that but but tell everybody a little bit in your own words about your journey to actually exit. After you had worked so hard to be commander. Tell us tell us that nutshell right. Yeah so it's a it's a tawdry story highs and lows and You know it's funny. I was watching on the airplane home. from the event Boston we both attended recently a lot of the musical -biotics so it was like Elton John and and Freddie Mercury and it was like you know that classic you go in and they're they're innocent and they they're shy and it also make it the success and then everything goes off the rails right so I'd like to think of exactly like that I that's funny. You were watching that. On the way back I watched the prophet the uh-huh yeah the guy who goes in and fixes businesses and really gets down to brass tacks. So it's kind of funny. I think we I think we probably have like I think on the same lines. Yeah Yeah for sure. It's just the two different Different takes on the same journey. Yeah but my journey was Sort of an accidental entrepreneur's. I journey like I didn't I didn't set out after graduating from college to be an entrepreneur. I was doing all kinds of random creative things. I was doing video documentary. I was in the band. I was getting involved with Multimedia cd-rom when that was the next big thing so beyond you just dated yourself I did and I was at web one dot O.. And that happened and business intelligence One Dot O.. When that happened when everybody I started to say hey we got all these databases? Maybe they should talk to each other and so the way. I ended up getting into becoming an entrepreneur. Entrepreneur was was was fairly accidental Z.. the circumstance was that I had met my my wonderful wife and she happened can be in market research. She was a design researcher and early on with doing ethnography back in the mid and late ninety s when it was really finally they starting to to take the place it should and in two thousand to our child was born and we. I was working at a Museum Museum Exhibit Design Company in Oakland California which was a wonderful job but not very well and my wife's business paid very well and because she was quite good eh and so we made her business the family business and so I came on and I was sort of the marketing guy in the tech support guy and the the the the Guy Friday essentially a disappointing and and stay at home dad and which was amazing. Wouldn't really loved it that that's how it how it unfolded so a Lotta Times my wife would do Nagasaki's before these ethnography is visiting people. At home she would go down to Kinkos at the time. Right and put together these elaborate paper diaries. And then she would fedex. These diaries out to the participants depends and then they would fill out the diaries for our certain portion of time before she showed up to do the her observations interviews in homes and and the whole point was that she could understand what was going on over time and while she wasn't there and as I watched her doing this we have these things called blogs that have just come out and they seem like the equivalent of what. You're trying to do this thing right like web diary paper diary. Maybe we can make this a little easier and so we started playing with that. I had enough technical background to take some off the shelf blocking software to me. We can just do this. Pre Work Online and people post and what they'll share and that will you'll know going into the interview. What it is that that you might be interested in knowing more about and it'll be easier you'll have all the information and so we? We started doing that and it worked really well in fact it worked so well that it was like wow. They're they're sharing a lot of things like sharing things we didn't even think they were gonNA share And it was early on so there was a legit question of what our PR people actually going to be honest and share what. They're what they're doing and it turned out we were blown away by and so we started presenting at these research conference in saying. This is what we're doing. It's Kinda cool and what we discovered. And here's this really really amazing moment that that we captured and people started coming up to us after the after we would speak and say wow that that is really cool We'd love to use that. Can we use that and I said well you you could but you wouldn't want to. I mean you. We really had to be very technical to make this thing work and And there wasn't any tools at the time that did this. There was basically bulletin board software and it was just is not the same thing it was. It was a totally different way of thinking about how you're going to pull a qualitative research online instead of replicating a a room. We wanted to basically extend our our view out into people's lives and their experiences which ultimately I think is the mission right understand people to answer questions so but I thought you know I'm technical enough could probably figure out how to get this done. And so that's that's where the journey started. We also saw that. We were in a service company that we weren't we weren't really like keen to scale like we didn't want to have a bunch of people working under us. It wasn't in the model that we wanted to do but we saw that the software side of things had that potential to scale. And and so. That's where we started to step forward and start to make that happen. Well it is a little bit hard to kind of go back in time and couch. The what you were creating in a time when people really were curious about whether people would tell the truth online you hit on that just a little bit but that was a huge issue like are you know th the whole you know market research search world is trying to understand consumer behavior consumer sentiment you know and then also like trying to pull out the pieces of where consumers lie to you when they're talking to you about what their behaviors but then they walk in the store and do something else so there's all these all these different thoughts swirling around and then up POPs is this ability to really from the privacy of your own home in the safety or perceived safety and security or privacy of your own computer and and and putting in a quote unquote diary then. The question is much bigger now. Will people truly be honest about you know as their no positioning is there. No you re thinking is in a restructuring of you know their true opinion or their true sentiment and I think it is really understated because now it really seems seems obvious to people and we've come up with a lot of ways you know since then to gauge true sentiment. But back when you're talking about this was a whole new conversation. Yeah this was two thousand four two thousand five where we did our first test study. We called it the parenthood project because we had recently become parents and we had other friends who had become parents before us and are they had sort of disappeared from our social lives. Like what the heck happened you know. And we're still young and you know young married couple in San Francisco and our our friends suddenly couldn't do anything anymore. Like what the heck they're living in a different world and then we had our kit and we're like oh ooh that's why they disappear. So what did this company actually become. What was the name of it? It was called revelation. And I know it. Well the Laura but tell the audiences are familiar with it what what really is so. It became a software system now. What was it subscription based or not? Well that was an interesting question. So it was a an online platform it was a qualitative research platform instead of replicating focus groups rooms. What it did was it allows you to create different kinds of activities for your participants? Do out there the real world. So keep a diary to a photo journal I do a metaphor elucidation. Exercises so it was the first activity-based online qualitative research platform that it was created and it was definitely a a big leap in terms of the thinking in what was possible at that point and so you. Asif was a subscription of software and in a way it was and in a way it wasn't the way in the way it was is that it was a hosted platform. I'm that you could conceivably subscription around. The thing that prevented that from happening was qualitative. Research is not an ongoing day to day thing is episodic sonic it happens when it happens and early on discovered that no matter how low a price you charge for a subscription. Shen if somebody wasn't using it during that month they felt like they were paying for something they they they weren't using concept and so some of the innovation there was is how do we create greater connection and sticking with our customers while not being able without the subscription model. Really being something. I think that works in. We actually came up with this idea participant days so people bought a block of of participants days credit usage credits basically and they got a better deal. And that's how we actually early on got like got a sixty thousand dollar contract and the only way we could have made that happen with sort of to it to adjust our business model right..

Boston Steve August founder Kinkos Nagasaki Museum Museum Exhibit Design C Elton John commander California Asif San Francisco Oakland researcher Shen Freddie Mercury Laura
"museum exhibit design" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Be back with you. keeping Chicago company right Jack and I talked about the Chicago River here in the beautiful downtown area the central business district where there will be no. legalize marijuana. as we found out from the mayor this week today we got a wonderful program lined up for you focusing on Chicago's rich and vibrant arts and culture but is less about the arts and culture maybe more about the application of arts and culture because let's face it I guess that we focus on arts and culture every show. in fact there's so much to fit in from the Chicago area that we could dedicate every single extension seven twenty from here to eternity on arts and culture so what does that even mean. but no longer should we look at arts and culture as being ancillary we can't afford to as a matter of fact you may have seen the news this week that the arts based industries in this country they're contributing to over seven hundred and thirty billion dollars to our U. S. economy to give me an idea that's more than transportation or the agriculture industry. yet we still treat arts sorts training arts education as secondary luxury a novel pursuit. so tonight let's talk about art and how it impacts Chicago but our segments and stories are more about the people using art in different ways for instance a new eggs for instance the new exhibit at the Bridgeport art center brings together seventy different artists and photographers sand physicians positions first for the question what is health care what if we can use images and other our disciplines to make health and health care the number one priority in this country on this planet no politics or policy just people some people everybody the name of the exhibit and the curator will be out with me tonight. how about the floating museum a collection of artists in Chicago the dedicate that decided that the museum shouldn't be a building the communities travel to but instead the museum should travel to the communities that's the idea behind a floating museum in the summers insulations and exhibits about along the Green Line. have serve captured the west side of Chicago the museum exhibit design for passer bys about that the commuter. you're on the train and you look at some of the green space in Garfield park other places. and it's an art exhibit it's it's a museum installation happening from stop to stop. how cool is that. we'll get out of the studio ten and explore one of the spaces right outside Garfield park how about that right by the conservatory. the actual Chicago begins night over navy pier at Chicago's answer to art Basel in Miami beach the biggest art fair in the Midwest but the organizers are not content on stopping there they have their eyes on this annual expo to be on par with the likes of I guess said my Amin or Paris or Milan the other are capitals of the world so just how does Chicago stack up when it comes to contemporary art we convene our first ever arched panel featuring curators from the Art Institute DePaul University and the exposure kago itself so much I'm so excited about that how great is that gonna be. this goes well this could be a recurring. segment right get the curators in town to come in and talk about art I love it and as I said with romantic jazz guitar great George Freeman is in studio tonight performing the ninety two year old legends played alongside greats jazz greats like Charlie Parker John Coltrane Jimmy McGriff just to name a few talk about an artist Freeman has seen Chicago jazz up close and personal continues to not only produce music but serve as an arts educators several younger generations of musicians course George Freeman's great brother von Freeman passed away not too long ago was also big on this in a new apartment lounge we're going I was producing for Richard Steele and we went down to do a piece on a Tuesday or Wednesday night and. von Freeman George Freeman others should be on stage this was probably in the late nineties. maybe on stage in this this bar that was really it's called the new heartland it really was just a a frame house there was a bar. and in the back they would just jamming these kids would show up from the university of Chicago when they show up from you know wherever they're coming with their you know their. trumpet case when they're saxophone case nervous you know sweat coming down the forehead and then get started in van for him to call these kids up on stage and they will get a chance to jam with the legends because that man twenty March Freeman was in the seventies through right now ninety two years old he's gonna be playing at the winters jazz club right here north pier. how about that. which the club looks awesome by the way it's gonna and I looked up the website there's a lot of great jazz acts because they're not really. too many places to see jazz music in Chicago anymore jazz showcase of course well the the other greenmail course and classic and then you got winters here so he I think is planned this weekend the twentieth. George Freeman and he will be he's got a new album out we're we get we get someone to talk to him about ten teachers live we'll hear some music from him coming up right after the break is a lot to do tonight that's a great line of first tension seven twenty Pete seer Jordan's here doing the news weather and traffic sports all that kind of stuff will pay attention to what's happening on field cubs course gonna win this big series I got to win this one working series at Wrigley so we'll find out about that but much to do tonight extension seven twenty you're always welcome to join three one two nine eight one seventy two hundred whether by phone or by text and we'll continue the conversation as we take a break and come back and we'll get some live music but George Freeman so stay with us..

George Freeman Chicago Chicago River Jack Pete seer Jordan Wrigley cubs thirty billion dollars ninety two years ninety two year
"museum exhibit design" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Collaboration just the fact we call ourselves we say as opposed to the name of the young nece of the company or something like that is so that everyone feels like they're working underneath a ban that is almost a collective and cindy alabana that's almost faceless as well the you know it's a coop of people working together and the fact that we've got people with the longevity of service here as you were mentioning a gift space to the fact that people enjoy that they they enjoy not specialising they enjoy being entirely collaborative even to the point that a sculpture i don't know if this is necessarily the one the one that we did it with but we will have sculptures that we will hand from artists to out as some of them will work on it for three weeks and then it will be passed on to another sculptor who may work on it for a bit of time and saw so that the collective is ebbing something rich to it then i'd just a single individual wow and you know i imagine that's a fairly unusual thing in the world yes absolutely and i mean a you know it what it lends itself to as we walk round is the understanding that wet it is about so much more than just felt or telling stories on film and television that you guys are into architecture and museum exhibit design it storytelling in every possible place you could find it he had the term my than it might be a little bit clumsy but with us services the worlds are creative industries because we're autism studio we're not fill micheals we don't make movies pay the checks and mike findlay these we work on james cameron does andrew adamson does eccentric asia we contribute says to them and we love to be an injury gold pogam among something like ghost in the show you find yourself being an incredibly inge go pot and other she may be just a passing moment in the making of the folks but what we're trying to pay as i am not as saying.

cindy alabana mike findlay james cameron andrew adamson inge three weeks
"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"museum exhibit design" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

"Collaboration just the fact we call ourselves we say as opposed to the name of the young nece of the company or something like that is so that everyone feels like they're working underneath a ban that is almost a collective and cindy alabana that's almost faceless as well the you know it's a coop of people working together and the fact that we've got people with the longevity of service here as you were mentioning a gift space to the fact that people enjoy that they they enjoy not specialising they enjoy being entirely collaborative even to the point that a sculpture i don't know if this is necessarily the one the one that we did it with but we will have sculptures that we will hand from artists to out as some of them will work on it for three weeks and then it will be passed on to another sculptor who may work on it for a bit of time and saw so that the collective is ebbing something rich to it then i'd just a single individual wow and you know i imagine that's a fairly unusual thing in the world yes absolutely and i mean a you know it what it lends itself to as we walk round is the understanding that wet it is about so much more than just felt or telling stories on film and television that you guys are into architecture and museum exhibit design it storytelling in every possible place you could find it he had the term my than it might be a little bit clumsy but with us services the worlds are creative industries because we're autism studio we're not fill micheals we don't make movies pay the checks and mike findlay these we work on james cameron does andrew adamson does eccentric asia we contribute says to them and we love to be an injury gold pogam among something like ghost in the show you find yourself being an incredibly inge go pot and other she may be just a passing moment in the making of the folks but what we're trying to pay as i am not as saying.

cindy alabana mike findlay james cameron andrew adamson inge three weeks