18 Burst results for "Museum Archipelago"

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

01:35 min | Last month

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"This episode of Museum Archipelago is proudly sponsored by a beautifully foolish endeavor, a brand new book by Hank Green Ivan, following green for over a decade I on his excellent WLAC, brothers, Youtube Channel, and now on his podcast, attracted by his humanistic approach to the world and to science education, a beautifully foolish endeavor is a sequel and conclusion to his first fiction book, an absolutely remarkable thing, which is the story of a young woman thrown into fame during the global crisis of. Of contagious streams and mysterious Robots Library Journal's review said through this adventurist, witty and compelling novel Green Delivers Sharp Social Commentary on the power of social media and both benefits and horrendous consequences that follow when we give too much of ourselves to technology. The book is out July. Seventh Twenty Twenty in physical audio in the book form wherever books are sold, or you can just go to hankering dot com, thanks so much hankering, and a beautifully foolish endeavor for Sponsoring Museum archipelago. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at Museum archipelago dot Com Museum archipelago is supported by listeners like you who have joined club archipelago on Patriot. If you can't get enough about how museums shape, our lives join now for two dollars a month. If this is your first episode, subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcast player, and if it isn't leave us a rating review. And next time. Bring a friend..

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

06:25 min | Last month

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Chris Newell Remembers Visiting the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor. Maine as a kid, his father was hired to put on educational performances to perform songs about their past Mikati language, history and culture at the need of market and the native American Festival hosted by the museum. So every summer, the family would drive the two and a half hours from their home in MMG, Look Newell, look forward to it year after year with an almost giddy level of excitement, but even as a young person, Newell could clearly see the difference between the surrounding events like the native market and the festival, which will run by members of the WAB, Inaki nations and the museum. which was not back then the Abbey Museum was more traditional ethnographic collection, a lot of weddings and things like that, so when it came to the museum itself, and did feel very much like inclined museum was Barbara Institution not necessarily allow mackey institution, so I definitely felt a lot more connection to things like the vessel, native American festival in those, because those were neater run and be supporting them, although I knew what. I knew the special collection I knew the shredder, and they have as far as the history of mind. People's by able as well as I keep. People's in general, always been attracted to wise available in the Abbey. mcdonagh's as a child I felt it was different spaces today, Chris Crystal, a possible quality citizen is the first member of the watanake nations to lead the Abbey. Museum high money. My name is Chris Lual and I am the director of Education for the. Educational Initiative also CO founder and I'm also the executive director and senior partner. Donations for the Abbey Museum in Bar Harbor. Chris! Co founded the ADAMO. Educational Initiative in two thousand, eighteen with Donna Spears DNA ob joy, chickasaw Choctaw and Dr Jason Man Cheney Agamal is a pass quality word for the snowshoe path at the beginning of winter. The snowshoe path is hard to find, but the more people pass along and carve out this path through the snow during the season. The easier it becomes for everyone to walk together on episode sixty eight of this show we interviewed spears about how the initiative was born out of their experiences seen colonial museum practices across present New England. So, what do we mean when we say colonial museum outside the context of Colonial Williamsburg of course, this kind goes off of my colleague Don from. Who was on the museum archipelago before museums are colonial artifacts. The idea of a museum comes with colonization and tribal museums, even in their own right are using that colonial artifacts. As a way to present her native histories, only doing different in tribal museum in a non tribal museum, largely consists of the American conservation movement which started in the nineteenth century, and when came to museums, and especially the way museum content was created colonial museums would oftentimes focus on tribes that they felt at the time were less impacted, which would have been Western plains tribes in South Western tribes so if you go into a non-tribal museum that. That has native content Colonia Museum. Then what you typically see is a presentation of native cultures through the Lens of anthropology and archaeology and a lot of those voices, ninety nine percent of those voices, especially in the past were non native voices that were framing that lends and hot of you are cultures, and so it's not uncommon to see things that out place, so to go to northeastern museum that has a collection and to see only planes. Or only question. Pari and no Wolpe Martino. Ashland basket is really kind of an old fashioned way of presenting things that goes back to a motive, thinking really originated in the idea that native people were going to vanish at one point and that we needed our history saves by an outside force, and that's literally well. The Columbia Museum represents is that mindset and the Abbey Museum is rooted in that. Mindset opened in nineteen, twenty eight. It housed the collection of native American. Objects gathered by radiologists Robert Abbey in a purpose built building. Newell was hired to lead the Abbey Museum in February twenty twenty. Four lockdowns due to cove nineteen began, but the decolonization process had been going on at the museum for the past five years. The Abbey Museum has gone through the fast five years under the previous executive director. The President CEO at the time cinnamon. Caitlyn the good I the colonization, process and car that. Not just in the content of the museum, which centers need voices now, but also in the structure of the way the museum is run in the has overtime restructured as board to become a majority Ebina Keyboard so Columbia Museum that Presents Lab Aki history. We are probably the only museum that has a structure where the voice of the people that we are representing is now centered, and is also governing the institution itself when the change of directorship happened, the museum changed the title from President and CEO to executive, director and senior partner to the watanake nations as part of this decolonisation process and the shift of power the. Tribes today are five times asking. Scott. Avenue tribes in the history. There was over twenty drives at one point, but currently there are five tribes. Nike is an over arching for the cosmetology of the peoples. Tribes in the beliefs and stories. Of Being Liska created on people from Yash reason gave us the name weapon. Aki, which is the anglicized version of impassioned twelve naccache wish would translate to the people of the dawn collectively. That's how we see ourselves. We we understand that we are the easternmost tribes on the consummate, and.

Abbey Museum colonial museum Columbia Museum tribal museum Colonia Museum inclined museum Chris Newell Bar Harbor Educational Initiative executive director Robert Abbey Abbey Colonial Williamsburg Ian Elsner senior partner Donna Spears Nike Chris Lual Maine President and CEO
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

16:51 min | 2 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Yet fail to engage with what is really at stake, namely identifying acknowledging and removing endemic structural problems of racism in repair to form a suggestion. By more than a few people is museums wind up? The statues of problematic people in museums is the bottom of the harbour, really the right place for Statue of Colston. Of course, these questions tend to ignore that the bottom of the ocean is the final resting place for hundreds of actual. Thrown overboard from Colston's chips because they were deemed a poor investment for Colston's company on the Zeke Appel go. We've investigated what various Eastern European countries are doing with old statues of dictators like Lenin and Stalin. Monica, notice interviewed on episode. Five of this show describes how her family's native Lithuania removed. It's ubiquitous Soviet statues from city squares all across the country. The removals were events that helped build the young nation, but once the statues were removed from their original locations. No one knew quite what to do with them. Many of them ended up at something called Curtis Park a kind of half theme park that includes a massive statue garden. The statues are presented simply and somewhat randomly each has a little description of the city and square where the statue used to stand many Lithuanians and the Lithuanian government have criticized the uncritical approach to the parks laughed. Visitors are free to do whatever they want. I guess like once you got into the actual dash you. It's Kinda funny because you can do whatever you want. So like planning on top of London installing, picking their nose Tottenham on the head. Doing whatever you want but I like to think that I have some sort of connection. Some sort of understanding that spews images might have been both sterry inspirational different times. Somebody's life for me. They've always been images. That were bad like no like I. Feel like throwing I always do that. Lenin Stalin phase like these are the faces of terror that drove my grandparents out of. Yeah but. Interact with them on this like humorous level is really interesting. The situation at Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia is somewhat similar. The outdoor sculpture garden is littered with statues. Commemorating Soviet power placed wherever there's room I visited many times, and I'm never quite sure how to react. There's a lot of power in deliberately taking these statues out of the context they were made for what once may have been in imposing statue, underscoring who's in charge in the public square is now just two key, leading impotently outer Rosebush in Eastern Europe the statues of. Of Lenin and Stalin and others were erected during the communist times and were swiftly removed when the system fell in the West statues erected more than one hundred years ago. Still stand without context Washington's next. Because the money he made from owning working in selling people isn't a footnote. It's the reason he was the first president. Even at the museums of Bristol Website Colston is identified as a revered philanthropist slash reviled slave trader in that order. As if the money he gave away to the city of Bristol wasn't violently extracted from the people he enslaved. It's not a sufficient answer to simply put these statues in the museum I. Don't know if there's enough museum space for all the confederate monuments in the American south or enough museum space for all the statues of King. Leopold in Belgium, but more importantly political exercise in selective remembrance neatly packaged as an unbiased archive. That statues represent is the same exercise that museums represent. Represent museums and statues are bridged together. Many of these statues are right in front of museum entrances, priming visitor for what they can expect to find inside statutes, museums share centuries long history of supporting white supremacist colonialist, racist ideologies, helping them flourish providing the evidence for them, and under girding them through their placement through their air of authority and through their supposed neutrality. The statues of American football players at American universities helps me think about this because the stakes are so low, the rivalry is so clear. Our football team has heroes and the long legacy, and it's telling that the two tools that were employed to make that point are statues and museums. This has been museum archipelago. Haven't checked out club archipelago. Now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our museum movie. Review Series archipelago at the movies is now completely free joining Rebecca. We've deny as we break breakdown two thousand four's national treasure, discussing the tropes of museum films. Now Museum Exhibit Design is reflected back through popular culture to listen for free and hopefully find a little distraction. Could the Patriots Dot Com Slash Museum archipelago and look for the episode on national treasure. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at museum, Archipelago Dot Com. Museum archipelago is supported by listeners like you who have joined club archipelago on patriotic. If you can't get enough about how museums shape, our lives join now for two dollars a month. If this is your first episode, subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcasts player, and if it isn't leave us a rating reveal. And next time. Bring a friend..

Lenin Stalin Colston Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Com Slash Museum Archipelago Dot Com Bristol Website Colston Museum Exhibit Design Zeke Appel Lithuania Lithuanian government Bristol Curtis Park Eastern Europe Monica Sofia president London football Tottenham
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:21 min | 2 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So, let's get started. The statute appeared in two thousand eleven on the path of my daily Commute to the University of Florida. Where I was a student, it was a statue of football player named Tim Tebow, and the strange thing about it was that Tim Tebow was still around. In fact, it was just a few months after he graduated, and it was commemorating events like touchdowns that I remembered seeing I remember seeing him around campus, and now I was looking at him houses statue, but it wasn't. Wasn't just a statue behind the statue was the entrance to a hall of honor which featured football trophies, but the space was not just a room with trophies. It was a story about the football program where trophies were an inevitable consequence. In short, it looked like a museum reader, rails and old pictures of the early days of the program were presented alongside pigskin football's from the nineteen thirties with lighting, but this wasn't just one university all across the football conference. These trophy rooms looked like museum spaces. At Florida State University just a few hours away. The trophy room begins with artifacts from and descriptions of the seminole nation. Even though these are tellingly light on the details, the point was to tie the athletic program success without a historical figures fighting a US invasion. It's all done very deftly one minute. You're looking at a map of what is now Florida? Drawn by US general and the next. You're looking at a tattered Football Jersey the next, a bronze statue of the stories heroes. There's a bridge between statues and museums. They feed into each other. So why do athletic programs adopt statues and museum like spaces because they want to sell us? A selective account presented as a neutral archive of.

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:21 min | 2 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So, let's get started. The statute appeared in two thousand eleven on the path of my daily Commute to the University of Florida. Where I was a student, it was a statue of football player named Tim Tebow, and the strange thing about it was that Tim Tebow was still around. In fact, it was just a few months after he graduated, and it was commemorating events like touchdowns that I remembered seeing I remember seeing him around campus, and now I was looking at him houses statue, but it wasn't. Wasn't just a statue behind the statue was the entrance to a hall of honor which featured football trophies, but the space was not just a room with trophies. It was a story about the football program where trophies were an inevitable consequence. In short, it looked like a museum reader, rails and old pictures of the early days of the program were presented alongside pigskin football's from the nineteen thirties with lighting, but this wasn't just one university all across the football conference. These trophy rooms looked like museum spaces. At Florida State University just a few hours away. The trophy room begins with artifacts from and descriptions of the seminole nation. Even though these are tellingly light on the details, the point was to tie the athletic program success without a historical figures fighting a US invasion. It's all done very deftly one minute. You're looking at a map of what is now Florida? Drawn by US general and the next. You're looking at a tattered Football Jersey the next, a bronze statue of the stories heroes. There's a bridge between statues and museums. They feed into each other. So why do athletic programs adopt statues and museum like spaces because they want to sell us? A selective account presented as a neutral archive of.

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Yet fail to engage with what is really at stake, namely identifying acknowledging and removing endemic structural problems of racism in repair to form a suggestion. By more than a few people is museums wind up? The statues of problematic people in museums is the bottom of the harbour, really the right place for Statue of Colston. Of course, these questions tend to ignore that the bottom of the ocean is the final resting place for hundreds of actual. Thrown overboard from Colston's chips because they were deemed a poor investment for Colston's company on the Zeke Appel go. We've investigated what various Eastern European countries are doing with old statues of dictators like Lenin and Stalin. Monica, notice interviewed on episode. Five of this show describes how her family's native Lithuania removed. It's ubiquitous Soviet statues from city squares all across the country. The removals were events that helped build the young nation, but once the statues were removed from their original locations. No one knew quite what to do with them. Many of them ended up at something called Curtis Park a kind of half theme park that includes a massive statue garden. The statues are presented simply and somewhat randomly each has a little description of the city and square where the statue used to stand many Lithuanians and the Lithuanian government have criticized the uncritical approach to the parks laughed. Visitors are free to do whatever they want. I guess like once you got into the actual dash you. It's Kinda funny because you can do whatever you want. So like planning on top of London installing, picking their nose Tottenham on the head. Doing whatever you want but I like to think that I have some sort of connection. Some sort of understanding that spews images might have been both sterry inspirational different times. Somebody's life for me. They've always been images. That were bad like no like I. Feel like throwing I always do that. Lenin Stalin phase like these are the faces of terror that drove my grandparents out of. Yeah but. Interact with them on this like humorous level is really interesting. The situation at Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia is somewhat similar. The outdoor sculpture garden is littered with statues. Commemorating Soviet power placed wherever there's room I visited many times, and I'm never quite sure how to react. There's a lot of power in deliberately taking these statues out of the context they were made for what once may have been in imposing statue, underscoring who's in charge in the public square is now just two key, leading impotently outer Rosebush in Eastern Europe the statues of. Of Lenin and Stalin and others were erected during the communist times and were swiftly removed when the system fell in the West statues erected more than one hundred years ago. Still stand without context Washington's next. Because the money he made from owning working in selling people isn't a footnote. It's the reason he was the first president. Even at the museums of Bristol Website Colston is identified as a revered philanthropist slash reviled slave trader in that order. As if the money he gave away to the city of Bristol wasn't violently extracted from the people he enslaved. It's not a sufficient answer to simply put these statues in the museum I. Don't know if there's enough museum space for all the confederate monuments in the American south or enough museum space for all the statues of King. Leopold in Belgium, but more importantly political exercise in selective remembrance neatly packaged as an unbiased archive. That statues represent is the same exercise that museums represent. Represent museums and statues are bridged together. Many of these statues are right in front of museum entrances, priming visitor for what they can expect to find inside statutes, museums share centuries long history of supporting white supremacist colonialist, racist ideologies, helping them flourish providing the evidence for them, and under girding them through their placement through their air of authority and through their supposed neutrality. The statues of American football players at American universities helps me think about this because the stakes are so low, the rivalry is so clear. Our football team has heroes and the long legacy, and it's telling that the two tools that were employed to make that point are statues and museums. This has been museum archipelago. Haven't checked out club archipelago. Now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our museum movie. Review Series archipelago at the movies is now completely free joining Rebecca. We've deny as we break breakdown two thousand four's national treasure, discussing the tropes of museum films. Now Museum Exhibit Design is reflected back.

Lenin Stalin Colston president Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Bristol Website Colston Museum Exhibit Design Zeke Appel Lithuania Lithuanian government Curtis Park Bristol Eastern Europe Monica Sofia Rebecca London Tottenham football Washington Leopold
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

13:28 min | 3 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. He's never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. There's a way to look at history that focuses on the events themselves. And then there's a way to look a history that focuses on the fallout in the Fourth Century. Bc. E So Lucas. Who's one of Alexander the great successors and Chandra Gupta who is the first Moyen Emperor in northern India met for the first time by the banks of the River Indus and there they had some kind of military encounter? What kind of military encounter? Well we don't really know what we do know is that following the encounter. Greek ambassador megacity was sent to the Indian Interior for the first time and he wrote an ethnographic cool the indicate and it described India for Greek Odeon based on personal observation. But also that you need this. Lots of strange storytelling as well. And this particular tax reform the foundation of Western knowledge of India for generations. And you can just imagine that. Soldiers and British soldiers in the nineteenth century took translations of this particular taxed with them to north west of India when they were exploring. So it's a very long life and it's particularly that that continues to resonate. This is Dr Shushma John. Sorry Tabor Foundation Curator of South Asia at the British Museum. I'm talk to central Michigan. Sorry on the Table Foundation Creator South Asia at the British Museum. And when I'm not at work I welcome my podcast which is very much a passion project and this is called the Wander House will get to the wonder house in a minute because it's an excellent podcast but I a doctorate at University College London. Jane sorry studied this ancient encounter of which only Greek descriptions survive. That moment of meeting in connection has been completely transformed it was transformed cleaner period by British and Indian scholars have precious scholars saying. Oh you know so. Give Woman's warned. He defeated this Indian general whereas the Indian scholars right the the complete opposite that take gender. Gupta defeated this incoming European and he became a great leader and ruler. So actually I think because of this uncertainty. I think it tells us a lot about the time we live in right now. And how may have been transformed in the past so that Doesn't it doesn't bother me in the sense that we will never have this Tonic truth because you know we're never going to get that what we can study is the fallout. How people interpret these historic events and how that reflects on the moment. They're living in now and of course what better way to see in the form of a building how people interpret historic events than a museum itself. This is why the whole idea of decolonizing museums and collections is so important. Because I think up. Till now we've all been complicit in telling partial stories under the guise of trying to be neutral and as we know that neutrality is quite problematic and it tells very very partial truth or partial version of a story. Museums are great way to see what historic events meant to the museum. Builders and I can think of no clearer example than the British Museum. We have reading credible exhibitions on. Say you know when you're thinking of ancient South Asia? They're often on Buddhism or Hinduism organism. So they have a very close religious fakers but will they don't tend to address very rarely that I've ever seen anyway is today's collections. Arrive here. What was the clinical interest in that material? How has it been interrupted? How's it been presented at also? Why why Nice particular ways? How how has that changed over the last century or so it? It's too easy to present a cycle neutral view the ancient Pau of ancient religions. But I I don't think that's particularly ethical. I think if you're going to be doing that you need to be telling that full story in episode thirty nine of this show. We examined Hand Sloan and the origins of the British Museum. Funded in large part by his marriage into the enslaving plan Takeuchi of Jamaica and aided by Britain's rising colonial power global reach. Sloan assembled an encyclopedic collection of specimens and objects from all around the world that became the basis for the world's first public museum the British Museum. A place where anyone could freely enter to see the glory of the British Empire the empire and fuses pretty much every aspect of life life in the UK. Whether we're all aware of it will not in a weather. It's the names of the streets. We walked down the the museums that were founded the collections. They hold the structures. We still all inhabit when you look around at the museum's mice museums I'd say UK. They hold the contents of empire objects collected around the world by client officials by soldiers by Salas people. Working Abroad Uber. Count disentangle the two. When you are telling a story you need to be honest. And tell the whole story or at least as much of it as you can possibly share. Because otherwise you're telling a very very partial one. That often overlooks the violence of an object's collection and the situation and circumstances it was created taken purchased and brought him to the UK to be held in a museum today. Sorry is the first curator of Indian descent of the South Asia collection at the British Museum. In the past Tracy Tell Dighton. Do you think about it very much. I think he's signing when I look at my couture practice and how I approach my role. The collections who. I want to work with and how I realized that actually there is a difference between what I do. And what's other people in a whole range of institutions? Bring Two zero and at first. I was really uncomfortable about that. I thought my goodness unit is it. Just because of who I am and what I am. What about you know? My academic side Olifants might use skills knowledge but actually. I think it's my ability to do my job. Is it somehow rich? I bring a slight different perspectives. We'll say in how I do it. The South Asia collection at the British Museum is so enormous that it can capture the sweep of history of South Asia from the Paleolithic period. To the present day. The gallery opened in two thousand seventeen before that it was last refurbished in nineteen ninety. Two it just happens to be the largest gathering the museum so hey no pressure looking say. Try Not to fail on your first go. It was it was really tricky. We started by thinking about who actually comes to the museum and seventy percent of our audience comes from outside the U. K. And if those people a huge proportion than not very well versed in the history cultures religions of South Asia. So how'd you present your collections in a way that shares this really incredible to the world with people who'd About it and so. We decided to have a chronic thematic kind of approach. We started with the Paleolithic. She's about one and a half million years ago and ended at the present day and the encyclopedic collections at the museum permits us to be able to do something like that. As part of that isolated wet on the ancient to medieval sections. Which is the collections? I cover along with the bulk of the anthropological collections. And also the textiles it. It's got a mammoth collection. The Dakota but as Powell fat I was very keen to introduce moments were slightly unexpected stories and people what presented so for example in the main oil. You walk down. One of the first sculptures you encounter is the modern line capital which takes about the first century day and it was actually excavated and request to the museum by South Asian Collector Pokharel Energy on. I put a portrait of him on that label as well as little bit attacks expanding it because I wanted people to be confronted by South Asians in South Asia Gallery. It's not enough to display their culture of their collections in their history. I think it has to be a shared enterprise and an in another section for example in the Janus in western India the Medieval section I included fate graphs of the Jane Temple from less. Which is where I'm from in the UK who wanted to show you know the sculptures on display. They are just as much positive. British culture as it was back then in the medieval period. It's not just a alien religion in Asian culture. It's our shed culture now. I think it's really important to connect the dots so you do. Share this broad sweep of history and culture but then you want to intersperse it with these other reading important moments linking in a WHO and what you might see around you as you get your everyday life in the UK linking it with with the pastas. Well I asked John. Sorry if she's noticed changes in who visits the gallery and how much time they spend there since the update very interesting. Hughes how they engaged with different displays how it can sort of tweak them to make more engaging annoy definitely notice that there are more South Asians in the gallery space the South Asia section. Anyway this is a really tricky one because I hope that a museum is for everybody. The reality is that as you say. A lot of people don't feel that the museum is for them and it's it's terrible because obviously the museum is for everybody but once again when you have very neutral displays and people aren't addressed people aren't consulted people you want working with members of the community. I think understand why they might feel somehow excluded from these spaces and we've all had moments have been chatting to people may assume that museum is not for them it somehow seen as a very different other ring space. A when you see the workforce inside the museum also predominantly white and. There are very few members of your black and minority ethnic stuff in the museum's once again. What sort of message are you trying to share with everybody else? You're saying hey come come to a museum but you can't work How how'd you change that? And I think it's not just one not tweets. I think it's a fundamental reimagining of what exactly a museum is exactly. This museum is full. I'm not sure that we have these answers. But what I think is really really important. Is that we start having these conversations. Are We start experimenting? And this is one of the reasons why John. Sorry started the wonder House podcast. The podcast which is completely independent of the British Museum is away again. Sorry to share the most innovative contemporary approaches to decolonization and so I got in touch with some people whose work I really respect and I asked them if they were willing to talk about their work what they learn what they what they thought didn't work quite so well and share their stories and experiments with decolonizing where they love about. The wonder house is being able to listen in on these conversations. That might not be happening in museums themselves but are happening at coffee houses and pubs nearby and the show explores the scale to you here. John Sorry who works at one of the largest institutions in the world in conversations with people who might be their museums only curators. I worry that the decolonizing museums incredible energy that it has right now. It's quite easy for that. To evaporate every single a movement has its moment and unless we embed this kind of knowledge and approaches it's it's going to evaporate and that that's one of the things that worries me. Most I not just the collections but also you know the the simple fact that many of us who work in museums you often one of the one or two Black Amano. She ethic people in an entire institution. That's not easy. Sorry studies the ancient world. But now she is at the forefront of modern museum interpretation printing not just the event but also how the event ripped through history remember the story about Salukis and Chandra Gupta from the beginning of the episode. The Indian interpretation of that moment has worn out. And actually if you read historical novels modern comics if you watch Indian films and in TV series. That's exactly the vision of John. Goto that we have now and you know what it's evolving over time you know days of being shaped and reshaped day by day at the moment and I think that's.

British Museum South Asia Dr Shushma John India Chandra Gupta UK Tabor Foundation Curator of So Table Foundation Creator South River Indus Ian Elsner South Asia Gallery megacity foundation of Western Asian culture Michigan South Asian Collector Pokharel Alexander Wander House
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:38 min | 4 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Sense and. I'm sure you can. It's that when it's sort of misused or thoughtlessly used leeann results are bad. We can't just so glibly and unthinkingly employees something like a push button as we did before and I am honestly. I don't know that that's a bad thing. Because then it sort of forces us to think. Well how could we provide a satisfying experience in? What are the interfaces or other kinds of opportunities that we could provide them with you? Carry the content that will carry the emotional ideas that we want to carry across in episode. Twenty seven of this show. I get that. There's a certain type of content. That digital media is best suited to system simulation understanding concepts like climate change requires thinking about how complex systems interact with one. Another and computer simulations allow that type of inquiry. It's almost like a video game. Visitors tried to find the edge of the rules of the world except in an exhibit about climate change. Those rules are the rules of atmospheric and Oceanic physics. Right now the best understood and most common interface to digital media is a touchscreen. There is a certain segment of people who love their touchscreens. They're museum with touchscreens. They would do it. I'm agnostic touchscreens. In touch tables they're amazing tools but now we have to be realistic. So now you're gonNA bring somebody into a new museum and asked them to crowd around with several other people and poke at a touchscreen after what has just happened in the world. That's a that's a that's a toughie interfaces allow visitors to interact with digital media without a touchscreen and without requiring the vizier to touch anything with their hands. And if I think for example of a large floor projections system where you could even just tap with your foot to control some different parameters or different people may be on the different corners of this huge. You know large projection could be controlling in real time different parameters could imagine that actually being positive and a worthwhile experience that still takes into account a social aspect but also social distancing aspect as well as you know something that is sort of full body doesn't involve people touching their hands on that you don't have to sort of sanitized floor because people are tapping it with their feet and doing things in his most optimistic moments or sally hopes that the new approach to hands on exhibits can bring Universal Design Front and center flexibility or control with something like tapping of foot which could easily also be. Somebody wheeling their wheelchair over the active area too. I mean I think this brings the notion of universal design to a different place in a positive place. You know these these limitations in this triangulation between posts Cova nineteen perception and the notion of universal design. I'm going to be optimistic. Maybe that puts us in a better place in a more thoughtful place in more satisfying place alternately in terms of interactive experiences for visitors which. I suppose is really what the sort of all boils down to how supported our museums as institutions in various countries or parts of the world where they exist or how resilient are particular museums or museum structures that led them withstand the sort of events. But they're sally sees a silver lining an end to all those mini grocery store exhibits at children's museums. Finally be a good reason for all the children's museums in world to get rid of those horrible mini grocery store exhibit small room filled. With lots of tactile objects kids are just constantly pawing over and checking out and throwing into their many baskets and then they get put right back on the shelves already already. It's a gigantic entropy experiment. So if you're gonNA keep that experience after everyone has touched something. Hundreds of things. White and disinfect. Them all and then replace them for people to just do this. I think constraints are good thing for creativity and now we've just been thrown some public hell in perceptual constraints. We have to think about that because certainly our visitors are going to be thinking about that. If we don't show that at least we're sensitive to that our visitors could rightfully think that we are insensitive. Not only to those design constraints in those design considerations but insensitive to them as people who want to have fun and want to be safe if you haven't checked out club archipelago now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our Museum Movie Review Series Archipelago at the movies is now completely free. Join Rebecca we've seen and I as we break down two thousand four national treasure discussing the tropes of museum films now museum. Exhibit Design is reflected back through popular culture to listen for free and hopefully find a little distraction the Patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and look for the episode on national treasure. This episode of Museum archipelago is brought to you by pigeon by S- recess a real time intelligence platform that uncovers the power of way finding for your museum enabling your visitors to maximize their day at your venue using pigeon. Yes like the navigating bird. The museum's management can gather real time data for managing space effectively in relation to visitors while improving their Roi through marketing. Automation and using pigeon visitors can navigate the maze of museum with ease conduct automated and personalized tours based on their interest. Rsvp for events and get more information about the exhibits right in front of to find out how pigeon can help your museum visit. Pigeon that's recess dot com slash museums. That's G. E. O. N. Dot S. I. R. S. Y. S. Dot Com slash museums things? So much to pigeon for. Supporting Museum archipelago. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at Museum Archipelago Dot. Com Archipelago is supported by listeners. Like you who have joined club archipelago on patriotic. If you can't get enough about how museums shape our lives join now for two dollars a month if this is your first episode. Subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcast player. And if it isn't leave us a rating review and next time bring a friend..

Museum Archipelago Dot Supporting Museum archipelago Museum archipelago Com Archipelago sally G. E. O. N. Dot S. I. R. S. Y. Cova Rebecca
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:12 min | 4 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. He's never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started a few months ago before reports of a new form of crony virus now known as Cova Nineteen started appearing in the news. I visited an exhibit called outbreak epidemics in a connected world at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington. Dc The exhibit laid out the coordinated. Detective work that public health workers and many other professionals do as identify and respond to infectious diseases. Such as HIV AIDS Ebola virus and influenza. There was even the touch screen game. That invited me the work cooperatively with other visitors to contain an outbreak before it spreads further. So the funny thing about public health and a lot of the scientists that contribute to the to the knowledge that public health workers use. Is that if you're doing everything right. Nobody realizes that you're doing it right. It's kind of the opposite of a glamorous job this is raven forced who scelzo a professional science communicator and writer who works as a content developer and production assistant at the Field Museum in Chicago and hosts the excellent science podcast tiny vampires. Hello my name is Raven Forestry Scelzo I am the host of tiny vampires podcast and my day job is at the field museum here in Chicago so public health is a little bit of a complicated thing because there are a lot of people who do public health that maybe people don't consider them to be public. Health workers forced through scelzo lays out three broad groups of people working in Public Health. Scientists public health workers and clinicians the scientists generate new knowledge. The public health workers apply that knowledge by creating plans to prevent disease and increase access to treatment and clinicians carry out those plans by directly treating people as a science communicator. I think one of the issues between scientists or health workers and the public. Is this thing that we say. Insights communication called the information deficit hypothesis. Which is basically. We're assuming that people don't know things and if only we could just give them the information then they would know and understand using that model which is basically how most science has been communicated in the past. It causes a lack of trust because it's kind of this assumption that on the scientists standpoint that other people are ignorant and we decide what information they need that that has created this massive rift this massive trust issue because the public doesn't trust the scientists because the scientists are assuming that they're ignorant and the scientists are not trusting the public to understand with healthcare in particular. There's there's a lot of emotions. People are afraid of getting sick and they also have a lot of their own personal experiences that they're trying to incorporate into what public health officials are telling them and this is where museums come in so museums. Which I think is something that you've talked to a lot on your show about is that they have a lot of trust. Their credibility is really high. There's a lot of information there about disease and different public health aspects. That are kind of all over the place for example burning burning tick with a match. So when you when you have an exhibit about why it's important to remove take with forceps tweezers instead of burning it with a match if public health worker tells them that they might be skeptical about it. This is the way that my family has been doing it for years and years whereas with a museum they have that credibility and they have that ability to show in more detail in in in a lot of different ways. Why that's important. People will take that information and internalize it more than with with an organization that they might not trust as much. One of the advantages of presenting. Public Health within the museum is simply the context. A lot of museums are starting to do exhibits that not only incorporate what we know but also how we learned what we know and that really increases people's trust in that information because if. I just tell you a fact you might be skeptical. You should be skeptical and at WANNA look into that deeper but if I tell you fact and then explain to you how we got that information your your ability to trust that information vastly increases. I think a lot of exhibitions and a lot of museums have started to put a priority on that and I think that's really important because you know museums in the past have done and said some really terrible things and we're constantly trying to acknowledge and move past that or at least at least the field museum is And I think one of the ways of accounting for that is telling people is starting to tell people how they know what they know because if that was the philosophy of museums back when they were presenting a lot of racist information they would not have been able to support it with scientific information or scientific research. Because it's not there. You know the new way of doing things is you can't just say things you have to back it up and and I think that is a really really important way of accounting for the past. There are a number of museums that present public health topics either as outreach or by focusing entirely on the subject of public health there are actually a few museums. That that's all they do There's a public health museum in Massachusetts. And then the CDC actually has a museum of their own museums. Really have the ability to make a large impact when they do public health sorts of exhibits or incorporate public health into their existing exhibits so a good example of that is at the field museum. Part of our ancient America's exhibit is about the smallpox transfer from Europe to the Americas and how that impacted the native people of South and Central America. So that's not what the exhibit was about but it is incorporated into it so another great example is the northwest African American Museum in Washington. They did a really cool exhibit. That was about five diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect the African American community and there are a lot of art museums around the country. Who HAVE ART therapy programs? That aid people who are being treated for Mental Illness. So there there are a lot of different museums that are starting to think about what their role is when it comes to the health of their community. The outbreak exhibit at the National Museum of Natural History Opens with of planes taking off and landing at various airports around the world underscoring one of its main points that the world is connected as I was walking through the exhibit and I can't stress enough how abstract the threat of viruses seemed to me at the time I was suddenly aware of walking through the gallery with a crowd of people reading about infectious diseases on the graphic panels. I was less eager than usual to use the touchscreen exhibits with my bare hands. It it really is a testament to the to the power of the exhibit when you when you kind of your pulled out of the exhibit and then realize that what it's about is something that you're currently Participating in right. I think that's where that's where museums really fit in. Because they have so much experience in helping people to understand complex ideas and using lots of different types of media to make that happen. We're broadcasting during this pandemic the end of March twenty twenty almost all of the themes presented in the outbreak exhibit. Seem relevant today. The diseases aren't quote exotic in other words. They don't all arrive from distant places that the connected world has advantages even during a pandemic but as forced scelzo points out the fact that the National Museum of Natural History is physically closed because of Cova nineteen and so is the field museum. And every other museum we've ever featured on the show is telling in itself so museums closing. I think is a really important statement that they're making that they trusted the scientific information that is being put out there There's a lot of scientists who work at museums but that does create a gap museums are where people get a lot of their scientific information and like US especially adults and once once you're out of school they're there really isn't as much access to scientific information a lot of it's behind pay walls so museums are institutions that the public is relying on cove nineteen as really changed. My View on how important digital media is to how the community how how the museum is interacting with the public on her podcast. Tiny vampires forced through scelzo avoids the assumptions of the Info deficit hypothesis as she communicates science to her listeners. Each episode is instead guided by questions sent in by listeners about insects that transmit disease and the scientists who are fighting them and like a good museum exhibit. The question is answered with background information and the story of how scientists were able to shine light on that particular mystery. People are far more intelligent and far more understanding than the scientist public. Health workers of the past gave them credit for this whole concept of Talk to people like their fifth graders. I is exceedingly condescending. Like we're we're we're all in this together regardless of our educational background or anything. So yeah it's it's definitely a were all figuring this out and just being good stewards of the information and having really good communication.

Field Museum National Museum of Natural His African American Museum Cova Washington Elsner Chicago CDC raven Massachusetts Central America scientist African American community writer America Europe
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

02:10 min | 9 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"A new museum. podcast cast called stories here. The latest episode is an excellent two part series about the eastern state penitentiary in Philadelphia. It includes the story three of a family secret being hidden from daughter revealed after talking at the site with former incarcerated person. The Ad Copy did not ask me to say this but I feel like anyone interested in museum archipelago will really enjoy stories here in addition to the episodes about the eastern state penitentiary. I think my audience would. I really enjoy the episode about the international coalition of sites of conscience to listen to the stories here dot com or type stories. Here into your favorite podcast player. My thanks to stories here for Supporting Museum Archipelago Just Justin time for your holiday. Travel are archipelago at the movie series continues with two thousand and four is national treasure.

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

12:17 min | 9 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so is never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural conversations. It's really interesting to approach these issues from the framework of such a technical profession. What is different? What has changed interest in the field of conservation since you were in school? I I was in Grad school two decades ago. So it's you know. I guess I would break it down into technical practices desist which I think most conservatives would would think of themselves as doing sort of things with their hands changing a surface in some way and then more social practices this or how do you how do you be in this world. In terms of technical practices. I mean some of the things that we do on a regular basis or certainly did to me raise a lot of questions about how do even come up with this. So you know one of the things that I was trained on and I think a lot of conservatives still do is something like spit cleaning leaning for a long time it was known that something like human saliva has really amazing cleaning properties. And you know it's the reason why your mom might have like littered Dom uh-huh and rubbed off your face but but it works really well and it's you know there have been attempts to make this much more scientific Tillich. What are the enzymes designs for example in saliva that work? But you know now thinking about it. My Gosh you to spit on someone else's things it's really really strange concept and yet it was something that was really suggested as a very efficacious way of doing a treatments for me. This is meant that I really have to be extremely aware of the choices. I'm making an at least be aware of the discomfort that they raise in me when I started thinking about what I'm actually doing. And then there's how how does one work with anybody else certainly in academia and I would say also in in museums are very hierarchical spaces where you know in the museum. The end the sort of curator often has had the privilege of storytelling and often when people are not within. The museum are consulted their consulted assaulted. Either after most of the work has been done or that that information is extracted from them and presented as part of this larger narrative rather than allowing doing people to simply say what they they believe. These objects are how you know. The story needs to be presented for those in an established field like museum professionals or conservators. It's easy to go with the language and practice that exists before you arrive. Projects Untold Stories challenge those assumptions and help help create a new model for me. It's really about kind of activating cultural heritage. In in very kind of living ways underlying all of this work with untold stories was to really think about what is possible in terms of preserving cultural heritage if you think of cultural heritage as being something that's preserved by people in in conservation labs only to that's really limiting and it also is untrue because we have millennia of people caring in for their things and their stories and passing this knowledge on through oral traditions and other kinds of traditions so to somehow claim that we are the only ones capable of doing this kind of preservation. Work is fundamentally untrue and so to me kind of bringing up this resilience but also just this joy of doing miss incredible connected. Human work was something that I wanted to be around the next untold..

American Institute for Conserv Collaborative Conservation American Institute for Conserv Bala Chandran Cheetah Bala Chandran John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Cinci Bala Alexander Bala Archaeological Theological Mus Elsner Mohegan Sun Europe Johns Hopkins University blake Ed Wanda Shipton Grad school
Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

08:36 min | 9 months ago

Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural

American Institute For Conserv Collaborative Conservation Cheetah Bala Chandran American Institute For Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cinci Bala Alexander John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Mohegan Sun Johns Hopkins University Associate Director Europe Blake Ed Wanda Shipton Director
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:29 min | 11 months ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started in the middle of Bulgaria not far from the crumbling boozers monument why as the town of gap reveal situated in the Valley of the Balkan mountains the city prides itself on its unique brand of humor. Many local jokes are self deprecating about the gap ravine obsession with frugality and entrepreneurship and center around the comical links. The townspeople go to save money. The Mascot of the city is a black cat without a tail. It said the bruins prefer cats without tails because then they can shut the door faster when they let their cats out saving on their heating bills. This used to be the kind of humor that exist in data in the region around gobble not owning governable but then abrazos abuse were smart enough to brand it as there's best the entrepreneur does entrepreneurial course this is Margarita Sheriff's. Go hello my name. AMY'S MARGARITA DOT COM. I'm curator by profession and I'm director of the Museum of Humor and sat are based in Gobble Bulgaria. The museum was founded founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy two before the wall fell. This location was known as the Communist capital of humor extending its reach across eastern bloc countries and and also into certain circles in the West. I visited gap radio because I wanted to find out how this political humor and Satire Museum could have started here during Communist Times yes and how the museum is tackling. The global memed driven culture of the world today. There are a couple of precursors that we have to go through to understand how the Museum of two things one is the governor of jokes so someone announced a competition in the newspaper that the municipalities paying certain amount for each job that gets druid into a collection of the jokes so they collected a lot of a lot of these jokes made a book and this book was this absolute bestseller. It was immediately translating of course in the Russian those who in different languages like French English German and it started selling L. Inc very very well and the other thing that happened was car narrowed the Ghabra Carnival which was restarted in the sixties this and it is typical for being a carnival a with a lot of political humor and satire the people running the Carnival and later the museum were experts at walking up to the line without crossing it when we speak of political satire do not imagine that the general secretary of the of the part to being saturated it was very clear to what level of satire can reach so satire was an instrument in the hands of good communists to fight. Dole's who abused power but to certain level so talk to maybe your local exactly exactly 'cause very clear you're aware to set our can reach as to the governor will joke. They're not political they deal with the economy with them and tolliday of the of the local people combining the two or maybe more realistically using the Gabar Vo Jokes as a Trojan horse to present more political satire was what led some entrepreneurial Gab ravines to open the museum typical will style day didn't Butte a new building Aberdeen refurbished old leather factory so the building we are in name is a former ladder factory for secrets cheaper second it could go slightly notice because you don't need the same kind of permissions nations to build and to refurbish and if you wanted your out of the mainstream project to succeed in Communist Bulgaria asking for permission was not the way to go. The museum started to put on. BNL's festivals held every two years which featured invited Western guests. The first was in nineteen seventy three. They immediately started with the bi-annual. The first edition was dedicated to Kerr tools and small satirical sculpture. It was international and they brought in the jury amazing amazing names like amazing petunias international out so how could how could that exist well. If you ooh think of that time most Tunis in the Western World would be critical. They'll be leftist so they'll be very welcome in Bulgaria and that indeed the gathering place for people from East and West but there was a problem with that first biannial the jury selected for first prize a cartoonist from Turkey Berkey a country on the other side of the Iron Curtain Director. Oh well what we did and they started asking themselves between never asked for permission mission to make that make an international together. All these people are going to be a huge problem. What are we going to do and then he thought okay don't think I can do is go straight to the monster. So the museum's director went straight to the daughter of the general secretary very with Mela Sheesh Cova who would later become Bulgaria's minister of culture. She was she was good enough to listen. She was smart to pursue seve good ideas and support them. So it worked she came she opened the be annual. Antidote went to on well and they never gave award award having more to a cartoonist coming from a country. That's the initial. The museum and the bienial kept growing until communism collapsed in one thousand nine hundred nine nine thousand nine hundred nine. They had more than eighty four in guests artists jewelry coming in for a new and that was massive after eighty nine was the collapse indeed at that time there were more than one hundred people working king house of Humour Mark. Because if you think of all the different departments cinema literature folklore it was big enterprise. We need a lot of events tweets amazing executions when I look at photos from exhibitions from the seventies and eighties. I'm absolutely astonished by exhibition designed. You see it's it's amazing. It's so well done. I don't think anywhere in Belgrade Bulgaria exhibitions were so good. After the collapse the museum staff shrink to a skeleton crew as you can imagine until one thousand nine hundred ninety nine my colleagues would insist that humor is juniper very so that whole human being laugh and humor is omnipresent than Union for so and so on the first fight I short of had to have with the team when I came was to say I'm sorry but humor is not universal. Humor is so culture based. It's totally coacher base. Of course it's safe for into say humor is universal and not go into political humor. It's safer but you don't do your job. Our mission needs to be very very timely to very actual to show things that are happening today from their museum can do that. Who else would be able to do that while it has improved over the past decade in Bulgaria. Media Freedom is declining most of the press has been purchased by the guards and corruption and collusion between in media and politicians is widespread. You know there are issues with freedom of expression in Bulgaria Freedom Media media media ownership and so on so at least a museum should be some sort of outlet the museum addresses the Civic Space in Bulgaria with a new temporary Rachel exhibit called Garden Town. The charming subtitle is where mischief has a happy end motive of town where the different neighborhoods address different issues such as you know graffiti. You're invited to draw or voting over. Dare the place where you go by a yourself and it's accidentally a toilet but also voting rule then we have some guerrilla gardening making bumps of seeds leads and then finally is the park where kids because they usually come in groups. They are invited to sit down and have a discussion and reach a decision to give them some advice about how to have a discussion and also explain how they could reach decision like tossing a coin or consensus. ASSOC- or voting or you know different offices including anarchy. It's really something to see how far the museum has come from starting within the Communist system to reinventing itself to remain relevant in ways that are crucially important to a modern Bulgarian audience. The roofs good mitts that the next stage of reinventing interpreting interpreting humor on the Internet to an audience that lives mostly online hasn't happened just yet the first big challenge. I could think of when I I when I learnt that. The museum is looking for director aching to retire looked at it. I was really impressed and then I told okay. How can you change this place. What can you do about it. And how can you make it really fun when all the funny near is on your phone you know you can just scroll. Oh for hours and you wouldn't stop laughing. So what can museum do about that. Are we supposed to show the same things. No I mean you don't go to museums due to look at something that you see on your phone. Internet certainly has changed humor a lot and this is an exhibition that we've been planning for ages and we're trying to to find the right research team to prepare that means different. Thank fully games. It's really interesting to see how Internet has been changing humor and where are we at now. The way that jokes jokes developed in Gabarevo where people told slightly different versions to each other and in the process carefully distilled the most sharable essence of the joke mirrors. Here's the way that memes are forged in online communities constantly morphing to get more attention. Maybe the best chance we have of interpreting communities. He's on line and off comes from a humor museum. The Gabar Vo Museum of Humor and satire which has already morphed through twenty years of communism and thirty years of democracy accuracy is a good place to start. Just close the door quickly when you let the cat out this has been museum archipelago the you'll find full transcript of this episode along with shouts at Museum Archipelago Dot Com Club archipelago members get access to the bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary into the main show fund extras like stickers support the show and join club archipelago today today the two dollars Patriot dot com slash museum competitive. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend..

Bulgaria director Gabar Vo Museum of Humor Museum of Humor Satire Museum Museum Archipelago Dot Com Clu museum archipelago Museum of two Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelag general secretary Gobble Bulgaria Margarita Sheriff Bulgaria Freedom Media bruins BNL Communist Times Tunis Belgrade Union
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

11:30 min | 1 year ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner pews. Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. There are many sites on earth that play a role in human spaceflight the mission control building in houston texas where flight engineers communicated with the apollo astronauts on the moon or even the grassy field in south eastern russia where eureka garin landed to end his his mission as the first person in space but hutchinson kansas isn't one of these sites. No spacecraft engineering happened here like in huntsville alabama. Emma no rocket engine testing happened here like in pearling taken mississippi. There's not even a historic exploration related radio telescope here like in parks australia despite this hutchinson a town a forty thousand people is home to the cosmos fear a massive space museum. The cosmos here boasts enormous collection the spacecraft including the largest collection of soviet space hardware anywhere outside russia. How did all of these space are the facts and up in the middle of kansas to find out. I visited hutchinson to talk to causes here curator shannon wetzel. I think some of our brochure say why not us right. The story of the cosmos fear is more or less the right place at the right time. What's all says that the museum museum has had many decades to be in the right place at the right time. Hello my name is shannon wetzel and i am the curators here at the concentrate the cosmos fears. I was a star projector in folding chairs so up at the kansas state fairgrounds in nineteen sixty two by woman named patty carey she was inspired spire by the launch of sputnik and ultimately wanted to set up a space science center in the mid west the volunteers. We have who knew her personally. I did not know her. Personally have pretty not much call her very nice arm-twister. You didn't say no to patty kerry and that planetarium grew to what you say now by the late nineteen seventies his potty carey was making plans to transform the planetarium into the kansas causes fear and discovery center the collection as we know it started in in the late nineteen seventies nasa is looking to a hedge singers unload but looking to get some hardware out there for the public to see and the cosmos fear was beginning its first expansion so we had the space and the connections. That's how we wound up. Collecting eighteen space harbor the cosmos fear was in the right place a big building in the mid west and the right time the late nineteen seventy s the era was a strange time for space exploration. It was after the apollo program but before the space shuttle the smithsonian errands space museum opened in washington dc in nineteen seventy six and and i get the sense of the whole bunch of space artifacts that didn't make the cut for that museum ended up in hutchinson this massoni and nass. I mean they want to get ed stuff stuff artifacts priceless our tracks out for the public to see everywhere and maybe also that's a sign of their success status and they have gotten into the mid west and it's been a priority and we are so grateful to the smithsonian. I don't know if you noticed on our labels. How many of our items on display are from from them and we're just grateful to be. I believe we are the only smithsonian affiliated kansas looking carefully at the collection. You also see another pattern hardware from missions that didn't go exactly as planned. It is heavily damaged mercury boilerplate capsule from the mercury atlas one mission. There's liberty bell seven another mercury capsule. That was the u._s.'s second human spaceflight mission in nineteen sixty one the astronaut survived but the capsule sink into the ocean and wasn't recovered until nineteen ninety nine and then there's the apollo thirteen command module odyssey which was restored and added to the museum in nineteen ninety five live at the end of the apollo thirteen mission. The astronauts were home safe. It was fantastic and then it was viewed more as a failure than success. Apollo thirteen was displayed in france. It wasn't viewed as something that should be around here necessarily and and so yes it was on display in france for awhile and then our guys restored it. I can't imagine any museum turning away the apollo thirteen command module today but but it is the cosmos fears ethos to say yes to an unwanted unrestored artifact even if that artifact is sitting under the water or somewhere in france they see the investment in the recovery and the restoration as well worth the effort to add it to their collection but there's also a bigger point that the museum is making thing with the collection as a whole space exploration is as much about the failures as it is about the successes. I believe that apollo thirteen had come up with contingency plan before it wasn't on the fly and in a way it was testing their contingency plan and it went wonderful. They got home safely. We discuss a lot. I know about how it seems in our culture. There's a fear of failure. We are afraid to fail or if something doesn't work the first time that means that idea should be discarded and i think that that's not what got us to the moon. That's not what made our space program successful so without meaning to. That's kind of become one of our catchphrases around here. Don't want our campers our students to be afraid to fail but the collection it wasn't just made up of american space hardware. The cosmic sphere also boasts the largest collection of soviet space artifacts anywhere outside of russia and this fills in the sizable reasonable gaps of how most other space museum's present the space race the cozma sphere team which included patty carey served obtaining soviet space hardware in in the late nineteen eighty s and early nineteen ninety s again right place at the right time. The soviet union was cobbling. They were looking to get rid of some of their artifacts artifacts. We worked through a broker and we were able to obtain them so they are part of our collection. They are not loaned pieces by the decision to try and collect them. Why why didn't other museums try to in the same way that you did. I think that our early leaders were very visionary in what we could become and recognize that in a sense we were only telling half the story half of the space race coury is colored red and filled with soviet space objects and text about the soviet human spaceflight program and the other half is blue telling the american story. Our gallery is is setup particularly well in the sense that you get a comparison. We split the gallery in a sense where you can see. This is kind of what was going going on the soviet union at the time. This is what the americans were doing. I think that our gallery does a really good job of comparing the two in a linear way so you can say okay during the mercury program and here's the vostok program the effect is striking the causes fear is not a design museum but by putting the artifacts from two different superpowers superpower's close to one another you get an appreciation for the subtle and not so subtle differences in the industrial design compare the design language of the soviet looking at the moon rover on display at the museum with the american mars rovers that americans might be more familiar with and you can see the different ways each program approach the problems of surviving in space even without the color coordination wessels favourite soviet are the fact is the luna sphere a copy of a soccer soccer ball shaped device carried by luna to whose only purpose was to cover its crash landing site on the moon with little pendants embossed with images of the hammer encircle. The soviet sent the luna sphere and it's just a small ball that upon landing it has a small explosive in it and all of these little art gallery calls them cosmic calling cards all of these cosmic calling cards go all over the surface of the moon. What a nice little just such a <hes> a metaphor for the cold war a little stick in the eye wetzel said that it's becoming increasingly difficult to teach younger generations about the political context context of the space race after all. It's been thirty years since the berlin wall fell very difficult to explain. I would even say the cold war is kind of difficult to explain because first of all they didn't live through it. I don't know if you did but i mean i was on the tail end of it. It wasn't isn't black and white there was so much great and i think that's the difficult part especially you've seen. Our gallery is pretty big. A forty five minute tour down there you just barely make it to the shuttle and that's if you're rushing so it's difficult to portray those ideas in a short amount of time to a younger audience no matter what you do do it gets wrapped up nice eight as we change here on earth so too does the way we teach the story of spaceflight what's will give me me an example of the list of items. Humans have left on the moon. A list that includes everything from the propagandistic lewis fear pendants to actual trash left there by the apollo astronauts. I didn't with our campus yesterday. We do a collection sure and i was telling they were appalled. I was like wow the generational it were hauled. What we we trashed.

shannon wetzel patty carey soviet union russia smithsonian errands space muse kansas hutchinson france museum museum soccer houston alabama smithsonian huntsville texas
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner pews. Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started for many indigenous people native people we're looking for ways who engage a culture at all places at all times and for me and for many other native people it happens to be in the realm of museums and donna spears focuses on engaging with her culture within the realm of museums precisely because museums violently separate her culture from living context yup to a a donald spears initiate hush con- you believe people buses team. Hello i'm donna spear yucca like a fruit shanghai and online crane. I'm born for the way people my maternal grandfather from the tangled plan and my paternal grandfather is from the chuck todd chickasaw people well. I'm the director of programming and outreach for the adamant educational initiatives spirits co-founded the educational initiative in twenty eighteen with chris newell and dr jason ma'am sheeny the initiative was born out of their experiences in museum and classroom education across present day new england. They saw the need to supply regional educators with the tools to implement competent education on native history and native contemporary issues. They created the initiative to build those tools. The word adamant is a pass inequality word. It is the pessimist plenty word for the snowshoe path. One of our co founders chris newell is a quasi and he recommended this term as a defining part of our our initiative because snowshoe pass at the beginning of the winter season is hard to find. It's hard to walk on but the more people pass along this past and carve out this path through the snow. During the season the easier it becomes for everyone to walk together and we see that as of of our our mission and part of the work that we're trying to do part of the guiding principles for our work that we are looking to add to that educational taste experience for people we living with an amongst here in what is present day new england because we're all going on the same direction and the more information and the more culturally accurate and respectful and historically accurate information. We're working within the easier. It is for our children far grandchildren and when i say our a need that i also mean native people the initiative focuses on what's called sites of knowledge these include k. through twelfth schools universities and museums but a spirits describes the notion of silence sites of knowledge is a western idea poorly suited to the work work they do instead the agony educational initiative seeks to employ knowledge at all places and at all times something that museums as they exist today fail to do in our traditional communities native communities there is no place that you would go to learn and to gain the authority on one one particular place and then leave that place and and not employ that knowledge someplace else or not see the connection between one place and another so there's no to a the museum and this is the authority and this is where you learn about this and then you exit the museum and that knowledge is no longer useful to you as you go the daily life that concept of silencing knowledge and silently our understanding of the world is a foreign one to this continent spears share share the striking example of this at untold stories twenty nineteen which was called indigenous futures and collaborative conservation. The session was the closing session of the american institute for conservation annual conference there. She showed an image of a hard no schone cradle board as presented in detroit art institute. It is completely they divorced from context and certainly doesn't feel lifting in typical museum conservation fashion. She compares this with an image of the cradle board that held her as a child tiled and has securely held all four for children. The ties on the cradle board are ceremonially retied for each child representing continuity in the material real world that is nowhere to be found in the museum. If you came into my house right now you would see all of the cradle boards from when i was a baby that were made for for me which i have a few and then the credit of words that we had made for for our children and my husband and i children they are placed up on the wall the difference difference between that and he is that we keep pieces of that babies experience within the cradle awards so we keep we keep a blanket in certain certain pieces of material culture so we keep those on the cradle boorda wing put them up on the wall to remind us of of that time that special time with our our son or daughter her and so these are instances where the critics award is referring to a specific specific place in a specific emotional life our family spears uses the difference between her cradle boards in her own home and how they would be treated in the museum collection to illustrate the difference between living collections and ethnographic objects. I think we look at within using collections. All of that is ripped away. All of that is stripped stripped and that stripping of those experiences and the spiritual and emotional life of that piece is a violent nine one and it's a very apt representation of what colonialism is that we're going to take this and we're going to repeat away from its relationship relationship with you and make it only relevant in his relationship to us the colonizers and that's the story like it's honored. That's the story that's more important and that is a violent story and it's one of domination and so when we go into museums and we see items is that have a lived relationship with us within our communities within our homes we see them on display as <hes> ethnographic jack objects that is a reminder that our understanding of our own <noise> material culture is not the one that is important to prevent the continued need violent ripping of the emotional life that object collections represent the initiative offers a range of educational support services in educational programming across present day new new england and part of that is making sure that certain words remain problem is d- using the term present day because we don't like to use the term new england even on probably ties like it's this is not problematic. Everyone calls in new england. This is okay. We sanction this term. We don't want onto us anytime that place american western understandings of our of our places and our culture in our communities in reference to into reference to europe in this case england some of.

england donna spears chris newell american institute for conserv shanghai director europe detroit art institute dr jason fifteen minutes
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

07:46 min | 1 year ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner Museum Archipelago Guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started all over the city of Toulouse France on buses and on the streets there are ads featuring a smiling moon within the American astronaut reflected in its Science Demotion Response Apollo Day is the fiftieth anniversary celebration of the Apollo eleven moon landing the first and for now only time humans have made it to another celestial body hosted by the city museum until.

Ian Elsner Museum Archipelago Toulouse France fifteen minutes
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Everything is in a constant state of decay in the past human heritage that decayed, slowly enough on stone, valium, bamboo, silk, or paper could be put in the museum still decaying, but at least visible and today, human heritage is rotting on hard drives, the entire internet, everything from social media to Wikipedia is stored on hard drives on an honest computers, waiting for the inevitable, and not too distant day when they will just wear down, and stop working human heritage lost forever to the sands of time. But there is one potentially beneficial loophole to digital heritage as compared to non digital heritage digital files can be copied, they can be copied again, and again, and again perfectly every time the path between past and future for a digital file is too. Hop from one storage to another every few years in an unbroken chain saying, one step ahead of digital decay. Digital copies aren't like Xerox of Xerox, which just become unreadable over time. And best of all, making a digital copy doesn't destroy the original with lack cylinders, there, you can only do it so many times or then the grooves will be inaccurate after playing it. But then within the digital interface because it's so easy to pick up and throw away. That's where it becomes even a higher risk of deterioration and loss within the file. This is Sarah new Ian, the project coordinator of preserve this podcast, a project that proposes solutions to fight against the threats of digital decay for podcasts. She cautions that preserving cultural digitally while having some advantages over other mediums comes with its own set of pitfalls high. So my name is Sarah new, Ian. I am the project coordinator for preserve this podcast along. Inside the two archivists airy kid and Dana, Gerber Margie, and our producer, Molly Schwartz. Currently I am an MLS student at university of Washington. So I get to bring in kind of the current readings of what people are talking about within, preservation, or within file formats. Preserve. This podcast is a tiny and delightfully meta podcast called preserve this podcast, and it is accompanied by an equally delightful Zine detailing what you can do to prevent digital decay. Podcasts are notorious for being DIY people who are independent story makers audio creators, who don't have an institutional backing usually, we kinda see as preserve this podcast as supporting what we call personal digital archiving. So PDA is the acronym for it. We want to make it so that podcasters are able to be Todd Humous and have the agency to control their content outside of the digital decay as we call it. Personal digital archiving is the idea that today individuals who history might call normal people have the opportunity to preserve via digital methods in the past. It was only the rulers or the vastly wealthy, who could take control of their own data. This is the first time in human history that your data have a good chance to be archived. That's why this whole sub program of personal digital preservation has been this movement. And I think it's like once a year twice a year. There is like a PDA conference host various institutions around the US, we're kind of just talks about, like, what are low barrier to entry practices that people can use to archive their own work because in like how real world works when you don't have the luxury of your job, being archiving any sort of digital files because you have to create these things, and make sure that there is a return on investment, artists, and creators, aren't really looking to save their work at the moment in time when you're creating something. It's a disruption to actually have to think about how do I back up and save things because you're on like a, a wave. And you kind of just want to make it make it happen. One of my other part time jobs outside of preserve this podcast is with the dance company, and when you like, just like creating a piece of work, or choreographing, a piece, while you're in the dance studio, you're not also making sure that your file is backed up off this camera off your ipod or iphone, you know, I will admit it here. I'm a hobbyist PDA, or I've systems that automatically log everything I can about my activity and health to custom, spreadsheets, I built, a private server that my phone automatically updates my location to several times a minute, so that I can always knew every museum I've ever visited you can be sure that the file, you're listening to right now will be transcribed and backed up in multiple locations for the Cording to noon. Automatically backing up is only half of what properly archiving actually means automatic backup. And automatic transcriptions are in some ways making it easier to preserve but proper archiving is also about contextualising. So it's not enough to just record podcasts or my locations, as individual entities, I need to contextualized them, too, and that's one of the bigger bottlenecks of archiving is, like, are you contextualising that object that file correctly, so that it's represented in the correct way? So I think that in certain processing like the manual side of it potentially is becoming easier, but the more intellectual side of representation, and identity of thing is becoming more difficult because especially with podcast or almost anything on the internet, YouTube videos, whatever things are being created at a much faster rate. Many, many hours of video are being uploaded to YouTube every second of every day. And each video is analyzed by machines looking for patterns expecting the machines to conceptualize all. Those hours of content is only going to lock in bias sees either Mirroring societies. Or introducing new ones the way that people have perceived, libraries museums and archives is an educational place space. Right. They think that it's all fun fun and interesting in educational versus like having a specific opinionated point of view. The whole point of podcast is that you have a story you, as an individual have this idea of how the world works, and you want to share it. That's what makes it even more important to be able to assign your own descriptive texts to it. So that you ensure that people know what you're trying to say to them. So like in our most recent episode with Caitlin Bailey who does the oldest pro podcast, she talks about, basically, the oldest profession, which is sex work, and like for her to say, you know, specific words within her podcast, it can be misinterpreted completely by Google algorithm. And that's when then her podcasts could potentially be taken down just because the automatic flagging. They'll misinterpreted as she's trying to promote sex work. It strikes me that we are in the middle of a big shift from archiving tools of the past. Now archiving is in control of the individual you instead of being left to a third party like a museum or library, but changes the Valence of collections if everyone can take over their own story, whether any of this data are going to be useful or interesting to the future is beside the point by reducing the role of chance and eliminating the institutional gatekeeper who determines which data in stories are worth preserving anyone. And everyone's data has a chance to inform future history. We put this under the guise of a PD personal digital archive. Right. So it is up to you, if you want to, and you feel the need, and, and the just want to save your own work for the future. It's. Under your responsibility. I kind of that's kind of where we're putting it at. It's kind of, like if you want to share your story, then you will go as far to preserve it versus just handing it off to someone who might preserve it under the wrong context. So I think that it's important to the point where you as a creator believe it's important. And so if we can give you all the tools and a step by step guide to do as necessary. We would love for anyone to be able to do it in the past museums, and libraries, would control who got to be collected the best way, forward might not just be to force these institutions to open up, but also bypass them altogether by making the archiving tools, accessible to all in, in libraries and archives. There is this whole debate about the archives and libraries are not neutral. We're not neutral because there is that idea that, like, yes, we want to give you the options to have access to all different types of materials. Even if it is racist. Or can be hurtful to someone but should we because are we actually neutral in that way? Like, is it going to actually help? Or is it misinformation at that point? So we wanna make sure that within your podcast when you're creating it, you're able to control so that someone doesn't misinterpreted in a way. That's why we want to give the agency to the creator themselves not to put it under the onus of someone else. And if this does take off, which we kind of hope it does that like someone will be able to fund actual server or institution where people will be able to submit it for the long term versus in the generalize in an archive, first steps are just kind of making it in an accessible way. Zena podcast workshops where people can kind of dip into the waters on feel, if it's important to them, and if they want to do it, and then if not, we're totally fine with that to preserve this podcast can be found wherever podcasts are available for now in the final episode new Aeon and the other hosts acknowledged that. Guessing their podcasts into the future depends on the three one redirect and remembering to pay their server bills. The project is funded by a grant from the Andrew w Mellon foundation and is hosted by the metropolitan New York library council. Preserve. This podcast is also travelling to various workshops and conferences, take podcasters producers, and audio archivists through their curriculum of archiving podcasts, you can find a full list of where they're going at preserve this podcast dot org. Museum.

Ian Elsner coordinator Sarah new YouTube Xerox US Wikipedia MLS Todd Humous Cording Andrew w Mellon foundation Google university of Washington Caitlin Bailey New York Molly Schwartz Dana
"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

10:49 min | 1 year ago

"museum archipelago" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started Wallner pie dish is from Croatia. We are a small country, and we have your inhabitants than some US heat is, you know, we don't we don't have as many fields. So fiendish three or sarong economy or whatever Theresa May be the most important field. We have. But in recent years, the Croatian city of Dubrovnik due in part to being a prominent filming location of the TV series game of thrones has experienced dramatic overcrowding. They're less time. And it's supposed to break too much therapy to see the people were waiting in lines to anther inside the old town inside the walls. And there were so many agencies Sally game of thrones stores and taking people to some specific areas where where it's kind of difficult to have so many people in the same place, even for for safety reasons. Punishes, the founder of fun museums a heritage and culture travel blog. Okay. Okay. My name is Lana pie. Dash my blog, it's called fun museums because I simply liked to say this museums are fine about all these thing museums. He's a fun experience. People shouldn't seem that to museum. Sars something called elegant smart in intellectual. Just two people can have that experiencing their leisure time. Pie dish is also a museum marketer and consultant who overall fem- is that museums are fun. It's a radical idea and it influences everything from her philosophy on museum marketing to away to approach overcrowding in museums and heritage sites. Exactly that he has the my guiding principle the way I write my hours decals is still say, the most coal funky stuff about each museums. Visit sometimes as young professionals like the all that's why some people from use Iem squatters, for instance, Sora marketing museum, marketing professional sort of education professionals. They sent me messages, you know. You could you stop saying things that way because it's in contrast with our professional values. But then they said, okay, that's what's this was people like no, that's what people like to hear. If you're seeing that it should be more intellectual you need to understand that most of the people can't really read it that way, can truly understand the way you want to press present it to them. But there is a real tension because the access isn't just between what is fun. What is intellectual in episode seventeen of museum archipelago, I cover the spectacular failure of Disney theme park concept called Disney's America in one thousand nine hundred four the park which would have opened in Virginia. Not far from Washington DC with showcased, quote, the sweep of American history within the fun theme park environment. It is particularly notable to witness the confidence and enthusiasm Disney executives had for a tightrope between entertainment and American history and example, is the. Town on the on the east of Cratia each name is code. The town was heavily destroyed in the most recent war in this part of Europe, in nineteen ninety one when it was occupied one almost all the buildings were destroyed almost all the people had to go away from there, and it was one of the most terrible stories that happened in Europe, after the, the end of the second World War, and the now that city is has been quite well restored. Some people went back to leave there and the, the museum was completely renovated and obviously the visit to that museum is a nice enjoyable experience. But in recent history, you really need to, to deal with some awful stuff that happened just less than I years ago, it's difficult to a person from a from western Europe to, and sometimes it's difficult to understand what really happened in them in. The lens of ex-yugoslavia, it's even sometimes complicate even for people from these areas because it's not. It's not that simple as some historians like to present some books like the present or some journalists or, and there are even many different opinions. So I think that museums really sometimes need to take thirteen side. Even though others will disagree museum that deals with those stories and needs to first of all to show, what are those emotions and to collaborate with people who suffered those emotions, of course, some emotional intelligence is very important to for those museum professionals who would create that storytelling that would turn Smit emotions of certain people to people will be just winters or who may have nothing to do with, with those areas are stories. No matter what kind of museum you're about to walk into, you have a sense of what you might find inside and since census partially informed by museums marketing pie dish has made a habit of noting how people react to museums before they go. In most cases, it happens that people procrastinate their decisions to go to, to a museum that happens more often than not most of the time, they will say, like, but maybe some other time I go some next time I would like to is that museum. But today I feel tired, I'm hungry. I want to go to eat to drink I prefer to stay at home watch movie, but I would really love to visit the museum, but maybe one day to when the Mike friends to Peres, for instance, they say, I want to is louver, but there, there are other museums, but may be other time because louver is already enough for, for me for these three days or something like that, right. This tendency to choose the most. Popular museum to the exclusion of less frequently visited once is part of Pisces interest in sustainable. Tourism, partly interested in sustainable travel king along with the museum Inc. And visitors a tour areas that I actually mentioned as my primary areas of focus and interest so museum since sustainable travel, and the sustainability has so many faces, I'm quite interested in seeing about an energy efficiency, and waste management bats over reason being one of the one of my focus areas, even though I don't really pretend to know what, what could be a solution for that some traction such as they are Humber Casto in Spain introduced online booking. And you can't really just commune buy tickets and enter, but you need to walk your sports in advance online. And sometimes you can't get a ticket. If you've just remember Lee before he wants to go and. That these are these are some of the solutions, I do wonder how much of this heavily concentrated overcrowding has to do with the nature of social media itself. There's a network effect of geo tagged photo, not just out of particular heritage site, but at a particular spot within that heritage site. That presents the best angle for a photo or looks exactly the way it did on game of thrones. Of course, there are many other factors that lead to overcrowding the cheap flights the increasing ability of people to travel that they namic travel as a product. And if the Acropolis in Athens is already at capacity every single day, whether this is gonna look like ten or twenty years from now and to go back to Disney, theme parks tourism as a product already has an answer, just raise the prices, but heritage for the rich isn't heritage anymore. Heretic should be acceptable, obviously, for many people around the world, it's not really affordable to even go to someplace is what they want. Be avoided is that it becomes too expensive. So. Wealthy people can afford visiting those attractions. That's what I would like to be avoided and other seeing I would really like to encourage more more people foolery like to travel to visit some secondary attractions. Look, go necessarily to the most famous places, but we at some places around that usually also need visitors and can devote more local people could make money for leaving they get visitors on that particular place. Because more people could be employed in those places are some businesses could flourish shore. That's the basic thing. And this is what ties all aspects of pie dishes work together to use the social media network affect to share the secondary attractions of the city balancing the pressure on the most popular heritage site to read pie dishes blog and to learn about her consulting work visit fund museums dot EDU. Her Twitter handle is. L. A. P. A. J. D. A. S. This episode of museum archipelago is sponsored by the museums heritage and public history program at the university of Missouri at Saint Louis. The museums heritage and public history program is currently accepting applications for the fall twenty nineteen semester. They offer an EMMY degree as well as a graduate certificate their programs address, pressing needs of museums and heritage. Institutions in the twenty first century and prepare students for professional careers in museums historic sites in societies, cultural agencies and related organizations financial support is available for a limited number of students and applications are due by February first. For more information, please call three one four five one six four eight oh five or visit their website at UM S, L dot EDU Ford slash Tilda museums. Thanks to the museums heritage and public history program at the. -versity of Missouri at Saint Louis for their support of museum archipelago. You'll find the transcript of this episode along with shown at museum, archipelago dot com. Club archipelago members get access to a bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary to the main show. Subscribe at patriotair dot com slash museum archipelago. If this is your first show, don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

museum archipelago Disney Europe Sora marketing museum Popular museum museum Inc Lana pie Croatia US Elsner Dubrovnik Theresa Saint Louis EMMY Missouri founder consultant Cratia Twitter