19 Burst results for "Museology"

"museology" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

05:53 min | 3 months ago

"museology" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"So i think if joe biden could do that that would be tremendous however. I'm very skeptical. Because i do remember. In two thousand and sixteen. Mrs clinton was for it and then changed her mind because it was wildly unpopular in her party and at the democratic convention in two thousand sixteen. I saw so many signs denouncing tpp. So if he could do that you know maybe he could sell it. As an anti-trump measure trump was opposed to this so therefore good. That would be great. And i think those kind of things where he could use some of the The talents of the people that have been around for a while in government to reach a kind of multilateral agreement. They know how to do that. But i'm skeptical that he's would be willing to stand up to what i believe would be the considerable pressures against him on that on the economic side. Meanwhile the the big Appointment that has been announced so far is made new. So far is janet yellen for treasury secretary. Yellen goes back away. She was chair of a president. Clinton's council on economic advisers and then did long service at the federal reserve and on one hand. Jason it's not elizabeth warren who reportedly wanted the treasury secretaries job but the issue raised in the journal's editorial today is the question of the fed's independence and i'll just a line here The royal says Museology worked with current fed chairman. Jerome powell during the obama years and they are likely to form a mind meld. Fiscal and monetary policy. Right president trump. And we've we've criticized him for his attacks on jerome powell as undermining the fed's independence that's allegedly been the concern of some some senators about his most recent fed nomination know the independence of the federal reserve. But you know for many years and especially since the financial crisis you have the fed taking on larger regulatory role and you have basically the fusion of the fed and the treasury department. And i think in our point about Janet yellen as as someone who is deeply connected with the with the feds staff as treasury secretary. She might be able to coordinate Even more closely. And so if we're really worried about fed independence which may were not. Maybe we're fine with you know. Maybe our politics is fine with the fed becoming a subsidiary of the of the treasury department. But if not then we should that this is an opportunity to talk about that relationship and what is becoming and what are..

fed Mrs clinton Janet yellen joe biden treasury department treasury Jerome powell president elizabeth warren Museology obama chairman Jason
Biden to pick Janet Yellen for Treasury secretary

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Biden to pick Janet Yellen for Treasury secretary

"On the economic side. Meanwhile the the big Appointment that has been announced so far is made new. So far is janet yellen for treasury secretary. Yellen goes back away. She was chair of a president. Clinton's council on economic advisers and then did long service at the federal reserve and on one hand. Jason it's not elizabeth warren who reportedly wanted the treasury secretaries job but the issue raised in the journal's editorial today is the question of the fed's independence and i'll just a line here The royal says Museology worked with current fed chairman. Jerome powell during the obama years and they are likely to form a mind meld. Fiscal and monetary policy.

Janet Yellen Yellen Treasury FED Elizabeth Warren Clinton Museology Jason Jerome Powell Journal Barack Obama
Christian Louboutin Reflects On His Career

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Christian Louboutin Reflects On His Career

"I'd like to go back to the beginning of your career and I read somewhere that you dropped out of school at a very young age around twelve. Have to cool till sixteen when you when you live in France but I was. Yeah I started to be expelled. Twelve so of out of school basically right and you were already obsessed with shoes right Yup. Yup where did that? Where did that come from this? Like shoe obsession. It comes from different thing than it. I would say comes from two things. It comes home in a session that I had as a kid for showgirls music Horn and even even movies where I could see dancing and it comes from that and it comes from actually from the place where we are now. Which is this museum which used to be which used to be a African panic art museum when you were answering on? It's a beautiful magnificent building. One thousand nine hundred eighty one so when you are entering a signal which was enjoying it was representing a shoe so it was a sea of a shoe high here on the fifty. But it just wasn't a late seventies so I didn't know that these join may me become sort of conscious that everything stopped by joint because it was drawing of a shoe of women's shoe but it was not existing because I'd never seen such show. It was appointee last appointee. Stiletto so I fought. I understand that. It's a drawing representing a women's shoe but this should doesn't exist so and it was. You showed me sign or symbol. It's a sign saying. Don't wear these shoes all issues when you saw them. As a young person he wanted to create shoes like that is that what happened. Exactly exactly so between my obsession for dancers on that joying. That made me understand that everything. Basically start by drawing and so. I wanted to do something which was not existing for music owned else and I sort of you know for me. Musical go further so they were like exotic birds on. I always love but and so I didn't think that had costume because someone told me but you could design costume for musical food was no costume. You know birds always have further which was natural to have further to those girls but buds don't have shoes. I wanted to create a human thing for these birds of paradise in a way. What what do you think shoes represent in our culture and why what is a shoe? What a shoe represent a lot of things According to different culture it has different meanings to same thing for callers. The interesting thing is at that. Say about work when I first started to design shoes for me on my name that say so early. Nineties shoe was people were always making reference to an accessory and then from accessory it expanded into something by itself. Schumer has moved. The Nimitz accessory has left the domain of just being an accessory it has become its own identity and things that it comes from different things but definitely it come from the fact that it's it's a very big symbol of Liberation. It's a symbol of feminity but it brings to it brings. The person wears issues a different poster. A different way of being a different way to show yourself and and so. It's a very different attitude. It's very small. It's a very small element which gave radiates. Antibody chains the body language. It changed it Sunup. Gravity and shoes whereas a woman of women who opposes by the Shoe Charissa woman right. So you didn't formerly study should assign but you weren't with some very famous shoe designers most importantly house if G. Yes what was that like? Because he's got obviously a you know long and very historic famous history here in France as a shoe designer. What what was that like working with him so what happened. Executive was is that when I worked with him he had ended his career but he was a mentor to me and so I worked. I did a museology type of work so I was ever seeing his assistant. But I never designed for Jose. Never no no. I worked at a period of the retrospective. I had met him before and then he asked me to be his assistant for everything but not designing on. That didn't want to design for him. I was so excited and happy to look at the work of someone that I knew so well and to have it explained but it's mass by his master and so what happened is that when I was ten I started to do. A sketch had seen that museum. Do Undo Redo that sketch always the same profane and so I started to put it every table of my different schools where I got expelled. Because one of the reason was because I was like trashing Zell's tables with my designs and and then one day one person and then it was almost sixteen. Gave me a book and say for you and I who likes shoes I find newsies and someone gave me the book of what it was Gold Makarova on just had his name. When I opened the Book I realized that my obsession with join shoes was also a beautiful work but had never thought of it as a work before it was rare in being shoot as no. I didn't know any design is right and so when I opened at book I fought. This is it. That's jobs and supposedly doing and from that moment I started to change the angle I started to. I was always own enjoying pro fine and when I decided that it could be a designer assured his on I started to free quarters exit down when I saw the work aversion so obviously has been very important and influential because he's sort of opened meat completely to the ideas that it was a beautiful possible word So then how did you actually learn how to design shoes so now so I started so? My first thing was to to jove a to do shoes for showgirls. So I started an internship when I was seventeen at I stayed less than a year and then after I realized that you know this is not Boorda was not going to do was not going to do shoes for showgirls. Invalid just doesn't happen. I was sent to glue to have to bring coffee Which was very nice and I learned a lot actually from dances but to really design shoes. I was not going to be there so I ended up thinking. Fashion is probably the place to go and I opened the yellow pages. I remember there was nobody. The first house was Batmans. Was nobody answering. The phone. Second House was Joel on ice to speak to the director. They say Jericho. What a subject off. Cuccia and on the path maters this wonderful lady quote Ellen. D'amato was direct couture. She gave me an appointment. She looked at my design. She said it's very pretty. And we want to do a stash jokes. Wt BY SEAN. Joel I say yes so. I got sent into south of France for one year and this is why I learned to be. My first job was as a modest so my former education of Mideast comes home sold off and then after I was. Stephen merged like a night club so one year a challenge. Although in in the south in the middle of nowhere was a bit tough but at Shell Joel down the technical aspects of creating shoe. That's where you learned it because it's important you were just showing me that incredible installation to show. How shoes or graded You know and the sizing of it like I think designs a bit like architecture hearing engineering and architecture. That's why yeah. That's exactly what I'm trying to show. It's actually Victor Nick. Yeah it's really precise but it's organization. It's very important Yeah it is definitely. It's very technical. This is why actually it's also often expensive and for instance. It's complicated for someone who would start to do a proper so so much engendering you know so much metal inside formation in order to keep the balanced also to keep the arch. You know you can sort of easily against do address with like a stitching being a needle. You can sort of manage to do something with fabric. But she's not fabric slander component which are complicated. It's orange

France Shoe Charissa Joel African Panic Art Museum Schumer Victor Nick Stephen Batmans Zell Jose Executive Boorda D'amato Cuccia Ellen Director
"museology" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"museology" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It's a learning design company and we focus on building technical problems for soccer engineering and product teams and we founded edify almost five years ago which is little crazy to to realize sometimes and we've we built on breeding programs for companies. He's like elemental in u._s. Open skies voted puppet all kinds of amazing companies. We've gotten the instant work with and our focus. This is as we talked about earlier really trying to make sure that teams are getting up to speed faster in a more humane dignified way because to be honest it it really sucks as a new hire to feel left out of the conversation to feel not necessarily socially left out but but technically left out like how am i supposed to engage with this. I came here because i wanted to contribute had great interviews seem to like me but kamar often than not when i go do interviews with new hires i find out that this new hire has been sitting basically on their own for weeks six and it's not a good feeling that's one of the reasons you lose people right it's because they weren't given an opportunity to really use their skills and to ask questions in to deploy knowledge together new knowledge in it's. It's basically wasted money for the company in time for the team. We didn't really talk so so much about you know the impact to existing team when a new hire joins by there's no ifs ands or buts about that. You are going to impact your team. Productivity will go down on a team level especially if you're on a lot of people at once because that team is going to have to absorb the cost of helping new hire get up to speed in your morning urban urban should decrease that challenges well should make it a little bit easier for the existing team to do that and so that's really action of ours and we try to balance that but the fact that things do change in our industry so quickly that while documentation is critical not everything needs to be documented in in the same way that so more long-term or concrete processes do so we love teaching and building capacity within engineering technical teams to figure out what should it'd be taught what should be white boarded what should be written down and how should it be organized to make. Everybody's lives easier. Why did you start this company. What gave you the inspiration well honestly. I've always been learned designer. My background is in museology which basically means learning design in a museum and so i've always always been very curious about how people categorize information how they use new information and i couldn't realize that i was doing on boarding in the whole oh my different jobs and helping people on board into a job or help them helping them onward into new information that they wanted to be curious about her or wanting to understand stand and when i was working i was working at a web development company so that was my first taste in two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen of love but it was like for technical people to onboard into a new company and i just saw how how <unk> unfortunately and started hanging out look at user groups in more technical meet ups and realizing that everybody had this problem and said there was something happening. Companies are not doing a good job. They weren't five years ago and so. I realized that i could use my skills to fix that end at all companies. Do has had different erases. I had all kinds of aspirations. When i started the company that are still going to do museum work a nonprofit education workin gradually that all sort of fell away okay and we've just really focused on this technical on boarding piece because i think this is every company is going to become a software company every company the serb already moving in that direction and we are going to have to figure out how to make this transition in our whole economy work better in in a more more dignified way agreed..

museology five years
"museology" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"museology" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Have to adhere to that so the rumors requirements is that you have to make wanted to like his mental health professionals available for players and you have to have a license psychiatrists to help with issues when needed they also have to have a written plan in case metal emergency the rise and have to have confidentiality policies as well as a man driving a close bond for the NBA invest well salute to guys like Kevin love and the mod to rose who have been open about their mental health struggles and I'm sure that that that called the shift in the league last year that MI made them reacts so saluted all guys who today and we play the last year the NBA Players Association also had a mental health and wellness program that they had created already so them and I'm sure it will because the the Kevin love in the modern world museology book about this issue that's great alright put every cell has worn in their third governor in less than a week so they're just as secretary one the Basque whereas gar stayed was sworn in and that happened yesterday as the third governor so we'll see what happens they said as she might not state Iraq because he really doesn't want the job so they might she might give it to somebody else or something yeah I don't know what's going to end up happening but you know as you guys know already what happened there was that unconstitutional governorship the former governor and then he had a hand picked successor all kinds of issues importer Rico some vast ways has said that she respected the ruling she would assume the governorship to support we go does need certainty and stability that was her statement that she released to be a Twitter but I am we'll keep you updated on what's happening with the controversy my parents actually on a cruise in there which is important yeah they called me from my shows they'll find a Marshall's any marches importer Rico okay alright last front page news now when we come back Sherri shepherd will be joining us will kick with comedian and actor Sherri shepherd so movies the breakfast club good morning.

NBA Kevin love MI NBA Players Association Iraq governorship Twitter Marshall Sherri shepherd secretary Rico
"museology" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"museology" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Or China plus in the APP store now. Let's turn to our final topic. A recent survey shows Chinese young people who were born after the year of two thousand choose college majors based on their personal interests rather than the future salary. It's quite the opposite compared with previous generations. The survey has poed over seven hundred thousand students who have just finished finished choosing their majors from thirty one provinces and regions in China. The results showed that most students choose the majors such as history archaeology and so on which are believed to face lower future income so why is there such a sharp shift in choosing majors for the young generation Asian now johnny ministries commentator Manning Welcome. Thank you so much so first of all. Could you elaborate more on the most popular majors. There's for the two thousand students what are the most popular ones <hes> like you said history museology museum science and <hes> archaeology and sometimes even you know like philosophy or these kind of Silva code majors a becoming warmer I call it. It and it's just amazing. This piece of news is just amazing. I show think big data technology is confirming such a trend which is already being harboured in my mind for years and years because I was trained as a educator graduated from normal university. I've been longing foil such a thing to happen and just confirmed it so amazing that a how person no and family choices I reflecting China's social social and economic growth social end we progress I mean so what are the most popular majors history and Museology you know the study of museums and archaeology these usually nobody touched upon these things because they promise not a very prosperous future in cash and welby material hobby arts majors. What about the science majors? What are the most popular science majors like a robot you know the new generation of science which is very different from my parents choices aces so signs is still there <hes> Internet I robot animation in all these kind of things yes and then the computer cloud cloud computing very modern science certified scientific set of majors over there <hes> most <hes> one of the most desirable set of measures? What about the most popular majors full the previous generations? We were a agriculture agriculture a big agricultural country right there was an urgent need to move from agricultural to industrialization. We need to Butte our own planes lanes our own railways our own factories. You know hydro power you know electricity generation the all these cut of hard sort of for a hard core economic elements needed to be there so that's why there's a saying <hes> Jerusalem so being Shanteau Bopha if you are mathematician. If you learned math your service area your job sort of area would be playing building railway building. You you know Hydropower Station building big damn all these could have very <hes> okay <hes> vehicle manufacturing kids follow parents in strategy. That's right yeah the guidance at least so so and then we come to the second stage after forty nine and unto nineteen seventy eight China open open it up to the outside road and we <hes> embarked on economic reform right then staged to means <hes> the the demand of economic development so every major the most popular majors for the service for the so serving the purpose of economic development so that's why we see see finance banking management business running accounting even mess here you know <hes>.

China museology museum Shanteau Bopha Museology Hydropower Station Manning Silva
"museology" Discussed on Filmhaus

Filmhaus

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Filmhaus

"And he always goes back in time to this. Yeah. He's he's sort of infatuated with this one time period. But there's a really good part in there where even when he goes back in time to go back in time even further because the character, he's with was American cultivar. She's like, oh, I love nineteen ten. That's when I should have been alive. And he's like he's like, no the fair forties. Fifties a great. Wow. Like, you gotta be there. Like, the he's into the nineteen twenty the roaring twenty s where all the the. Is there? The American writers or in Europe from movable fees. Right. I mean ways mobile fees. Yeah. But there's a specific name for all those right that that group of people that were hanging out. They had like a name that they think the Bella pop where she wants to go back to believe in the eighteen nineties the lost children, but the Bella Bella pug does she talking about regardless is in the eighteen nineties. We're like to lose was there painting thought the two best movies to get that story across from midnight in Paris and Tron legacy where they say on the thing that you went after was always in front of you the whole time. So you could give me fascinated and. Yeah, be in love with this thing that you don't have. But maybe the reason why you're so infatuated with it is because you don't have it because he is thing that I think they call a golden era syndrome or something syndrome or like, you're always sort of. Yeah. You look back at the past as being like, that's the bet that would be the best time. Very like romantic ideal unto itself. Yeah. But the movie overalls kind of slow but LOKI has a cameo. I think Brody I think he's in L E. The Corey Stoll. I was gonna say the guy played yellow champions the scene. Most most of the us in this. And I know that because they MD be trivia will tell you that. Garbage. So it's it's a good movie. I wouldn't call it a room that being said it's a Woody Allen. It's a romance fills definitely romantic made a movie every year almost I think for the last five years. He's a monster came out does it. Another movie, my list, also probably not that romantic too many. But memories of Asia. I know what you're thinking a movie about a young woman forced into servitude. And her virginity sold off. How can you find that the lease? And asking how can you not find that romantic Museology? zoology? What is it? And these awhile ghee, and I mean, I think it's romantic and spoilers. It kind of builds to this culmination. We're like every step in her life. She's been doing to try to get closer to this man, which is not a great mentality that have. But I love Ken Watanabe. And I mean, I would do that for Ken Watanabe also because like at the end of the movie spoilers. He's like he's like Finally, I own you. She's like, oh, yeah. Thank god. He owns me. And he could is what when he's not thanking his wife. He probably coming gotten hurt so many times or whatever and been like, hey, I'll pay her debts and I'll marry her. But he never did being said, it's probably the best movie. Rob Marshall is made. It's great movie. I hate Chicago. I really don't want to be the worst pirates which is saying a lot. And then what was the movie that just came out? That's also garbage that he's probably alpha. I'm just assuming why does the movie that just came out? But I'll say this will James trying to figure it out memoirs of a geisha isn't for you. I say watch memoirs of the invisible, man. No why. Exactly. I don't know. But. Mary poppins. Oh, really? Yeah. You didn't see it? You guys. Did. It's sort of like why we watched what did we watch today? Crystal skull. I I would've I would've not gone mine tire life had it not been for work to watch an antigens and the crystal skull because why would I will tell you as bad if enough people tell me something isn't worth my time. I typically just go. Well, I only got so many hours left on this planet..

Ken Watanabe Woody Allen Rob Marshall Mary poppins Europe Corey Stoll us Brody Paris Museology Asia Chicago James five years
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"I kept kinda bouncing around according to Allie, pedia heard out Wikipedia. She started isn't illustrator at the l. a. weekly in two thousand and five here in Los Angeles before writing for the same publication in two thousand six. Then she moved on. We're upward to the LA times in two thousand seven and wrote for them until two thousand ten would sort of gave you the means to come around and do this kind of in a way, right? And also we just for listeners, we both went to UCSB. As we both did the same program. Right? We did. Yeah, which is so crazy to think about that is really, really weird. I hear they're like twenty five years after he. There were? No, we would when I was in college studying film, we would actually cut film with like razor blades and have to tape it back together as editing. I will be feel very lucky though, like my cost is probably one of the last classes to do that because they definitely don't do it lucky which is sex. I, there was some things then about it a little bit just like, but I think only just because it just was, does people don't do that anymore thing for me. But yeah, I agree. I don't know if I'd want. I definitely as an editor, I definitely wouldn't want to do that for a living came badgen editing. No, no. But yeah. So basically, did you know film stuff in television stuff, food stuff, but then that kind of allowed you to. Right, right. So then what the so the no question that a lot of people had, of course, which was. There's breed Johnson, Danny king, and then Melissa Kotal. I like the way she worded at what was what was it that finally gave you the kick in the butt you needed to actually start making the podcast you wanted to make for so long which is. Oh, jeez. I like I like the food arena, but it always felt like it was not quite what I was like. What I really wanted to do. I feel like it kind of fell into it and was like, okay, but but I, I started volunteering at a museum in twenty thirteen. I had a really, I don't know. I'm sure some people have heard the straight and I had really, really shitty shitty year like my mentioned it in the hematology episode, I think, or no, the the museology no. And Tamale episode. Museology. I feel like maybe I can't remember, but I had a really shitty year and I was really sad, and my dad got diagnosed with myeloma. He's doing really well by the way. And so I was just, I was I went through a break-up, whereas really bummed. And so I started volunteering at the museum and that kind of opened up the whole science correspondent stuff for me because I really just did it because I wanted to be there..

Allie Melissa Kotal LA times Los Angeles UCSB Wikipedia editor Johnson Danny king twenty five years
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"Every summer to visit the museum in the village. So a chance to to come work here was a dream come. True. So did you see some of these trains when you were growing up the same ones that you are in charge of? I did. I, I have a picture of my office of me as a six year old boy standing on the pilot of the Allegheny. So it's very cool to come back here and now get to work with it every day. So did you realize when you were growing up that was making that much of an imprint, or how do you become an transportation throughs east who turns into a job? Yeah, the enthusiast parts easy right to trains and cars really since since boyhood, but. You know, I never really considered that people actually made a living at museum. So it never occurred to me till I actually went to college. I initially was going to be is school history teacher and then took a class called intro to public history and learned about this idea of working in museums, archives libraries, and you know, that might be kind of fun so far has been so quick shout out to the museology episode with brawny Klein who breaks down what it's like to work behind the scenes of all the exhibits that the rest of us aren't allowed to touch but really wanted to like so bad. Okay. Matt. Now, when you were growing up, were you in two trains? I was just took my I train ride at two years old and absolutely love watching them go by riding them anything that had to do with employing them. Certainly. So definitely. Why do you think people like train so much? Because I feel like there's two kinds of people. There are people who are into trains, and then there are people who are like, what? Yeah, are cool. Like train those into it, like what happens to get people so into trains. Yeah. Well, I've got. Sort of my enlightened intelligent answer, and then I've got my good answer. I think the the enlighten answer would be the trains are really unique in American history and that they're so closely tied with the history of this country. I mean, we, we've had railroads for all, but fifty years that we've had a nation in, you think about the role they played in the civil war. You think about the transcontinental railroad, the effects add really even into the early twentieth century is really, really fascinating study. But I think the simple answers were just fascinated by big things and on land. You can't find anything much bigger than than a train, just incredibly impressive kind of awesome to see one to feel one. You know, you feel trucks and cars, but not the way you feel train, which kind of rumbles in your chest even before you see it. So that's that's an amazing thing. I never thought about that about they're really visceral experience of having a train go by. Yeah, I, it's really, you know, you go to a railroad crossing. There's almost as Bilden climax, you know, you hear the bells and the light serving builds up the nation than year the whistle and the distance or the horn. And then, yeah, the ground shakes underneath you as this thing goes by and you just. Just hear the rumble of that Diesel Motor. It's a lot of fun. So side note, at least one person has been identified as being in a monogamous relationship who the steamy locomotive. So this German man named Joaquin does admit though that he has this affinity for fixing things, and that can lead to emotional infidelity with other objects in a California woman named Carol is married to a train station in San Diego. She rides the bus forty, five minutes a day just to hang out in the station and touch the walls and talk about her day, which honestly sounds like a healthier relationship than a lot of people have..

Matt Carol Joaquin Diesel Motor Bilden climax Allegheny Klein San Diego California five minutes fifty years two years six year
"museology" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Tim rice wrote the lyrics i ran andy wrote the music andrew lloyd webber wrote music i'm reading you're going to be going with andrew lloyd webber sunday night now you have an andrew and it's in brooklyn live performance on nbc yep yep now you were telling me that it's a little bit controversial whenever this airs why is that well jesus christ superstar often attracts protesters because you know it makes jesus christ very human emphasizes the affair he had with mary magdalene his sexuality it's a rock version jesus christ superstar can so over the years a lot of evangelical people have been offended by but funnily enough even though some are offended by it back in the day when it first the album i came out a lot of churches loved it and did productions of it in the church so many that they had to police it because tim and andrew were getting any money from these productions that went around the country damn churches christians are not paying their royalties though looking forward to tim rice coming up in an hour to hey i let's check in with w o ours museology ray stagich good morning ray and good morning how are you hey ray i just wanted to have for a second because watch outrage big deal yesterday because yesterday at this time we wanted to know the exact temperature for the first pitch of the mets game yesterday was advertised for one ten it was more like one sixteen and you said fifty you said fifty one fifty one way off i was again yeah it was fifty oh my gosh that's blasphemy we expect by waves resignation at the half hour they're good job really stay are we done no we're not going to be any more snow are we done with snow no renato with snow are you kidding me do that would get your attention i don't think it was impossible that we could see snowflakes next week i think there may be an opportunity possibly later in the week toward next weekend to say and possibly north west of the city north and west of the city wait say you're done howie rose let me call the mets game yesterday will you let me call the.

Tim rice ray renato andy andrew lloyd webber brooklyn nbc mets howie rose
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"I was just oh i just got a cologne that i've never haven't tried yet but it's how book lex yes it's amazing so i'm like excited to try it so i don't even know who makes it i just got for christmas like a little sample that but someone was like oh i know you would like this book oh my gosh i would need to order that okay quick aside why do old books smell so good i just google the shadow of this and it turns out that paper is made of cellulose and lignin from wood pulp and when they degrade they throw off volatile organic compounds that smell a lot like vanilla and almonds so it turns out there are few colognes formulated to smell like old books and they have names like paperback in the library book and dead writers but i applaud all of them for not opting for the less huff friendly name of bookworm do you have any future goals like is there anything in terms of being a museology that you're like i want to do this before the end of my career totally i do think that a lot of exhibits can be updated and can be more inclusive and i do want to change that so i do have that as a goal to see what ronnie clients day to day life as a museum logist entails follow his very wonderful instagram it's museum ronnie and as long as you're there you might wanna check out granny the dog which is his scruffy rescue pup who is very cute i am proud to say i was her first follower i was on that he was i hey i cut in boom follow you can also follow all ogies or allie ward with one l on twitter or instagram you can join the amazing facebook allergies podcast group which has admitted by aaron albert thank you and hannah lippo who just moved to boston in case anyone in boston needs a new awesome smart friend we're gonna miss her so so much in california i can't even talk about it without crying but i'm so proud of her for this adventure and for her work as an attorney for the aclu there.

twitter aaron albert boston california attorney google ronnie allie ward facebook hannah lippo one l
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"So there's a house museum that i take care of and it's the vallejo home in cinema and vallejo's wife is known to haunt the house what's and hate english speakers so anytime you speak english in there she gets very mad yeah have you been there i have been there what does it feel like i wait for her to yell at me and she hasn't yet i think you know when you want a go stale you never happens there's such jerks i always wanted though there is i also take care of a building called the toscano hotel and one time i was trying to film a video for instagram and the music wasn't working and i was like trying to do like a billy joel song till like some sort of weird thing or something and then it didn't the music didn't work by when i replayed it there were many voices in the background and there are definitely no men there deepal even goes churn share yo sure open to it i would love to see a ghost you wouldn't be freaked out i know i would love for jacqueline become hang up me yeah he's just like your ghost homey totally hannah wants to know what is your favorite exhibit you've worked on what was giving preparing an object to be on on display and it was a dress made of human hair and so so i was picking out dead bugs from the early nineteen hundreds from this dress with like tweezers and my cousteau mike.

vallejo toscano hotel instagram jacqueline hannah billy joel
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"Active than it has been in the past so his his story is not i was thinking about that last night i couldn't sleep last night and the word his story it just kept coming back to me and i'm like god damn it i wish we could change the name of history this is how do we change it and i was just going through my head those like our story their story like what can you change it to ours but you know in that sounds kind of weird or not but probably his story his story sounds weird to if i heard it just keep calling it our story then everyone will call it our story i mean languages elastic so evolved so that's interesting that that's that's good to know that it's being like that i'd never thought about what's weird to think about women's history women's his story like seems so weird to me that just gave me anger induced goosebumps it's so crazy how barely out of the dark ages like how you still are in so many arcade like this is smell dark age this is a dark we're in a dark age dark age laura ice in wants to know have you ever used cooler weird stuff from the museum to impress a day oh unfortunately haven't had ronnie you could steal so much cool stuff what's the most expensive artifact you've ever dealt with or handled that's such a cheesy question but i'm sorry i'm gonna ask you know it's interesting because some of the artifacts are priced lose so we don't know how much so just from the sentimental point of view like just the other day i was holding jack london's camera which he's amazing photographer and took photos of the what was it the nineteen o eight seven earthquake l o six of san francisco san francisco and his crops were amazing so these photos appear in a book the paths men take published in two thousand sixteen and on the state parks website which i'm going to add to all the episode links at allie war dot com slash apologies and side note ronnie also says that some artifacts that aren't on display can get loaned to museums all over the world kind of like a shirt that you lend to your roommate before trip hoping she doesn't get investor it on it we do you know share them.

ronnie jack london san francisco san francisco
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"Yeah totally but i don't mind it's very peaceful drive but so i live in sacramento and the job the opened up was in snow and it was also my dream job because it involves jacqueline instead historic park so i applied for the job and then i got it and that's how it works how did they tell you that you got it did they send over like a carrier pigeon or did they do something with antiquity to like send you a telegram and i just heard my my boss get the call the call the reference check call oh my god it was amazing i was another on my desk and i just heard her like oh so good was she sad to lose you though yes she i think she hung up the phone and said dammit ronnie oh my gosh did you celebrate it was amazing yeah what'd you do did actually i'm sure i just probably went for like unlimited sushi yeah that's my celebration that's so dope so what is your day like like data day to come in like see like if anything's been missing or broken or needs a tending to or like you know you're up in sonoma's i know that we had scheduled for last month around thanksgiving but cinema was going through some of the worst wildfires in state history so my daytoday scheduled for since men since october has been kind of not daytoday scheduled we did evacuate we're able to we have an emergency evacuation plan the fires were coming it was very intense and we were able to evacuate all of the threatened areas which included six moving trucks of objects and we brought them to the facility rut today which as you can see this place is huge so it was able to house all of those artifacts and all of those objects so we were able to get out.

sacramento jacqueline ronnie sonoma
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"Because i don't just have one medium it's very unique experience that i'm working in where i manage a collections of over thirty thousand items in twenty two different parks why so we can get to them all unfortunately like it's very hard to get to most of them but most of them are collected in like a lump of five different locations wow that's so many items twenty two different parks and thirty thousand items yeah do you how do you keep records their spreadsheet well there's multiple spreadsheets we use what's called the team the museum system database okay and many museums use it the smithsonian uses it we are opening it up so that the public can go on if they want to research the lanterns or if they want to research anything really thimbles rigs or dairy containers we have you can just find him and then you can come in look up all your containers and you'd be you know what is your house like are you very organized are you do you like knickknack ary or do you are you very clutter free like how has being a museology changed the way you live that is a good question my house is orderly until you get to the very back room like it's you know some people have like a junk drawer on when in the background junk room but it's just a room at the end of day where you'd like opened the door up and throw something in a closed quick but other than that i do like older paintings or even if it's like a painting that a husband made of his wife in the nineteen fifties that i found in a thrift store like i appreciate that and they'll maybe purchase that and put it up in my house.

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"That's you'd like sling sausage and then you're like these are my people definitely yeah totally that is amazing did you put your put your hotdog cart there on purpose because you like state parks there was there were corners to choose from and i knew that was the corner ice scoped it out i knew that that was the corner if i had the opportunity though where i would be in that's where it was it was the wind is the windiest corner in sacramento like it's you would not believe how windy it is and you believe how much wind affects a hotdog cart that goes off of propane gas really very windy very upsetting but it was worth it no yeah i loved it i mean i would probably never do it again but there was a bucket listing and it was amazing i two hotdog cart dude did you ever read confederacy of dunces no it's about hot carts really weren't lens it's fascinating and it's infuriating and it gives you so many emotions but it's definitely about like hashtag hotdog cart life so side note this book's backstory is as fascinating as its actual plot so rejected by publishers the author of confederacy of dunces john kennedy toole tragically committed suicide at the age of thirty one and i'm sorry that's two mentions in one episode that's the last one i promise so his mother thelma found this shabby smeared carbon copy of the manuscript atop a cedar armoire after his death and she made it her mission to get published she said it around and around around she was rejected over and over until she badgered one publisher so much that he relented he promised to read it he was like married like two page list so i can reject it and he did he was like oh dang this is really good so it was published a lemon years after tools death the title of the book is based on a line from jonathan swift essay that reads quote when a true genius appears in the world you may know him by this sign that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.

thelma publisher sacramento john kennedy toole jonathan swift
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"Walking through the halls smelling the smells so yeah just sharing the images just hopefully excites people to want to come to the museum tell me a little bit about museology what's the educational structure like like do you study in a classroom about museums do you go to museums and electors like here's how these this has been curated will the museum world is very i don't know it seems like it's a very it's also that sometimes like a secret society it's hard to get into but so i major have a major in history but while i was going to college i spent four years working as a student archivist california state parks of photographic archives and that's where i was introduced to the conference day parks museum world so from there he graduated in two thousand nine but the recession hit and he thought all maybe he's going to be a teacher i don't know what i was going to do something in history so i ended up leaving and starting a hot carte and it's very headed on my bucket list to have a hotdog cart and arnie lobue when the recession hit i was like well i guess now's a better time than india's have a hotdog cart so i ended up having a hotdog cart on a corner street of downtown sacramento for two years what was it called state bear sausage dogs okay i secretly made my own sausages in my home and sold them there illegally which was a hit.

arnie lobue india parks museum sacramento four years two years
"museology" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on Ologies

"He's great please ready your ears and behold the precious wonder of museology just ronny kline i don't think ever been interviewed ever this doesn't work you can trash i'm okay with it i'm not gonna trash this tell me about the first museum that you went to do you remember do it was on a field trip was in sacramento it was the california state road museum and i do remember kind of just being kind of i don't know i feel like we were free and just running around like crazy kids jumping through things and exploring the museum ourselves no guidance whatsoever where were the doses during this does i mean swede dozenns through the very sweet but sometimes they're a little older than the children that are running around do you like any museum movies i realized that there are no good museum movies really that i've seen okay i even watched a movie this week in anticipation for this question thinking it was going to be a good museum movie you're doing your homework i was it's called bringing bringing home baby bringing back baby and it's with cary grant oh audrey hepburn okay romantic comedy i'm like okay this is up my alley it's going to be great and then it was just like it was very frustrating has good reviews what museum did it take place in in a natural history museum so cary grant was a zoologist and he was putting while he was zoologist but he was putting together a dinosaur.

ronny kline state road museum sacramento california audrey hepburn cary grant
"museology" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"museology" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The i do some of the small wow when returning and best song goes to remember me from uh cocoa resumed there's a few hours there's one that i wish i don't think it even got nominated but they haven't come out with any nominations yet so we don't know why i've it hasn't been nominated in any of the only other to this point yet uh i don't know if you haven't seat baby driver that should get an award for best direction move is i'm not giving away any plot things but it's not a musical but everything is done to the beat of the music if somebody is being shot it's to the beat of the museology ours lawbased and yet it's a very subtle thing it's not like a dance or anything like there with the music composed to the acp now now it as france meet music from fifty sixty '70s and '80s oh i see how the case listening van his ipod the concept is that he has tonight us because of that anytime he steals a car whatever he gets the eye the sitting there and that's the music you here so if it's a glittery idolized going along lake right anything is going along to the beat of music of the way it's choreographed his one though it even his spins of his steering wheel go with the museum will add that when it dawned on me boost when the elevator door open and at whoa that's the beat of the music and then i really kind of plugged into that if you get a chance it's eight ondemand now this really younger and i think it's going to be it is going to be looked over even though it sobered because kevin spacey's in the mood than i'm predicting that in two thousand eighteen will all be moving to the beaten resolve lucky after haiti your musician do you are quite the musician pianist do you up you also pike attardo well a fake the deterring blade panaria but then you are the musical mental list as well right i do something or well we did this last year the thought of a song in a yes very sad clear flavor you play piano in your in your show at that before yeah of korea because of that i can really i was went to a conservatory reasonably concertos and all that is how he focused as.

acp france kevin spacey haiti korea