26 Burst results for "Musa"

Trump demands Congress amend pandemic relief bill, issues controversial pardons

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:19 min | 3 weeks ago

Trump demands Congress amend pandemic relief bill, issues controversial pardons

"President Trump has sharply blasted the bipartisan cove in 19 economic relief bill that Congress passed this week. He's demanding changes, including an increase of the $600 stimulus checks to Americans up to $2000. The Cove in relief package is part of a bill that also funds the government through September of next year. And if the bill is vetoed, it would be in a government shutdown. CBS political analyst Leonard Stein horns says there are many implications. This is a stunning turnabout that has the potential of throw Washington into chaos shut down the government. Delay essential aid to American families and businesses and leave renters and unemployed workers with few resource is to cope with their uncertainty, and there's another political twist to this as well. Because if the president follows through on his threat in Congress doesn't come up with an alternative voters in Georgia may take their frustrations out on the two Republican senators running for reelection in what is already a tight race. It is unclear how serious the president's threat he is or whether he would actually veto the bipartisan legislation. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi responded quickly to the president's statement, saying she's ready to push for the $2000 checks. He's now asking for Pelosi posted on her Twitter page. The Democrats would bring the president's request to the House floor for a vote by unanimous consent before the end of this week, Mike DeBonis, congressional reporter with the Washington Post says that could lead to another standoff. There's gonna be a very brief session tomorrow in the House, a Democrat will come in Fran Tastic bill to do the $2000 Jack. We expect a Republican is going to stand up and say, Well, That's not all the president wants. He wants to get rid of other parts of this bill, so they're gonna object and say we got to negotiate this. But you know if that's the case, Democrats Musa a. We're not negotiating more. We'll do We just sign the bill that we already talked about. And move on. But that could just really spark and extended sort of stand off. That could mean among other things, the government shutdown people not getting the benefits they were expecting. And this could last. You know, frankly, all the way till Joe Bynes inaugurated on January 20th. Senate Minority leader, Democrat Chuck Schumer of New York, says he's hopeful the president will not veto the coronavirus package. He says Congress can pass additional funding in a subsequent

President Trump Leonard Stein Congress House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Mike Debonis CBS Fran Tastic Washington Pelosi Georgia House Washington Post Twitter Musa Jack Joe Bynes Democrat Chuck Schumer Government
Walter Wallace Jr shooting: Philadelphia police to release 911 tapes and body camera footage

John Tabacco's Liquid Lunch

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Walter Wallace Jr shooting: Philadelphia police to release 911 tapes and body camera footage

"Say they will release the police body camera footage and the 900 tapes in connection with the officer involved shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. Mr Wallace's father, Walter Sr. Says he wants the violence and looting to stop at a press conference Wednesday, and I don't know violence. 10 of city stores in all this chaos is everybody heavy respect from my family and my son to stop this violence and chaos was going on in the city. I mean, we got good cup. We got bay. That's a sentiment in the system. I'm not somebody had to be all accountable for what they did. No time frame was set for the release of the officer's body cameras. Musa Radio news.

Walter Wallace Jr Walter Sr Officer
"musa" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

05:47 min | 3 months ago

"musa" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Part of my job here is to be the devil's advocate so I can't help. But ask this question you know if I if I take a an attitude that this is exactly the kind of issue that should be solved by the free market. If we find that there is systematic discrimination against a brilliant conservative isn't that a wonderful opportunity for certain departments to corner the market by hiring all these brilliant conservatives that can't get hired anywhere else I don't necessarily buy that argument, but am curious as to what your response is. Well. So there has been a market solution on an almost an almost literal market solution. And that is the emergence of these private think tanks. That, have that are taking all of these conservative intellectuals and whatever who feel like they don't have a place in the Academy of rural are the problem though what you see as a result of that is that basically neither is you get these to sort of separate ecosystems. So you actually lose the benefit of diversity happens when you have these different viewpoints actually engaging with each other having the answer to each other and clashing with each other and. Exposing one another. But instead what you see as two separate members have sort of think tank echo chamber with a lot of right-wingers or religious people whatever kind of talking amongst themselves without much of a challenge referring to one another's work it's better and then on within the mainstream academy, use the a similar phenomenon on the left, and so there's technically diversity in the sense. There are conservative intellectuals, a lot of them outside of the academy, but the benefits of diversity that you get from putting these perspectives into. Conversation with each other by being challenged. ETC by collaborating by having people with different views, actually collaborate on projects and it's None of that's happening and in fact. One consequence that is that a lot of the institutional structures that we have like peer review, our Institutional Review Boards, committee decisions. They're sort of their fundamentally premised on the idea of this kind of adversarial thing that you would have people with diverse frameworks and view through whatever. Hashing it out and so as a result, these kinds of Midi decisions like pure review, institutional review, boards, and committee decisions whatever will push us towards a more objective, more truthful more accurate. You know understanding of reality towards better but in a world where the people making decisions share the same, the same axioms, the same blind spots, the same. Assumptions about the world. Then you can have been rather than correcting bias by means of things like peer. Review Committee decisions you can actually exacerbate bias his like. A revolt of these. Processes that were supposed to correct right by these..

Review Committee Academy of rural
"musa" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"musa" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"I'm. GonNa, come to your to your area. I'm going to try to trigger I'm going to get the reaction I'm looking for because even though you know what I'm trying to do, you won't be able to resist giving me the reaction I'm looking for and that will you know etcetera so there are these people there became the this whole kind of dynamic where a lot of groups would be inviting speakers to campus basically just to troll other people to get a reaction. Yeah. And then when they got the reaction they were looking for at made them seem like their opponents were reactionaries right who you know and and again they were kind of being reaction that you didn't have to give the people. They didn't have to give the reaction them. These people are trying to solicit, but it's also at the same time as we recognize that it's also important to recognize that the people that were engaging with weren't necessarily gauging in good sell. Yeah. Everyone is. DRAGGED DOWN By this. Yeah, and so the and so this was the environment in sort of in which Heterodox Academy was trying to find its footing. So, there are these major blow ups the at campuses nationwide. There was this there was a significant uptick and fire in professors being fired for political speech on the left and the right on the right mostly led by Fox News Oriented Fox News campaigns of which I have some personal experience with, and then on the left, you know a lot of times it was sort of led. Campaigns to get someone fired for saying something they didn't like or otherwise represents and you know escalated to the point of physical clashes in some cases. Culminating. I would say probably with the death of heather higher and the at Universal Jinya on and and so you know we recognize that. The our initial approach to the problem which was like here. Let's make some arguments and present some data about why this is important like that wasn't going to cut it. For. The. Kind of problem kind of situation that we were. Facing Post. Twenty Sixteen so we were so we've tried to be a lot more. And how we? Thought about the problems and tried to address them started developing different tools, resources We developed a robust a much more robust organizational structure to help move projects along arm a much different membership structure to to hold more people into the project and sort of empel, pull their ideas and information and resources, and stop in disseminate them and so now heterodox. Academy. IS WE HAVE A. About forty five, hundred members who are primarily faculty but also Grad students and administrators off from all around the country. I stepped down in January of twenty twenty in. So I haven't been like super involved with a lot of the sort of day to day operational stuff there. But but yeah, the time I left we're very different organization from the one we started with we had totally different approach to talking about and engaging on these problem and Yeah, it's. A pretty well, it's interesting because it's sort of the flip side of. The flip side but a different version of what will Wilkinson told me about I had him on the podcast and he works for a Libertarian think-tank, Niskanen Center and they had plans for what happened when Hillary Clinton would get elected. Namely, they would work closely with people in Congress to sort of nudge everyone in a more libertarian direction and you know reach across the aisle and so forth, and all those plans went very much out the window and.

Heterodox Academy Hillary Clinton Niskanen Center Congress Universal Jinya Wilkinson heather
Can any long shots stun Tiz The Law at Ky. Derby?

At Home with Gary Sullivan

03:34 min | 4 months ago

Can any long shots stun Tiz The Law at Ky. Derby?

"All right. Jody Delhi is going to give us the odds on the Kentucky Derby race. Of course we've heard about is the law. Everybody's liked his. The law is the law. Well, there are other horses in the race. Right, Jody? That's right. Says the law is 45. This is current odds right now. They just opened the windows this morning. Ah, 25 minutes ago. This is current odds. Tis a law fortified. And then there is a pretty good distance between him and the next horses. And the next course is there's actually a pretty good distance of who are a pretty good racer. Who's the second choice right now. It would be Santa Anita Derby winner Honor AP at 8 to 1 Authentic, though, is 9 to 1. That's Bob Baffert horse who won the Haskell Tendo one Bob Baffert horse 1000 words Who won the shared beliefs. So you've got those horses? Ahh, right there. All four vying for second choice in the Derby. Let's run from the inside, post position out. We'll give you all of the odds here. A CZ. We go through it finish the fierce. The number one horse, The one eyed gilding has been scratched. He is not running in the race number two Max player, Ricardo Santana Jr. The jockey, Steve asked. Musa is the trainer Max player. Is down. 18 Toe one. He was a morning line. 30 to 1. He's back. He's been bet. Pretty good. So far enforceable. Adam. The skits of the jockey Mark Cassie is the trainer 23 to 1 down a little bit from 30 to 1 in the morning line. Storm. The court who was the breeder's Cup juvenile champion last year, Julien Les Peru is the jockey Peter Kurten is the trainer 26 to 1, Major fed James Graham and Greg fully 34 to 1. They were 50 to 1 in the morning line. Number six. King Guillermo has been scratched. Money moves. This is the one that is interesting to me. Money moves from Todd Pletcher, making just his fourth career start. Was a 32 1 in the morning line and is getting bet. Heavy. Todd Pletcher's Horse Down 15 to 1 South Bend. I don't think all the Notre Dame Ah money has come in yet on South Been 34 to 1, Tyler Gaffney, Leone and Belmont trainer. Mr Big News. Gabriel Sias trainer Brett Calhoun 47 to 1 number 10,000 words as we said 10 to 1. Number 11 Necker Island, who, by the way will have his blinkers off, so he's been running with blinkers on in his last few races. He will not wear blinkers today 51 to 1 Miguel Mania and Chris Hartman is the trainer. Soul a Valon Day. Patrick being cone Lucas Panici is the jockey Volonte 29 to 1 attachment, Right, Dale? Romans 49 the one I thought that he would actually get a bet down. I'm a little surprised that that one winning surprise winning impression is no surprise. He is 52 to 1, the longest shot on the board. Dallas Stuart and Joe Rocco. In the irons, New York traffic 15 to 1, Paco Lopez and Saffy Joseph is Ah Ah, actually, I think he's gonna end up being like the third or fourth choice when it's all said and done. Probably a little bit of a buzz horse here out here among the horseman Honore P. 8 to 1 in the 16 post position with Mike Smith. John Sheriff's is the trainer. Tis the law 4 to 5, Manny Franco and Barclay Tagg. An authentic on the outside Bob Baffert 9 to 1 John Velazquez in the iron, So there's your Kentucky Derby odds for right now and again betting is open. And we've got a bunch of our hot We have 30 minutes to the first post 31 minutes right now to the first post long time before we get to the Kentucky Derby, So a lot of money will be bet on there, Terry.

Jody Delhi Bob Baffert Kentucky Derby Musa Todd Pletcher Santa Anita Derby Peter Kurten Dale South Bend Mike Smith Mark Cassie John Sheriff New York Honore P. Barclay Tagg King Guillermo Necker Island Manny Franco Valon Day
"musa" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

05:36 min | 5 months ago

"musa" Discussed on The Trip

"Qatar..

"musa" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

07:18 min | 5 months ago

"musa" Discussed on The Trip

"You eat. That'd be had to break down. Yeah. Africa. So. Yeah. I mean for me food is a kind of ritual as a way to reward myself because as a right try works in isolation. going. Out from. Meal. The sense of occasion is so important. So powerful it also. Diversity. You get from the city, a Sudanese Food Lebanese Syrian. Of course. Great German and Austrian Food Schnitzel here so it's really away to engage with the city also battalion spots a great too. But the the. Talk About Nostalgia I've had some of the worst Chinese food. In my life in Berlin and that's That was a long time ago. Feels like that that this is one thing that Berlin is actually doing it. You know we don't want to like throw London on it but it's it's moving it is moving yeah and you can have these amazing food and people will recognize it as a challenge in Berlin in. Copper Challenges. The first is the city's not as diverse as London. and. So the the. The cuisine tends to be titles dominant pilot. On the German PAT doesn't really go for spices in the biggest way. So, actually, you'll get better food in Hamburg. I think on the whole because hamburgers closer to the water is called the port. So you have diversity want great Portuguese food in Germany Hamburg's replace Greek food to Vietnamese Vietnamese food is pretty good here because they got the east and they've got that but. If you really want great food in Germany. U. it's easy to Hamburg but if you dig it and but nothing but the thing about the food and Belen is like much the rest of the city you have to work a little bit harder. than. You wouldn't a lot of other places, but the efforts is so worth it when you crack. And again, you you're you're building those muscles is the the way that you have to earn the summer by getting through the winter? Yes. Absolutely and I loved I loved the sense of the sense of. Joy when you've discovered something. Different in mine gone to Shanti Fantastic writer London Sean Jake on touch and. She was like, Sean Sean Sean. Tell you absolutely and she was like always a good fish place I was like. Checkout fillet up by abras virus Tulsa. That's the one ten tram couple of, stops down. Who? WHO's much toss on it's the stop and she was like, Oh my goodness send me patriots. This is just absolutely delicious. This is a Londoner. Big Standards Absolutely. how I'd. A chapter about brief chapter really moving for me about Schnitzel. Yes. What an odd sauce Lewis thing they do here? Yes. I mean. What's what's the highlight and low light of the German menu for you. Schnitzel could be the harlot on the low light. That with respect and love simply because the Schnitzel is Is An entity unto itself into size of a kind of It's the signs of a Turkey dish is is it's huge at some. Society, it could be the size of a laptop cover. It's huge And they set up without source nephew like thank you in the mood Schnitzel around know what happened with the mushroom sauce in which case it's the best thing. But if you have no soul to the toll, which is what the Austin's in Germany then it's a disaster. Drinking sand is just so there's no relief from it. It's an attritional dish and it's almost a trial of strength to completer and you fill out when he finished it you've passed some kind of test that may actually be the German citizenship. Forget You know these racists who were asking you if you speak German Schnitzel. Yes. Yes. Eat. Out probably probably, you had just come to hear from. Recording, your own podcast studio, which is a football podcast soccer as we call it back home. You and I both worked with Tony Karen. The great great man who? Combines a deep love of the beautiful game with politics or someone left of Stalin, and it's just an incredible combination is one of one of my favorite comrades on Earth. What how did you come to football? Writing. Football. Presenting and what is what is that done for you here in Germany? Well, it's been amazing festival from Germany it's been incredible experience and. I came to a speak my family's always been involved with my grandfather carts got national side a few years. Back before the war goodness. Okay. Yeah. Way Back when whereby sixties he coached them was an amazing coach and a couple of my cousins and playing old America Thirteen selected soccer in unique and actually one of the. Is. Funny. How sport runs in the family one of their. Daughters the career now plays Gopher Alabama University of Alabama. I've been second in like the PJ amateur, PGA tournament. Well, some of them are you helping poet athletes? Exactly. Right, you you've got a team. The Unicorn. I stopped playing them. Two years ago. No, no, no no, it's great. We want to knock out tournament or mainstream. You the trophy won a tournament this summer. Invitation Tournament seven, which I was playing. You got the band back together. We did indeed go back into action like the avengers. Yeah. Exactly. Sam Jackson. So, football's always been in my family, my blood. And so it was. Two Thousand and seven, I was asked. Look or was approach by the and he said the. Stuff. Want to work on something that I loved about football and that was the first because I wrote culture nominated sports book of the year and it was read is looking at. What makes for Great? Footballer but whereas Greatest Football. So not just about what makes a footballer but what is it? We Love the strange game. Why are we so obsessed with it? And really just over the years my of career is taking directions but being in Germany are funded football is such. A kind of foss track the soul of the nation. It's a shortcut to so many great compensations because I have this background in it. It bridges a kind of cultural gap my otherwise be there. So yeah, it's been wonderful. How is Hata dealing good goods. They've just got Jurgen Klinsmann and and Oh my year. There was a bit of a concern the column back from America and do the best job actually have to say in the US. Guess. You think Patrick had playing some really enterprising stuff and maybe. Maybe, there's something to be said for if you're in the right context. You know you're better coach because I think what Clinton has done is he's breathed life into a kind of slightly more uniform hat is a club which has underachieved given its fan base very passionate fanbase. Lajolo crowd. Thousand people every game. That's a lot of fans. So I feel almost you shot in the arm and I think Clinton's given them that the really exciting. You went to Brazil Yep. How do we get to?.

Germany football Schnitzel Berlin Austrian Food Schnitzel Sean Sean Sean London Hamburg America Africa Germany Hamburg Jurgen Klinsmann Clinton Gopher Alabama University of A Belen Sean Jake Vietnamese Vietnamese Hata London. writer
UFC 252 Round-Up

The Corner

05:22 min | 5 months ago

UFC 252 Round-Up

"We are talking and may more specifically talking about the UFC and UFC two, fifty two which just happened over this past weekend. dray looked it looked good on paper for the main card right. And I was like, okay, we got a nice little main card. Overall. I really thought it. disappointed. A. Wasn't. It wasn't it was some weird circumstance. Is Not, the fighters falls yes. It's not like they all wanted or tried to go to decisions or anything, but some sheet happened that made it kind of weak. So I will talk about John Dodson. Showing up in doing nothing. Mood he's gun shy told you these headed someone's wrong sums? Are you gotTa drop the weight? You know it's not it's admit this is mental. This is a one hundred percent mental Dj Rodham, his soul Shang soon them he probably I think. So something happened because remember when Dawson arrived on the scene like he knocked out Tj dillashaw the magic man, but he was everywhere. Hands hit bricks for hands fast as hell you couldn't take them down. Like he was easily the number one number two, the fastest fighter in division. Easy. Maybe the entire UFC. But now it's like he's completely gunshot. And visibility. Didn't he just? Fuck this, he had so much fun beating up on John Dasa just like tossing him around. I don't know who John Dyson it's over this drop the weight it won't matter if you don't let your hands go. Yeah. Morale was having a blast Murrah was in his quarter just like that's easy lay. This is mile in after the fight through the headdress back on he just didn't care and do we both picked us and I can't remember I definitely did. White I feel terrible and morale is going to be a problem at bantamweight. He's. If. He continues fighting like this. The way he's you know just out wrestling guys like he's on a nice little fight he streaked. Yeah and he was able to out strike Dotson granted Dotson tried too much to to throw hands I. Don't I don't know what the game plan is for Dotson Eurofighter anymore like why watch them fight I go to the Jimmy Rivera finally what's what's cleaning I? Don't think there is one. Rob. is on a firefight winning streak last lost. What's to Ricky Simon Smoke. Yeah. Okay. That makes sense. Okay I. Remember there was a submission. So young has buzzer. By the way you might have won that fight yet move rob has been dominant these past few fights but this the dots performance impressive. I. Think he could be a problem but I put more of the blame on John Dasa because something mental is going on with this man is not up to his capability. Yet Very Weird I. Can't call it he needs a sports psychologist. He's recapture some late when you don't even try to let the hands go. That's when you got a problem. So next fight, Herbert, Burns versus Daniel. Pineda this is where you are right and I was wrong. A feeling this and like this. I I don't know another weird fight because I think burns was just dominated from the jump. Eight just he didn't seem to have it this night. No. Cash wait forty, five, I don't. I can't. Blame it on but. The elbows came down and it was a rap so. Whichever I mean yeah I mean. Significant strikes. Ten. For burned. Fifty, seven for opinion. Yeah. I mean like it'll be like this but I kind. Win this fight, but that's wild and that was in dominant fashion. Then we go to the next night jd s versus Rosen struck. and. Bump you know super buff. Different, body. Mustached. GPS. Didn't help him because he got rocked. And slumped on cage. So the thing about Rosen's struck is what I've noticed now is yeah. Okay. Everybody's GonNa lose the Francis in God like if you rush Francis and got gotTa, you're going to lose that's what's going to happen. So this fight, he was a little bit more patient picked spots really didn't do a lot in the first round. Waiting for eighty s kind of open up getting a little bit more comfortable like ease up on the guard and he's just let it has put away. But this division. I don't want to say that there's like a huge gap is not a valid Musa Tanko gap. That's we're going to call that gap that's shift that's it is absurd. Touching her, but it's a pretty significant gap in skill after steeping. DC's probably gone. I don't know skill wise because. Roy, as he is. With all the raw power, he's still a role as an enemy fighter. Roses stroke is a raw power like the striking's there but. What happens with Steve puts him on his back. And clearly debate Baker Take Punch. So I don't I don't know who's who's going to be a problem for steep A. At this juncture, we'll talk about it in a little bit because even though I think in God who's going to be better if they have another fight. I can't. Skill wise. It's different levels of this shit.

UFC John Dodson ROY Burns Francis John Dasa Dj Rodham Dotson Dotson Eurofighter Dawson John Dyson Dray Rosen Murrah Ricky Simon Smoke Steve ROB Pineda Baker
On and off screen, Olivia de Havilland exhibited grit and grace

Business Rockstars

00:59 min | 6 months ago

On and off screen, Olivia de Havilland exhibited grit and grace

"Or ah, Hollywood Great has passed away here is more from Musa radios. When the king gone with the wind, and the air is star Olivia de Havilland, one of the last luminaries from Hollywood's golden Age. It's passed away in Paris at age 100 for the two time Oscar winning actress died in her sleep at her home in Paris. She was born to British parents in Tokyo. She was the older sister of actress Joan Fontaine, who died in 2013 at the age of 96. The two sisters had a famously contentious rivalry. In 2019 The Supreme Court rejected Devlin's petition to review the dismissal of her lawsuit against FX for its Siri's feud. Bette and Joan. Javelin sued the network stating that feuds show runners used her name and image without permission or compensation. Catherine Zeta Jones played javelin in the series that depicted the battle between actresses Bette Davis and Joan Crawford for US radio News. I'm

Bette Davis Javelin Olivia De Havilland Joan Fontaine Joan Crawford Hollywood Great Paris Catherine Zeta Jones Joan Hollywood Supreme Court Siri Tokyo Devlin Oscar United States
"musa" Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

04:23 min | 6 months ago

"musa" Discussed on The Two Of Us

"I didn't ask any of it. And I have to say those people have to hear this. It's too much though me. It's too much. The things are expected to deliver. On the science of the fucking cowards. I get cooled up to comment by the BBC. About Eaton's history with colonialism and slavery. And I'm like. Why is the headmaster of Eton not talking about this? Why the descendants of slave traders not talking about this? Why have you not cold them? Why have you called a black person who was the most affected by that kind of environment to comment? Why do you always cool the oppressed to comment on the oppression? This is my fucking job. People say our Mussa like you made a career, I said. Do you know I've lost? If people knew how many friends I lost acquainted. I'd lost connections lost, and so oh, yeah, but do it. Do it for the work for the work, so yeah, price you paying. What price of these people pay on a human level? I'll do it. I'll do it. Don't get me wrong. I'll do the work I'm not going to give us an fucking medal I do it. This private conversations I've had a far more stressful fof nappy Kyw, far more important in the article I and I have those conversations and I never duck them. Out in the last week alone I have had. More of those conversations than most people, most fuckers having a lifetime where I've called people up cool people out in a private context when it's most frightening. I've called out people who've helped my career and I've written them privacy and said you were wrong. I've spoken to them and I'll keep doing it. And this isn't about whereas my reward. This is not what I'm saying. It's like. How do I get home? When do I get home? When do I feel safe? The fact that I sat here the age of forty. And I wrote an essay. I'm talking about. Maybe I'll sacrifice for the next. People dot made me sad. Because made me realize at some level I have given up. On macy my unhappiness. I have given up on it. So, yeah, Multi S. Is Well. I'm dislike. On that guy that lives on the corner. and He loves his partner. And Evan. Mary knows about none outside the district. We Know Zain. And like. When he passes away like Oh. Yeah, he was a guy. A No one really knows that much more. Yeah, it was a guy who was around Latina. His partner and they love doing this nasty, not and they were kind of my. That's my multi-diverse. And the reason why I can paint so eloquent is because I think about it. All the fucking time. I'm so far. This is the saddest thing about all of it. The past I am. A dent regret the life. I've made a proud of it. I'm really proud of what I've done with while I was given. But I'm so far. From the reality tonight one for myself. I think we'll be fucking. Slow painful I realize often about the multiple within. This this idea eve may ask his dislike. In this reality. It has been the span testicle reality. Physics improve. Do you know what I mean? It's not even a parallel universe that you can slip into slack. It feels like. The feeling is it's not there. But the longing for is the all the time. All the time and I want people to hear this because I wanted to fucking no. This is not a game. We'd have fun without complaint about this Shit for fun Oh. That sounds me. You sound like a normal duty. I am a fucking normal dude. With an op normal life an.

partner BBC Eaton Eton Evan Mary
"musa" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

02:08 min | 7 months ago

"musa" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"So yeah. We cover a lot of history on this podcast. Yes, do a lot of American history European history have not tackled a lot of African history, and so that is, we're going today. We're going to talk about the richest man who ever lived. Mansa Moussa. This

declan Mansa Moussa Lauren Bill Steve
The Richest Man Who Ever Lived: Mansa Musa

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:25 min | 7 months ago

The Richest Man Who Ever Lived: Mansa Musa

"So yeah. We cover a lot of history on this podcast. Yes, do a lot of American history European history have not tackled a lot of African history, and so that is, we're going today. We're going to talk about the richest man who ever lived. Mansa Moussa. This

Mansa Moussa
Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

Automated

00:47 sec | 11 months ago

Microsure MUSA Robot Used for First Time on Real Patients

"This past week. Mussa or M. U. S. a surgical robot built by Dutch robotics. Company was used in the first in human robotics Assisted microsurgery so music and operate on vessels under a millimeter from point to two point. Eight millimeters in diameter so. This is compared to the most successful surgery robot the DAVINCI system which came out already twenty years ago but even the Da Vinci can only. I put an air quotes only operate down to one millimeter. But what's the benefit of this though? So the patients have faster healing and it also removes any non deliberate hand movement made by the surgeon which clearly would improve the success chance of the operation itself

Da Vinci Mussa M. U.
"musa" Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on The Two Of Us

"I respect that dignity you know and the reason why that feel shame when I talk like this because something else propels you forward the thinking about the right thing to do or what you believe right into. Then there's no room for it as room for misery or shame because there are a luxury this point point okay. I'm thinking of this now house and not how then. Perhaps it's not related to this entirely. How'd you deal with breath? trolls especially are on when you have to have like an inner boundary so you have an impact on you because you do have trolls. Yeah of course. And how D I mean it's not just the case of blocking and blocking and blocking and blocking unblocking how do you deal with the impact of that okay and we completely honest about a lot of people don't realize that we're human. I think a lot of time on their on. TV Radio People look at all that guys. He's put it through. We can do anything at him. As part of those are the fun of like the game if occasion of light human communication now with online. You can just throw anything that will. It went both of them. I think I've got process now of step away from the computer off post articles. I block block comments on my website. I have read a blog comment since two thousand and ten some of my mother on that they said basically My father was killed in the war was four years old and I mentioned being raised by just the mother with four siblings with four siblings. And I wrote this piece by. Didn't mention the piece that my mother had been widowed because at want people to think I was saying and she was the good kind of single moment quotes you know she was widowed. As opposed to you know a mom whose pollen at them or whatever and someone wrote this Disgusting Austin Bluffs come and they said well maybe for mother had managed to keep the man around the house. Then you wouldn't have struggled raising five kids by herself. Maybe she had answer to lose lifestyle and I thought to myself. I've never wanted so much to jump through a computer screen on the other end and break. Someone's fucking neck and adopt one. I was like Nah. You know reading this again. You're not going to have somebody inside of the world power to her. You discussing common. I don't care Catholic. Pope is commenting on my staff going. I'm enlightened now. I don't give a shit who reads my stuff. I'm not reading comments. Because the lack of what has done is it's emboldened people and it's important. The worst kind of people is the thing it has emboldened cowardice because the average person he's got the courtesy to approach and say something. We'll just we'll say anyway but it's empowered people who wouldn't normally speak to speak without consequence and I couldn't abide that in April. That an intelligent how I still hunting. Of course it hurts like you got sense. What's The cousy get sent like racist racist remarks on twitter? I'm human of course hurts. Why do is receive a racist remark? I post them at the article by someone I. I think it's amazing. Every time I get a piece of abuse I share something. That's incredible. That's right to this positive. A piece of what by friend or Song Sung which bases. She's like my response to abuse is not to be silenced. is to get even better. Why do that's my response? Does that seems really wise responsible. Johnson also very generous response as well. Because you're sharing something the way forward. It's the only way on that note. Can you read something. Yeah it's an extra along with Everton. And because he fed me earlier I thought appropriate incredible cake unfortunately beer by the baton listeners. Get into this'll be long gone but yeah this is called how to eat cake and Berlin and can you tell me what the longer pay. It's the longer actually the longer piece. Basically as distillation of all things have been discussing so far today I suppose the creative creative journey alienating regret intimacy over lack of it life in Berlin race racism identity and it's called and in the end it was all about love have you got. I don't. I'm looking typical me usual. Response Noor we like like the writing you agree we like to writing. No no does list. And I'm like Oh my God I've created yet another. Why wouldn't you do as a podcast but to be honest if I'm honest with you I don't sound negative damn to myself if I look at my career? Iran sounds really negative Stanley. Madore step and thinking my career has basically proceeded slowly. Actually it's been really slow best but no kind of like. Oh wow he's a moment she's like chug along. Oh yeah that guy. He's a good right here he's good he's good I'm I'm just I'm a respected writer and I sent out this book. Amoco die readings casinos responses one by one have been. Yeah I really like Kit. Yup that's typical me. I cry all this work on. My poetry had to publish poetry because no publisher. I mean the raiders. Love it but it's like you have to do it myself. So yeah this is another one project. I'm proud of it. I told him because you've got such a beautiful speaking voice that I think is a serialized. podcast it would work really well. A new get a listenership. Oh Shit Plan. I think to be honest at some point up doing that. I think if I do tend to podcast I think economy audiobook. Maybe I'll be some sound design designed around it. I'm not sure that no I mean you've discussed on some great ideas on it. Yeah we'll see. It's out the moment. Publishers I mean names but I was disappointed by couple of names that said no because I had curation ships at them and stuff them before what I was kind of hoping something might anyway. Let's go for cake. Here's the piece. How do we cake in Berlin? The best time to eat cake and Berlin is a weekday afternoon. Say Two PM on Thursday. You can't do it much earlier because you weren't event it you have to get the timing timing just right if the cafe for three PM then when you finish you will emerge into a swarm of angry. And how rebound commuters. The best place to eat. AAC Well that varies. It depends what you're looking for. If you want to go somewhere where you can pass out off the arrival of the sugar rush them as quiet spot in your neighborhood the where the atmosphere is almost supernatural gentle. Where even when it was full and busy one evening you would still able to write I to short story without being distracted? That's the same cafe which has a dog who seems to spend ninety five percent of his time in a state of hibernation slumped on a shelf just behind the bar to only wakes when another dog and to his realm then he is almost on his hind legs with fury and he will not start roaring until the door closes behind the startled and rapidly retreating invader that's also cafe where the toddler Babbel's at your in Spanish and tries to impress you behold the.

Berlin publisher twitter raiders Iran Austin Bluffs Pope Noor Johnson writer Stanley
"musa" Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

11:29 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on The Two Of Us

"You've written and all the places you've appeared and as I approached it you can see the building to the city of London in the distance and if it was either the Canary Wharf fully in the square mall. You can see from here as buildings during my goodness twenty years ago. You made the choice. I'm almost forty now. You made the choice to go to different direction that you could have been a million by now. You're not you spent twenty years writing thinking creating trying to push the world in a small way in a certain direction trying on a helping hand direction you may not succeeded arguably you haven't you don't have that much to show from not particularly well off. I'm doing okay but not that great and I'm like you've got to work now you've got to make a difference now you've got to consolidate you've got to actually go for it in one particular direction and it was quite profound in the way here. I was thinking Markham are that have I done like that was a real. Yeah I thought that's what I really hate you and I have that sense in news like you. Oh and because you're not yet forty doing that thing of looking back. I'm looking forward at the same time thinking wherever I come. Where am I going but considering the one I read just a bit of your bio at the beginning and how diverse your work as how creative your expression is in different areas areas? I don't know if that's reckless. Because I always say recklessness is a sort of abandon. It's difficult because ause if I'm honest all the places I've written for all the stuff of Deng I've never had a staff position. Any of these places and over have been close to a star position any major media organizations. I've written for all these offices. These grand publications. There's never been a sniff of actually be a staff writer. See Start question in yourself and going. What is my too much generalist to not have been bank Tom? Because I've never if I look at my sort of writing career I've only had two agents. It's in my life as a writer. are in several years without any sometimes wonder like what myself I still negotiate all my contracts apart Mike Nutrition negotiate appearance fees. My performance fees. And I'm like I've never had like really management team. I've never had someone who goes other production money anything. What's wrong with me? You think about it. I think a lot like what have I done wrong unapproachable and difficult to manage and someone say reckless. I'm like maybe there is something in me that people look go back guys ungovernable. I've had to create a suppose my own way and having done that especially primarily a single and have been single mercer my life like you. You don't have the great being relationship I think especially if you get a second pair of eyes is to run things by you know I can. I can try out. I've never had that point of reference. To the reason it feels recluses because so often your cost the about in the dark. You know if the next next project I remember working one thing for the BBC huge project. Arcot Mitch the names not GonNa say it huge project. A big part in my career and the paycheck came in the show. Me What actually paymasters like. I done six weeks of work. I fronted a show that's gone out to like hundreds of millions of people like and that's getting paid at the end of it. I was like this is this is horrifying because it makes you realize. That's reckless is reckless to accept a joke by the reckless to put your mutation out. Dad Kip shredded. It wasn't because the piece. If there wasn't the point the point was I ended up after six weeks of the best work of my career almost out of pocket. That's what I say reckless. I mean that I mean I pursued the work on the quality of the work at the expense of almost everything else has. Has it been at the expense of your self esteem. Of course of course. Of course I mean I was having a chat with a friend. Mutual Friend's wedding and we had a chat and he was describing my work to me and it sounded like he was talking about different person on actually someone else came over and he was in Berlin. Recent it's always young guys mid twenty s and he was described my work both with and they were going. Oh Yeah your work. Yeah ever in. The office talks bad that we respect like what the heck is being spoke. DOC is like being spark having been away from Earth or Vulcan for like five hundred years near a town people are. Oh Yeah. That didn't like who are these people. Who are these people that rape me? I've never heard of because you taught people in the industry in the respect. Is there one of the reasons I left the. UK is because they didn't feel the respect with outside. No one gives no one cares. Okay I'll go question. Then how much is your Self esteem or even yourself identity dependent on other respect from others whether it's personal or professional and financial renumeration for the work you've done. I think both is huge. In both cases there's a tremendous sense of guilt as a writer. I've never been able to you know I'm not gonNA lie. have been able to have my mother her feet up. That is a tremendous source of guilt. That's never gonNA go away on. I'M NOT GONNA lie about people that here this to be to understand the cost. The emotional cost is to be an artist. I sometimes the deep sense ashamed to have I wrote I won't name Your Organization allowed to buy did some work a couple of years ago for a world leading organization that broke records. They said you'll work has broken records spy fifteen times or expectation and we're not expecting it to go this far like it's been huge and I was like how can I do that and bring that much. Happiness Organization is readers not provide for those closest to me. I feel a deep sense of shame about that because if I don a job that was a consulting job or like a legal banking jobs which I had in my early Micra turned down. I can put my Mama House cla attire. Fifteen years earlier and I didn't do that I'm not his. I'm never going to forgive myself for that. I don't think not entirely even though you slay another gonNA forgive yourself. EPIC carried on this way. This is like the might scenario and you stayed at this level of a earning notoriety. Your would you be able to continue creating with the sense of shame within you. Can you make peace with that. I think that's the that's the perfect Fraser's can use. I think making peace. I think making pieces the key. Maybe that's the same as forgiveness so I don't know I think I look at all the things I tried to my writing. I actually think the best work hard work I turned down there were jobs I was offered. That didn't feel ethical. Go to our MOMS often. A lot of money last year bought other organizations to a huge piece of work for a sport organization who tried to use sports sport to basically why reputation and so they offered me a very large sum of money and I said no to it. Because I can't do that. Get conscious cannot be that guy that obviously coming. Because I'm seeing someone whose reputation is in the area unimpeachable the recruiting office this sometimes the capitalist goals and the articles artists goals a complete non-aligned. They were like let's get him. I said to my friend. I've got the tennis money. Donald I call up five my best friend and I said they've offered me this money. I know I have to say no. I'm just calling for courage to say no. I need people to know that this happened. I said I turned down anyway. I will buy need you to know these kinds the sacrifices that I make because they're really painful and I think it was wrong. Still the country that was commissioned the work I was going to do is responsible for the deaths afoul of people and they wanted to use my name and that is so painful. It's almost a cruel joke because it was the dream job tons of job SPEC but people paying it monsters so I said No. I'll never forget that and I think I didn't give myself enough credit for making those choices in my career. I think you should give yourself a loss of credit for that A- and I'm wondering if you didn't get paid anything at all road is still create stuff absolutely because even take a breath then absolutely because we live in a time where actually ideas and more important than money if you look at all the people right now who is scrambling. What are they screaming? Full voice for platform. That's why I told me Robinson's so frustrated he's been taken off these major social media sites. That's why aren banks in Brexit is throwing money at one. He hasn't voice whose voice people on social social media are basically holding people to account if we did not have. These amazing campaign is using social media. We'd be out of the UK We'd be you without the ideal. And I don't know where the weather listeners of this podcast align themselves politically. I don't know where the listeners in this podcast on this other cat. Ah That's fine you vote leave. You don't have to go to leave. It's not about that. The point is the people trying to take this country off a cliff. Dot happy entrusts US Thursday believe in mind which lie the whole time and the reason why we're we're out the EU yet without a deal is because of a voice and that's always he's creat because the importance of speaking with integrity and residents right now at a time of climate collapse the rising fascism. It's never been more important to create the now see. I totally agree with that. I'm when you talk about this. I'm listening you know what you said about same. I'm not being able. I'm just perhaps making peace with that but when you talk about with talk about your voice and the voice and being voice of people who haven't got the opportunity she to have a voice on the passion with which you talk about it doesn't that goes some way to erase some of your shame. I'm now oh I'm in a position of privileged position because I'm a white woman hair so I'm talking the very different way but I still think when you talk with such passion about what's what's needed for me. That alone is brilliant. Even if you will just living on marmite sandwiches for the rest of your life. It's so important. Aw I just I really appreciate first of all. Thank you for that at the same time it it has to be done. It has to be said you cannot turn a blind eye to this stuff you just call now icon. I've never been able to. I think it's one reason why I've been. Maybe a bit of a an arm's length proposition for over winners Asians. Because I'm just very frank about things not an aggressive or insincerity but just you have to say like I was talking to my. My relatives alerted hard to leave. And I said Look I get disaffected. You're going to all of the stuff I said but the things that you want to happen is all of this. Are they gonNA go your way and people you say. How can you speak to them as well and my relatives so the humans whether if dignity and I think it's strengthened my writing is hopefully people can read it and say this skype doesn't agree with me but he respects me as a human? He respects my dignity and that I think is essential even the people that would have me strung up. I respect that dignity and I mean literally strung up I mean the ones that were you know if I went into the wrong Paul my town off dark probably end up with the body intact..

UK writer. Canary Wharf London Deng Markham BBC tennis staff writer rape Donald I Tom Mitch Kip Berlin EU Mike Nutrition Paul
"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"In time Timbuktu itself began to prosper. Mussa built a palace there and spent an increasing amount of time in the city the population boomed and it's fame and renown as a cultural cultural center began to spread stories of a great city of gold known for its learning and advancement filtered across Europe and the Middle East scholars and historians and adventurers flocked to the city to see for themselves marveling at what Monson Mussa had created with his name in and his empire now increasingly known across Europe and the Middle East Mussa began establishing diplomatic relations with foreign countries trade which was already the backbone of the Empire's economy and wealth increased. Even more in time molly became the second largest empire of its day. Larger than Europe's Holy Roman Empire and second in size only to the Yuan Dynasty in China. It boasted more than four hundred cities and towns. John's as with his early days little is known of the final years of Monson. Mussa's life in thirteen thirty when Moussa was about Fifty Fifty Timbuktu was attacked by warriors from the Mossi Kingdom which was situated to the southeast of Mali. Moussa led his powerful army against these invaders Peter's and managed to expel them following this. He built a wall around the city. With a fort to protect it from future assaults. It was his last widely Lee known act as emperor shortly after Mussa died of unknown causes some time between thirteen thirty two and thirteen thirty seven. Even his son mcgann took the throne after him and ruled until thirteen forty one. He was then followed by his uncle. Mussa's younger brother Soleil Mom Tom Under these rulers and those who came after them the Malayan Empire began to crumble. None could match months Moose's charisma. Aw or his innate ability to lead the Empire's borders began to shrink and the great cities fell to ruin Timbuktu who was absorbed into the growing Song Guy Empire and eventually it to declined its buildings falling into rubble and its streets reclaimed. by The desert cert- by the early nineteenth century. The city was little more than a legend. With geographic societies offering large sums of money any to European explorers or adventurers. Who could rediscover it? By the time molly became a remote French colony in eighteen. Ninety two Mussa's Moussa's great empire was long gone and largely forgotten by the outside world. Monson Mussa was not only the richest just a person who ever lived. He was also a powerful leader. Who made a profound impact not just on molly and West Africa but on the larger known world his pilgrimage to Mecca became the stuff of legend passed down in oral history and written down by travelers and historians he spent bent so much gold on his journey that destabilize the entire Middle Eastern gold market it was severe in fact that it took a decade for prices to recover recover in Egypt? It's the only time in recorded history that a single individual and his spending has resulted in the destabilization of currency Eh. Though his empire crumbled after his death traces of his building campaign remain including one of the mosques he built in Timbuktu like all of the buildings designed by his principal architect. It was built entirely of earth and Straw. During his reign months. Mussa doubled the physical size of the Malian Empire. Expanding it to include parts of modern Mali Mauritania Burkina Foucault Senegal and I and Guinea furthermore trade tripled under his rule and the standard of living for his subjects surpassed the norms in Europe and the Middle East. Uh Archaeologist Ashley. John Hilary Goodwin has stated it can be said with fair certainty that the Malian Empire of the fourteenth century was far stronger stronger far richer far better organized and even more literate than any Christian power in Europe thanks to his prodigious wealth and his famous pilgrimage Mussa is credited with literally pudding molly on the map prior to his reign European map makers routinely marked West Africa Africa with drawings of fantastic beasts and empty desert's after Mussa's rain that all changed in fact in thirteen in thirty nine just a few years after Mussa's death molly was featured prominently on what would become the most famous map of the Middle Ages the so-called Catalan atlas of thirteen seventy five a six paneled work of art showing the entire known world at the time it shows molly and several of its cities including Yanni in Timbuktu. Mansa Moussa himself is depicted on the atlas he's shown sitting on a throne with a sceptre in one hand and a large gold coin in the other a caption states this lord is called Mussa so abundant is the gold old which is found in his country that he is the richest and most noble king in all the land..

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

09:24 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Coming up we'll explore one of the most famous pilgrimages in history and how it made months Mussa. Aw a household name across the Muslim world now back to the story in thirteen twenty three forty. The three year old Manson Mussa was at the height of his power. His Empire of Mali was in the midst of a golden age and Mussa had amassed a personal fortune that outstripped all of his predecessors on the throne. It was in that year of thirteen twenty three that Mussa began planning a pilgrimage to Mecca in fulfilment fulfilment of his duty as a Muslim he intended to put the full force of his prodigious wealth behind the journey from his capital city of Neon -I the pilgrimage midge would cover more than four thousand miles he planned on inspecting the resources of his many towns and mines along the way as possible so he chartered a journey journey. Along the most valuable trade route in the empire he would travel nearly a thousand miles northward into the Sahara. Then turn northeast. Just continue on to Cairo from Cairo. He would cross the Sinai desert and enter the Arabian Peninsula. The final leg would take himself and other seven hundred miles to Mecca the pilgrims with Mussa at their head set off on their journey in February of thirteen. Twenty four when Moussa was was about forty four years old as his predecessor Abubakari. The second had done Mussa named a deputy to lead the empire in his absence. He chose his oldest son Mulligan who was probably in his twenties at the time he also left his best general in charge of the military taking his second in command on the pilgrimage. Instead Moose's wife a woman named in our economic came with him on the journey and brought along five hundred servants servants. That's a Lotta servants. Yes it is but it's nothing. Compared to her husband's retinue Mussa is said to have brought along twelve thousand servants servants including five hundred. Whose job was simply to carry golden staffs and walk in front of him? The rest carried his bank account for pounds. Gold bars each joining. This huge entourage were eight thousand soldiers and Cavalry to protect the caravan on its journey. In addition to at them another forty thousand people came along for the trip including government officials wealthy nobles and their families and servants and every day Molly Ivins who wanted to make the hajj in addition to the servants who carried gold bars. Some eighty to a hundred camels were loaded with three hundred pounds. Hounds each of gold dust. Gold Dust measured in Wade was the preferred form of currency in the empire. All told it's estimated that Mussa traveled with about a billion dollars worth of gold as the caravan got underway. The going was slow with so how many people it was impossible to make more than a few miles each day in every town and village they pass through. Mussa commissioned the building of a mosque leaving enough gold to pay for the materials and construction. It took nearly six months to reach Cairo upon their arrival. The caravan setup a tent hence city near the Pyramids while Mussa and his retinue made a grand entrance into the sprawling Egyptian capital but when he was taken to meet the powerful powerful Sultan there was a problem. Egypt's Selden at the time was a man named all messier. Muhammad is deputy informed Mussa. Who says that any visitor to the sultan was required to bow and kiss the ground before him Mussa knowing good and well that he was not only wealthier but also ruled a larger kingdom in the sultan flat out refused? Very little is known about Mansa Moussa as a person but it's clear that he guarded his own indignity and Royal Majesty. He wouldn't grovel before anyone but not meeting with powerful Gypsy consultant while Mussa was in Cairo. ARRO- was simply not an option. They seem to be at an impasse until Mussa finally had a bright idea. He agreed bow in the Salton Hiltons presence but to characterize it as bowing before Allah with the matter of protocol settled Mussa and the sultan met and and Mussa was formally invited into the city. He ended up staying three months in Cairo resupplying. His Caravan and spending prodigiously in the city's marketplace's during his long stay in Cairo. Word of his wealth and power began to spread into the larger Arab world exactly as he intended his generosity and extravagance quickly became legendary finally in the fall of thirteen. Twenty twenty four. The Caravan moved out of Cairo and headed westward into Arabia. It passed through the sacred city of Medina. Where the Prophet Mohammed was was buried? Mussa prayed at his tomb and left an offering of forty mule loads worth of gold dust. Then the party moved on to Mecca arriving arriving as planned in time for the festivities of that year's Hajj Mecca was the one place where Mussa wasn't allowed to show off his finery and wealth all pilgrims Grimm's on the hajj are required to wear the same undecorated white gowns. Mussa and his people join the throngs of pilgrims for week of prayer ceremonies and celebrations when it was over Mussa stayed for a while in Mecca. which was the religious cultural and academic center of the Muslim world? He recruited routed numerous people to return with him to Mali. Including architects scholars. Theologians artists and writers. He'd succeeded in making his empire fire wealthy in gold now he wanted to make it wealthy in knowledge and culture too but not all was well on the home front all throughout his pilgrimage. Mussa had been receiving regular reports from messengers who travelled along roads between his capital and the Middle East while he was still in Mecca. He received word that a rebellion had broken out in one of Mali's eastern provinces. This convinced him that it was time to go home. The Caravan began retracing. Its route back to Cairo. Despite starting off with thousands of pounds of gold and gold dust Mussa had managed to spend did all on his lavish pilgrimage as a result when he got back to Cairo he was forced to take a large loan to fund the rest of the trip. Home while this this was good news for Egypt which had seen the value of gold depreciate after Mussa's first visit the summer before he'd spent so much gold it had flooded the market market and driven the value of gold down by nearly twenty percent but when he took out a huge loan with interest prices rebounded deciding he needed to get home home quickly to see to the rebellion. Mussa opted to take a different route home from Cairo heading South West through the most desolate and arduous portion of the Sahara. Hera when he arrived back in his empire he discovered probably to his great delight that his generals had already put down the rebellion and captured more territory in the process process. This included the large and important trading center of Timbuktu on the Niger River once he arrived back in his capital of neon Mussa immediately took gold out of his treasury to pay off the enormous loan. He taken back in Cairo. The bankers had loaned him the money had expected to make a fortune and interest instead he paid off the loan in one installment ruining the bankers hopes and flooding the Egyptian market again with gold. Now about forty six years old and debt free Mussa turned his attention to improving the infrastructure of his booming empire MM pyre he immediately put to work all the architects artists scholars and skilled laborers. that he brought with him back from Mecca and Cairo. His new principal architect was a thirty five year old Spaniard. He'd met in Cairo named Abraham. Also holly a poet and intellectual as well as an architect architect also. Holly began building campaign throughout Mali. That transformed the towns and villages under Moose's direction also. Holly built a large mosque. Ask in Timbuktu. That became the home of a new university. Mussa endowed with thousands of books and manuscripts. He'd obtained on his pilgrimage. It soon became became a center of learning equal to its counterparts in the rest of the world at its height it had twenty five thousand students learning everything from mathematics and medicine to astronomy history and philosophy Timbuktu's library surpassed anything in Egypt or the Middle East. In fact under Mussa it grew to become one of the largest libraries in the world with more than a million books and manuscripts.

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Of any powerful king it also kept his subjects happy and Mussa knew that word would spread of his benevolence and majesty hosting feasts and giving away. Gold was a quick and easy way to earn appreciation but Mussa knew that improving the livelihood of his people. People was the best way to earn a lasting reputation as the trade routes flourished in his early years on the throne. His subjects began to thrive in addition to gold mines. Molly was rich. In farmland and rivers as the economy boomed food was abundant. Mussa subjects were well-fed. Oh Fed well educated well clothed and had a high standard of living compared to their European counterparts who often lived in abject misery especially especially as the trade caravans began to bring in more than just salt imports began to arrive from as far away as Europe Persia and even China. These included everything from spices and silks to handmade tools fine fabrics and Arabian horses in exchange for these goods from across the known world molly exported not just gold but also copper copper was especially prized in the land south of Mali where they made brass us from copper and zinc a valuable copper mine. On the eastern edge of molly had been annexed several decades earlier by Mussa's predecessor Mansa Mansa Sakura but being operated by the rebellious tauregs taxes and fees hadn't always been paid that all changed with Mussa's campaign to pacify pacify the tauregs early in his reign. Trade in copper increased tax revenue began flowing in Moosa would later state. There is nothing in in all my empire which is such a large source of taxes as this coppermine and those taxes are how Mussa really built his legendary legendary wealth as salt copper silks livestock and countless other trade goods poured into and out of the empire. All of of it was subject to taxation every marketplace had a royal tax collector assigned to it and every town had financial officer to oversee the king's things business there the goal began to pile up and Moussa's treasury used it to fund military campaigns to expand the empire's borders broadening his reputation as a successful military leader and by putting more lands under Mali's control Mussa brought even more wealth into the nation under Mansa Moussa Molly had entered a true golden age. It was at the height of this golden age around the year. Thirteen twenty three. That Mussa decided he was ready to be officially introduced to the world. By this time he'd been at the helm of Mali's Empire for eleven years and he was was about forty three years old. He brought his advisors together and asked them to begin planning a grand pilgrimage to Mecca in the Arabian Peninsula. Every Muslim awesome is required to make the hajj at least once in their lifetimes as a particularly devout ruler. Mussa was especially eager to go. Furthermore for any medieval Muslim ruler who wanted to be known far and wide taking the hajj was a vital necessity. Not only did it fulfil a religious this requirement but it was an opportunity to display wealth power and prestige and Mussa had every intention of outdoing any sultan ruler or king. who had come before him? He was determined to make his pilgrimage. One for the history books.

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"As unique as the pups themselves and sure to bring you closer to the furry friend in your life so get ready to sit. Stay stay and rollover with excitement for podcasts. endearing series dog tales listened to dog tales. Free on spotify. Or wherever. You get your podcasts outcasts. Now back to the story. Around the year thirteen twelve Konkan Hong Kong Mussa became the emperor of Molly when his predecessor Abubakari. The second failed to return from exploration of the Atlantic Ocean Mussa. There was about thirty two years old at the time he had spent his early life in the background. Biding his time now. He stepped onto the world. Stage the exact circumstances surrounding the transfer of power are not clear but by thirteen twelve Mussa and his family had moved into the Royal Palace in the capital city of neon e and Mussa began running the empire. One of the first issues facing him was the problem of lawlessness particularly securely along the trade routes trade was the backbone of Mali's economy isolated in west Africa from the power centers of Europe and the Middle East. Molly relied on very long. Trade routes which branched off from the Empire in almost all directions used by travelers as well as trade caravans over the years. These routes had become infested with crime nomadic torok tribesmen prayed on the traders and travellers. Sometimes they would require told to pass other times. They would attack a party outright killing travelers and taking their goods they were even known to attack a town or village college in the immediate area. For years the situation had severely limited trade and travel to and from the isolated empire this was especially true on the Western trade route that ran northward across the Sahara to Morocco. From there it would pass across north Africa and into the Middle East. This was the vital artery tamales economic heart because the most abundant salt mines were situated along this Western trade route. Molly was awash in gold old but lacked salt. Trading gold for salt was one of the primary sources of income for the Empire as a result. Mussa was determined to establish I safe passage for his trade caravans. He wanted to be the richest and most powerful Emperor Africa had ever seen and he knew that gold and other trade goods were the way to make that happen. Molly had a military of about one hundred thousand men including nearly ten thousand was and mounted soldiers in the cavalry leading. His men into battle. Mussa attacked the brigands and desert nomads. Who played the trade routes within the empire he was able to drive them back into the desert and away from the caravans but all his work wasn't done at the tip of a sword? Musso was widely known for his negotiating initiating skills which he put to use with Tauregs by paying them off he insured. They would steer clear of the trade routes allowing Molly's economy to swell clearing the countryside and trade routes of crime not only boosted the Empire's economy but one praise and renowned for Mussa. He had passed his first test is emperor and was increasingly seen as not only a wise and effective administrator but a successful military leader as well with his empire cleared of Brigands Monson. Mussa turned his attention to matters of religion a devout Muslim who is likely well educated in the Karan when he began using the country's growing wealth to build mosques. One legend go so far as to say that he commissioned a new mosque. Every Friday of his reign and while Islam had been practiced among Mali's royals and elites for centuries many of the Empire's peasants and commoners still practiced older forms himself traditional African religion Mussa issued edicts for millions to convert Islam. He reinforced this by building. Numerous religious schools this he knew would help spread the teachings of Mohammed to new generations of Malians whose parents were still steeped in the old ways but he also knew how to balance his is deep piety with his commitment to the secular health of the empire when news of his edicts trickled down to the one Gara gold miners in the south of the empire. They didn't take it well. Located in the modern area of burkina-fasso in Ghana the one Gara were staunchly loyal. To their way of life and the leaves they rebelled against Mussa's edict convert initiating. What later generations would call a labor strike? They had no intention of converting to Moose's who says religion which these people of the land likely saw as a vehicle of the elite as the very foundation of Mali's economy. These gold miners liners knew they had a lot of clout. The strike became a standoff. As Mussa's government insisted on carrying out his decree and the strikers responded by refusing to work Mussa's more hawkish ministers advised him to lead the army to the southern provinces and force the miners to go back to work. DOC but Mussa didn't dare advice instead he gave into the miners demands. Exempting them from the requirement to convert to Islam a ED promptly went back to work and the flow of gold returned. His decision was viewed and widely retold as an example of his great wisdom through it. He sent a message to his people that he was willing to listen to them. And do what was in their best interest and that of the nation on a much more personal level all it showed that despite his piety Mussa was willing to bend the rules if he thought it would negatively impact his wealth and status archaeologist Ashley. John Hilary Goodwin has stated that for Mussa Islam was more than just prayers and scripture readings. It was also a way of bringing his empire into the modern age and gaining respect for himself in the cultural centers of the Middle East. None of that would have been possible without his gold mines. So when they rebelled against against his attempt to convert them Mussa wisely allowed the miners to retain their traditional beliefs building. Wealth and power was one one thing but Mussa was also intent on displaying it. He likes to play the part of the Aloof and majestic ruler. He was acutely aware era of the importance of public perception. If you wanted to be a strong and powerful king you had to look and act the part. And that's just what what Mussa did he conducted the business of the empire from top a magnificent Ebony throne on a pedestal in the courtyard of the palace the throne own was flanked by two upright ivory tusks which were potent symbols of power. Retinue of armed guards stood in a row behind him When Mussa entered the courtyard trumpets and drums would announce his entrance once he was seated a large curtain was drawn revealing him in his splendor on the throne? The assembled crowd was expected to show proper deference to the king. They arrived wearing dirty clothes. As freshly freshly laundered garments were considered disrespectful to the king's own spotless elegance when the curtain was raised they went to their knees and bow their heads to the ground ground then they took handfuls of dust and ported over themselves. As a way of groveling. Before Mussa's resplendent resplendent majesty only Mussa gave a signal. Could they finally rise into a sitting position on the ground in front of his race thrown. Once the proper respect it had been paid Mussa would begin conducting. The business of the court. Servants would stand by his side shading him with large woven umbrellas and fanning him from the heat of the African Sun. A herald with a booming voice repeated his words to the gathered audience. The Herald was a close advisor the emperor and wore robes of rich fabric and a specially decorated turban. He carried a sword at his waist and held to ceremonial spears. One one of gold and silver heralds were chosen from among the lower classes. This was so that he could never outshine the emperor's dignity with his own family connections. As a general rule. Mussa never spoke publicly to anyone but his heralds if he needed to say something to someone else the Herald spoke on his behalf. On court days. Petitioners would come from all over the empire to have Mussa rule on legal matters and settle disputes from his throne took reports from his ministers and issued orders and commands he also oversaw religious and secular ceremonies on feast days. He he wrote out to a specially designated field on horseback arriving as always to the sounds of trumpets and drummers he was accompanied by a retinue who of soldiers each decked out in gleaming armor and carrying swords and spears gold and silver decorated their scabs quivers and arrows everything gleaming in the African Sun after Mussa arrived the festivities would begin entertainment during the feasting included singers dancers servers music and acrobats. The Herald would recite epic poems about the history of Mali and the exploits of the emperor. Mussa for his part would give away gold to the assembled masses most of us these festivals as a way to display his wealth splendor and generosity. All of which were were expected trades.

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Konkan Mussa was born around twelve eighty ce into the family that founded founded the Malayan Empire as Monsa or emperor he would go on to become not just the wealthiest man of his generation but the wealthiest person listen who ever lived adjusted for inflation modern estimates put his fortune around four hundred billion dollars. That's that's a lot of money yes it is. In fact it's more than today's three richest people combined the only other historical figure who comes even close. This is John. D. Rockefeller the nineteenth century oil magnate whose estimated to have been worth around three hundred eighty billion in today's dollars. Mussa lead molly. During the height of its golden age expanding the Empire's borders spreading the teachings of Islam and cleaning up the corruption that had proliferated rated for decades few people in the broader medieval world. had heard of molly before Mussa came to power but by the time he died his name and his empire the stuff of Legend but reaching that height of wealth and of the fame that came with it had never been guaranteed for Konkan Mussa. Despite being related to the imperial family the Kingdom of Molly emerged the eleven hundreds as one of several Islamic Kingdoms wyndhams in west Africa that rose up from the ashes of the Ghana Empire. By the time Konkan Mussa was born around twelve. Eighty his grandfather Abubakari Luba Cari ruled over a vast empire. Molly stretched over a thousand miles from east to west covering a wide swath of Saharan and sub sub-saharan West Africa that included both the Senegal and Niger River valleys. The Empire had control of gold mines near the southern border which were operated by the longer people molly also had well established trade routes in gold and salt adding to their considerable wealth. Konkan Mussa was probably born in the royal palace in the capital city of Neon. -I the name. He was given as Arabic for Moses born into privilege. He was in and direct line for the throne but all that fell apart when young Mussa was just five years old in twelve eighty five. His grandfather grandfather abubakari died. How he died is not known but his son Moose's father foggy Leah didn't take the throne after him instead? Usurper named Sikora seized power. The circumstances surrounding Sikora's rise. Our mystery was Mussa's father already dead by by then. Did Sikora defeat him in battle. The historical record provides few answers. What is known is that Sikora was a former slave who we'd been freed and had risen to become a prominent General Tomasa Sunday Yata and his successors under his rule as MONSA? The empire began to to expand again. As the general turned emperor retook the lands that his predecessors had lost he revived their dwindling trade routes and return molly he to its former glory where con con Mussa was during this time or what he was doing is lost history. Nothing in fact is known of his Childhood Hood or upbringing aside from his connections to the imperial family and that he had at least one younger brother named Sulaiman. We also know Oh that around twelve ninety eight months. A Kura decided to go on the hajj. The annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca West Africa had begun to convert sort is llamas. Several hundred years earlier by the time the Malian Empire came into prominence in the twelve. Hundreds Islam was well established among the ruling in classes Mansa Uli some forty years earlier had taken the hajj as well but on his way back home to molly. MSA Secures Party was was attacked by bandits and the emperor was murdered wanting to reestablish the ruling family on the Empire's thrown the Imperial Council looked to a nephew a few of the empire's founder Sunday Outta this nephew named cow took the throne around the year. Thirteen hundred Konkan Mussa so was about twenty years old thirteen hundred and it's not known whether the Council considered him for the position. Having been the grandson of a former MONSA. It's possible he was considered too young to take the throne at that time. Moussa was probably living comfortably. In neon -I completing his education this would have included mastering several languages including Arabic and becoming proficient in Islamic history and theology as a member of the imperial family. Mussa must have also learned how to lead and govern. He would likely have had lessons in things. Like Science History Geometry and economics given his known appreciation for scholarly pursuits. While Mussa was busy completing his education. His relatives ruled an increasingly wealthy and powerful empire in thirteen. o five months ago was followed on the throne by his son. Mohammed when Muhammad died died around thirteen ten he was followed by a man named Abubakari. How this second Bukhari was related to the Royal Family's not clear ear but evidence suggests he was either a grandson or grandnephew of the first emperor? Mon- says Sunday Yada the only biographical information mation historians have on a Bukhari. The second comes from a story told by con Mussa himself which was written down a few years after his death. According to Mussa Abubakari the second was a dreamer and explore intent on continuing to expand his new empire. He dreamed voyaging waging into the Atlantic Ocean and colonizing the places. He found their one hundred fifty years before Christopher Columbus was born Abubakari. Sorry the second was convinced. There was land beyond the Great Western Ocean. In the first year of his reign. Mansa Abubakari sent four four hundred ships out from the western coast of Africa on an exploratory mission to see if they could find the other side of the ocean. Several months later a single ship returned telling a story that must have kindled. Boubacar is spirit of adventure. The captain claimed that the ships came upon what he called a river in the ocean with a powerful current. The other ships went on ahead. But this particular captain stayed back. When none of the other other ships returned he finally turned eastward and headed back home? According to Mussa Abubakari immediately began planning a second journey this time he wanted to see for himself exactly what the captain was talking about. He built a thousand ships to carry himself and his men and then built another thousand to carry all their supplies. It was customary among the emperors of Mali to publicly name a deputy to oversee the the empire when they were away on military or diplomatic expeditions. abubakari chose thirty two year. Old Konkan Mussa to take care of things in his absence. How the two men were related is not known? Although Mussa was likely a nephew or cousin as a member of the ruling family he was probably already working in government in some way Mussa was also probably there on the western shore in thirteen twelve to see the great armada of ships. Tips embark on their grand journey. He would later state. I became the master of Molly because my predecessor refused to believe that the ocean was infinite. He assigned to me his authority and power until such day as he should return a two day. No one has ever seen him again. COMING UP WE'LL EXPLORE CON con Mussa's reign as the the emperor of Molly. 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"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Historical Figures

"In the following story dates names often differ among primary sources. When the correct name was in question we went with the most widely accepted English version when dates are in doubt we use the timeline offered in the book Monson Mussa in Timbuktu by Charles River editors in the summer of thirteen twenty four and extravagant and lavish procession paraded through the western gate of Cairo? The thriving capital of Egypt at the head of this procession was a line of five hundred men dressed in richly woven fabrics of purple green and Crimson. Each man held six pounds. Staff made a pure gold following these heralds came a splendid rider on a stately. Black Lack Arabian thoroughbred. The writer wore a red tunic. Stitched with golden threads and impossibly wide silk pants. A A sign of His Majesty and power on his head sat a gold skullcap. The man's gold and silver jewelry glittered in the afternoon after noon son. The writer saw thousands of onlookers packing the streets to get a glimpse of him. He tossed them gold coins by the handful behind him. Came more riders on fine horses dancers in rich silks servants decked in colorful headdresses and hundreds of camels Dell's loaded with enormous sacks of gold. And this was just. The vanguard camped outside the city were sixty thousand IOS and more men women and children a moving city that had just crossed the Sahara desert. The distance of California two main it. It all belong to the man on the splendid Arabian Horse Monster. Mussa Emperor of Molly the richest mayhem..

"musa" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

Chicago's Business Authority

09:13 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

"It it shouldn't hurt to urinate one six a man she's me one at a six man will get prostate cancer in his lifetime. most of the other guys will develop some sort of BPH are benign prostate hypertrophy. and this is something that you hear that well everyone's going to get at some point and some will stay like while they're in a wait as if nothing could be done. well there's a lot that can be done to prevent it are there lots of guys in their eighties and nineties that have no prostate issues at all. so today we're going to talk about is okay with the symptoms of prostate issues and how to avoid them so that you're not one of those guys that gets it because what I'm finding is now men as young as their mid to late twenties. are getting some form of a prostate issue. and they go to a doctor's office typically serologist. they're getting you know put on either some cipro or some other medication and is poor guys are gonna be on this stuff for life. and it may sound like it's no big deal but it's something that affects a lot of men and once this process starts it reduces the satisfaction from sex it makes it very uncomfortable your name so a lot of guys now find at the drink less water with a totally change your lifestyle just because the the pain from urinating interferes with so many other you know activity Saturday or function. certain symptoms that guys will report is that you go to a basically get urinal the go to urinate. ed nothing happens so they're slow to start urinating. or when they do start to urinate the stream is very let's say a week or slower then they remember when they were younger. there could be a inconsistent movement patterns of as far as like the star to urinate and it stops and starts again were they stop urinating and then maybe a few seconds later a bunch of your and dribbles out. or when they do your innate there's pain. so all of that stuff is stuff that should not be happening. do symptoms are symptoms that can be avoided by following certain lifestyle decisions earlier on and so gonna do today is kind of go over some of them. we'll start first with some nutrition stuff because it seems to me that this is real quick easy stuff that guys can DO of one food source that you almost never hear talked about. is a sun dried tomatoes another one is one of melon now you probably heard about eating cooked dark tomato paste to catch up with things like that in a common thing with those foods is the octane lycopene and like pain seems to be very beneficial for a prostate. another food source that seems to be really good for the prostate is Brazil nuts even wheat bread could work too and foods are naturally high in selenium what they do is it provides the backbone for making antioxidants that reduce information in a prostate that could dramatically. reduce symptoms that you know link to pain with urination and stuff like that. two why would guys get inflammation of prostate to begin with is a question I often get asked and essentially the the tissue the prostitutes pretty dense so you don't get all the blood flow there that she would maybe another tissues so once an infection it it should say takes a while for information to kind of started there and build up to the point that you feel it. what can cause stat inflammation could be something like a viral infection a bacterial infection so for example men that have multiple partners you've been exposed to lots of different organisms from the different partners and those organisms they may not be healthy for you so an organism that may not be affecting another person could be something that's irritating or inflammatory to you as an organism grows inside to prostate it's going to create some information that information's going to draw some fluid or some water type substances there and this can increase swelling which can lead to the pain or pressure when you urinate that you feel. so minimizing multiple partners warm wearing a condom if you're gonna have multiple partners would be one way to minimize the exposure of the urinary track and a prostate two organisms from other bodies. other thing to look at is things like. sweet. if you're not getting enough sleep. Musa storm will be weaker and she'll be more open season two organisms of any kind anywhere in the body so you'll be less likely to fight off an organism that's making a switch your prostate now in order to prevent let's say there was some organism. exposure one way to prevent organisms from growing we're sticking to the lining of the urinary tract is we know data cranberry my guess as a fruit the most people probably consume it as a juice provides a number of substances that make it difficult for bacteria and certain other organisms to stick to the lining of the inner urinary tract so basically every time you urinate you can eliminate some of these organisms and by eliminating the organisms then you gonna be less likely to have issues you know in the future. some other things to consider a certain nuts like walnuts almonds pistachios some of these knots have fatty acids that seem to have a mild anti inflammatory properties on throughout the body but particularly in the prostate. and so ingesting these nuts they will provide health benefits for multiple ports and body like your joints but specifically in this context looking at it as a way of reducing inflammation another food dad's got a lot of ability behind it for fighting prostatitis is garlic is really interesting research that in a put rats on cipro. not all the rats respond to Sir pro Pfaff like the human equivalent of prostatitis when they put those same rats on cipro and garlic the response is way better. so there's certain natural antibiotic properties are anti microbial properties of garlic that scene and hand certain medications so rather than stand on let's say several for the rest of your life which you could do is let your doctor know Hey I'm gonna be taking things like garlic and and see that the time that you need to be honest Shipp probably much less instead of being on a for several months you will need as long. now the substance it's getting attention for treating prostatitis is curcumin we've recently started using a a research based Kerr command that provides like ten thousand times more curcumin to the body than other types of Kirk men like you would get in the store and the results have been really impressive people tell me no aches lover body are gone but specifically to prostatitis issues are way down its forces symptoms experiencing with pain and stuff like that. so some things that could be done to make sure you get control of your prostate so it doesn't affect you in a way that reduces the enjoy man or quality of your life so one of weight. avoid doing things that are going to aggravate the prostate like having sex with multiple partners and there's unprotected sex or self yet are you deaf in one where condom to minimize the microbial exposure you can consume foods like sun dried tomatoes Brazil nuts garlic the drinking cranberry juice I recommend organic cranberry juice that doesn't have any added sugar I'm gonna have a very tart taste to it but you can mix that with another type produce like freshly squeezed orange juice if you want to get more of a. better flavor profile you can even thirty cranberry juice in this movie if you want a by ingesting no substances and by you know just a lifestyle that's one way to make sure that you reduce prostate symptoms going forward where if you don't have any symptoms it's one way to make sure you don't.

Musa
"musa" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

30:58 min | 1 year ago

"musa" Discussed on Think Again

"This episode them lula gear. You clearly insana be bonani abban. Josh tarantula john shitless donald donald dawson guichard the tide do should be shares be eerily cheat machine which teach senator diabetes inhere talk looney should hear applauded consc- karan's italia cheang america shade that shinde bet mochi luke top when i need to cook unpredictable mosser other to get theon unambitious top the kid stop the move is the num- show side to gimmick of the a young shortsighted honey and ben good glad to be kicked up. All liam shouldn't be hard to get the cheap to gimme gimme up two year limit yours among or a bangles up miscellaneous benintendi leave. This is dishonest in his armies meet. The sinn is down the on board by sarah museum on or near a sit european on wanted or anita. Is yanni much the yemane oslo-based. Let me eighty giora missing. Shonda unbe should get there. She took his tom o. Doll teaching kids cigarette psyche much kinison keep you you look it up awesome. That should only on b._b. Gbi the raffin and coo to read the nasa. Keep france's more pla tunnel ma let the costumes are trenched up blood buddha canaan and on the mamba yanni number these answers that will not lead we wear your and she threw yemane mealy entity yemane jaw shoulders. I'ma look it up up to chair. The chair set on donor. Surely gordon year end regular celje mcnabb's book about yanni moved who you're getting said muslims together so he says that nationalities constructs as files a cuisines scenes concern. You can't really talk about turkish cuisine or cuisine and that cuisine. There aren't cuisines of nations their cuisines of geographies. The reason why the book is called turkish cookbook is because it's not published in turkey and it's published for turkish readers. It's published for english shooting audiences or readers and that's why it's called the turkish book and if it were to be published. I hear he would call it. Local and traditional recipes not turkish is united says when you you look at a cuisine or whatever it is from a foreign perspective than you call it turkish or or french or whatever it is but as a person living in turkey you don't think to yourself. Let me turkish food today. That's the food. I wanted to say that national well and geographical borders are of course porous. He was telling us earlier that okra came to turkey from central africa which which i was very surprised to learn possibly from slaves during the ottoman empire and i guess i wanted to ask about whether and and how he does the work of trying to figure out where the strains of influence have come from given that the traditions are mostly oral not written down. How do you do that ethnographic figure out what's hittite for example. If there's anything left of the hittites lab <hes> zelic pitchy in game each may lead patriot when koyna sutton tom the ball how much chin yang europe's yanni jalen derogation gillan lima or movies intrusive his initial balmier bomb being used the sinica mummy tunnel majeure majority of the years but tara. I'm jay but goosen mm-hmm domanski for hsueh-liang potisk. Come up salary mubarak. Thank you bill saves. Hillary share kebir all citizens you use them. Don teens h._p. She popped up. Don't or the high any up there seem to show frank kim she recited gabby topic victims young tamil machine and you'll shrink any ski coin was that napa that made the mistake would be truck trump on number two on them to clean up. Let we should jura ah onion any big mall dooms among or mini stomach tiny really can't shaw so we learn from dancer in shame kilom- origin solutions we do strategic sorta lunch machine used to move us and lebanon tobar and burley beer. She stayed grenade can be on my son who kinda plan. W workers listen to you. Cheetah la jeune is mature. He'd been secretly mm-hmm. Stop blah blah blah just during each year of secrecy the kid lounge chairs that don't dominators you wear your honey or the dr by your so walmart. It cut a bed what she named that tommy tommy hamadeh mukunda get them a better gillard choke on number. Should your book on the data comes in an m._d. Yelling kulu in nin- door to share aw honey chargeable they made us take your modulus and dodge new chemistry that she did. He make the donald them one hundred mumia. She said it took me a may. Wanna you may from what advocate yanni only to usual tunnel russian. You're the issue on. Domo toronoto was each surrogate for tumble returnable. Neither kinda. Tom eaters so this is something that they've very strongly focused on and <hes> <hes> <unk> they do research original documents quite carefully and thoroughly to see what names <music> of products vegetables and and <hes> als and what names of dishes exists so he knows that bomb mia didn't exist this in turkish cuisine in balmier means okra in thirteen hundred because it's just not there there is no document whatsoever that includes that word they see it for the first time in seventeen hundreds so they thoroughly research and scan original documents these could be the palace ultimately empires palace documents it could be documents could be any kind of documents and and not only do they try to establish a history of ingredients and materials in the cuisine but they also are trying to correct mistaken can information inaccurate information that sometimes is widespread. I talked a little bit while we were eating the food that he chose for us ignorantly about what it was not knowing and you can translate that damn if there's anything any little stories or little details that he might want to share about the process or the history culture behind them. Shouldn't it be done humane. You mean the c._d. Through day whoa similar rick honey coveney committee's honey optimistic. You're surely be making the american philosophy on their mendel. Neutral jinx and cousins dylan trump was on your make a kayak larva who's really difficult reconduct up on a show and shame luanda luanda off. She called the topical travelers colella daily on taylor the honey mooners mahal get it you know can they then will not let mommy talk shady shady pulled london cleanup gillette the second cd william e the chain them the rejected that lopa lapus easterner shame coach mom sean carnage darshana trenches and they're gonna be bagging. Mish large won't be burgum all mesh australia day all the the mitch ostra day truck guests and they should be better than their who's bomb mea me off auguste slash when adults who himslef burly shaved a cage chemists detroit trump park partly similar partly land chapel kinison their shade that all muscle must guinot dounia junior medina who tell her that she's gonna sugar out. They came up orthodox. Ah yup to yarmuk resilient on tuck ya ledge josh. How do you say this to shake. Who say we let ashir sudesh borakove. Mitch mccoy must be all on what could be the toll goo shoot did the miss yameen seasonable w mark minton turning it will da ah australia llamas shula shlomo australia mulama sir hi shawn massa uh champ gabby op la la certainly old for sheila mahara hush on sold all of that jesus jesus co loop extent sums up your own schnitt jamesy. It was the oliver better or not. We'll meet the cherries kafka screw who can then in all muscle mass may some day uniquely the mclamb check yet washington dennis and cook could the gentleman a man yanni a you picked the eternal though merkel's mcdermot walk the dog do nato all on him zetino being all of a sudden it is buddha ame men had a ios cook in rona cool 'cause learners the bull mcclair us and this is the part part d take him a key part only really only the dole olma iran tiso non near kushtia young the move would not to get your yes tauzin on it. She quehacer terry muthu schaffner's so he he told me what each <hes> thing that we ate <hes> consists of i don't know if i should tell them all one by one one what the general idea is that there are many different versions of each of these recipes depending ending on where you go so you know sometimes they cook it with meat. Sometimes they cook it without meat and for example pull the okra dish that we ate is from some academic research that people at the magazine conducted it did come from <unk> africa to the ottoman empire and then it split into two different recipes one with one without meat and the name is slightly slightly different. Sometimes they use certain types of spices depending on which region nine non is meant and sometimes different spices so you get to have a variety of versions of the same same food changing slightly from region to region or location to location which enriches the whole cuisine. The last thing that i want to ask is sort of a two part question maybe a three part question but while we were taping we were drinking. Turkish coffee and mussa quietly returned his cup over which to me indicates an ivan did the same lee which to me indicates reading the grounds of the coffee two things one one. I wanted to ask about this. Tradition of coffee ground reading. What's interesting about it to me. Is that at least as i've encountered it. It's unlike anything we have in my culture in so far as it seems like people kind of part believe. I don't believe it's like a game nada game but everyone or many many people know how to do it especially women. It seems and then secondly whether shall we do that here. Y'all send a booby two hundred honey tear up he did do they showers junction kennedy mulu made ski does not more than the minimum can shut them car in on should i you miss offi covet their dennis soon a belief you keep a gallon chill sean sean benchers carmen newson and he chew receptacle donor should be vice-captain sheep congregate honey a you watched the corner club kush clear that your child sean and he's made car tariff among among us and data michigan they did go to your your the killary on konami. You showed you really the the hustle. Is it again. Dan shave at us. Welcome laura denison mama dada the ball shnell muslim on that oslo cool cool llamas that the shooting shot at tisch every shane nicholson shot to donor miss berlin two j. louis charge to the united water hunting a hunting call trucks all dossier dossier poon yang appalled the shaky laibach the shaky larry nicola the canal sinful. Nobody would the moose as now has offered to read my coffee and we'll do that. We'll be you you mush miami. You much economic choke discontent chain. We sent you <hes> had great. Financial troubles seems like nowadays. It's getting results. Stuff is getting better. Berlin is some saana this could be goes. Goes named chandler goes the chamois or good you missing manga curriculum spot lamont saw somebody look at you. Evil lie patched you you. You actually push it away. But you haven't destroyed yet. You need to destroy totally popped up my darpa mccomb number certainly them moore the key dot com or get again trump really your ladder <hes> <hes> and you get to see succumb to libya berle over then <hes> to us more the key shake leaguer so when there's this explosion this distraction will happen on. It's a pretty frustrating area. You should be you beware of that. Don't go there. There are many different aways things that could happen there. Stay out of that area russia them although susan it dims ms year in the us in tampa ten <unk> who's look hot <hes> uh will burn the regime toppled good other than the struggle area which is related a to whatever it is that you are trying to resolve the res- is super clear easy happy good the them be shaker besides sound me a number between one and three the bilas get you because you're roy are too ambitious. Keep your feet on the ground while you are. You're setting up. Your girls calls so by the way we're hearing. The evening called appear in this stumble at the window. Do you want to translate wait. What he said about coffee culture. He said about coffee first of all is that's a whole different book you can write about coffee but but as far as reading the copy copies concern right now it's part therapy part gossip parts giving information formation that you don't want to give directly but implying stuff and that was how it was in early as people who worked for rich rich families in istanbul in you know in the old days used to read coffee leaves to explain what they wanted what they wish for to the people that they worked for things that they couldn't say directly. It was used a lot for gossiping purposes for example. Van mussa was a child. It was understood that if somebody visits you at home if they drink the water before coffee that meant that they were hungry hungry so you were supposed to offer food to them if they drag the coffee i but the water afterwards you didn't need to offer food so there are many many different ways that coffee was and is still used in the turkish culture but it's a huge n._j._i._t. I can't complete the explain now okay. I will try to read missile sculpture. Let's see what i can make of this all right all right breath. I should say that. I have zero experience with this well. I mean what i see here. There is a i mean this is sort of like reading cloud. What i see here is a structure and it seems to me that this structure picture is this kind of multifaceted thing that moussa's trying to do with the restaurants and with the book and and all of these kind of unified project. It's got many different many different pieces and it's like open. It's open to the sky. There is much room for it to grow still but it is clearly like the architectural <music> outline is there and the direction in which it's headed is clear beyond that i'm going they ask him is that enough to any thoughts on that. Good job in choke possibly could should make awesome. Thank him so much for his time and for all of this and for being on the show ben tissue yeah i think i hope i had some good contribution..

yanni africa Berlin Shonda unbe lula yanni jalen liam coo donald donald dawson sarah museum france anita dylan trump america tommy tommy hamadeh Josh senator Domo toronoto Tom eaters
U.S. Sanctions Take A Toll On Ordinary Iranian Families

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:40 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Sanctions Take A Toll On Ordinary Iranian Families

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR. How are American sanctions affecting ordinary families in Iran? Well, Orion sticking a break in Istanbul Turkey, spent some time talking with NPR's Peter Kenyon about how they're coping. Is to close street is bulls. Most famous commercial boulevard and on a recent afternoon street musician, serenaded people from all over Turkey Europe, Asia, and Iran for Iranians heading next door to Turkey for a break is both easier and less expensive than trying to get to Europe or the US. I met several around ins who were nervous at the idea of having their views recorded worrying about possible retribution by thirties, back home, but some agreed to speak if their family names weren't used corrosion. A young man with sunglasses says Iranians have grown used to economic hard times run on by political clashes beyond their control. About my son is I have nothing to do with sanctions. I don't even really understand what they are. But I do know many businesses are struggling and some are closing that includes his own small business, the textile, shop, he opened with his brother to produce shirts. Perot says as President Trump sanctions reduced, incomes and spending money. He was forced into bankruptcy and closed. The business now he comes to extend bowl to buy items to sell back home, but even with the scaled-back business, he's grown used to not being paid on time Magnier style angel. My mom in audio I have been doing business this way for a year now. And in the past few months, it has become harder, especially after this last announcement by the US about new sanctions. Mariam also from Tehran is strolling down the boulevard with her husband and young son. She says inflation is terrible. Everything is three to four times, the usual price. Tonight at gay, and there's no stability, you cannot feel secure things are very uncertain than Iran right now, there's no way of knowing what might happen in the next year or two, and on top of this. There's a lack of trust between the people and the government Mariam's husband Ali, who towers over his wife says he works in the manufacturing sector in Tehran for him. The biggest impact of the recent tensions has been losing hope of seeing his older son, who studying in America Ali says they haven't seen him in three years as to get on the bus to the mobile since Trump has been in office. We haven't seen our child, we only see them online, and I really miss him as father Ali says, getting a US visa has been difficult for some time. But with the way US aronie and relations are going now travelling to America seems less likely than ever, it was a of panic, and then they go now everything has gone wrong, and we're here to go to the Canadian consulate. If we can get Canadian Musa we will go to Niagara Falls. And if our son comes to the other side of the. Falls. We can wave at each other. Under the American sanctions. Iran is facing double digit unemployment, and inflation is running at some forty percent. Sixty two year old Tehran resident for Johnny breaks off a conversation with friends to explain that there are so many ways people are suffering these days. It's hard to say which is worst, but she thinks it's the loss of hope in the younger generation he javelin hall Yankees issued the unemployment is very bad and young people have no motivation. Everyone is lost hope the ones who are out of work feel the pressure of not having a job. But the ones who do are always worried. They're about to be laid off when asked to people are blaming for all these troubles for noses response echoes the views of most of the people interviewed for this story, of course, the Trump administration is to blame. But so is the government in Tehran, which is riven by fierce infighting. She says some even believe these hard times could lead the government to be more responsive, but she doesn't think so. Judical Ozzy boat on the people are so desperate and hopeless to save themselves from this crisis that some even turn to the US government and the US president to save them. But I don't think this is the right mentality. She sighs and gives a wry smile as if to say, please just let her enjoy her few days in Turkey before she has to think about what awaits her back home. Peter Kenyon, NPR news is Bill support for this podcast and the following message come from atlassian, a collaboration software company powering teams around the world committed to providing the tools and practices to help teams plan track build and work better together. More at atlassian dot com.

United States Iran Tehran NPR Turkey Frame Bridge Peter Kenyon Us Government Niagara Falls Mariam Father Ali President Trump Turkey Europe Perot America Atlassian Donald Trump Asia Johnny
"musa" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

10:53 min | 2 years ago

"musa" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Except soda of stuff. You missed in history class brought to you by Google podcasts. This is a new Android app from Google, and it's a podcast app that's loaded with all the podcasts that you love, and it pays attention to what you like to give you recommendations for new stuff that you haven't discovered yet. It also works seamlessly across Google home and Google assistance because Google podcast is integrated into all these products right out of the box. Google podcast is free and you can download it right now while you're listening to this podcast on Google play. Happy Saturday. Everybody. Today's episode is from twenty ten back when Sarah and the bleeding were hosts of the show. It is about Mussa the first of Molly also known as Mansa Musa and he continues to be one of our most popular listener requests. When folks right in to ask about African history, we do have a little update on this episode, Sarah and Dobalina talk about UNESCO world heritage sites in Timbuktu that were threatened by desert encroachment and a lack of upkeep in the spring of two thousand twelve. These sites were further threatened by several militant and extremist Islamist groups which began destroying some of them on the grounds that they were examples of idolatry. The French military intervened and unrest has continued in the year since then. Welcome to stuff you missed in history class from how stuff works dot com. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Sarah doughty and I'm to blame a trucker boarding. And today we're going to be talking about a city of gold, but this one existed long before anybody had heard about El Dorado with its. Mythical streets paved in gold. There was this city in Mali, and that's this great west African empire that was supposedly so rich that slaves could carry staffs that were dusted in gold, and even the most common objects like everyday things around your house would be made out of this precious metal. That was so rare in most of the world yet. But the interesting thing is for most of the middle ages, European even paid much attention to Africa beyond its northern trading cities at all, but the gold, it really changed things. Yeah, especially when according to the British historian, Dr basil Davidson. The rule is Molly were quote rumored to have been the wealthiest men on the face of the earth. So I would say that would be worth checking out even going across the desert for perhaps I'd say so. And the most luxurious ruler of this empire was Mensa Mussa in he expanded territories developed greats. Cities, and most famously displayed his lands wealth and a procession of thousands across Africa, and he didn't do this to fight about will he did it to make a pilgrimage to mecca. So okay, we're going to be talking about this city of gold, and we're going to be talking about this ruler who made the Spain Mus pilgrimage. So who is Monson was the and where did he come from? He came from the Suhel which is this band of land that separates the Sahara from the forest of southern Africa, and it's always been an important band important part of the world because of the trade that crosses it. And that really started in about seven fifty AD in lasted until the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. When finally ships replaced overland, caravans of camels, you could do your trading a lot easier by boats guests and the first great kingdom of this area was that of Ghana, and that's different from the modern nation of Ghana that we know today. Yeah, it's not even really in the same spot nearby, but not exactly the same. But while this kingdom splintered apart Islamic proselytizing converted much of the region to Islam, including ruling families. Yeah, in one of these families, the key to started up a new kingdom that replaced this empire of Ghana. That was the kingdom of Mali and its first major leader. The leader who brought the family to great power with Cindy Atta, and there's kind of a fun story about the sky from the oral tradition. Supposedly, he was a really strong child but kinda clumsy on his feet. But there was the rule like a King Arthur and the stone sort of Nori, but there was a challenge, whoever could knock down fruit from this special tree in town, and then swallow the pit of that fruit would become king. And so this strong, but clumsy boy gave it a shot. And most people would try to knock down the fruit by. Throwing rocks or some sort of object at it, and it wouldn't work. Cindy oughta picked up a man in through him at the fruit, knocked it down, swallow the fruit whole and for good measure. He plucked the tree out of the ground and replanted it in his mother's yard. So other people couldn't still the fruit. Wow. That's a hard story to be about becoming king. Yeah. I mean, I would make him king. Yeah, it's worth it. So the empire of Mali thrived because of its placement near the Niger river. This kingdom had a lock on all the gold that traveled north, but it wasn't just gold. There was also trade in copper slaves and salt. Yeah. So imagine mostly gold and slaves coming from the south and salt coming from the desert and all of it going through this kingdom where they can tax the merchants heavily and make a big profit. But we shouldn't think of it as to cohesive and empire because it had really distinct regions. Where different people live. They spoke different languages. I, it's not a an empire how you might think of an empire today in according to Timbuktu the Sahara's fabled city of gold, which was a book I reference for this episode after Cindy OTA's death. There were there was kind of turmoil. There was a series of emperors. One was insane and murdered by his courtiers. That's never good in power is kinda juggled around until somehow it falls on this man of the servant class name. Sikora and power changed hands a few times again after him and settled on Bouba cure the second. The immediate predecessor of Monson Mussa. Yeah, and Monson Mussa. I mean, we're going to be talking about him more at length later, but he proved to be a very able administrator. He expanded the territory allot its reputation, but he wasn't a shoe in for becoming king and at least the timing of his ascension is. Kind of a fluke. As he later told the son of the Sultan in Cairo. The only reason he earned his throne was because Abu Bakar refused to believe that the ocean was infinite. So basically the sky was obsessed with what was across the Atlantic stare out at the ocean, just dying that there might be land over there that he is not emperor of right? So he finally launched an expedition of four hundred ships into the unknown Atlantic Ocean, and only one came back, but the men spoke of a river on the ocean, so that must have been enough for him. He was intrigued of a river being in the ocean, which I, I don't know if that's like a current or something. Perhaps he was interested. And so he ordered two thousand new ships thousand with men, a thousand with supplies. And this time he led the fleet out and toll months Mussa you're in charge until I come back unsurprising famous last words. Yeah, he never. Came back and if you want to compare this to some other transatlantic travel, this is thirteen ten or thirteen twelve. So it's kind of fascinating to imagine what if he did make. I think you have a good of comic book or something. Fortunately for months that he's a lot more content with what he has and expanding the territory on land, not sailing off into the great unknown ocean. Yes. So his empire became one of the world's largest at the time. A lot of people said it supposedly took a year to travel from one end to the other, but that was probably a bit of an exaggeration, actually, fourteenth century traveller Iban Baotou said that it took him about four months to travel from northern Mali to neon e in the south. So still a very sizeable empire in the seventeen year of his reign month Mussa embarked on the most famous journey of his lifetime. What is the reason why we're talking about him today on the podcast, probably that's his pilgrimage to mce and basically this pilgrimage let the whole world knew how wealthy his kingdom was and what was beyond the desert. And he traveled from his capital of neon. To a lotta to to ought to Cairo. And from there he went on to mecca and he had a caravan of sixty thousand men, twelve thousand slaves, dressed in brocade and the finest Persian silk. One wife. He brought his senior wife with him her retinue of five hundred slaves. And then he himself wrote on horseback with five hundred gold staff. Slaves that we mentioned in the beginning riding in front of him and his entourage has baggage was carried by eighty camels and they each carried three hundred pounds of gold. So I mean, just imagine something like this passing through your tiny little desert town. No, that's a lot of baggage would be unbelievable, especially considering Hillary brought one wife. Yeah. So along his way, he gave generously and he spent lavishly and his party was noted for their good behavior, and he was noted for his own pious nece in Cairo. It took a may. Major convincing to make months Mussa pay a formal visit to the mom look Sultan since he didn't wish to break away from his religious observances yet, basically took someone saying, you really have to go meet with the fault, or you're going to be in trouble and according to the chronicler all Amari he said, I came for the pilgrimage and nothing else. I do not wish to mix anything else with my pilgrimage, but probably the most amazing detail of this pilgrimage is that twelve years later, all Mari found people still talking about the visit in Cairo. And apparently, although this is kind of a disputed fact, apparently he flooded the Cairo market with so much gold just giving to every official he could find and spending buying everything he did find he infused so much gold into the market that it basically crashed in

Monson Mussa Mali Google Cairo Sarah doughty Africa Timbuktu Ghana Molly Spain Mus pilgrimage Mussa empire today UNESCO Atlantic Ocean Dr basil Davidson Monson Mansa Musa Cindy Atta
Warning of deadly flu virus that could kill millions across the globe

The Dr. Dahlia Show

02:28 min | 3 years ago

Warning of deadly flu virus that could kill millions across the globe

"I hate i will we get warnings like this i really do because we all panic and he says the most dangerous drain of what was the bird flu last pandemic hit in two thousand nineteen thousand ten with swine flu the merchant mexico i i don't know how many lives were taken with the swine flu i know we lost a lot it was worse than this flu season but went back to the spanish flu spanish flu pandemic of 1918 took a hundred million lives so now what scientists are watching or the easy and flew and there's three strains are looking at the h five n one the h seven n nine and the h five n six they say of those eight five and one poses the greatest threat of mutating and sparking the next killer pandemic he said if a new and highly contagious grain of h five n one were to evolve and hitchhike with an unwitting passenger on an airplane the fed embassy to which will quickly assumed disaster movie proportions so basically of as somebody gets on a plane with it and brings the to your neck of the woods there we go he said the disaster could be averted if more vessel was put into looking for universal vaccine for the flu now they are working on that right ucla i think there's been working on that there's a bunch of different places working on more universal vaccines that could work for any string it's tough not all flu so the same shape vaccines work of by mimicking what you wanna fight either in a killed form or a live weakened form that usually with the flu shot were using that killed form although now they're going to bring back the flu vest the live attenuated vaccine where we of a weakened version and your body needs to recognize shapes needs to recognize receptors just like this you know there's like h three n two hour h five n one the hugh mcgahan in in the noram did these little proteins on the on the uh structure of the virus is what helps trigger are musa system his the quickly review our blood cells are making the bone marrow bright bone marrow get some key factors telling it to produce blood cells your heat lymphocytes fight infection you'll be lymphocytes make antibodies and the bill of.

FLU Two Hour