18 Burst results for "Murder Inc"

"murder inc" Discussed on Only A Game

Only A Game

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Only A Game

"Is the dedication he says to Dad Luchman who played the hardest game of all. That's it in Nineteen ninety-six external an on camera interview for the Lincoln Academy of Illinois. Sid mentioned his father but not the murder. My Dad was sick a lot of his money in the stock market and he never did recover to the very the end he can't talk about. It cannot talk about only one of sids three children. His son Bob knew their the grandfather had gone to jail for murder. But Bob didn't know the victim had been his great uncle. Sam Druckman not. Everybody can keep a secret like that. Not everybody what he can go through life. Bearing that burden alone SID Luchman died in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight. He was eighty one years old. That's only a games. Gary Wallich Ardy. Rosen's new book is tough luck. Sid Lachmann Murder Inc and the rise of the modern. NFL You only game is produced by Martin Kessler and Gary while I quit quit help from Jonathan Chang. Our technical director as Marquees Neil. Our executive producer is me. I'm Karen Given only a game returns next week. Thanks for listening and..

Sid Lachmann Dad Luchman Gary Wallich Ardy murder Sam Druckman Bob Murder Inc Lincoln Academy of Illinois Jonathan Chang Rosen Martin Kessler NFL
Pinball Machines Waas Once Illegal

Retropod

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Pinball Machines Waas Once Illegal

"This New York Times article from January twenty fifth with nineteen forty two reads like the beginning of a crime novel the city's Mayor Fiorello Laguardia makes a surprise visit to the a New York police commissioner these come there on the basis of some very interesting information the mayor is afraid that the police aren't working fast enough to seize a certain contraband and he's worried that the powerful financial backers of illicit items will seek a federal injunction against police rates to get them off the street the mayor won't say the nature of information that led him to make the visit but soon after he leaves the police commissioner issues a special order then every available patrolman it's a sign to the job of seizing the contraband pinball machines the police seized almost three thousand pinball machines and served more than fifteen hundred summonses and in a show old force real force mayor Laguardia then proceeded to smash the machines with sledgehammers while photographers took pictures he'd been fighting against the machines for his entire time in office about eight years at that point he was convinced that the pinball embalm industry was operated by criminals and the shady underworld described it in an affidavit as twenty million dollar a year your rackets other major cities followed in targeting the machines Washington DC issued you didn't order making pinball machines illegal after what the Washington Post described as a lengthy investigation launched by complaints from parents and teachers that school children were feeding lunch money into the electrical laws in New York this city band end all pinball machines that were used for gambling that meant any machine that paid winners in money or in the very dangerous rewards of free games or prices it sounds silly now but the thing is the Gordian might not have been wrong in worrying that pinball pinball machines were part of the city's seedy underbelly for one thing pinball machines back then didn't have livers so it was a game of chance dance more than a game of skill and that made claims that these were gambling devices more plausible a succession of New York mayors were able to make convincing cases that pinball did in fact have mob Tux mayor William O'Dwyer who succeeded in the Bardia was if anything even more dedicated to the crusade against pinball machines in one thousand nine hundred forty eight he said that wiretapping had yielded information in that illegitimate big money was interested in getting pinball machines placed in New York and that the Organized Crime Group Murder Inc used pinball machines to recruit their killers when he found out that pinball machines had returned to New York shops he sent an army NIA plain clothes police officers out to play them and determine if they were being used for gambling the New York Times ran the story in nineteen forty eight about a policeman named Frank Barron who went into a cigar shop to test out a pinball machine called the Marvel Papa Barron put a penny in the machine played five games in a row and on the fifth one a free six play that he turned around and arrested did the shop owner for unlawful possession of a gambling machines pinball kept its reputation as a slimy in disreputable we'll pastime for years in one thousand nine hundred sixty Republicans even tried to smear then presidential candidate John F. Kennedy by connecting him to an Indiana pinball owner more than thirty years later it was looking likely that the mayor would sign a bill bringing game back to New York City on May thirty first nineteen seventy six the time about New York column went out to talk to people in the cities arcades about the possible return pinball one man told the reporter he didn't think he'd see the day I'll believe they're back he said head when I get to play one the very next day pinball was legal once more

New York Times Twenty Million Dollar Thirty Years Twenty Fifth Eight Years
"murder inc" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Crew from over there, Planned Parenthood. They always say all that's all about rim, women's health rights, etc. But that's all a big part of murder Inc. But one of the heads was caught on video talking about how they can get all kinds of cash, and she could get herself one of those fancy sports car sound baby parts or this or that or whatever. I mean, isn't that all documented while I'm glad you brought that up because David delighted at Lila rose, the undercover investigator got them on tape. Yep. Saying they're selling body parts or the later they Kramer. We're not making any money. Yeah. That helps it but at any, but she said, I need a new course. So what does that tell you? So at any rate what they're doing is. What you I'm glad you brought that up because Camille a Harris. The big news this empty pantsuit star of the Democratic Party. She was attorney general of California, and she didn't prosecute Planned Parenthood from moving around the body parts. She prosecuted David delighting in the investigative reporter tried to put him in jail. Wait a second. Is that the same community Harris that used to crawl around underneath there and take care of Willie Brown when he was mayor San Francisco is that the same talking about. Cast to be. She's got nefarious background because even Willie Brown. I I saw story where he was bragging about all these women. He helped him get to the top or whatever. It sounds like she was on the bottom for a while around her knees or whatever married. Married, man. And she was over there servicing him like Monica was service, slick billiard. Now, you aren't you challenging the bullies yourself. Yeah. In the whole Democratic Party, including Obama, including Michelle. Yeah. Are not objecting of this. So it's like the democrat party is going to crime Inc and Merck. And by the way, in case, people aren't familiar with his adult stem cells from your own body or the only things that's working so all the diseases and all that can be cured from the Gulf stem cells. They're still working on it. But people have been incredibly rejuvenated with stem cell therapy. So we don't need the unborn babies. We don't need to be killing people to try to even if they're very little people try to but Jimmy, but Jimmy I gotta I gotta refresh your memory, the democrat party has been in cahoots. Because Hillary's big idol was the who was that nefarious one that that put together Planned Parenthood. That's singer Margaret Sanger. Join up and she was. Yeah. If you go back and look Planned Parenthood like Hitler in Dr mango of the NAS, right? That's right. They wanted jet. They wanted. They didn't call genetic engineering. They called it eugenics. She wanted to limit the population of black people and also every race of lower IQ, God sends people in the world for a reason. If you believe in God in the individual, providence, Democrats already don't believe in God that you know that right? Right. So that so, but the point is we can I just wanted to make it clear all the progress ensuring disease, and it is being made from adult stem cells and some people including a Mel Gibson's, father, Hutton Gibson got stem cell therapy in Panama. The mayo clinic told him they couldn't do it this eight years ago, he was ninety two he couldn't even lift his head when they will into the wheelchair. According to the people that have seen the video but three weeks later, he came out walking sprightly at ninety two. He's still alive at one hundred. He's still live at one hundred. I've had several professional help people out that the naturopathy say there's incredible things coming down the pipe, but they're all being done with adults. Stem cells. So they might imply something, oh, don't you want to experiment, but that's not solving the disease. Can I comment on Trump and his number real quick about two minutes hate Manning's another one who benefited from stem cell? Oh, really? I didn't even know that. Neck whenever he got hurt never play football again. And that's when he went to the Bronx before we went to the Broncos. It's exactly how it let's take a break real quick. Okay. Back on jimothy. Yeah. Okay. Let's Jimmy hang hang on. We'll go ahead on a wrap you up here because he's got get his beauty sleep and make sure his fingers are all rested. And stop these doing his Oregon work at six AM for the church, and that's a real jerk..

Willie Brown Democratic Party Kramer Hutton Gibson Jimmy I democrat party David murder Margaret Sanger Lila rose Harris Broncos investigator mayo clinic Hillary Monica Camille
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Two, two of the nine eleven hijackers were traced by the CIA coming into the United States before nine eleven living openly in San Diego, and they never tipped off the the FBI the CIA didn't. And you have concluded that that was deliberate by the CIA that they purposely kept the FBI in the blind. And so the question is why they would have done. So were they protecting the Saudis? Was the CIA hoping to work for with the Saudis and think that the Saudis we're going to watch these guys. And if that's the case, did something go terribly awry concluded. I mean, the CIA inspector general issued a report on this. The chairman of the Senate intelligence committee has at the time. Centigram has spoken extensively about this numerous FBI officials testified about it. State the facts, and then you know, say what? The what my theory is. The facts are that two al-qaeda members came into the United States and firmly thereafter the CIA became aware of that. They knew that they were not just run from the mill terrorists, but they were in fact all in putting tax that had already occurred. Those two Al Qaeda. People were then approached by someone who may have been a Saudi intelligence officer according to the FBI. The CIA was aware that they were in the country. Was it where over a year over fifty CIA officials knew it. They never told me even though I received the daily briefing often by the CIA director himself, they never told the FBI, the liaison officers that we had put from the FBI in the eye headquarters. We're told they couldn't tell anybody else in the FBI. It was essential decision not to tell me beyond. All right, why? Well, I think the obvious reason is if I had known or if they have be, I had known these guys would have been arrested right away. And for some reason, the see I did not want them to be arrested and you can. I think only conclude one thing that they were following them or hope to flip them and failed to do that. And at some point weeks before nine eleven, they realized that they had failed in that effort, and they really didn't have the money to control and they told a low level FBI fearful. Now, the problem is the CIA is not allowed to operate like that inside the US only the FBI can. So it's the CIA used Saudi intelligence to approach them under a false flag. Perhaps pretending to be all kinds of sympathizers and maybe the Saudi intelligence at the behest of CIA. Was running them in the US in any event, the c. i. officials involved, including the director have all denied all of this theory under oath. So if the theory is true, they've committed perjury if the theory isn't true, it's hard to come up with another explanation of the fact and and bottom line. Do you believe the Saudis were aware of their presence in the United States and aware of what they were up to? This is a guest. The Saudis were aware that they were in the US because the CIA told them that and that they were doing a favourite for the CIA and trying to flip them or monitor them. Do I know do I think I know that at some point, the Saudi intelligence people figured out what they were doing. I don't know to what degree of certitude do you have that if that information had been shared. And they've been picked up at the FBI that the plot the the nine eleven plot would have been real rolled up, or you can't say that didn't rich. In retrospect, it's hard for me to to say what I would have done, but I really don't know. I mean, you can't reliably run the clock. Let me likely would have done something right. I mean, well known that there were two al-qaeda terrorists inside the United States. I'd known that they were to terrorism the United States. I definitively I would've had them arrested, but then the hour. But would we have been able to break them and learn from the various threads that we could pull that there was a larger plot and break up that plot? I don't know. Dick, I wanna ask you about future state as a fellow podcasts. Der- tell us what future state is and what sort of episodes you've got feature state is right. Now, a ten part podcast series. It's like Bill Clinton, Madeleine, Albright, Susan Rice, McCullough. Seth, Moulton we have a cyber war episode..

CIA FBI United States Senate intelligence committee San Diego director al-qaeda perjury chairman Centigram Bill Clinton Dick officer Der Seth Susan Rice Moulton Albright
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Do it be shocked beyond even the shock of what they just did if they took some of their intelligence officers involved in and and killed them very surprised. Dick, what do you think that domestic implications in Saudi Arabia are? Because you know you is, is there a scenario under which this destabilizes the the kingdom and and the Royal family, you know, over time, even a lose, lose its grip on power that that's kind of a nightmare scenario. Right. I mean, I heard Tom Friedman of the New York Times talking about, you know, the possibility perhaps remote, but if Saudi Arabia becoming a failed state, you know, with all those oil reserves and an ideology that's not going to hurt, that's going to happen dome smoking something there, but no, no, what what could happen? There's probably, you know, less than ten percent chance that. The king replaces the crown prince and that creates a certain number of problems. One of them is his reform programs, which we like opening up the country and limited ways and and changing the their dependence on oil and doing all sorts of good things that reform program might die. If he were no longer the crown prince would become the crown prince, possibly someone who would bring them back to more traditional conservative ways. You know, this crown prince has taken the religious police on kind of put them in the box and said, you know, go away, don't don't continue to impose strict religious rules on the country. This crown Princess, the HAMAs them the type of Islam, the type of Sumi Islam that has been practiced in Saudi Arabia is. Wrong. It's too too strict to traditional, and he's taking the country away from a hob ISM. Well, somebody else's crown prince could walk that cat back. So. Well, a lot of people say they want this crown prince out if he were involved in this decision. I think it's very important about who would replace him in the unlikely event that happened. Let's talk about the implications here in the United States. You know, the Saudis have been famously throwing money around Washington for years for decades, including think tanks, and I'm looking at the list of contributors to the Middle East stone. We do. We received a an unrestricted donation of two million dollars two years ago from the from the Saudi embassy. And we declared that publicly, we declare every donation get publicly. We only take on restrict Dawson Saudi, Aramco, I believe is annual contributor of up to a million dollars. So I wish I wish it were. No, it does contribute to nothing. Nothing. Nothing like that. So are you going to continue to take Saudi money? Well, the moment we had the board meeting this week to the side on the board was unanimous that no, under the current circumstances, we don't think that it's appropriate for for us to take Saudi government money. We pulled out of a cultural program in New York this week that we were co-sponsoring with the Saudi embassy. You know, the only way that the. Middle East institute is willing to take funding from foreign governments is if they're unrestricted grants. And if they acknowledge our statement that our scholars have academic freedom and we never want a donor and it'd be the human individual being or government to call up and say, you know, do this or do that, and, and I don't like that tweet or I don't like that report or don't like that guy being on the panel, we've walked away before from government money. We had a basis. Do you return some of that two million dollars that you did receive a couple of years ago, we spent it. We got it two years ago. We had, you know, a program for a long time where the Turkish government funded programs on on Turkey and the US..

Saudi Arabia Saudi embassy United States Dick Middle East institute Tom Friedman Turkish government New York Times HAMAs Middle East stone Washington Turkey New York two million dollars two years million dollars ten percent
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"But kashogi was a journalist, he was based in the United States. This was on foreign soil or in a foreign country. Why would they have gone to these lanes against him? Explain wondering. Give us most of us have Jamal kashogi oh, I'm the chairman, as you said of the Middle East institute, a Washington-based think tank that's been around for seventy five years. Jamal came to our meetings. He was on our panel. He was a well-known figure in Washington. He was an employee on the Washington Post. Now he was what we call a US person, and he had a green card. He was a permanent resident alien. There's never been in my memory case of the Saudis, killing someone who fills all of those boxes doing in a NATO country. And then you know, chopping him up in pieces and putting them in a box on it. It's just unprecedented and you can't come up with a rational reason. You can try to put yourself in the shoes of a decision maker, but. Never gets a rational this. Maybe they were trying to send a message to other dissidents that the this is what happens to you and we'll get you wherever you are, and no one can stop. We have impunity, you know, that's very reminiscent of Putin going after former spies and diplomats and dissidents overseas because clearly that's the message that Putin wants to send. You can't. You can't run beyond our our ability to kill you and we can kill you get away with it. Well, dick, if it turns out that NBS had foreknowledge of of this decision to kill our kashogi, what does that say about the the effective ruler of Saudi Arabia? And what does it say about his ability to continue. Ruling in that kingdom. Well, I'm not sure we'll ever really know if if the crown prince made the decision or not when we might luck out and have intelligence that is definitive, if we do how could he not have known about this? How could he not have? Well, we may never know. Do we assume? Oh sure. We assume it's not the kind of government where people make this kind of decision on their own at a level below him. I wouldn't think so. Yeah, we can assume it, but if we don't know it, that presents a different issue because in the absence of evidence, we can say, well, you know, it's not proven, we don't know, and I'm surely I'm sure this administration. We'll try that. Now the congress, of course, get spree FT. At least the intelligence committees get briefed on questions, like and the intelligence. Committees can say, show me all intelligence show me all the intercept show me all the human reports. And if it turns out that one of those intelligence reports is definitive about who made the decision. Well, then there's a, there's a more difficult problem of accountability at that point. And if it doesn't and no hard evidence ever emerges, but the strong suspicion is that he had a hand in this do things eventually just go back to to, you know, we go back to to business back to normal, not the way I think there's a scenario may play out in the next few days. There's a scenario in which they throw someone under the bus, they say, oh my God, the intelligence minister did something awful, and he's been fired and people under him been arrested and they've been sent to jail. And of course you. May never know whether or not they've been sent to jail, but they may replace a minister. And if we don't know that it went above him, we may just have to accept that. But even at that, I don't think things go back to normal right away. I don't think they publicly disclose who ends up in chop chop square in Riyadh. Do they? Yeah, they do know they do. They do normally say they do, yeah. When when they when they have public capital punishment, they do normally say with it. So it's, it's, they hold people accountable here. We should expect the execution of whoever was in the council at in. I would never expect that. You know if they, if they chose someone under the bus, I think you're gonna see, perhaps any minister changed out. You're going to say some people tr- allegedly tried and secret trials and allegedly sent to jail. We'll never really know if they were not it is murdered. Do they not have capital punisher you the..

Jamal kashogi Jamal Putin Middle East institute United States NATO Washington Post chairman Saudi Arabia Washington Riyadh dick congress NBS seventy five years
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"To skulduggery. Thank you. Thank you for letting me on your bucket podcast, a podcast. So like we have been delving deep into the fate of Jamal kashogi. It seems to be a pretty grisly story, and a lot of people are wondering where all this is headed and what the implications are for the US Saudi relationship. Give us your take. Well, I think it's a dream Li likely that the outcome of the various investigations will reveal. Will he was killed by Saudi intelligence officials in the consulate in Istanbul question, there is the two ordered that who approved that, and I'm not sure we're gonna get too far on that. I'm part of the investigation, but we, we can assume that it was fairly high up the idea that it was some rogue decision seems extremely unlikely given that this sort of thing has never been done before by the Saudis. This was an extraordinary act. What does it mean for US Saudi relations? You know you how the relations are important to both countries. They go back to Franklin Roosevelt. When he met the king of Saudi Arabia, the Saudis can do a lot of good in the Middle East if they want to and they can do a lot of harm if they. To they're great economic our, they're a great political power. We had hoped of. They were beginning to do a domestic reform that would make them more of a twenty first century country. But that reform was being driven by the crown prince and the crown prince maybe implicated in this murder. Dick l. let me ask you this because you know you have been inside the White House dealing with very sensitive national security matters and managing very sometimes difficult relationships including with the Saudis. So I want you to maybe think a little bit about if you were in the White House. Now how how you think you would be thinking about about this issue clearly you, you worked in more sort of traditional or normal administration's, but. I'm sure you would be outraged by what happened, but wouldn't there also be an enormous amount of Hangwringing about the implications of a serious? You know, the potential for serious rupture in the relationship and wouldn't that incentivize you to find ways to go back to business as usual as quickly as possible. How would you, how do you think you would you would deal with a situation like this. If I were advising a normal president in the situation, but I would say, look, we didn't want this to happen, but it's happened that we have to accept that reality in all the consequences, but come from that congress is not now in any near future, going to approve major arms sales to Saudi Arabia. So forget that don't even try that and tell them that. And if you lose some arm sales fun, you lose some arm sales. You know, we're not an arms store that's opened for everybody to buy everything all the time. We never have been refused sales to people in the past, even though it costs us jobs, refused sales to the Saudis in the past, even though it costs us jobs. That's the first thing. The second thing is. America is unlike other countries in that our great strengths on the international scene has been until Trump at least some degree of of moral standing. Even with George W Bush who got a lot of criticism correctly for the Iraq war mistake. I mean, he was doing some good things like, you know, the aids HIV initiative kept millions of Africans a lot. We are different. We stand for something. We're not just a piece of geography where a political idea, and that political idea includes the rule of law. We can't just walk away from that and he come amoral and still have the power on the international scene that we had. So we have to do something. And then something probably includes a cooling off in our relationship with Saudi Arabia until and unless they come clean and there's a count ability rather than impunity. So you mentioned before we haven't seen the Saudis do something like this before. Of course, they've, you know, executed and beheaded people in their own country, including political dissidents..

Saudi Arabia George W Bush White House Franklin Roosevelt Li US Jamal kashogi Istanbul Middle East murder Dick l. president Iraq America congress Trump
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"And whether a rendition taking him back to his home country would qualify against against right, this is what's kidnapping versus what's rendition. I talked to a former senior intelligence officials said, look if there was an interpretation of this information such that this looks like some kind of element of due process like he's going to be arrested. Or charged with something. We probably would not view that in the due to warn category. But if it was he was going to be killed, absolutely grave physical harm. It's actually, I think it is a member. Qualify counts, and then you get into the question of whether kidnapping and rendition like what's are the line that you're given his prominence, though you would think that you might air on the side of warning. One last question I want to get your thoughts on. We opened the show with a potential new who trend out there. February two thousand seventeen. The exiled half-brother of Kim Jong UN is assassinated in the Kuala Lumpur airport, March of two thousand eighteen Sergei score. Paul is is exposed to a chemical agent by Russian operatives for the purpose of assassinating him. And now we have this, is this the new trend? And you know, just as a extension of that, you know, doesn't that make how the Trump White House response to this all the more important. Because if you don't send the message that this kind of activity is unacceptable. It just means we're going to see more of state-sponsored assassinations. Yeah, I think it does look like a trend and you mentioned like three liters that all have something in common with their their hot headed and ending. And for whom Donald Trump has said, kind. With one of them so so. So he says, but I would even like go back to the even the the idea behind the question is, does the White House need to do something forceful responding? A lot of foreign policy experts say yes, but the question I have to is whether or not these actions are an outgrowth of the fact that there is this culture of permissiveness that the White House has in the president have created, which is essentially to say, we're not here to tell you what to do in your countries. You know, we're not necessarily going to push back on it. Forcefully. The president uses pretty aggressive, bellicose rhetoric on his own. I'm not saying he is, you know, causing this to happen, but is he sending a signal to these countries that you can get away with this? And this is not something that's going to invite a really tremendous response from us. I think the argue answered that is yes, and you know whether NBS took this action because he thought he could get away with it. We won't. We don't know right now, but certainly unless the president were to forcefully come forward at this point. Now, after three of these incidents in. Say something. I think you'd go credibly say that the United States position is, you know, you can assassinate an attack people on foreign soil, and we're not really gonna, say, boo about it Shane Harris. Thanks for joining us. You were great, and we'd love to have you back anytime. Love the show. Thanks guys. Thanks John. That was great. We'll be back with more skulduggery. We are now joined by a dick Clark wise on all matters involving Saudi Arabia, dick as the former counter-terrorism visor do President Bill Clinton, and for a while President, George W Bush. He is the president of good harbor consulting the chairman of the Middle East institute and the host of the new podcast future state. Dick Clark. Welcome.

George W Bush Donald Trump kidnapping dick Clark White House Trump White House President Kim Jong UN NBS Kuala Lumpur Saudi Arabia Bill Clinton Middle East institute Paul United States Sergei Shane Harris chairman John
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"I think this tracks with other reporting we've done. It's not as if you know many officials in the White House are sitting there going, gosh, maybe the Saudis didn't do this. I mean, everyone understands what the score is, and I think is he put it simply the only question maybe in their mind is to what degree was Mohammed bin soman responsible for this? Let me ask you about the Turks because look all the grisly details about what happened to kashogi have come from leaks from the Turks from audio recordings and video recordings, but we haven't seen or heard them. And that does make some of us suspicious about why we are trusting these Turkish accounts when they can't provide the evidence that they're based on. Yeah. And I think this has been really. Problematic both in the way that the investigation is gone and it's been a, that'd be totally honest. It's been very difficult for us as reporters because this is where the information is coming from. What I've tried to do is go to my sources on the US side and say, okay, look, how are you reading this based on the conversations you've had with the Turks and what they describe as inist because as far as I know, unless it's happening, you know, in at lower levels or in Warren's that we're not seeing which is possible. No one on the US side has gone through an analyze this recording. Do they even have access to it? I understanding is no. In fact, secretary pump Heo was in. Turkey yesterday and his spokesperson said he had not heard the tape and they were very keen to make sure reporters understood. He has not heard the tape, so I don't get that. You're asked to hear the tape, is it? Is it because he hasn't asked. They don't press on that we didn't get an answer the most we're getting his. He hasn't heard the tape because maybe they still want a little plausible deniability. Do think that is what's going on here. And I mean talking to fficials in allied countries as well. That is their read that the White House does not want to get in front of Saudi Arabia and the CIA is not going to get in front of the White House. And so let's just wait and see how the investigation goes, but that's really unusual. I mean, normally you would imagine the intelligence agencies saying, give it to us, give us a day. We'll assess it and we'll give you our opinion and why haven't the Turks released it. I think there's a couple of plausible reasons for that. We don't know exactly why one from the beginning has been this whole question of sources and methods which feels to me like has basically been blown apart now, like if you really have recording from inside the consulate, then you know, basically every consulate in Istanbul is gonna, bring rip in that place down to the studs, defined your bugs if that's how it happened. So that kinda that kinda. But I also think you know, let's be honest. It's a little bit of leverage of the Turks have right if they really do have this audio in, it is graphic as they claim it is an several people claim it is. It would be awful for the Saudis to have that out there to be, you know, uploaded on websites for people to listen to. So maybe it's their way of saying, because remember what is Turkey going to get out of this is a big question that's a bit of a car that they have to maybe leveraged the Saudis to come to some accommodation with Turkey. So are there going to be consequences for the Saudis out of all this is is the Trump White House prepared to do anything that punishes the Saudis for doing for for murdering, a journalist who is based in the United States, it's not clear that they are. The president has said they'll be very serious consequences, but the president says a lot of things. Certainly he will face tremendous. Pressure from Republicans and Democrats in congress to do something. And now the Magnitsky act is actually been triggered as part of all of us, which is really interesting. It's not clear to us that the White House is preparing anything really severe. It may be that they looked to the Saudis to make some internal corrections. There's been chatter about maybe Mohammed bin soman will be demoted to deputy crown, prince kind of find that one hard to believe isn't going to devote himself move back up to to be, hey, wouldn't that be like?.

Turkey Trump White House Mohammed bin soman United States congress Istanbul secretary CIA Heo president Saudi Arabia Warren
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"It was I was talking with a senior US intelligence official who said the thing you have to know about NBA says he has this elevator speech where he talks about everything in the region being Iran's fault. Everything runs through Iran and of course it's a very Saudi Centric view. But the fear was that when the new administration came in already hostile to Iran, that simplistic kind of, you know, bullet point, elevator pitch was going to resonate with Jared Kushner, and with the Trump people and it seems like it did because they're saying, yeah, exactly. That's what we're looking at. He's got it. He knows what he's talking about. Let's go with him, but there's another side to this Shane, which is that's the kind of geopolitical side and and how you know the Saudis fit into the whole Iran equation. But for Trump, it's also just purely kind of transactional. And he sees sees all of this through a lens of deals and money. And you know, he's, it sounds like he's obsessed with it or what would happen to the hundred billion dollars in arms deals. And what happens if the Saudis turn off the the oil spigot and you know, which obviously is a would be a serious concern. But I mean, I don't know how much he's thinking about geopolitics and how much he's thinking about, like, you know, we still got a lot of money we can make out of this this this PD bay. Yeah. When you hear him talking about the reasons why you know we need to maintain the relationship. He doesn't speak about it in terms of statecraft. He speaks about it in terms more of commerce. I think the prisoner may actually believe that one hundred twenty billion dollars could just be kind of sucked out of the GDP immediately. I'm not sure he understands the way these contracts are structured. These are multi arrangements. You know, they're not buying one hundred twenty billion dollars in a shopping cart at one time, but you know, Dan, you're right. I mean, he sees it through that kind of a lens into be Frank given how the president is talk. About the press in this country. I'm not so sure that he's seeing the case of Jamaica Shoghi as an assault on the free press or freedom of expression. I think this is more a disruption in the kind of, you know, the deal making that he likes to do. And frankly, I think that his son in law is exercising, tremendous influence over him on this. And I, I think from what we understand behind the scenes, Jared has constantly throughout this crisis been saying, we cannot abandon mom had been some on. Yeah, he's still, he's still helping to craft the response. And he's, you know, as far as we know, he's probably still texting NBS on their encrypted. What's? But I, I wanted to ask you Shane, and this goes to, you know what the Trump administration's. You know response is going to be able to me and how much pressure they're under right now. One of the things that I thought was interesting about your piece, your latest piece in in in the paper and the post was you. Had there were a couple of quotes from Rudy Giuliani, who of course is Trump's kind of staunchest defender on on cable news and he, you know, we, you know, did not make it sound like they were gonna necessarily get out of this, this this fix all that easily. I think if got, I was thumbing for the only question is, was it directed from the crown prince or the king? Or was it a group that was trying to please him? Yeah, leave it to Rudy to tell man. Why did you call routing in the first place on this actually credit to migrate colleague? Carolina was actually talking about some other things. What do you think about the show. But you know what he also said. In addition to that, that quote is within the White House, people are decided basically more than a week ago. The Saudis did this. I mean, there's no real as Rudy's telling it..

Trump Jared Kushner Rudy Giuliani Iran Shane US Dan NBA White House official Carolina Frank assault president one hundred twenty billion dol hundred billion dollars
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"The era parent in a very fast aggressive way that is neutralized many people who are more senior than him, including people who were very close to the intelligence establishment in the United States. So he's not dumb. I mean, he is highly effective, but the CIA officials who, and other intelligence officials who've I've talked about him over the past couple of years, really see him as somebody who is not really in control. I mean, he's he, it seems it seems like he's he's impulsive and a bit of a hot head. And actually the the analogy I think about from Hollywood is the godfather, but the dawn would not, you know, he, he, he appointed Michael to be his successor and not sunny, who was the hothead and who was impulsive and who was emotional. Yeah, that's a good analogy. And we lacked at the end of the first godfather so much of an option. Yeah, NBS is is not Michael, right? I mean, they the the profiler would agree with you on that, and he's also somebody you know of, you know. Extravagant tastes. I mean, he bought the, you know, the world's most expensive yacht. He bought through a cutout, the world's most expensive painting at auction. And at the same time he's pushing this, you know, anti-corruption campaign and locking all these corrupt people up in the Ritz Carlton and shaking them down for billions of dollars. There's always another side to the coin. There's the, you know, I'm promoting policies that are allowing women to drive. But at the same time, I'm locking up people. The women who were actually pushing that effort because they threaten me any also kidnapped the the president of Lebanon. Very, which was a bizarre move. Yeah, and I think that sending to with that, I, if you're getting more looking at the profile, they're looking at things he's actually done right, and there are so many extrordinary reckless things from the Americans be really from probably many people's points. End countries points of view that point to this is somebody who is thinking their view, not prepared for the enormous responsibility that he now finds himself in as the air apparent and effectively running a country. I mean, there's I think fairly strong indications that king soman is perhaps not exactly the most kind of out of within of kings right now. So MB s. is for all intents and purposes is running Saudi Arabia and yet I mean, the Trump White House has banked a lot on m. b. s. on so many levels. I mean, we all talk about Jared Kushner's relationship with them trying to bring them along on the Mideast peace plan. But more centrally, I mean, the the. The principal focus of Trump foreign policy in the Mideast has been to stigmatize Iran, Saudi Arabia is Iran's mortal enemy. They have done everything to beef up Saudi Arabia's. Solidify ties with Saudi Arabia was the swear President Trump went on his very first visit. And this assassination, if that's what it is, which it certainly looks like is quite awkward development that gets in the way of what the Trump White House wants to do in terms of going after Iran. Absolutely. I mean, I think that it's not too much to say that the White House has outsourced much of its foreign policy in the Middle East to Saudi Arabia and to Mohammed bin soman. And Jerry Kushner manages that relationship, and he is the one who has gone around the administration. Another young, upstart prince with a lot of experience in statecraft and tried to convince veteran Nash. Security and foreign policy people in the establishment that Mohammed bin some honest, someone they can trust and we've already talked about what their view of this is. I remember when I first started really paying attention to to Muhammad..

Saudi Arabia Michael Trump White House Iran soman CIA Jared Kushner United States Jerry Kushner president Muhammad Trump Hollywood Middle East Ritz Carlton Nash Lebanon principal
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"So there's that and then there's some other first of all. So I gathered the story. We'll be there trying to make a distinction between detaining and maybe you know, executing written dish in bringing bringing show you back to Saudi Arabia, torturing, interrogating all of that. And actually murdering Because you're. you're there signals at. That's maybe whereas heading, you know that they distort you might be. I think the New York Times even s and reporting on this this afternoon on Thursday afternoon when we're talking that you might be well, he was meant to be interrogated, but things went too far. Now, of course, do you always bring a bone saw a forensic pathologist to an interrogation like that's that's a new one. Being a professional interrogation. I don't know, but I don't recall seeing bone saws in enhanced interrogation techniques that the CIA was carrying. We didn't. That's right. But you know, Dan, I think you're you're putting it is that there might be some sort of story about an operation gone wrong, which then might sort of try and be in the middle of Muhammed. Vince Oman knew nothing versus he ordered the plan. Something in the middle might be a little more credible, but there to the problem is going to be well, we know them Hama been so on based on US intelligence, intercepts that of Saudi officials wanted to get your Malka Shoghi back to Saudi Arabia and detain him. And there appear to be other efforts by some of his allies try and actually do that by talking to Jamal alluring him back from Virginia. So on the one hand, you could say, well, he knew nothing about this plot to go out and get him at at the consulate, or he didn't think it was gonna go this far, but he was very clearly according to the intelligence that we've been briefed on trying to get kashogi back and this was something he'd been doing for some time. So I suppose you could say, well, let's pretend that they say, well, they didn't NBS didn't know the. Tara Gatien was going to turn into a killing. The point is though he still set in motion efforts months ago to get this guy back and doesn't eat bear responsibility for his fate in case, why would they have gone to these lanes? I can understand trying to get him back. He's writing stuff in the Washington Post. That's extremely awkward. That's critical. And you know, getting him back, interrogating him, you could have interrogated him back in Riyadh. They didn't have to do it at the consulate. I, it's still baffling as to why they would have gone to these lanes in STAN bowl or gone to these lines at all right. And that's the way I think to that point, why the idea that it's an interrogation gone, Ron doesn't hold up. You send fifteen people onto planes to interrogate a guy that doesn't make any sense. The bigger question is like Jamal kashogi? Why was he such a threat to the Saudi government that they wanted to to silence him in this way? I think you guys have cast a couple of. Days ago talking about, you know that Jamal was an insider, but also wasn't a bomb thrower. He wasn't advocating for a regime change or trying to plot a coup against Mohammed bin Salman. So why go to these extraordinary lengths at all? Like why did NBC him such as this threat? We'll we'll. Yeah, I was gonna follow up on that, and just want just ask you in the course of all of this great reporting that you've done. What have you learned about NBS that would provide some clues to that or or is it just a mystery? Well, now here I'm gonna put my psychologist hat on maybe a little bit, but you know, what would the CIA profiler is saying, I guess, yeah. The profile of MB s would be the following, which is very at odds with, you know, the picture you would get from watching him on sixty minutes, which is that he is hugely ambitious. He is ruthless. He is if not naive, he is perhaps reckless and he is a send it at a very young age up the chain of command to become..

Jamal kashogi Saudi Arabia Salman CIA Saudi government Riyadh NBS New York Times Malka Shoghi Tara Gatien Washington Post Vince Oman US NBC Virginia Dan Jamal Ron sixty minutes one hand
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"And my guess is his boss, Donald Trump didn't want him to pull out. But finally, the pressure was too great and they and they did. So we'll see what that means in in terms of what they're open, it responsibly, but it's a small sign that they're, they recognize how awkward since speaking of awkward, I should mention that that invite I got the which I mentioned last week's. Unless weeks episode to the Saudi national day celebration at the Saudi embassy which was supposed to be the day to the day. We're recording this October eighteenth has been cancelled. The invitation had come from the Saudi ambassador by the way, the younger brother of the crown prince, but apparently he's flown back to Riyadh as well. So I will not have the opportunity to enter the Saudi embassy and get to the bottom of what the Saudis are up to not in a partying mood, not in a party mood, but we do have somebody who is been following this story as closely as anybody is a really plugged in reporter, Shane Harris of the Washington Post coming on. So let's let's listen to his insights on this Shane Harris. Welcome to skulduggery. Thank you. I am so Pacific fan of this podcast. I'm so glad to be here. Well, we are honored that you could join us. So you wrote that the Trump administration and the Saudis are trying to come up with a way to explain the death of kashogi without implicating crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, how they're going to do that. That's going to be a great trick to pull off because so much circumstantial evidence from US intelligence reporting to analysis on social media, to passport records and other things that are pointing towards Mohammed bin soman being. If not the one who ordered this operation than being somebody who is definitely aware of it and certainly wanted to get your mouth kashogi to lay hands on him into detain him. So it's going to be a real trick to somehow say that Mohammed bin soman didn't know anything about this, particularly since if you talked to people who know how he works and how the Saudi government works. He's a micromanager. I mean, he is somebody who has his hands very. I firmly on the wheel when it comes to implementing all these reform policies overseeing the government. The idea that a group of rogue actors fifteen people in into government, planes in different groups, go to stumble to pull off an operation like this, and he's completely blindsided. It just, you know, it seems so implausible to the experts the and the officials we've talked to so and Shane, the the, I mean, having covered the Middle East, the the one area of the government that Arab leaders tend to have, you know, micromanage the most is there is there into intelligence apparatus..

Mohammed bin soman Saudi embassy Shane Harris Saudi government prince Mohammad bin Salman Donald Trump Riyadh US Middle East skulduggery Washington Post reporter
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

05:34 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"I'm Michael Isikoff chief investigative correspondent for Yahoo news and I'm Dan Kleinman editor in chief of Yahoo news. You know, Danny, when we used to be at Newsweek, we worked for a magazine that prided itself on capturing trends before anybody else did and putting him on the cover. I suspect this would be our cover for Newsweek if we were still there the new normal on political assassinations. Yep, Evan Thomas writing, writing it with as much detail as possible. And I will say, you mentioned three assassinations. I always said it takes three for trend. It look. It used to be that carrying out a state, sponsored murder on foreign soil was one of these red lines that nation states, you know, rarely if ever crossed and it doesn't look like that's the case anymore. And you got to ask the question which our guest last week. Jamaica show us good friend did whether these despots feel, you know, increasingly like they can act with impunity in part because Donald Trump has, you know, he's got this kind of devil-may-care attitude about these kinds of things right now. It's worth mentioning. Of course, this didn't begin under Donald Trump's watch when could go back to two thousand six when Alexander lifting Yanko is poisoned to death in London by Russian agents. But the fact is that the United Kingdom did not re or nor did anybody in the west respond particularly forcefully to the assassination of lifting Yanko at that time, and that may well have a sent a strong signal to Putin and others around the world that you could get away with this. But there's clearly bitter and other hic. That's what's. Differences. I mean, there are differences between between those cases and and this one, and I, I really think that it's a combination of the grisly nature of this. You know, still suspected not proven crime, but it's looking more and more like it was a murder and how it spilled out into the open. And that's kind of shocked the conscience of of the civilized world. And one of the kind of more ghoulish details that came out this week was from this audio that that the Turks say, they have of what actually happened in that consulate. And you know, it's, it's that this Saudi forensic doctor who was allegedly part of this fifteen man, Saudi assassination team. You know, at one point he says to his fellow hit squad members that they ought to listen to music. He says this while donning his own headphones while doing. Doing their work to sort of ease the tension while while dismembering you know, their victims body and it to me is sort of reminiscent of that line from Hannah Arendt Eichmann in Jerusalem, the banality of evil. There's something about that juxtaposition of what they were doing allegedly doing and you know, listening to music that is just kinda horrifying. And one other detail is the Saudi console who admonishes the hit squad, please don't do this in my presence. Can you take him outside, which was yeah, right? It's not like he obviously he's not having any pangs of conscience. If each has doesn't want to be associated with could get me into some trouble if you do this here, and it's worth mentioning that console has since left is STAN and is unavailable for questioning by at least the. Urkish investigators, but look, the larger point here is. Everybody now is watching how the White House is going to respond to this. The visual of secretary of state Pompeo flying to Riyadh meeting with m. b. s. Mohammed bin Salman the crown prince smiling seeming like he was going to the most routine of diplomatic visits when in fact, he's supposedly there to get to the bottom of a grisly murder was quite destroying to watch. So the question is is if all the signs point to this being a state sponsored assassination ordered from the very top of the Saudi regime is President Trump and the Trump administration going to respond sharply and we'll, it will this affect our relations with Saudi Arabia, and the fact is we don't really know the answer to that question right now. Yeah. No. I mean. There's a, there was a small indication today that maybe the Trump administration is beginning to kind of get the message here secretary Mnuchin the Treasury Secretary today. When we recorded this podcast announced that he would not be going to the Saudi investor conference in Riyadh. Lot of kind of high level business people and media companies withdrew from the conference in because how awkward the whole thing is, and and he took a long time to make that decision..

President Trump murder Newsweek Saudi Arabia Evan Thomas Yahoo Yanko Michael Isikoff Danny Riyadh Trump editor in chief Dan Kleinman secretary Hannah Arendt Eichmann United Kingdom Jamaica London
"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Here's a new global trend that you might not have picked up on in February two thousand seventeen. The estranged half-brother of North Korea's. Dictator is waiting for a flight at the airport in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia when two female assassins brave VX nerve agent on his face, causing him into feel dizzy, collapse and die before the ambulance carrying him can make it to a nearby hospital. Then in March, two thousand eighteen to Russian operatives attempt to assassinate a defector Sergei scruple in Salisbury England by exposing him to a military grade chemical agent, known as Nova jock and this month, dissident Saudi journalist, Jamal kashogi enters the Saudi consulate in Istanbul and never leaves amid reports that he was brutally murdered his body and fingers dismembered by a team of assassins dispatched from Riyadh. What do these cases have in common all three victims were political exiles, living abroad and murdered by age. Agents of the despotic regimes, they fled is this the new normal, the preferred way for Thawra -tarian governments to deal with pesky dissidents in the twenty first century. One other common denominator worth mentioning the regimes of all three countries that carried out these murders a run by leaders for whom President Trump has had kind words North Korea's, Kim Jong on Russia's Vladimir Putin and Saudi Arabia's crown prince Mohammad bin Salman as we sort out the latest murky news on the kashogi case will discuss the new wave of twenty-first-century state-sponsored assassinations on today's skulduggery. There is absolutely no collusion. I didn't make a phone goal, the Russia. I have nothing to do with Russia. Everybody knows it because people have got to know whether or not their president's across, but I'm not a crook. I told the American people. I did not trade arms for constitutes my heart and my best intentions still tell me that's true. But the facts and the evidence, tell me it is not. I did not have sexual relations with that woman. The British government has learned the Saddam Hussein recently saw significant quantities of uranium from Africa when he times to answer this question and you just. Shit rooms..

Russia North Korea Saddam Hussein Sergei scruple Saudi Arabia Saudi consulate Jamal kashogi Kuala Lumpur Malaysia nerve agent Vladimir Putin President Trump Kim Jong president Riyadh Istanbul Salisbury England British government Salman Africa
"murder inc" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

05:27 min | 3 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on Mafia

"The employees of murder Inc were not only good at their jobs, but took pride in their work. Once again, here is author Nate Henley. There were members of murdering corporated who were genuine sadists that they, you know, they genuinely enjoyed torturing people in horrible ways and doing all sorts of awful things. Nothing was off limits for the murder Inc workforce. They used guns ice picks knives their bare fists, whatever got the job done and anesthesia. Harnessed these brutal killers to professionalize murder. Wholesale pits were organized and efficient. Ernest Volkmann. The idea was most murders carried out by people. Religion idea was these birds be carried out by people who strangers very difficult to track. And with a new way of killing came a whole new way of talking proper business talk. A Myrtle order was called a contract. Now, sometimes the body we left around what they call the advertising budget, somebody who had stolen money, he'd be founds ants cutoff. Somebody who talk too much of his tongue cut out. Somebody would become a squeal. They find him dead with Canaries stuffed in his mouth. These are all meant to send a message. In some cases, the body totally disappeared, which case they had people, they call evaporaters who did nothing, but make sure the body was never found Albert anesthesia managed everything, but not one to take a back seat. He was a hands on kind of leader. Asked Asia could've probably just, you know what? Here you go kill this guy, but he doesn't do that. He enjoys Killian taking part of it and they say they believe he was involved in personally and sixty murmurs himself. He was a guy that just could go out and kill no compunction about it. Despite his work as the merchant of death and a stage show also had a softer side only seen by a few. All these saying is the is the street devil in a house angel. Basically what it was, you know, he's one guy on streets of Oakland. He was another guy at fort Lee, New Jersey in nineteen. Thirty seven. He married Elsa, a Canadian immigrant sixteen years, his junior who loved him dearly. Here's Diana Blass once so mind boggling about Albert anesthesia is at from nine to five during his workday. He was out executing people creating this world of fear, but then back home in New Jersey and his big sprawling mansion he looked pretty quiet life. He didn't drink. He didn't party. He had a wife and kids, and he was home every night for dinner. So just so bizarre somebody. So ruthless and evil could go and be the ultimate family man after the workday as the head of murdering cooperated. Life was good for Anna statia Lucina dream of the perfect criminal organization was becoming a reality and Anna statia was at the heart of it. But stages murdering, cooperated was becoming a victim of its own success. The growing crime wave brought attention from the public and the beliefs and by nineteen thirty five, anesthesia found himself a target for the f. b. they were trying to clean up the streets and hotshots special prosecutor. Thomas Dewey was leading the gang busting assault. Top of his list was crime, Lord, Charles lucky, Luchino, and Julie had a mandate to get his man do at this point has become very powerful. He's probably the most powerful person in law enforcement, maybe even so more j. Edgar Hoover. He's focused on just these mobsters. He felt quite rightly that their powered grown point where the danger to the Republic and he designed, he was going to do something about though he was a very extrordinary man and a legal mind like. Nobody ever seen don't. We was the kind of guy he would sit there and somebody would relate to him a prosecution case. He will listen quietly and repeat it word for word, and then turn around and argue with equal brilliance, the defense case against it. That's good. He was. I, what he did was for the first time begin to organize. Anti-crime in the way the crime had been organized for Luchino in the rest of the commission. Dewey's investigation was clearly a problem, fearing for their livelihoods Luchino and stage and other mobsters met to discuss the emerging threat and a stage. You believed he could solve the Dewey problem forever. Albert onstage you're actually started to fly away to assassinate him, begins to stand outside his Fifth Avenue apartment posing as loving father. He even said to borrow h off a bike and Joan just play with them outside the.

Ernest Volkmann murder Thomas Dewey Edgar Hoover Albert murder Inc Luchino New Jersey Killian Nate Henley Anna statia Lucina fort Lee Anna statia Diana Blass Myrtle Asia Elsa prosecutor Oakland Joan
"murder inc" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"This group were meyer lansky lucky luciano and bugsy siegel but it should be noted most those italian gangsters obviously most of the assassins and murder inc were jewish and they all answered telepathy he got his nickname leckie because his mother called him left kella i can't do a jewish accent or pronounce their words but that means little louis in yiddish about that let introduction to crime which pushcart shoplifting not that mean like grocery store pushcarts toward sounds like to me sure was he like sprinting through parking lots just grabbing from baskets because that is gangsters hell yeah i might start doing this i don't know could be my introduction to crime or organized crime but anyway by the time this it was nineteen by nineteen nineteen this dude it already served to prison terms and then him and his friend jacob gra shapiro they strong armed their way to control of the unions representing garment workers on the lower east side this is where he really started to get rolling by extorting these garment workers which are just kind of random this enabled into to shakedown factory owners by threatening to hit them with strikes he took control the unions which also guaranteed him income and capital by diverting union dues and bank accounts from their base in the garment industry diversify your assets got to you got to book alter branched out and that's when he started shaking down other area businesses with his protection racket so he had his own little you know full blown organized crime thing going though he was later to enjoy greater power and income from his ventures after becoming a major mafia player he kept control over the garment industry unions because there were so lucrative like even when he got deeper in the game he still kept his his garment industry racket going during his time he was one of the premier labor racketeers in new york city at one point he got thirty years in leavenworth for drug trafficking and unfortunately it was found out he was the killer of one joseph rosen he was a truck driver who refused to get out of town on book alters order and a snitch named abe rela to save himself ratted out our boy lepe for this and four other murders and he caught the death penalty and he sat in what was the name of the electro ole sparky or something yeah i thought that was one in florida or something really well he got he got zapped on march fourth nineteen forty four three years after he was convicted as many as one hundred deaths were attributed to let himself wow while those under his control in order in other words he ordered these hits that number might be up to around a thousand thousand human beings slain at lefties order so a lot of people went down because of this dude here's an interesting thing about him to date in history he is the only american mob boss to receive the death penalty in the united states after being convicted murder ever wow pretty wild shit and that four years yeah louis lucky buckhalter your straight up mobster you haven't heard of next segment which is similar related to this one french gangster escapes prison by helicopter this is a bad ass story that was in the news this week francis most infamous criminal this dude name ridwan fade if aig faida i don't know the dude broke out of prison for the second time in he did this shit in spectacular fashion like straight out of a hollywood movie style escape these scape again when heavily armed men took a flight instructor hostage at a nearby flying club they hijacked helicopter forced him to fly it but hijacked it and then forced him to land at the one part of the prison compound this man was being held in which doesn't have antiaircraft netting which in hindsight if the rest of the compound has antiaircraft netting they probably should've just put that shit everywhere i don't know what yeah that seems like an error they made a statement that was something along the lines of will prisoners only hang out in that part of the compound when they're being released so it did need antiaircraft it's just put the fucking netting everywhere all right anyway after they landed the.

bugsy siegel meyer lansky nineteen forty four three year thirty years four years
"murder inc" Discussed on The Morning Roast

The Morning Roast

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"murder inc" Discussed on The Morning Roast

"Shell pennzoil performance line easy for me to say thank you joel thanks yeah we got a bad way did bad way to dominate anything what are we talking about i twenty dollars get out of here we've got skype this outside is looking at it but he can't hear this talk man i could see his say the backwards dominating don't make me pull up the hits it's ridiculous zoo this that's the most shameful what put it up right now right now one's gotta go you gotta go joel scott to go best the one that's got had so many bangers that was a ridiculous and then he said that murder inc gives you like a failing and you know where you were actual bamboo like bear several bamboo thongs that hit my air and i'm like oh yeah you know what hold on i have all my phone right now because frequently i'll listen to shake the tail feather just in case you didn't know that the bamboo twenty years eight adversity roxette is a banger you don't want got no blocks murder inc understand that listen to this feel so good mace hit warning by biggie victory hit notorious thugs hit oh you see hit classics what you want hit flavor in your ear hit hypnotize hit i need a girl part to sneak banger major hit don't even forget about don't forget about side and bad boys never forget about oh with the fake big voice we love joel dudes other on his label next level mindblowing anyway very fired up about this bad boy murder inc situation we'd love joel coming up we're gonna talk about where we've been because i've been to a couple of places including los angeles california you love joel morning sodas pin radio that point got no hits show on television that you're not watching it's called the last oh gee you're listening to.

joel scott murder los angeles Shell pennzoil twenty dollars twenty years