18 Burst results for "Munakata"

"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:34 min | Last month

"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"I did not know <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that this could also <Speech_Female> be the fate <Speech_Female> of my firstborn <Silence> son. <Silence> <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> was born with a condition <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> that prevents the intestine <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> from <Speech_Female> absorbing nutrients <Speech_Female> or water for the <Silence> body. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It affects one <Speech_Female> in five million <Silence> babies <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> one <SpeakerChange> in five <Silence> million. <Speech_Female> It is <Speech_Female> so rare <Speech_Female> that one doctor <Speech_Female> felt confident. <Speech_Female> Telling us that we would <Speech_Female> be screwed. If <Silence> that's what our baby had. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> He <SpeakerChange> was the one <Speech_Female> who had to break the news to <Silence> a slater <Silence> <Speech_Female> drag. <Speech_Female> Parents have a lot <Speech_Female> to say about parenting. <Speech_Female> Even though <Speech_Female> they know their children <Silence> will die young <Speech_Female> or in my <Speech_Female> case <SpeakerChange> even <Speech_Female> if we have no idea <Speech_Female> whether our babies <Silence> will live. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Emily wrapped <Silence> wrote. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We will launch <Speech_Female> our children <Speech_Female> into a bright and <Silence> promising future. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> But see them <Speech_Female> into early graves. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> This requires <Silence> a new ferocity <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> a new way of thinking <Speech_Female> <Silence> a new animal. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We are dragging <Speech_Female> parents fierce <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and loyal <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> loving <Silence> hell. <Speech_Female> Our <Speech_Female> experiences have <Speech_Female> taught us how to parent <Speech_Female> for the here <Silence> and now <Speech_Female> for the <Speech_Female> sake of <SpeakerChange> parenting <Speech_Female> for the humanity <Speech_Female> implicit <Speech_Female> in the act itself. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Parenting <Speech_Female> i've come <Silence> to understand <Speech_Female> is about <Speech_Female> loving my <SpeakerChange> child <Silence> today. <Speech_Female> <Silence> Now <Speech_Female> in fact <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> any parent anywhere. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> That's all there <Silence> is. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> I thought <Speech_Female> my expertise <Speech_Female> in child development <Speech_Female> would help prepare me <Silence> for becoming apparent <Silence> <Speech_Female> instead <Speech_Female> becoming apparent <Speech_Female> helped me to see <Speech_Female> the science <Silence> in a whole new light <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so <SpeakerChange> third <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> appreciate <Speech_Female> how powerful the moments <Speech_Female> can be <Speech_Female> because of <Speech_Female> what they mean for you <Speech_Female> and your child <Silence> right now <Speech_Female> not because <Speech_Female> of what they mean for your <Speech_Female> child <SpeakerChange> long-term <Speech_Female> which you do <Silence> not know <Silence> <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> activist. Andrew <Speech_Female> solomon noted <Speech_Female> though many <Speech_Female> of us take pride <Speech_Female> in how different we <Silence> are from our parents. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> are endlessly sad. <Speech_Female> How different <Speech_Female> our children <SpeakerChange> are from <Silence> us. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Maybe we could be <Speech_Female> less sad if we <Silence> were more realistic. <Speech_Female> If <Speech_Female> we let go of <Speech_Female> the notion that our children's <Speech_Female> futures <SpeakerChange> are in <Silence> our control <Speech_Female> if <Speech_Female> we can embrace <Speech_Female> complexity of our children's <Speech_Female> development <Speech_Female> that can transform <Speech_Female> how we <Speech_Female> approach those parenting <Speech_Female> decisions <Silence> face each day <Speech_Female> and empower <Speech_Female> to realize <Speech_Female> how much more <Speech_Female> there is to having <Speech_Female> a child then <Speech_Female> trying to shape <SpeakerChange> a <Silence> specific outcome <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so much <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> appreciation <Speech_Female> every day <Speech_Female> in moments <Speech_Female> with my firstborn <Speech_Female> son <Speech_Female> who is thriving <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and with his younger <Speech_Female> brother <Speech_Female> and the unique paths. <Silence> They are taking. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> We <Speech_Female> are not <Music> screwed. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The science <Speech_Female> of parents <Speech_Female> and children <Speech_Female> butterflies <Speech_Female> and hurricanes <Speech_Female> can <Speech_Female> free people <Speech_Female> to focus on <Speech_Female> what is most important <Speech_Female> and meaningful <Speech_Female> in our lives. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> This can make <Speech_Female> the experience of <Speech_Female> being a parent <Speech_Female> and the <Speech_Female> experience of having <Speech_Female> been child <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> realistic <Speech_Female> and satisfying <Speech_Female> for everyone involved. <Silence> <Speech_Female> And that <Silence> i think <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> very relevant <Speech_Female> to being a good <Silence> parents. <SpeakerChange>

Andrew Emily five million today five million one doctor every day each day third one
"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:53 min | Last month

"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"The plane had been subjected to forces greater than two g. We learned that plans can withstand forces many times larger so my husband feel safe flying. He seems genuinely baffled by how anyone could feel. Otherwise i get that concept but only in the abstract. I've never been able to fly the same way since same event different experience just because an event doesn't shape people in the same way that doesn't mean it had no effect. Your parenting could be shaping. Your children. Just not in ways that lead them to become more alike. Your parenting could be leading your first child to become more serious. Your second child to become more relaxed your first child to want to be like you. Your second child want to be nothing like you. You are flapping your butterfly wings to your hurricane children. This isn't how we typically think about parenting. It doesn't make for simple advice. How could parenting books tell people how to raise successful. Happy self-reliant children. If the same parenting can lead to different outcomes for children in the same home at this point you might be thinking like students in my class sometimes. Say okay. We get it. Development is complicated. And maybe it's not worth studying because it's too complicated but meaning can be made from chaos scientists now understand how babies go from. These apparent lumps to become walking talking thinking social independent beings. They understand this process well enough to intervene to test newborns for example and treat them for a genetic condition. You still lead to mental retardation. Scientists are developing evermore sophisticated understanding of how parents could shape their children's futures. Science can tell us a lot but it will never tell us everything. So what can we do with this. I know that parents matter. That might seem obvious but smart people are arguing otherwise and what seems obvious is not always true. As we've seen second know that how parents matter is complex and difficult to predict for anyone who has ever been apparent. Stop blaming yourself. As if you are in control of your child's path you have influence but you don't have control for anyone who has ever been a child. Stop blaming your parents at least for the idea that you are defined by them. Stop blaming other parents. A recent survey of thousands of parents reveal that ninety percent of mothers and eighty five percent of fathers feel judged close to half feel judged all the time or nearly all the time by people they know and by complete strangers. These judgments probably don't reflect what's best for the kids. How could they given. How profoundly parenting as varied around the world and across time and given how the same parents can shape children's under the same roof in such different ways even when parents try their best. They can't satisfy everybody. There's only so much time this is especially true for dragon parents. The author. Emily rapp came up with this term after her baby was diagnosed with tastes x. Disease she knew then that ronin would never walk or talk. You would likely died before. Turning for.

ninety percent first child second child Emily rapp second thousands of parents eighty five percent greater than two half
"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:08 min | Last month

"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"On the one hand. He's finding seem unbelievable. Think about all the ways that parents differ from home to home and how often they argue in whether they helicopter and how much they shower their children with love you would think that would matter enough to make children growing up in the same home more alike than if they had been raised apart. But it doesn't in two thousand and fifteen a meta analysis. A study of studies found this pattern across thousands of studies following over fourteen million twin pairs across thirty nine countries. They measured over seventeen thousand outcomes and the researchers concluded that every single one of those outcomes is heritable so genes influence who children become but jeans didn't explain everything the environment matter to just something in the environment that didn't shape children growing up in the same home to be more alike. Some people have looked at these findings and concluded that parenting doesn't matter that you would have become the same person you are today regardless of. Who raised you on the other hand and really i should say on the other hands because there are many caveats to that story but also focus on one on the other hand. These findings are not all that shocking. If you think about how the same parent could shape different children. In different ways one child might find it helpful when her mother provides structure. Her sister might find it. Stifling one child might think. His parents are caring when they ask questions about his friends. His brother might think they're being nosy. One child might view divorce as a tragedy while his sister sees it as a relief. Same event different experience. My husband and i experienced this concept twenty years ago when we were thirty thousand feet over the atlantic flying from chicago to stockholm to work on a research project. The flight attendants were clearing the dinner trays. People were getting ready to sleep. We hit a patch of bumpy ear and a bunch of gers whooped and excitement. Then all of a sudden the plane was plummeting. Children and food carts hit the ceiling. The planes seemed to stabilize but then plummeted again. The ceiling panels flew up into their compartments from the force revealing wiring inside debris came crumbling down on us. People were screaming and sobbing. The plane plummeted again. After eternity the pilot came on and announced. We don't know what that was. We don't know what's coming. Stay in your seats. My husband came away from that experience. Feeling like planes are incredibly safe. Airline sent a letter informing us that we hadn't simply been falling across those thousands of feet of clear air turbulence..

stockholm chicago thirty thousand feet thirty nine countries twenty years ago two thousand One child over fourteen million thousands of studies one child today thousands of feet fifteen atlantic over seventeen thousand outcom twin pairs one single
"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:07 min | Last month

"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Power of parenting but children can be shaped by many forces that are often intertwined like successful parents successful jeans successful peers and a culture of success that they grow up in. This can make it hard to know which forces influence who children become. Okay you might think yes. It's hard to pull apart all these possible forces. We can make pretty good guesses about the importance of parents. Perhaps well how many of you know how a bicycle works. You've seen people riding bikes. Maybe you've ridden one yourself or even tried to teach someone else how to do it. Just like parenting. You've seen people doing it. Maybe you've done it yourself or even tried to teach someone else how to do it. We can feel confident about what we know when we say we now have a bicycle works. We think we have something in our heads. Something that relates the pedals to the chain and to the wheels. But when you ask people to explain how a bicycle works people have no idea work or zippers or rainbows or even topics. They argue passionately about. When you push people to explain how these things work they usually can't jus- caring about something like parenting or feeling confident about it doesn't guarantee that we understand it and everyone can't possibly be right about how parenting works. Given how wildly beliefs have varied mothers and a hunter gatherer. Society regretted when their children cut themselves while playing with knives but they thought the cuts were worth the freedom to explore even within society. Parenting wasn't a common term until the nineteen seventies before then parents weren't viewed as active shapers of children's futures years from now people may look back on today's views and feel just as amazed as we feel when hearing about other times and places the science could help parents and potential parents like my student to understand how they actually shape who their children become. Millions of children have been studied to disentangle. Although shaping forces that are usually these studies follow identical twins and fraternal twins and plain old siblings growing up together or adopted and raised apart and it turns out that growing up in the same home does not make children noticeably more alike in how successful they are. Or how happy or self reliant. And so on. Imagine if you had been taken from birth and raised next door by the family to the left and your brother or sister had been raised next door by the family to the right by and large. That would've made you know more similar or different than growing up together under the same roof.

today Millions nineteen seventies before twins fraternal children one
"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:52 min | Last month

"munakata" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"What a relief. I show people all around c antiquites. My guests engaged. I like to sprinkle in fun factor to next. Stop dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train. All over. The dc area azure smart trip to the apple wallet then tap to ride apple pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro a few years ago a student came up to me. After the second day of my class on parenting and child development. She hesitated for a second and then she confessed. I'm really interested in this material. But i was hoping your class would help me to become a better parent if i have kids someday. She was disappointed. We were going to talk about how parents do not have control in shaping who their children become. She jumped to the conclusion that my class wouldn't help her. I was caught off. Guard would confronting the science of parenting and child development not be relevant to being a good parent. I hope that my class her mind parents want what's best for their children young and old parents rich and poor married and divorced and parenting books. Promise to show how to achieve the best outcomes to address the difficult decisions that parents face every day and in the process to reveal why each of us turned out the way we did. the problem. is that parenting books and conflicting messages tiger parenting or free range. Parenting the dutch. To raise the happiest kids in the world. Or like the germans to raise self. Reliant children the one consistent message. Is that if your child isn't succeeding. You're doing something wrong. there's good news though. The science supports a totally different message. That is ultimately empowering trying to predict how a child will turn out based on choices made by. The parents is like trying to predict a hurricane from the flap of a butterfly's wings. Do you know the butterfly. The proverbial one that flaps its wings in china perturbing. The atmosphere just enough to shift win. Curran's that make their way to the skies over tropical white beaches. Intensifying the water evaporating from the ocean in a spiral of wind and fueling a hurricane in the caribbean six weeks..

iphone china six weeks each apple pay apple caribbean few years ago second day dc one consistent message germans
The Science Behind How Parents Affect Child Development

TED Talks Daily

01:55 min | Last month

The Science Behind How Parents Affect Child Development

"A few years ago a student came up to me. After the second day of my class on parenting and child development. She hesitated for a second and then she confessed. I'm really interested in this material. But i was hoping your class would help me to become a better parent if i have kids someday. She was disappointed. We were going to talk about how parents do not have control in shaping who their children become. She jumped to the conclusion that my class wouldn't help her. I was caught off. Guard would confronting the science of parenting and child development not be relevant to being a good parent. I hope that my class her mind parents want what's best for their children young and old parents rich and poor married and divorced and parenting books. Promise to show how to achieve the best outcomes to address the difficult decisions that parents face every day and in the process to reveal why each of us turned out the way we did. the problem. is that parenting books and conflicting messages tiger parenting or free range. Parenting the dutch. To raise the happiest kids in the world. Or like the germans to raise self. Reliant children the one consistent message. Is that if your child isn't succeeding. You're doing something wrong. there's good news though. The science supports a totally different message. That is ultimately empowering trying to predict how a child will turn out based on choices made by. The parents is like trying to predict a hurricane from the flap of a butterfly's wings.

Guard
"munakata" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

03:07 min | 4 months ago

"munakata" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Is the body of Frisco's USDA inspected and contain nose and 1000 Libera valuable? Asked. NBC says the febrero in Savannah supermarkets, So Camilla Siddiqui aboard Amanda, Come on Danny's spirit, No body Mass for minnows. Money on Siddiqui. And what is a couple of days? Almost Sanders and regular tomorrow Mihara pressures. My horse guarantee is in order of Italian and sent me home the same way about a quarter making it does everything effective. Oh, sorry, Kelly Blue Book Approaching Primary on the bongos, bass Bible oil city here but to come to a little more Latino l a more and more like a Xena. Improper supermarket system totals. This ingredient is gonna see to it that the man up there Neil del Antero Centavos. Oliva, Sanggojae Munakata. The stays put the dress on, says those number. They Lama Dressel accident. And this is how sweet, he said in a very complex issue out of tens of millions and economic experiencing. Castro's accident was funny about people. Latinos, Morgan Morgan. Remember? Mr Castle. I can't be happy the parking and dangerous operation. He said he was going to come for Germany. See that he is the man. Just simple. Believe your mother, Fucking oficinas Orlando El Portavoz Noticeable center in the first round. East. We story a musical restaurant. W W. What did they say? Some Swiss colonial drive. Hmm. Chief examiner.

NBC Camilla Siddiqui Amanda Germany Siddiqui Castro Savannah Castle Sanders Morgan Morgan tens of millions Frisco USDA Danny first round tomorrow Mihara 1000 Kelly Blue Book Latinos
"munakata" Discussed on Comunicazione Emozionale con Ema

Comunicazione Emozionale con Ema

02:02 min | 5 months ago

"munakata" Discussed on Comunicazione Emozionale con Ema

"Won. Praise spread so in this verb probably definitive three mahdi lamotte cynic dot images likud regional della combined solely dilemma is israel panel or luckily new equally interested in which plastic psychology through the dot is. Madonna morales which it it don't cup masuma. they'll associate qualis four billion. Kobe remain the saudi chief. La liga gone lance larson. Sony legitimacy sprint said paradorn. Fizzle nostalgia air marceau city on philippi complex in establishing a few hot your or did you start with the on roger courts. From what interest santisima radiology vitiligo. Of course ready to share. It must have been limited pretty mardi daddy yankee. Zoning reminded warm beer. They must softer the. That's your knee. Deep analogy margin people deploy up got. Ck kenosha dilemma. Shawny refined themselves can align td this john intermediary expedient saw me comunicacion. You'll be the governor. Kate put the different on twitter. Comment that kenosha in community surname sonali but we comic munakata pero laura involved too immature not only that but is it dumped rickandbubba equity data on it. Lets insulin that almost everything we salute saluto idiom. Our personal best..

Kate laura sonali twitter rickandbubba Sony Shawny Madonna philippi four billion Kobe kenosha marceau saudi likud regional della israel larson
"munakata" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"munakata" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is supported by equity multiple our real estate investing platform built for the self directed investor. When holly retired. She knew her priorities. She wanted the freedom to spend morning sewing afternoons on the water with her husband and weakens with their grandchildren so she turned to equity multiple equity multiple holly to access. Rigorously vetted commercial real estate investments. And she can choose from a diverse set of exclusive assets with cash flowing investments. A streamlined experience an asset management team. Holly knows that our portfolio is built for her future. Join holly and thousands of investors across the us at equity multiple dot com worrying. Some of us have turned it into a part-time job. I just heard you said fulltime you can worry about if your favorite presidential candidate is really going to get in viral pandemic. Did i mention economic crisis. Worrying itself has a cost. Marketplace's kristen schwab talked to some economists. What's worrying corey leach. These days what am. I not worried about leeches thirty four and lives in chicago with her husband and two daughters a three year old and a six month old yup a pandemic baby and having a new baby has heightened leeches worries about cova and climate change in the middle of the night. When i'm feeding my daughter There's definitely been moments where it's like. That's all i can think about doing this loving thing. You're feeding a baby but you're looking down not thinking about that. love your thinking about. Oh my god. I'm sorry for bringing you into the world. Not being present in the moment is one of the biggest cost of worrying. Says frank schoenbach a behavioral economist at mit. You know there's a budget that you have in your mind for mental energy that you can devote to different things and if you worry a lot about things that are out of your control within you have fewer cognitive resources available for other things in your life. Worrying actually hijacks a piece of your brain which can lead to sleep. Loss careless mistakes at work and even physical exhaustion but worry also serves an important purpose. Says lisbeth romer a psychologist and co author of the book. Worry less live more thinking about what might happen. Future is an incredibly adaptive thing. They just very human and berry natural for us to respond to threaten prepare for threat worrying forces us to problem solve but of course not. All problems are solvable. And just telling yourself to stop can actually make it worse. We worry and where it feeds on worrying than we want to not worry so we try not to worry and now we're wearing about worrying. How did we get here. Some of it's wiring some of its habit so we can learn from it being modeled if folks in our families worried lot. So what can we do. I think different people find different things useful. Sonia bishop is a columnist at uc berkeley. She says some people practice. Mindfulness others exercise they're also studies that show actually scheduling a half hour to worry can help you focus outside that time block and if none of those works if you're busy occupying your mind with something that seri cognitively challenging when you literally contin gauge and worrying like me instead of worrying i worked on this story about worrying. I'm kristen schwab for marketplace. But here's some progress stock in the pharmaceutical company. Biogen rose forty four percent yesterday. After the fda liked tests showing biogen's alzheimer's drug is effective in slowing the progress of the dementia exceptionally persuasive evidence. The regulator said at a mob is what they call the drug which seems like something spelled backwards but but munakata doesn't mean anything either other than the possibility of helping to address a terrible affliction. I'm david brancaccio. Marketplace morning report from apm american public media just in ho with marketplace. The economy is changing so fast. It's hard to keep up so our latest podcast is here to help. It's called the marketplace minute. Give us just sixty seconds. And we'll bring you the latest on what's happening in the economy three times a day market business news in how the numbers affects your personal economy. We'll tell you what you need to know why it matters. Just ask your smart speaker to play the marketplace minute or. Find it wherever you get your podcasts..

Holly Sonia bishop kristen schwab us corey leach lisbeth romer david brancaccio frank schoenbach chicago fda alzheimer cova mit uc berkeley munakata
"munakata" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:56 min | 11 months ago

"munakata" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"You would've remodeled your house by now, but instead you have twenty-six sweatsuits in every color under the rainbow. Who are that were that? You look really good. Acute and Enzi specially paradise with your geordies Oh. My New Jordan's Ooh so I, have some bad news. Well We say bad news. Yeah, we will. I was doing real time fact, check. And there was no facts. I think it's just because there were no facts to let it could be because I got lost in conversation that I forgot to pay attention to hear for facts, so you pretty mesmerized by smile I everytime. He flashed me that smile. Look over at you and see how you were taking that smile. You're taking it well not to take. It's an incredible smile as a beautiful beautiful and his brother they there is smile as well. It's a whole. FACE CHANGES IT'S They give weekly has which is, he's got this cute fucking smile, no matter how naughty he was being. Everyone just loved him because he would smile. What a superpower! It's a good one have a very nice smile. I always compliment you on how white and straight your teeth are. But it it would never get you out of trouble I. Don't look at that smile and go like Oh. That's innocent. Little Bird I go. That's a mischievous vandal. My smile gives me away Teddy. Trouble. Sheriff Callie that's not true at all. Very innocent well now my smile doesn't give me on anything right here. I'll smiley a ready. Look scary. Back of your eyes got huge. Yeah, so I found a new EMOJI yesterday a right. It's a moon and it has a face. Senate. Yeah, it's pretty cool. I sent it to you and I said. This is a Munakata. YEA, said it looks like me, and then I also sent it to jess and he didn't like it. Only on what grounds he said, it looked a racist. Now I said he was raised. That makes sense. He was whatever I don't even know what he said yet, but it was definitely racist. He said it looks sinister Oh okay, and I said well I'm sinister. Fair yes, over and then he said you are not gray, okay? The Moon is grayish black, and then I called him racist because of. any who I guess all to say, the Moon. Ika has kinda sly smile. Not Unlike the Mona Lisa says right so are you saying my smile is like Mona Lisa or Monica? Smile, let's see really. I'd. This, Mile Monica just gave me looks like she just eight six Cotton Tan an amusement park in is about to explode. This is file. You like Nice. You Look Ernest, thank you, that's I think nice. That means so sincere smile. Were there others I'm bridge. Okay, too. That's a dangerous word to use this I. Don't know whenever no whenever I use it. I'm just like boy hope. That was the right use of about. Never here on bridge. I mean professor umbrage from Harry Potter. You used it correctly. Most certainly I'm just saying you never hear it so when you're here. You're like Oh. Man, I hope that was right. Take on. Actually take umbrage. FEEL RESENTMENT TAKE OFFENSE YEAH! Explains how you feel about. Your resentful there was no facts. No, Oh, what are you taking? umbrage with or Ambroise using this expression features one of the surviving uses of umbrage, which now means resentment, but it comes from the Latin umbra for shade, presumably alludes to the shadow of displeasure. So shade is an old saying. No Shade Umbrella Oh okay I got wired resentful, and I heard shade, and I think of modern colloquial for shade is to disrespect or cast some kind of aspersion..

EMOJI Mona Lisa Monica Sheriff Callie Munakata Senate Cotton Tan Ernest jess professor Harry Potter
"munakata" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on KTRH

"We will take calls with Stirling this hour Recco wanna read you a little clip from the New York Times and get your take on this. This incredible story that everybody's been talking about the strange objects one of them, like a spinning top moving against the wind appeared almost daily from the summer of two thousand fourteen to March of two thousand fifteen high in the skies over the east coast navy parts reported to their superiors, that the objects have no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes, but that they could reach thirty thousand feet and hypersonic speeds these things would be out there. All the Lieutenant Ryan graves, an f a eighteen super hornet pilot, who has been with the navy for ten years, and reported his sightings to the Pentagon, and congress keeping an aircraft in the air requires significant amount of energy with the speeds. We observed twelve hours in the air is eleven hours longer than we'd expect what the heck were they talking about Rick. I don't know. You're dealing with various advanced aircraft's. It's possibly extraterrestrial possibly not. But whatever it is. It's moving, you know, hypersonic mach five or higher, the they both the air force in the navy as we understand it is in the process of developing specific reporting procedures for, for UFO. So they're taking anything, you know, were they ever responsibility to protect the country from any our airspace? They're very concerned about that. And rightfully so, and they stopped short of calling them extraterrestrial. Well, actually they won't say, personal opinion is that there's a reasonable possibility that some of them are extraterrestrial would I like to have one of them, you know, where we could go in and study them that would end all I think we do already somewhere. There's no question that there's been reason. Cetera. That makes you wonder certainly makes you wonder it's an amazing story. Let's go to some of the phones Mary's in New Jersey. Welcome to the program. Hi, mary. Go ahead. Stronger as upon ages, and you're like a leaker spot like was it could fly out? Okay, ma'am. Question about the van Allen belt, the Rick in does it get stronger is getting stronger or weaker. I, I don't think there's been any major changes, I there might be some change. I heard of a few years ago, there was a weakening in one section of it or something, then I'll radiation belts faster, noughts is not that significant because the, the spacecraft will go through it so quickly that you won't get much radiation effect on astronauts, a greater problem. What would Vassar notch would be what's called, galactic cosmic rays coming through solar system? And I think I've recommended for many years, as far back as I was in high school that we develop electro-magnetic shields possibly, augmented by sort of passive system. Some sort of material inside the spacecraft to shield, astronauts. But the idea of how you know spacecraft should be shielded is one of the things that NASA working on on a lot right now. And that will probably I'm sure it'd be part of the president's plan as part of the. Medical aspects. You know, it's very important that we protect astronauts, and using the what's called the lunar gateway, which, which a major part of the president program in orbit around the moon. We can do a lot of medical tests up there, you know, radiation tests, and other things to get a much better idea of the effect on astronauts, as well as what type of shielding will be necessary for say a man mission to Mars, what did the Russians discover in the of serenity on the moon in nineteen seventy that is another interesting. Recently did a paper on that I'm gonna lead from his papers and talent search of the Linda cod model. Mentioned what's interesting about this model. Is that NASA itself disgusted in one of their articles in this article, we digress from investigation ancient Mr. on our examining unresolved mystery of the moon, half a century ago? Apollo landed the first men in the moon a few years later, the Soviet Union continued their unmanned exploration program with the landing, and they get this. All that out of the Luna cod. Twenty one day Munakata to the Rover spacecraft in the mood in the crater Lehmann any I don't I'm not speak. French, too good. A month later on Thursday. February fifteenth nineteen Seventy-three, the Soviet news agency TASS reported that the Luna cod to with investigating quote unusual piece of lunar material, and quote report stated that a one meter long plate resembling, a modern house panel was proven to be strong monolith and goes on to describe the play as having a smooth surface and mentioned about it being mentioned in, in the Soviet are in the, the journal, Soviet aerospace, and it says the article aerospace, stated that the stone played, which has, so which has so puzzled scientists end quote, has he's mood surface, which is unlike the large stones in the area, and then it was stood the buggies pressure of a hundred atmospheres which left only slight traces on. Thin layer of dust, which covered the plate. So must have been a very hard material. And other words, also article said, scientists have determined at the plate seems much younger than the other stone. But you're only area because of the monolith uniqueness scientists decided to continue to investigate it to determine the chemical composition and magnetic properties as well as to transmit TV photos object was found on February thirteenth and plans were made to continue the investigation through the sixteen. The bedrock in the immediate area was described as being different from the material verb and tested earlier. And because the model of is also so different from the surrounding bedrock scientists were wondering if such a combination is accidental. Then he describes us news of this discovery was also reported by NASA, quote a monolith, one meter three feet long of unusual. Luna material was discovered February thirteenth, the plate had a strong smooth surface. Unlike surrounding park, Mark stones and appeared to be much younger. End quote, case you where that came from that quote, that is that quotas from the NASA document NASA SP dash, one eight aeronautics and astronautics nineteen seventy three and on page forty three it has the quote. Right. Says US are ground control. Commanded, the lunar toil to unfold unfolded solar battery panel and begin its second day of winter exploration. And then in the next paragraph it quotes that again, a monolith, one meter three feet long of unusual. Luna material was discovered February thirteenth played at a strong smooth. Stones and appeared to me much younger. Here's something I thought. Few weeks ago, the president of the Russian Academy of scientists came to an had discussions with our president of our national scientists, and let's see a minister with the top officials of NASA, and they decided that there's going to be two working groups to investigate the cooperation or areas. Venus exploration and moon exploration. I wonder if it would be possible for some somebody, high up the NASA, given the fact that NASA self is already discussed this in their own editor to request of the president of Soviet academy academy of scientists. There's there was data taken here. There was magnetometer data. There was chemical, composition data and apparently there was high resolution photographs. I would like to see all that data. So we could get a better idea what this thing was, it sounds on usual, and even that described it as unusual. So I if we could get access to that other day that would be very important. And maybe that's something, you know, NASA could think about trying to do is they develop their cooperative ventures with the Russia to try and get the data that this, whatever this object was did you ever hear reports that somebody may have spotted a small humanoid in the sea of serenity now doubt that all right? That sounds crack but. One of those stories next up on the calling list, Brian east of the Rockies in Indiana. Hello, Bri, George good morning. Hi there. How's everything going good? Hey actresses. Hey, we take the next time I talk to her. Who'll. Hey, listen. I ball. I hope they all day yesterday came to northern Indiana here too. They had day care today, who I met over Columbus, her partner, survive maintenance storm into it's been rough. Hey, listen. This is a great topic man. I'm we'll all about space exploration, and everything. And I was talking time you off off year and he kind of confirms that the last time then Linda Bolton. How was on the show by eight weeks ago or so she made it who sort gainer for time. She made a statement about seeing a memo. Okay, next. I can't remember who she said, I don't even know show to where it was from. And I understand, you know, you can just print amendment, I can look to Washington DC inside the beltway memos all the time. Anyway. She made statement that they already have the Dishman most that there's already two generations. George two generations already living on the dark side of the moon and I'm really interested in it. She said, they also established enter electrical trade with e my question is of electric gas. I can't remember his name to respond to the part about the two generations have already that are already up on the moon and planning to go to Mars to generation, he caught. Selectors not you'll nobody's up there. So I just want him to respond to that. And if anybody had pictures from the Columbus show about me on state posted to the wife. You got fast fans. You guys Ryan towards we had them in a live stage show where he proposed to his wife, the proper way with the ring this time right after all these years. But this one there's been talk that there's civilizations up on the moon, if you believe it or not, did you ever come across anything like that? And I, I would be very, very skeptical of something like that. In order to say you know, I just I. Nothing is impossible. But I would say it's extremely unlikely that, you know, we're up there already or somebody, you know, there may may very well be artifacts. I think it's highly probable, given these some of the things we've talked about. But somebody up there living. I, I think that's pretty far out for me. That's beyond my realm. Beyond my paygrade, so to speak next up. Let's go to Steve in the state of Washington. Welcome to the program. Stephen, go ahead. Yeah. The only thing to say it was, you know. I think private industry. I cover this. I don't think the government should we have enough problems here without one someplace else. And who them? I think that the most the most problems can be solved with private industry. I think you're right. I think most private industry will probably end up doing this, but the government will probably contract with them or pay them. They got it. They're not gonna do it for free. So somebody's got to pay them, but it's going to be much less than have the government did it, Rick. I would think that would be overwhelmingly less when it would be significantly less, you know. And here's another thing once the government puts a certain amount of money into it certain point, the private industry is going to take over everything here and, and just run it as a business. There's, there's some discussions..

NASA president Rick navy Ryan graves Columbus Indiana advanced aircraft New York Times George Stirling Soviet Union Mark stones crater Lehmann New Jersey Soviet aerospace Mary Washington Pentagon
"munakata" Discussed on Podcast

Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on Podcast

"Pat those experience some lamb better yet why next geico's textile fin hopper unisom pasi copay top nato munakata on occa madeo last jones the cosmic adopt amid dot com pablo sensations johnson to deal in vancouver lipa larvae doesn't have to use your plaque the particular uniform any horie ver not to say in the perth debt up to new avalon it foot how extraordinary the doc dala team in concert who the harsh reviews it as nipah professor reno hoc the anime dabbagh jemaine she's if an potato do not forget of where you're not meet kentucky's alaw what are you the weekly met guy i am forbath average nino homage to debry after soi oakland mashing cabinet knitter energy after one of the main while the savant halo nisei cdo how you donovan exceptional interros hookah sneak after your sauce for causing gusau blah told hana touchy.

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"munakata" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on WTMA

"Is a racist dialogue that they're having she is expressing her racism and her party has convinced her that if you live in a red state that you're walking among people who are all racists and don't think of you as a fullfledged person and stuff which honestly as is the democratic party has they've codified the soft bigotry of low expectations they live for affirmative action and and it'll be 'cause i mean it's condescending but because they they believe that you're not capable of accomplishing anything on your own because of your race and heads the democratic party is the cornerstone these days of the party of the confederacy just by the way i so uh the the of ice news continues he decided to go on a women of color healing retreat munakata hairy the idea is simple for ten days black women come together to eat vegan food meditate doing yoga and naturally i know we're having a white men they wouldn't be vegan we'd have lots of red meat and whiskey and beer you know probably guns we have a good time everybody and i have a lot of fun but if you had a white men retreat where people just had to get away from black people can you imagine the coverage of that story by vice nervous it can to here comes andrea the tenth we needed a safe space that was outside in the united states it's a whole certain conversation merge just the hill i don't think that we can do that in the united states i think that we're suffering and suffocating engines dying every single day trying to survive their nutro drew few can overcome brazil you had to leave the country to overcome research it's funny because uh when conservative try to have a conversation there are riots like at the university of washington over the weekend done uh and so on and uh ben shapiro now they'll they'll burn the town down somebody reasonable from giving a speech so she's having trouble having a conversation sure your well you're you're now this is this is one of my favorite once i love this soundbite uh it's a small price when black people want a break from feeling like a minority may often have to.

democratic party united states brazil ben shapiro university of washington ten days
"munakata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That's the trio called bolo their album is also called bolo and that piece is called shunga a prayer too that the day eddie of that name from the or the people of nigeria before that we heard munakata a piece by the trio called could donor from their album called cardona the two trio's both americanbased separated by about thirty five years condone a recorded that first of three albums back in 1979 and this record by bolo is from just last year i think it's interesting to put the two together backed back like that because you can see how the the context of world music playing has shifted over the the decades you know back in the '70s and '80s it was really the improvising musicians guys who had a foot in the jazz world who were the first to pick up these instruments from india and west africa in north africa and make music like could dona and then when by the time we get to bolo you know the the kind of africa pop thing has swept through and there's much more of a rock slash pop flavor to world music nowadays than there was say in 1980 in a moment will bring back code donor colin wolcott dan sherry and none of us can sell us for a really interesting medley that they put together of some music by the late ornette coleman who was kind of don sheri's mentor and stevie wonder we'll also hear one of done sherry's other bans old and new dreams taking on perhaps ornette coleman s best known work all of that is still to come on this edition of new sounds as in the senate does not mean the tax bill that could hurt new york will become law mayor de blasio holds out hope bath to go back to the house and there there's a real fight to be had because there's all water elman build are causing controversy perhaps members right and left within the republican party band of lousy o on the brian lehrer show next time will follow the breaking developments on taxes and the russia investigation the brian lehrer show weekdays at ten am on wnyc wnyc and supported.

wnyc russia brian lehrer republican party de blasio don sheri colin wolcott africa dona north africa nigeria the house new york senate stevie ornette coleman dan sherry west africa india cardona thirty five years
"munakata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Seven thirty nine one of our occasional programs of world music crosscultural music and back to 1979 we go for this first of the three albums by co dona the band's name is the first two letters of each of the three musicians colin wolcott who played the indian sitar indian toddler african thumb piano lots of other percussion dan sherry the great trumpeter who cut his teeth musically with ornette coleman and then became an early world music enthusiast picking up flutes from around the world and the dusson ghunaywah type of loot from west africa which you'll hear in this piece and none of us can sell us the brazilian multi instrumentalist plays all kinds of precaution the barron bowel which looks like an archery boat with a gore detached and while none of the three r lead singer material they do all saying in a kind of charming perhaps amateurish but still very communal sounding way in this piece called munakata a title that doesn't seem to mean anything it was written by colin wolcott and then we'll go back to the band bolo for a piece from their selftitled record that's called shunned go a prayer of sorts to one of the yoruba dieties of west africa and once again bolo just like could donor did over three decades ago bringing together sounds from africa and asia in this americanbased trio so first here's this piece from the first first and selftitled album by the trio co donor the more you do in number.

dan sherry ornette coleman colin wolcott asia west africa africa three decades
"munakata" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"The wants to impose multiple instances were rose walked in front of her with no clothes on while she worked from his house her name as kyle godfrey ryan when onto describes several crude phone call i took closed and how she was fired on rose learn she spoke to an acquaintance about his behavior so they're in lies the problem for charlie rose and whatever organizations working fourth at a time when she was fired she said because she brought up his in a proper fear and cease to for the company shortly thereafter i explained to my superior how unit prone inappropriately spoke to me during these times she would just shrugging say that charlie being charlie that's problematic for pbs and our cbs so that's a problem p plus has suspended rose uh the whole show with his suspension cbs will carry on without him on the morning show charlie rose come back after this i don't know as he always think about with every accusation who survived and who has gone into the barrel for good swim john conyers ryan seacrest glenn thrush the longtime political lighter who also now rights for the new york times now rights for the new york times oliver stone covered charlie rose mi missing anybody nick like twenty more who i know new oh new no oliver stone said russell simmons in yesterday the night com size more eric bolling uh you know and of course the president's remaining quite muthana roy more for some reason his called out al franken jeremy piven kevin spacey bill o'reilly got that as says the year the accused the year the accusers there's very interesting something god just coming out here too uh you familiar with rich miller in the capital facts at el springfield well i guess the state gop as saying that dad john democratic senator duckworth uh have gotten money from frank in at some point in time and i guess zerorez senator away because frank and had a pack at one point yeah so what does that mean addicted so what republicans would say dick durban and tammie duckworth are forced sexual harassment buffoonish has well see but this goes back to his talked about earlier you know like to strip club given money to a munakata candidate well if the strip clubs legal so you know people he's probably lean you'll donations to.

senator harassment bill o'reilly kevin spacey eric bolling charlie rose kyle godfrey tammie duckworth dick durban frank pbs senator duckworth gop el springfield roy president russell simmons oliver stone the new york times
"munakata" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The eclipse shadow passes over eu it's dark it's about as dark as a full moon night so it's not completely dark uh you may start to see bright stars and planets in the sky the horizon around you is a whit so it's a very strange looking so lord of dark and then a few seconds to a couple of minutes later the moonshadow moves on the at the totality part is over then you've got to have the the seal strange shadows again and then it continues until the moon leaves the face of the sun and eclipses over isn't it kinda cool me there's a lot of cool things about the moon but isn't it kinda cool that the moon is just the right size and distance that we get this yeah one this fund drama it's it's exactly right and it's not common in the solar system for a moon to be large enough to cover the sun we just happened to have a moon which is one quarter the earth's diameter whereas most of the moon's in the solar system if you compare them to the size of the thing that they orbit that thing they go around there are a lot smaller and so we're lucky to have a moon that is big compared to us it's it's a large munakata sorry compared to other moons it's a large minute i'm but also we've got the benefit of perspective even though the moon is one quarter the size of the earth its smaller and it's much smaller than the sun the sun is at the right distance away that the moon can cover it completely and so the moon is four hundred times smaller the sun is four hundred times farther away so that's how we can we can have this phenomenon happen the once it gets dark i'm guessing is where most of his side's will happen right what are the what are the big science experiments that's going to happen when that totality up and so one of the things that totality affords scientists to study is parts of the sun that are usually fairly inaccessible to us so when totality happens the moon covers the sun you see this this wispy white stuff around the sun that's the sun's outer atmosphere it's called.

solar system one quarter
"munakata" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"munakata" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"He shouldn't be allowed back in the game but we've seen as recently tate what was that game with a quarterback last year was that the miami quarterback tan how what are met more met met more i went back in and there was a camnews zoning to member where he was knocked silly yeah earlier in these guys wanna stay in they don't wanna come out and so we're we're entering this weird time where the athletes now have the information so we can't say this is like pre two thousand ten where it's like the nfl's lying about the effects of concussion and longterm damage all that stuff in there dis cat they're intentionally discounting studies about it in all the stuff that they did now we know we know concussions aren't great for you we know it's not good to have repeated concussions we know every time he had a concussion it takes longer recover we have stories all the time now like the story sports ostriches data about the 72 dolphins and nick munakata and some of the guys in that team in the fact that you know they there to take some ten minutes to get dressed all these things are now in the in in the public in brady has this information and if he gets buzzed and he decides to play and we end none of the doctors and spotters can really spot the science at that point what do you do well you know what you could do so here the the central hum neurological fact that drives a lot of this is is as follows that your risk of ct is a linear function of the number of hits you take to the head on so there.

nfl nick munakata brady tate miami ten minutes