20 Episode results for "Mulholland"

California Water Wars - There It IsTake It | 3

American History Tellers

41:01 min | 10 months ago

California Water Wars - There It IsTake It | 3

"Mm-hmm maginness twelve. And you're writing a streetcar through the crowded streets of Los Angeles your printer by trade. And you just left your office. One of the few shops in Los Angeles that's still follows. Union practices is getting near impossible to keep a job in the city. The Union is all you've got with every day that goes by powers of the city's he's capitalists get stronger and stronger olive avenue. You climb down the steps from the Streetcar and Hurry to the home of your friend. Job Job Harriman. He's been depressed since his failed may oral campaign but you found something that might rally. His spirits. Job Doesn't keep his door locked. A small sign next to it. Reads property is theft. Come on in so you walk straight into a small house without knocking me. Listen I want. Don't you take a look at something. Joe We take in the sad state of jobs house. Coffee Cups and old campaign flyers are scattered everywhere. hand-scrawled not not newspaper clippings have been pinned to a wall. Two cats jump off the dining room table. The place is a mess here. You find him lying on the rug tossing a rubber ball at the wall and catching. It looks like he hasn't slept for days. Listen a friend at work. Pass this book on me. Thought you might be interested. Joe Picks himself up from the floor and takes the slim hard bound book your hand he flips through the pages conspiracy by. WT spillman. This everything you were talking about your mayoral campaign. This fellow has gone through and laid out a very good case. Both against the aqueduct against Harrison Otis and the land speculators. I've never heard of spillman. I haven't either but copies are spreading all over the city fully sitting up now job leafs through the pages. This is incredible is just like you were saying thing in the campaign Mulholland. His aqueduct are both rotten to the core. When the people of Los Angeles discover the graft and self interest right under their nose they'll have no choice but to condemn the entire project and shut it down permanently? Do you think we can get more copies of this book printed. I can try Joe. Climbs up from the floor walks towards the wall to study his PIN news clippings. Suddenly he's filled with a burst of energy. You'll have to do better than try. The investigation board hearings are in less than a month. Use Your connections actions at the printers start handing out free copies of this book. We need to send it to every newspaper. I can go to the meeting hall this evening. If anyone's available seeing job excited it makes you excited you start clearing off space on the dining room table progress should be for the people. Water should be for the people not just the fat cats at City Hall in the Water Department Department and jobs right. There's no time to waste. Investigation Board is coming up. Job will be there to put their feet to the fire. When it's all over you job job and the rest of the workers will help bring Mulholland and his corrupt gang to their knees? American history tellers is brought to you by capital one. You know how it feels when you've saved enough for that long awaited home edition now. Imagine saving enough for an addition on that edition and that's the feeling with capital one. Where new savings account earns five times? The national average capital one is helping you earn more towards your savings goals. This is thanking reimagined. What's in your Wallet Capital One and a member? FDIC From wondering I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American history tellers our history your story by the middle of nineteen twelve. The Los Angeles aqueduct was at a crossroads. Construction was nearly complete along finger of steel steal tunnels and conduits stretched in nearly unbroken line for two hundred miles from the small town of independence in Inyo County. All the way south to Los Angeles engineer near William Mulholland self imposed deadline of mid nineteen thirteen. Seem very much within his grasp. Still there were those who doubted. The intentions of the engineer and of the entire hire project itself Mulholland would find his work buried under an avalanche of criticism and the focus of an investigation backed by the city. And even as the waters of the owns river finally flowed into a parched Los Angeles down to a trail the idealism surrounding the aqueduct and Mojo part in its creation. This is episode three three there. It is take it in the spring of Nineteen twelve job. Harriman suddenly found himself a popular popular man fresh off a stinging loss as the socialist mayoral candidate in the previous year's race. Herman continued his call for an investigation into the construction of the aqueduct. Worked the entire project. He declared had been theft from the beginning and his charges began to gain traction among a wary public. He went so far as to publish a pamphlet in which he laid out the details of what he called a water plot. Many of these were cribbed from a book. by W T spillman called the conspiracy which went to great lengths. To prove of the city's new water source was less about civic interest and more about personal profiteering. Like all good conspiracies. Spillman is mixed fact and conjecture until it was impossible to tell where one ended and the other began the plan he wrote involve gobbling up all the available land in the San Fernando Valley while securing Owens Valley water to irrigate them. He named William Mulholland and former Los Angeles Mayor Fred Eaton as complicit in the plot other alleged co conspirators included. La Times Times publisher Harrison. Otis along with his son in Law Harry Chandler and Streetcar Magnate. Moses Sherman Herrmann argued all these men stood to profit handsomely while Los Angeles taxpayers footed the bill. Some newspapers began to wonder. If they had also been duped. The aqueduct was the largest public works project. The city had ever attempted attempted. It seemed impossible that there wasn't a nasty secret lurking somewhere. Underneath it to combat the swirling rumors Mulholland recommended the creation of an aqueduct investigation. Instigation board it would be made up of five members from the city's various political parties and job. Harriman the former socialist candidate for mayor. Who is now hammering? The aqueduct for waste wasted corruption would lead it Mulholland felt. He had nothing to hide. If this board wouldn't put an end to the matter. He reasoned that at least it would be a good act of faith. The Aqueduct Investigation Board hired detectives to comb through the project's expense reports and budgets sheets. It interviewed site fight foreman and made structural integrity assessments at the dams and reservoir sites up and down the aqueduct line over several aggravating months Mulholland dash from the desert job sites nights to a stuffy chamber room in the city to answer questions from the Investigation Board. The affair quickly turned into a political wrestling match. The board humorless and often snide interrogated Mulholland with questions designed to trip him up when asked about the percentage of runoff for all the watersheds above twenty. Five hundred feet Mahala Bart. What kind of memory do think I have? The board member retorted that. He's been making a study of these things for years and yet Milhollin can answer that question. Mohammed toward that the board board member had been studying law for years but he couldn't give a citation without going to a book looking for for every statistic milholland presented based on decades of research. The board presented a handpicked witness to refute. The proceedings led more than one spectator to dismiss the whole affair as a kangaroo court. Mulholland was feeling strained. Not just by the board. There were several tragic episodes along the aqueduct as well in July a dynamite explosion caved in the roof of the clearwater tunnel in the San Gabriel. Mountains uh-huh three men were killed and four others. Badly injured had to dig their way up to the surface to live. Mulholland arrived at the scene to find John Gray. His old form in from Elizabeth Tunnel wracked with grief. Gray was the superintendent of clearwater and his son. Louis was one of the injured men who crawled their way out of the darkness. More violence followed a month later when to workers nearly killed each other while fighting with minors picks not long after that three workers near Mojave. Were coating the inside of the pipeline with a sealant of oil paint while trying to light a piper cigarette one of them struck a match. The fumes ignited killing all three men instantly in all forty. Three men were killed in accidents. Related to the aqueducts construction. Mulholland could take some comfort. That fatalities were much lower than at the Panama Canal or the catskill aqueduct. Cuidado New York but it was cold comfort best. Mohali could take comfort that the efforts of Job Harriman and the investigation board were finally dwindling away. Two of the five board members quit in protest in a letter of resignation. They wrote that they'd heard quite enough to come to their own conclusion. There has not been brought to our attention. One Particle Particle of evidence that would reflect in any way upon the integrity of management of the aqueduct proposition from its inception to the present time. In short. The two resigning members had had enough enough of the sniping. Harriman however had not his inquisition struggled on for a few months but by then the public lost interest too many it had become clear that the investigation board was a political mudslinging operation. And besides the aqueduct itself was nearly complete the board had uncovered no conspiracy a big enough or nasty enough to stop the Owens River water from flowing into Los Angeles the following year nonetheless the board did announce its findings ignoring all Lebanon to the contrary the Board declared that the Los Angeles watershed could even without the aqueduct support. Three times the city's current population. It noted that the Owens River water was contaminated by high levels of alkaline and unfit for drinking purposes. And finally that the general lack of supervision during the pipeline's construction and resulted in men's financial loss to the taxpayer. However the report regretfully concluded could find no direct evidence of graft or illegality an exasperated? Aspirin Mulholland was relieved to put the whole mess behind him. He privately worried that by creating the review board he may have in fact open a Pandora's box of conspiracy and criticism awesome but since the board didn't have the power to enforce its findings. He declared the matter closed still. He couldn't resist taking one. Last parting. Shot of his own Mahal told a reporter the concrete of the aqueduct. To a last as long as the pyramids of Egypt or the Parthenon of Athens. I will tell you that the aqueduct will at least endure until job Harriman. Harriman elected mayor of the city. Los Angeles his quote appeared on the front page of every newspaper in California and by the summer of nineteen thirteen. The last miles. I also the Los Angeles aqueduct were about to be complete Mahala and finally was ready to finish what he'd started. Imagine it's November fifth nineteen thirteen the day of the aqueducts grand opening. You wanted to see it for yourself so you enlisted your grandson drive you from your home in and Boyle Heights at eighty three. You've seen most of everything or the crowds leading up to the cascade point or something to behold and as for the aqueduct itself. It's marvelous like a staircase cascading down from the top of the hill. Where large gates stands at the crest men from the city are standing at a podium giving speeches and then it with the crack of a twenty one gun salute gates open water spills down the causeway? It's beautiful to watch white. And Frothy theon rushing down the hill. So fast you remember how it used to be. A water was always hard to come by. The city has been your home ever since you were little. Your husband is buried here. Your a daughter married a banker started her own family. Here just wanders a gift for all of them for their future and even your grandson right now peering over the edge gotta say grandma. This is impressed. Gosh Darn it leaning over to look down your grandsons hatfill right off the top of his head you can see it now flat and soaking and wet following the top of the water line down. The spillway. Just might lock isn't it. That's one of voice from behind. startles the both you see gravity. Got The better part of Your Stetson William Holland himself standing next to both of you. Peering of the Ledge. Don't worry you'll find your hat at the bottom damn in about seven minutes you serious the water's moving about three hundred feet from minute. Seven minutes seems about right and we can have one of our men. Fish it out grandson. Thanks him or he's down the hill after his hat. But you stay looking into the man's eyes. He's taller than you call. The only ever saw him from a distance. You used to be neighbors. Many years ago your grandson and his children used to play together in Holland Back Park. Do you remember Boyle Heights Mr Mulholland. He looks at you expecting you to perhaps as something more yes of course I do was wonderful place for my family. Hope you feel. The same smile begins to form on his face. I do. I'm glad it was for you to. Perhaps he recognizes you all those years ago perhaps not but in that moment. You're just two people sharing a memory of the city. They love while a torrent of freshwater water streams nearby enough water. You hope to keep the city growing long after your both gone. The grand celebration of the aqueducts opening continued throughout the day and into the night pressed to say something at the moment. The Gates were opened Mulholland campus thoughts succinct. He turned to the mayor. And the thirty thousand spectators who gathered to watch and try to make his voice heard of the water rushing down the spillway. There it is he said. Take it at a boozy banquet. Following the cascade ceremony while Holland was more verbose as he raised a toast to the city officials. Failure cannot come to anything that southern California undertakes takes with such citizens what Mulholland had termed. The big job was finished. Los Angeles had its water and perhaps just as appealing to the civic minded Mulholland. The entire six year project had come in at the original budget of twenty four million. What was more esme? It showed that revenues from the cement and power generation plants that were built during construction. Long with the sale of surplus equipment would return about three million dollars to the city. Mulholland kept his glass raised at the men around him. mm-hmm then continued with his toast. We are undoubtedly people doomed to success. One guest though was conspicuously not present for the celebrations. Fred Fred Eaton whose idea had sparked the whole affair. Decline the invitation saying that heavy rains prevented him from travelling Mahal and still gave credit to his friend and former coworker at the water department. I'm sorry that the man whom I consider the father of the aqueduct. Not here former mayor eaten to him. All the honor is due. He planned ended. We simply put together the bricks and the mortar but eating himself couldn't have cared less about the tributes. He'd made good on his promise to stay on his long valley ranch. Attention raise cattle. But that didn't stop him from criticizing. The project from afar eaten had taken a position as chairman of a water dish owners group in the nearby town of Big Pine while the aqueduct was being built. He didn't glaciated himself into the tight. Knit Community Valley farmers who gradually accepted him as one of their own eating took to the ranching life life forming eating land and cattle company to sell the chickens and steers. He was raising but pleasant life. Away from the city was eaten was still playing the long game. He knew that the the property his cattle graze was worth much more to Los Angeles as a future dam site. He would wait betting that eventually the city would be back and they would be desperate for more water. American history tellers is sponsored by Mac. Weldon as I've grown older I've become more and more Warren hammered with quality and comfort enjoying fewer. But better things small things like finding the right Coffee Cup that just right pillow or the perfect underwear. Whatever you're wearing boxers briefs Boxer briefs Mac Wellman is better Mac? Weldon is a premium. Men's essentials brand believes in smart design and premium fabrics rex. They offer underwear socks sweatpants. I just got a pair of those and more guaranteed to be the most comfortable you'll ever wear. And if you don't like your first pair keep them and they'll still refund fund you know questions asked I'm of the undershirts are cut slim and a little long keeping them tucked in and out of sight and they're comfortable which is probably the most important thing find out how how much better Mac Weldon is from what you're wearing right now for twenty percent off your first order visit Mac Weldon Dot Com and had her promo code. Ahd At checkout. That's MAC WELDON DOT COM Promo Code Ahd for twenty percent off your first order with the completion of the Los Angeles. Aqueduct Fifty Eight Year Old William Holland became a household name. A writer from American magazine arrived to get quotes about water. Who surprised to find gearless? Irish engineer ready to discuss all kinds of matters other than the aqueduct Mulholland held forth on everything from Etymology to baseball to the talents of a French stage actress Sarah Bernhardt the writer proclaimed Mulholland was a man with a mind remarkable for its breath and wit when pressed about his feelings towards his work on the aqueduct. Mulholland responded with a typical folksy quip. A man's worth as measured by his importance to society and humanity generally. I never wanted to be wealthy. Not all I did want was work. But by any estimation Mulholland had become a wealthy man his position as Superintendent of the water department was paying him. Ten thousand dollars a year or two hundred fifty thousand in today's dollars and in nineteen twelve. He would purchase land for his son. Perry in the San Fernando Valley that would turn out to be worth far more than he paid for them yet. He was careless and impulsive with his money known. For sending extravagant gifts to friends family and associates. He would also often failed to deposit his own paychecks in the bank but the man who delivered water from the desert to Los Angeles maintained admiration and respect in the city even if he was never seen scene without a cigar or a glass of whisky a group of businessmen approach Mulholland and asked him how he felt about running for mayor. The newspapers and the Chamber of Commerce would throw their support behind him. They said he couldn't lose. Gentlemen he replied. I'd rather give birth to a porcupine backwards. Mulholland disdain spending time in political political circles. Nor did he care for the wining and dining socials favored by men with political ambitions and besides his current salary paid more than the mayor's did but the engineer stayed loyal to the city. He had called home since eighteen. Seventy seven living in house with his daughter Ruth on South Saint Andrews street seeing a for sale sign on the room Victorian years before Mulholland had wandered inside and surprise the real estate agent with an offer to buy it on the spot. He offered one caveat. Though Mulholland wandered wandered the narrow circular staircase rebuilt straight always concerned with spatial dimensions. He patiently explained to the flustered salesman that he had planned to live in the new home until he died when he did. They have a hard time getting his six foot. Tall Body down that narrow circular staircase considerations of death were no exaggeration adulation. On his part. His wife Lily had passed away in one thousand nine fifteen after a long illness when the waters had I rushed down the cascades that Summary Day in September lily had been too ill to attend. His children were all grown up and living their own complicated lives. Now after his wife's death Mulholland turned inwards keeping long hours at his office looking for the next big project to keep him busy with the flowing. Waters of the Owens River sustain it Los Angeles grew at a staggering rate over the next decade Mulholland had done his part engineer this growth but other promoters or boosters helped spur the expansion Harry Chandler son-in-law of Harrison Otis took over the management the Los Angeles Times he used the papers position to tout the glories of the city to for the rest of the nation Chandler had gone from a young man delivering newspapers for the times to running it himself. And of course marrying Otis's daughter Marian hadn't heard his ambitions ambitions with his earnings from the Times Chandler also began quiet land speculation throughout the county developing properties in far flung reaches of the San Fernando Valley Chandler's ads boasting permanently. Sunny weather began appearing in east coast and Midwest newspapers usually right around January when those cities were at their coldest he he figured who wouldn't want to pack up and leave New York or Chicago or Indianapolis when the promise of cheaper land. Good wages and plenty of water was just a train. Ride Away with fellow land developer H J widdly Chandler health form an alliance of businessmen that led a push to annex the San Fernando Valley finally making the vast suburb. A A part of the city of Los Angeles real estate developments shot up and district's called La Brea and Hollywood and neighborhoods. That carried the wealthy businessman's names like Whitley Heights. A vast boulevard was named Sherman Way on behalf of Moses Sherman whose Red Electric Streetcar Lines stretch from one end of the county to the other like Chandler. You're most Sherman had seen the promise on the edges of a small desert city using capital from his railroad investments. Sherman built a transportation system that helped urbanize and connect connect the sprawling tracts of farmland. Many of the far flung locations on Streetcar Lines became neighborhoods for citizens who settled down on properties developed by Harry Chandler. All these men turned a handy profit from the city's water acquisition. Indeed Sherman had been on the original board of the water department and would have been one of the first to know about Owens Owens River valley water in nineteen. Oh three together. Sherman Chandler Whitley and Harrison. Otis had all been members of the land syndicate that bought the Porter ranch properties that same year. Now that the aqueduct was finished it brought water rushing into the city just north of that land the syndicate members made millions on their investment viewed in this light the charges of graft and self interest from job. Harriman and the Antioch Redux Socialist Didn't Seem so far fetched after all had these businessmen cynically enrich enrich themselves while arguing. They were promoting public good from William Mulholland commonsense standpoint. There was always someone who stood to profit matters like these. There's lots of land yet up here to be bought by anybody. The engineer testified during the board investigation. And just no crime to buy it no sedition against this city to buy piece of land there ever. The Engineer Mulholland reason that Los Angeles could not grow without a new water source the most geographically logical place for it to end up was at the top for the San Fernando Valley. He had done his job to help. The city grow and anything having to do with the syndicate was based merely on timing conjecture and point of view but the city grew in other directions as well a company named sunkissed use the plentiful citrus grows to promote a new concept called orange juice. The the burgeoning aviation industry also found plenty of space to develop airplanes. For Lockheed and Boeing. Ford opened a model t plant in the city followed by tiremaker goodyear and firestone and in Nineteen fifteen. A filmmaker named D W Griffith would release the first feature length motion picture shot entirely in Los Angeles. It it seemed like there was nothing. The bustling metropolis didn't have to offer the thousands of people arriving every year the job. Harriman would not be interested in anything. Los Angeles had had offer having failed at his run for mayor and his campaign to expose the hypocrisy of the aqueduct. He decided to form his own community. Seventy five miles from the city just over the Angeles forest. Harriman started a utopian colony. Called Yano del Rio on the very edge of the Mojave desert there. He felt he could finally escape. The corrupting influence of the capitalist machine. But Harriman and the idealists who followed him to Yano were discovered that no matter how are they went. The politics of water would follow him off one thousand nine. Sixteen your home standard in the new colony of Yano del Rio if one of eight hundred proud individuals chosen to set off on your own govern yourself by socialist principles you and your husband moves to this deserted baller strewn landscape gape year ago. There was a sense of promise in the Los Angeles had grown to stagnant to corrupted by business interests. Arriving at Yano. You've I lived in a tent alongside job. Harriman and the colonies other founders. No one would have hired a female carpenter. But here you help build the hotel that would attract curiosity seekers and perhaps convert them to your way of life. Now we're finally building a house of your own. You're driving in another nail when you see your husband walking toward from the Alfalfa fuse. He looks exhausted. But there's something else in his is. The city denied us the damn permit. I mean the damn permit not the damn permanent. They're both the same though this job. No He's the one who told me. The state corporations commissioner said we were too inexperienced to take on a dam project ourselves. That's a rotten excuse. That's a political political. Excuse it absolutely is. We can't make it out here without a damn. We can't build a dam without the state. Granting permits this is terrible news but you remain steadfast. Yeah but there's been good rain this year we own the water rights of the lamb. We on that should be enough but your husband shakes his ahead. I don't think it will but Yano is growing. We have the hotel we have the cannery. There's still plenty of ways we can make ends meet. We have a post office if we can't farm though it won't matter honor the carpentry and the cannery won't be enough. We don't even have a house with walls. Yeah we'll find. A solution will apply again next year. For the damn permit or wait until there's a new commissioner and we can lobby him. We left Los Angeles to get away from all this. Yeah here we are the same politics we used to talk about forming warming our own system. You sit down your hammer and put your arms around your husband. That's right. We're going to do it together. What he pulls away? Why don't think we can not even out here? He leaves without turning back. Watch him go. Then turn back to your tools. This is your new life your new world world. There's always a way so you're gonNA stay and build it yourself no matter what. Your husband does despite the determination of its residence. The colony of Yana wouldn't last around two thousand. People bought shares in the cooperative community and constructed a small town with a hotel L. Farmland and a school for their children but only two years later the town would be deserted Yano del. Rio was part idealistic effort to counter the wheeling and dealing of the the cities real estate tycoons to forge a new path that might be able to sidestep political corruption and provide a safe environment for free individual expression but by nineteen in seventeen. Yana was forced into bankruptcy by lawsuits from its members and denials of legal permits by the state of California after Yano Failed Job Harriman. Harriman left California for good trying. One last time for the same kind of cooperative community in Louisiana they're he hoped the plentiful water would be enough to sustain his vision but back in Los Angeles Herman's legacy stubbornly endured Mulholland was dumbfounded when a newspaper headline suddenly appeared proclaiming. Aqueduct water is poison and then aqueduct water is liquid manure a Chicago bacteriologist publish report substantiating. These claims and ask the left leaning papers began to publicize them to members of the original aqueduct. Investigation Board filed a petition for injunction against the city. The water they claimed was a menace to public health while Holland couldn't believe it the Pandora's box had opened again. American history. Tellers is sponsored by sleep number by now you've heard of sleep number but have you seen them and how they work you can head into a sleep number store and discover their individual technology as you lay down you'll see your pressure points displayed on a screen and how they differ from your partners. Then you can find the right settings to turn pressure into pleasure and a great night's sleep sleep number beds. Allow you to adjust on each side for the ideal firmness the comfort and support for both of you and sleep number three sixty smart beds senses your movements and automatically adjust to keep you sleeping comfortably throughout the night plus with sleep. IQ technology technology inside the bed. It tracks how your sleeping gives you personalize insights for your best sleep. Discover proven quality sleep and say fifty percent on the three sixty limited limited edition smart bed now during the ultimate sleep number event. Only at a sleep number store or sleepnumber dot com slash tellers that sleepnumber dot com slash tellers. Adam Newman was living the dream flying on private jets toasting with celebrities and running a company that was landing enormous investors every day as the company's value ballooned so did everyone's everyone's expectations. The charming founder of we work was rubbing shoulders with the biggest names in technology but they were starting to see through the facade for. I'm wondering comes. We've crashed listened to the new episode of we crashed as the story takes a dark turn and the massive cracks behind the perfect face of we work begin to show subscribe to we crashed. That's we crashed. One Word on apple podcasts. Or wherever you're listening right now you ever since Los Angeles agents bought up the land and water rights around the Owens River residents of Inyo county had been furious. But what could they do. It seemed impossible to fight a city the size of Los Angeles but then suddenly there was a chance. Dr Ethel Landon. Leonard was by mid Thirties. A woman of remarkable achievement in the medical oh field she'd attended college and Medical School. The University of Southern California and briefly held a position of city bacteriologist for Los Angeles but she'd returned to practice in her hometown of Chicago. And while there she wrote a report stating that the waters of the Owens River were contaminated if she was correct the water's flowing into the city of Los Angeles Angeles were also contaminated. Her report read in Los Angeles. The city itself is deliberately poisoning. The entire water supply the whole population they are committing being one of the worst defenses in all the category of crimes known to man and the facts. My report proven a furious mulholland branded the attempt an effort to create create public hysteria to promote private ends. He dared anyone to find any instances of sickness in the city caused by water but there was enough interest over the possibility the of a massive public health scandal to form another board of inquiry. The aqueduct have been funded with tax payer dollars and if the taxpayer's wanted to get to the bottom of this the city I had no choice but to allow it to men from the original aqueduct. Investigation Board prepared to call witnesses and questioned members of the water department. One of these witnesses and in Inyo county resident named George Waterson testified the dead animals had been left to rot upstream of the aqueducts intake point thus polluting the water supply taking taking the stand once again to defend his water system Mulholland explain for the court. How the aqueducts massive length was built in purification system? It took one drop three or or four years to flow from the first intake point to the city's water mains each reservoir acted as an additional purifier. Not to mention the knobby surfaces of the aqueduct talked walls themselves which turned an oxidized the water as it ran his was an informed defense full of facts and figures but the case wasn't settled yet it was time to produce the inquiries leading witness Ethel Leonard. The Chicago doctor whose reports started the scandal when she was called to testify. The doctor suddenly notify the court that she was too busy in Chicago to travel although she would consider doing so for a fee of one thousand dollars and round trip train fare it Toca focus subpoenaed to finally make her appear in the courtroom and when she did she appeared sheepish. She reported her bacteriological findings for the prosecutors but under cross examination she quickly backtracked Leonard admitted to having written the report but said that it had been published without her knowledge. Prosecution could only watch in disbelief as their key. Line of inquiry disintegrated after testimony for the defense from dozens of other engineers and health experts. That refuted any claims of contamination. The case was closed. I Mulan Clap. The city attorney on the back happily exclaiming I knew it. Let's go drink. Some of that polluted stuff just to show them how good it is. Dr Ethel so Leonard Reasons for writing the report in the first place and how she'd become embroiled with Antioch without causes remain a mystery. Some claims she had socialist sympathies. Others thought doc she'd been paid off by Inyo county business interests but at the end of the trial Leonard returned to Chicago presumably on her own time mulholland confidence in his engineering and once again been proven but he refused rest on his laurels. The Water Department Superintendent kept himself busy with an unceasing work schedule water. He now knew would be an unending problem for his city and he was starting to see solutions in very unlikely places. Imagine this one thousand nine hundred ninety five and you're a superintendent at Yosemite National Park. You've been on the job for a year and it's been the best year of your life. True Training. The New Park Rangers can be tough and tedious and the paperwork never seems to end. But you've always been drawn to the great outdoors but tonight you're inside invited to a ceremonial dinner for California senator in Los Angeles. The politics of your position didn't allow you to say no but a free dinner in a fancy setting isn't all bad. What's better you found yourself self seated at the same table as William Mohammed towards the end of the evening with a whiskey glass in hand he turns to you? Your Park Service aren't you. Yes yes I damn. That's a pleasure to meet you. Mahanta shrugs this off. You've a very beautiful park up. North of majestic part Yosemite. You've been there have you. His is flash intent and boring into yours. I certainly have on the park superintendent. An incredible coincidence. I've had an idea for your park was wondering if you could hear me out. You Ain't forward. They've invented. This new photographic process is called pet. He makes everything seem extra lifelike. And if I were custodian. Oh you know you're park. I'd hire a dozen the best photographers in the world. I'd set them up for a year. Let them take photographs in every season. All the beautiful colors shapes of the park. I think that sounds like a great idea. There's so much variation from season to see so then you have all these photographs waterfalls all the colors the Snow Majesty eighty then I'd print the pictures thousands of books and send them to magazines vipers. I'd make certain that every American in the country could see them. You're already starting writing to envision some of these images yourself you get to see them every day. Why not everyone else? And then you know what I'd do. I go in there and build a dam from one side of that valley to the other and stop the Goddamn waste. You sit back horrified Mulholland joking. You can't tell I'm not sure what you mean. When I mean is all all that water up there is going to waste when good is a resource? I ask you if it doesn't serve mankind. You don't have an answer your flabbergasted. It's a quickly. You excuse yourself and begin to make your way towards the foyer. Is that a great engineers idea of conservation taking photographs of nature's greatest work and then destroying knowing it hall. William Mulholland was beginning to show the effects of a lifetime spent nursing a nonstop war cabinet. Myopic and obsessed. He realized that his masterwork of engineering still wasn't going to see enough to keep pace with the growth of Los Angeles by the early nineteen twenties. The city was set to alpes. Even the monumental growth Mulholland had predicted and half a million people the former lawless crime-plagued play blow was now a bigger metropolis droplets than his haughty cousin to the North San Francisco and so there were need to be more water. The city engage Mahal once again to try and work his magic Mulholland Mulholland proposed a plan that would look east to the Colorado River but that plan was shelved. Harry Chandler who himself was using the Colorado to irrigate an eight hundred. Thirty thousand Acre Ranch Mansion Northern Baja Mexico so reluctantly mulholland began to look north once again while negotiating the locations for storage sites and aqueduct placement. Back back in nineteen o five Mulholland been forced to make an omission. There was no reservoir on the line. Big enough to provide storage for water year in year out the reservoirs he'd constructed acted along the aqueduct. Were only used for a few months at a time. Los Angeles Wander right of way claim to buy the Saul Field Mona Basin and congress that year a saline clean lake just north of the long valley site. Mona was a step in the right direction but it was still not a step far enough. The spot milhollin wanted was above the town of Bishop between there and Mona Lake. Lay the Long Valley ranch site owned by none other than Fred Eaton. Mulholland eaten hadn't been on speaking terms for some time by nineteen twenty one. Their friendship had become strained by Eaton's determination to finally make the prophet. He felt he deserved eat. Knew full. Well the geographical value his ranch inch to the city Mojo and try to renegotiate with eating time and again offering him as much as half a million for the land but eaten wouldn't budge in his mind. The matter was settled it was either a million dollars or nothing rejected. Mulholland bitterly complained to a water department official that he would simply wait and by eaten. Eaton's lands three years after eating. His Dead Dose Angeles owned water rights all along the southern points of the Owens River but the northern part of the river above the town of independence. It's remained untapped while Han decided he could make do without the dam site and the Long Valley ranch but the city wanted water now not water later and with this in mined the city would once again invade the Owens River Valley Mulholland sunk wells in the lower valley and ages from the city went into the upper valley. Attempting to buy water writes. This would put the City William Holland on a collision course with the valley citizens already angry at the theft of their water. Fifteen years before but this time. The Owens Allens valley residents weren't going to take any incursions lying down. They were going to fight back. Results would be explosive next on American history. Tellers colors and Owens Valley family takes on the mighty city of Los Angeles a series of dynamite attacks against the aqueduct begin a multi year few that pits valley farmers against city interests. Firsts from wondering this American history tellers. I hope you enjoyed this episode. If you did I have two other podcasts. You might be interested in American scandal. An American elections weaken game search for them and subscribe on Apple. PODCASTS spotify Google PODCAST WANDERING DOT COM. Or wherever you're listening to this right now if you're listening on a smartphone tap for Swipe over the cover art of this podcast who find the episodes including some details. You may have missed you. Also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. You help offer this show to you for free. If you like to hear more of American history tillerson other wonder shows in addition to receiving extra content early access and exclusive perks. You can subscribe to wonder plus go oh to wondering dot com slash plus as wondering DOT COM SLASH P L U S. You can also find us and me on twitter and facebook. Follow the show at H.. Tellers nine at Lindsey Graham and thank you for more information on early Los Angeles and the aqueduct you can read water to the angels by Less Stanford American history tellers is hosted edited and produced by me Lindsey Graham for airship sound design by Derek Barons. This episode is written by George Docker edited by Dorian. Marina are executive executive producers. Are Jenny Lower Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by her non Lopez for wondering.

Mulholland Mulholland Los Angeles Harriman Mulholland Owens River Investigation Board William Mulholland California Board William Holland Fred Fred Eaton Harry Chandler theft Harrison Otis engineer Inyo County aqueduct Mulholland Aqueduct Investigation Board San Fernando Valley Mahal
California Water Wars - Collapse  | 5

American History Tellers

42:02 min | 10 months ago

California Water Wars - Collapse | 5

"And magin it's march twelfth. Nineteen twenty eight. It's a Monday morning. You work as a city. Damn keeper at the Saint Francis Damn forty miles north of Los Angeles. Live in a cottage on site with your girlfriend. Leona and your young son. It's an unusual job. But you've made a lie for your family in the constant shadow this two hundred foot tall concrete dam. Saint Francis one of the last links along the aqueduct insuring that millions of Los Angeles residents get their water. The trees rustling in swaying in the nearby hills blustery wind blowing as you inspect the dam site. It's your job to take daily inspections with this morning. You've seen something disturbing only your nearly to the power station building. When you hear Leona calling you from down the path from your cottage she catches up with you saw you left your thermos on the counter and I thought you might be missing it. Thanks I appreciate it. She sees. Your face is clouded by something because it worse today. The cracks can't tell that with a win sending the water of the top like that. If there any more new leaks than their hidden by spillage but I did see you trailed off. You don't want to worry her unduly but you promised always trade with each other. I did see cloudy. Water underneath the east wing was Brown. Leona knows what this means. Damn leaking small amounts of clearwater is normal but Brown water is a problem that means the water has picked up sediment along the way in a worst case scenario. It could mean. The foundation of the dam is crumbling. But I don't want you to worry a I'm not no I'm not worried you're GONNA call them. It's the first thing I'm GONNA do inside the power station building. There's a telephone that has a direct line with the operator at the bureau office down in Los Angeles Station yes station. This is powerhouse to Saint Francis. Tony Harnischfeger here. Good Morning. Good morning you describe the consistency of the cloudy leakage. You've noticed the dams western wing. Okay okay understood. We'll pass this long We'll get an assessment team up there as soon as possible. Thanks but tell them that they should hurry hanging up the phone. You notice that even though you should feel somewhat better you actually feel worse. You've notified the proper authorities and they're on their way to check but you just can't shake the worry you walk back outside the power station nodding to a pair of operators pass along the way. There's no sense in jumping to conclusions. But you can't stuff down the lingering sense of dread something just doesn't feel right the billions of gallons of water just behind. That damn does become part of your existence. Your whole families but on days like this it's like living underneath. A volcano volcano could erupt anytime American. History tells us that brought to you by capital one. You know how feels when you've saved enough for that long awaited home edition now. Imagine saving enough for an addition on that edition. That's the feeling with capital one. Where new savings account earn five times? The national average capital one is helping you earn more towards your savings goals. This is banking reimagined. What's in your Wallet Capital One a member? Fdic from wondering. I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American history tellers our history your story by nineteen twenty eight. The California water wars had come to an end in Los Angeles is search for water had entered a new face. The city had survived standoffs in dynamite attacks from farmers in the Owens River valley who were outraged by the loss of their land their water rights but after the collapse of five. Inyo county banks under charges of embezzlement the resistance from the Owens River Valley was sapped William Mulholland and the rest of the L. A. City fathers could breathe a little easier. Finally the city had complete control of the Water. They would need to support their rapidly growing population but closer to home. Safe of the Owens River valley problems were reported at the Saint Francis. Damn one of the biggest along the aqueduct. At crucial new part of supplying water to the city despite all of his engineering achievements William Mulholland would struggle to face the biggest and most consequential challenge of his storied career. This is episode five collapse on the morning of March. Twelve William Mulholland received word from his office that the Saint Francis Dam was showing signs of leakage. Mulholland immediately sped up to the dam site bringing along his head engineer. Harvey Van Norman. Then Norman was a forty nine year old. Texan handsome outspoken. He had been nearly inseparable from all Holland and the water department. Since construction of the aqueduct had begun eleven years earlier Ben. Norman had functioned as second in command up and down the aqueduct line and he was Van. Norman to WHO Mulholland turn for advice on the construction. The Saint Francis Damn as well as the eighteen other dams that had been constructed. Long the aqueduct. These dams were important for the proper functioning of the aqueduct. In addition to acting as purifiers they held back critical reserves of water so that Los Angeles could regulate supply in times of drought or emergency without them. The aqueduct is as it was would merely be a two hundred and thirty three mile. Long Garden. Hose the Saint Francis Dam was located only about forty miles north of Los Angeles and on March Twelfth Mulholland and Van. Norman made good time and their chauffeur towncar. They arrived at the dam round ten thirty in the morning passing through the Small Canyon Community of city employees who lived with their families and cottages scattered around the dam site five years earlier when Mulholland and Van. Norman were scouting sites to solve the problem of year to year. Storage for the aqueduct. The San Francis Kito Canyon area had seemed perfect located in the Sierra Polonia Mountains. The site was nearly damn shaped already. A wide. Swath of Canyon between the mountains gradually narrow down to gully flowing downhill. It seemed to Mulholland that he could have it both ways. A large area for water storage with the minimum amount of retaining structure. By the time the Saint Francis Dam was completed in the summer of Nineteen Twenty Six. It stood approximately two hundred feet tall and held back thirty. Eight thousand Acre feet of water in the shadow of the dams face. Tony Horace fieger. The forty one year old damn keeper. Who phoned in the report treated Mulholland van Norman as they walked the curved length of the dam? The wind picked up even more winning waves of water over the top and down the sides this kind of overflow was normal but the streaming water made it difficult to spot the leaks. Harnischfeger had reported midway up the dams western edge. The men found water seeping from beneath the concrete wing. This was the muddy water that Harnischfeger had noticed that morning and it was a red flag. Its presence would mean that. The dams insides were corroding but as Mulholland and Van. Norman got a closer look. They found the seepage. Was running clear. Further down the slope the seepage had mixed with dirt giving it a muddy appearance at Harnischfeger had seen earlier that morning so after two more hours of inspection. Mulholland to his relief found nothing wrong. He and Van Norman climbed into the Water Department car and returned to Los Angeles. They decided to monitor the situation. Tony Harnischfeger and the rest of the sixty seven city employees continued with their work for the rest of the afternoon day turned into evening and at eleven. Pm Shift Change Powerhouse Number. Two just below the foot of the damn around eleven fifty seven one of the new operators who just come on his shift noticed a brief fluctuation in the power levels that station controlled and then moments later all power failed maginness March Twelfth Nineteen Twenty eight. It's somewhere around midnight and everything's calm and quiet. You're lying in bed next year. Lyman the lights were all off. The children were all sound asleep. You live in the small community of cottages surrounding the dam's power station. Your husband works for the city. Usually he's asleep wants his head hits the pillow but tonight he's tossing. Turn no matter with me. Close Your eyes lifestyle. You'll never be asleep. If you keep thrashing around like a whale. Did you just call me a whale? Yes but a loving way you sit up and reach for a glass of water from the bedside table. That's when you notice something isn't raining no you pure out. The window. Moon is barely visible through a strange mist below us. The darkness of Trees Below Them. The bottom of the canyon fog is not normal for this time of year. I don't know I hear something. It smells like rain. I'm going to get the washing off the line. There's no point in everything getting so it'll be fine. Just come back to bed. That's when you realize you feel it under your feet like the floor is moving lymon. Lymon dams broke the dams broke. Your husband is up to flash the two of you scramble through the cottage in your night-clothes you scoop up your young son from his bed as lyman runs to the other bedroom keep going. I'll get the girls you hesitate. Then turn holding tight to your son burst out of the cottage into the night air. Point your son close to your chest and run faster uphill as you fight your way through the scrub tree. Branches scraped your arms and legs want to turn around and look for your husband and the girls. Everything is chaos below you a great black wall of water pummels through the Canyon. Finally you reach the hilltop and turn around. Can't see much of anything you shout your husband's name your children's names but there is no answer all into crashing Russia Water Destroying Canyon Chevron clutching trying son to your chest. You can only wait and hope at nearly stroke of midnight between March Twelfth and Thirteenth the Saint Francis Damn Gateway moving eighteen miles an hour. Twelve billion gallons of pent-up reservoir water blasted down through the Canyon below of the twenty four people. Working at the Saint Francis Dam site that night only to adults and one child survive. Lillian Curtis climbed to safety in the hills with her young son but her husband. Lyman and two daughters were swept away. Powerhouse number two with his constant spinning turbines was obliterated damn keeper Tony Harnischfeger and his family were killed instantly. But the flood didn't stop in the Canyon. It continued following a downhill flow of gravity. Carried it through the towns of Kostanic junction. Fill MORE AND BARNES STALE. It washed through Santa Paula town. Forty two miles south and spilled over the Pacific Coast highway crossing between Oxnard and Ventura and finally into the Pacific Ocean in total. The flood swept over sixty five. Miles of land roiling through automobiles bridges locomotives and acres of citrus and nut. Trees A two. Am telephone call woke Mulholland with devastating news? His daughter Rose who handed him. The phone. Could only listen as her seventy three year. Old father his mind still fuzzy with sleep muttered the same phrase over and over please. God don't let people be killed in the pitch black darkness just over twelve hours. After he traveled to survey the damn that afternoon Mulholland climb back into a towncar with Harvey van Norman to travel north and assess what they both were quite sure would be a disaster even before sunrise. The effects on San Francis Kito Canyon were tremendous and terrible. All evidence of vegetation in the valley had been scoured away leaving a rock strewn landscape of granite and mudholes all that was left of the dam. Wall itself was the massive centerpiece of concrete. Sticking up like a giant one hundred ninety foot tall tooth or as many would soon begin to refer to it like a tombstone as Tuesday began Mulholland and Van. Norman continued to survey the wreckage. They were joined by hundreds of residents of the Canyon. All looking for evidence of their loved ones seventy four of these residents of the dam site with one hundred forty workers and a water department. Camp downstream had lost their lives. Those numbers would grow to over. Three hundred dead as search parties fanned out through the stunned towns and communities in the floods path and the ad still more would come by midday the Los Angeles Police Department and the Red Cross up disaster stations all along the flood. Path airmail pilots began to search for survivors by plane. The flood had caught a two mile wide. Swath from the towns of Santa Clara to the Pacific Ocean bodies were found as far away as San Diego. At least four hundred fifty people would eventually be confirmed. Dead over a thousand homes were destroyed and eight thousand acres of farmland washed out damage estimates would reach up to fifteen million over two hundred twenty million dollars today amidst the destruction and the carnage however were miraculous moments. Have Survival one woman in an evening. Dress found safety by clawing her way to the top of a water tank. A man his clothes ripped completely off by the force of the rushing. Water saved himself by climbing atop a wardrobe trunk. Mother and her three children wrote a mattress until it was lodged in the branches of a tree when he was morbid. Curiosity not miracles. That brought thousands of people to the area by the weekend. Congested stream of cars from Los Angeles ventured up to the disaster sites bringing traffic to a standstill as far away as the San Fernando Valley Furious. Local ranchers held back the gangs of spectators with loaded shotguns. Police were instructed. The shoot looters on sight then municipal leaders of Los Angeles were forced into damage control in the weeks. Following the devastation. It was clear that the blame was collecting it their doorstep but he was also clear would have to take the brunt of the public's fury face his day in court chief. Engineer William Mulholland American. History tellers is sponsored by quip the makers of the quick electric toothbrush and they want you to know the one thing that matters most for your dental care if you have good habits you're good that means brushing for two minutes twice a day and floss regularly no matter what brand of use quip though makes that simple starting with an electric refillable floss and anti cavity toothpaste quips. 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Two weeks after the Saint Francis Dam collapse downtown Los Angeles Theater hosted what promised to be a cavalcade of stars with ticket sales going to benefit the communities affected by the flood. Charlie Chaplin Gloria Swanson Laurel and hardy and composer Irving Berlin joined dozens of other acts in a high profile evening of entertainment and fundraising William Hollins. Name was not on this list of luminaries instead. He was requested by subpoena to appear before a Los Angeles County Coroner's jury. This was not a trial in the usual sense. Mulholland would have lawyer. But if enough evidence were uncovered the city would press ahead with formal charges of manslaughter from that first. Terrible morning when he'd seen the destruction with his own is the water department. Superintendent had been willing to shoulder all the blame that came his way during March. Eighteenth Meeting of the Los Angeles Board of Water and Power Commissioners. Mulholland stood and announced that he was resigning. A stunned. Silence fell over the room. Then one by one. The commissioners informed Mulholland that they would not accept his resignation despite the tragedy. They were still willing to stand by him. The Santa Clara Valley residents were not as magnanimous public. Opinion had turned violently against the man who only weeks before had been considered the savior of the region. One woman who lost her entire family to the flood hammered assign in front of the remains of her destroyed. Home in red painted letters. Read simply kill Mulholland Los Angeles district attorney a surprise. Notice this shift in public opinion as well pick to lead. The coroner's jury inquest kyw saw an opportunity to use this very public. Tragedy for his own political advancement. Only five years prior. Kyw's had been the Water Department's bulldog sending detectives up into the Owens Valley to try and prosecute the aqueduct bombers but now he saw Mulholland as an easy answer to the problem of the Saint Francis Claps on March twenty first eight days after the collapse of the Saint Francis. Damn the jury convened at the Ornate Hall of Justice in downtown Los Angeles but not before district attorney. Kyw's had staged several highly public press conferences directly blaming Mulholland for engineering and competency and criminal neglect whipping up anticipation for what he knew. Would be oppressed. Bonanza kyw's also insinuated that the other dams Mulholland had built. Were just a moment away. From bursting to hearings began as the county coroner called the proceedings to order for matters of record the death of twenty nine year old Julia Rising Wife Power Station Operator and survivor. Ray Rising would stand in this trial to represent all fatalities to the county. Coroner's left Santa Jury of nine men a collection of hydraulic engineers architects and construction contractors. One of these contractors William H Eaton. Junior was the nephew of mulholland erstwhile. Friend and colleague Freddy in the Front of the Gallery. Sat William Mulholland dressed in a dark three p. suit winged collar and light colored. Tie over the next week. Mojo in would be present. Every day of the inquest as a concerned citizen. A witness and the accused district attorney. Kyw's guided the testimony from construction workers and surviving residents of the dam site into two main points. Vac-vacation I he charged that the geology. The dam site was and always has been unfit to support a damn as the site lay on a faultline. Furthermore the later in rock called schist found under the damn steeply inclined east and West Wings was prone to sliding one witness presented several samples of shifts from the west side of the dam. Site a piece of this rock was dropped into a glass of water. The jury lean forward to watch as the rock dissolved in just a few minutes for his second point of accusation kyw's turn to the structural integrity of the dam and the concept of uplift or upthrust when waters allowed to under a dams foundation. It can swell the rocks underneath and float or lift a concrete dam when a dam is lifted in such a manner he can be weakened to the extent of collapse other concrete dams in America at the time. Us drainage systems to lessen the collection of water underneath the base but Mulholland had not installed drainage systems. Instead he installed drainage pipes notice bleeders halfway up the center of the dams face where he reason they would be more effective. Kaiser's witnesses all painted a picture of hasty construction and officials more concerned with completing the task than having done safely and correctly and each witness illustrated that at the top of the chain of command. Sat William Mulholland seventy three years old and already suffering. From the onset of Parkinson's Disease Mulholland made his way to the witness. Stand just as he had during the aqueduct investigation. Board hearings and the inquest over poisoned river water. Mulholland FOUND HIMSELF ON THE DEFENSIVE. But this time he had no witty rejoinders or folksy statement to make he looked according to one observer as if he'd aged seventy years. Mahal and quietly testified that he knew the hillsides were prone to sliding but stressed that it had all been part of the design. The dam's main wing was not buried into the dissolving. Schist the pressure of the water itself. He said Long with a weight of the concrete walls would compress the layers of schist making the foundation stronger not weaker and in response to the leakage seen by Tony Harnischfeger and other damn site. Employees Mulholland was calm but adamant like all dams he explained there are little seeps here and there but this was the driest dam of its size. I ever saw in my life but district attorney. Kyw's pressed if there was no apparent danger than what caused the Saint Francis Dam to collapse. The Superintendent shook his head. He did not know specifically what it was. We overlooked something. He monitored then pause for a long moment when he continued his hands had begun to tremble. He said very quietly this inquiries very painful thing for me to have to attend but it is the occasion of it. That is painful. The only ones I envy about this thing or the ones who are dead it was a mournful and self pitying response from a man known for neither Quality District Attorney keys had hoped to fix the blame to Mulholland. And so far he had been successful throughout his testimony. Mulholland responses stubbornly hue to the same theme. He alone had approved methods of construction. He alone knew the correct way to build a structure atop ground that was prone to shifting. This was Mulholland Dam and keys. Wanted to make it clear that he was Mulholland pride that was the real culprit but in the municipal halls of Los Angeles there. Were those still trying to piece together. One last theory about why? The dam had collapsed since the morning of March thirteenth. It had been suspected that the dam was sabotaged after years of explosive conflict. With citizens of the Owens River valley. The idea didn't seem farfetched. Caches of dynamite have been stored near the dam site as construction crews were using it to level out a nearby road. It would only take one person from Inyo county or anyone with a cruel militia streak to set the charges so as the courthouse inquest. Move Forward. There were other staffers. Just down the street at the Water Department who've been making some inquiries of their own maginness late March nineteen twenty eight. You're a Los Angeles City councilman and Longtime Board Member of the Public Water Committee on a rare rainy day. You Hurry from the hall of Justice to the Water Department building. The Office of Harvey Van Norman. The city engineer cramped and modest. But after brief look up he waves you in. You are watching the inquest harvey. I can barely stand it. But but here I have something for you. You pull a report from your briefcase laid on the table Van Norman. Read from the top of the report. Is this the statement from the Hercules powder company? It is a report suggests. Dynamite is the cause of the dam's collapse. They're the explosive experts. Who are willing to go on the record van. Norman stops reading. Looks up at you? They've done tests on the site. I've engaged lab here in town to run a second set of tests to and they've all come up. Positive these two separate inquiries plus the fish the Fisher circumstantial. Now there's nothing circumstantial about it. We have in addition to these reports a Stanford. University zoologist will go on the record. That dead fish were found above the dam farther. How would hundreds of fish get above the dam unless they were blown up there? Now hold on wages the minute their lungs were ruptured from concussive force in that force could have been the pressure of billions of gallons of water. Coming down on them. It could have been a wave. The catapulted them up there. Look I wanNA believe this as much as you do. There's a lot of men around here who think it was dynamite? But we've got no evidence. Speechless you gesture. At the report you just laid on his desk. That's not evidence. They're only takes one person to go up there in the dark when no one's around we've had years of dynamite attacks against the city's water supply and Norman closes the folder on his desk. No no it's over. We just we simply can't pursued this line of inquiry any further. The city is already agreed to a comprehensive financial restitution that means a clean up to counties that means payments to the bereaved money has already been allocated. Harvey. I'm not saying the city shouldn't pay restitution. Well I'm glad we agree on that. The city's going to buy its way out of us. It's going to be a clean sweep and they can't do that. If there's more controversy Harvey sits back in his chair his shoulders slumped. I believe in Bill. Mulholland you know I do. There's nothing we can do to stop him. From taking the responsibility these theories are valid. We need to forget about them. Put them away. They don't change what's already happened. It's true people are dead. You've been holding on to hope that it wasn't while Holland's fall. There could be some other any other explanation but right now you're just a man and room helpless. The dynamite evidence never appeared during the coroner's Inquest District Attorney. Kyw's didn't want to mention it. Less clear cut line of blame be muddled but politicians in Los Angeles also had for wanting the proceedings brought to a speedy conclusion. It was more digestible. Blamed the tragedy on one man than a series of construction airs or sabotage by dynamite plus. Another larger dam project on the border of Nevada and Arizona was threatened by all the bad press initially called the Boulder Dam. This structure would be the largest in the country and it's curved arch and concrete construction for uncomfortable similarities. To the failed. Saint Francis Damn Mulholland had been saying for years that a project along the river was necessary for the survival of the city and now with a bill on the Boulder Dam nearing a vote in the US. Congress officials in Los Angeles wanted nothing more than to wrap up their own failure for to be quickly forgotten in his final statement to the jury. Mulholland said. Don't blame anyone else. You just fascinated me. If there was an error and human judgment I was a human he knew just like district. Attorney. Kyw's that ultimately all responsibility for the disaster rested on his shoulders with his testimony over while Holland left the courthouse and climbed inside a car to take him back home. There he would wait for the jury to announce their verdict and only then would he know precisely the price you would pay for all that responsibility. American history tellers is sponsored by Ziprecruiter. Hiring can be a slow difficult process and the stakes are high. The wrong employees could be a disaster. Quotable co-founder Gretchen. Havener experience. How challenging hiring can be when she was searching for a new game artist grow with Education Tech Company but then she switched ziprecruiter and saw an immediate difference. And you can too by signing up for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM slash? Ahd ziprecruiter doesn't depend on candidates finding you. It finds them for you and by using ziprecruiter screen questions to filter. Candidates Gretchen founded easier to focus on the best ones and then find the right one in fact after posting her job on Ziprecruiter Gretchen. Said she was honestly surprised. She found qualified applicants so quickly and hired a new game artist and less than two weeks with results like that. It is no wonder that four out of five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day. Ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire see. Why ziprecruiter is effective for businesses of all sizes try Ziprecruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash? Ht THAT'S ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM slash A. H. T. on April thirteenth. One month after the Saint Francis Dam collapsed. The coroner's jury gathered to return their verdict. They placed responsibility not on the dam structure but on the failure of the rock formation upon which the dam had been built. They acknowledge that because of the dams nearly complete destruction following the collapse. It was impossible to render completely accurate conclusion but the disaster was still ultimately the fault of the Water Bureau and its chief engineer. Too much confidence had been placed a mole. Holland's hands the jury wrote and their statement chief William Mulholland and his principal. Assistance have had little experience in the building of large masonry or concrete dams previous to the construction of the Saint Francis and apparently did not appreciate the necessity of doing the many things that must be done in order to be certain that the foundations will remain hard impervious and unyielding as a result. Various errors were made by entirely responsible organization confident. They were maintaining high standards of accomplishment. The construction of a municipal damn should never been left to the judgment of one man. No matter how eminent even though the dynamite theory had not been brought up during the hearings you was popular enough in the city newspapers to warrant a response. The jury wrote while it was possible. There was still no evidence to support a theory of sabotage district attorney. Kyw's couldn't have been more pleased with the verdict but no further charges were pressed against William Mulholland. There was not enough evidence. The jury felt to convict him in a court of law still. The Superintendent remained convicted in his own heart humbled by his fatal engineering errors and bereft at the loss of life while Holland resigned from his post in nineteen twenty nine his protege Harvey Van. Norman took over the position of chief engineer. At what would be the newly Kristen Department of Water and power in Washington? The bill passed that would bring the Boulder Canyon dam project to life. The city of Los Angeles would soon have a second water. Supply coursing westward from the Arizona. Nevada state line and when the project was finally completed it would carry a new name. The Hoover Dam but the former water superintendent still referred to by his former colleagues as the chief did not take part in many more public affairs cared for by. His daughter Rose Mulholland spent increasing amounts of time at home accepting few visitors. Parkinson's which had affected him. Throughout the coroner's jury only grew worse with time. After nearly four decades in the spotlight of the city he helped create Mulholland obsess over his last an only failure in his mind. A lifetime of accomplishments paled in comparison to the lives. Lost at the Saint Francis. Disaster Water was meant to be a life giving force not a destructive one. Los Angeles was also eager to forget the legacy of their former engineer. Lake Mulholland was swiftly renamed Lake Hollywood following the Saint Francis Collapse but district attorney. Kyw's would not be around to enjoy the fruits Mulholland crisis by the end of nineteen twenty nine. The politically ambitious city attorney would be in jail on conviction of bribery conspiracy and jury tampering in connection with another case involving a petroleum company the DA who pursued Mulholland with such zeal found himself suddenly behind bars by the early nineteen thirties mulholland friend and decades. Long rival Frederick Eaton was battling his own crisis the former Los Angeles mayor was the one who in rigidly conceived of. The city's plan to tap the waters of the Owens River but he rarely set foot in his hometown anymore at seventy five years old. The former mayor's physical and mental condition had worsened. He'd given up writing Mulholland about the subject but eating still clung desperately to his long valley property pitching what city officials described as unhinged offers to sell a two point three million dollars. Eaton's cattle business. In the Owens Valley had failed and two hundred thousand dollars of his investments were lost when the inyo county banks collapsed. He and his wife Alice had very little left. Beyond the pasture land he purchased in nineteen. Oh four but suspicion and distrust would work their way into. Eaton's personal life with heartbreaking results. Nineteen thirty a bright sun drenched lunchtime in the town of Bishop. You're a young lawyer. You've arrived at a park near the center of town to meet a prospective client. Her name is Alice eaten a little background on her husband. He used to be the mayor of Los Angeles. If feels like the kind of case with plenty of money behind it. You Find Mrs Eaten. Sitting on a bench wearing sunglasses. There's large hat on her head which he keeps shifting around if she isn't satisfied with the angle on it you walk over and introduce yourself. She looks up you for agreeing to meet with me. I know it seems a little strange. Nothing strange about it. Mrs Eaten a Park Bench at lunchtime most common thing in the world. I don't want anyone to see people here. Have nothing to do but talk a phone call a few days ago. Matrix case quite clear. She believes her husband is in confident. And she's willing to go to court to retain possession of his cattle company and his land. Where is your husband? Mrs Eaten Friends at home with a nurse. I couldn't talk about this. There's just she stops closing your eyes for a brief moment before she continues. If does this case present? Any problems that you can see. Well you'll forgive me for being blunt but it's pretty standard fare from what I understand. Your husband has had several strokes yes. He has found him to be mad with exaggerated ideas of the property's value. I do mad is a tricky word. It's a little vague about insane. Yes yes that's correct. You scribble down some notes she continues. It seems like she's convincing herself to go through with this twenty five years we've lived on that ranch. They even ran us out of town at gunpoint. Once a we came back my stock. You down this. This is not the life I envision for myself but it's where I am and I do plan on staying here I want you to understand. This isn't about the money. Of course this is seen. I've tried to reason with him. I've tried everything but there's nothing left to reason with. I completely understand. We've never sold out to the city. I wouldn't sell that land to Los Angeles for anything. The water belongs here in the valley. I know what's best for Fred for us? You're inclined to let her sit and convince yourself with this all day. But you have to get back Mrs Eaten. I think you have a case I can help you with it. I'm writing down a number on this sheet of paper. This is my she glances down at the number frowns then readjust her had. That's acceptable. I'm glad can I walk you to your car? No thank you hear more. Believe her sitting there as you hurry back across the park. Funny how she brought up water up here. Water is nothing but divide. You've seen it happen over and over. Although this case is peculiar still you'll have. We take her FI alice. The young fiance who had relocated to the Owens Valley with Freddie in twenty five years ago filed suit to having declared incompetent in her statement. She said that Eaton had become insane. An exaggerated idea of the value of the land zones in Long Valley within a week. Allison separated from her husband. The court battle over the long valley land that followed depleted both Fred Analysis Bank accounts even further as Eaton and his attorneys fought back against her charges of incompetency within two years. Fred and Alice were both broke so the long valley property was submitted into final foreclosure just before Christmas in nineteen thirty two. The property they were fighting over was bought out of receivership by the city of Los Angeles. Fred Eaton had paid twenty to fifty acre three decades later. The city paid nearly the same twenty five dollars an acre the final price was six hundred and fifty thousand of which eaten saw not one penny two years later. Freddie and died at the age of seventy eight upon hearing the mojo until his daughter rose of a dream he'd had for three nights in succession. I dreamt of Fred. The two of us were walking along young and virile like we used to be yet. I knew we were both dead just over a year later. Mulholland himself passed at the age of seventy-nine slipping away in his sleep. Mulholland left his estate entrust with five children. Despite accusations of graft the trailed him throughout his career in Los Angeles his total holdings consisted of a municipal salary investments in stocks and bonds and small landholding on the western edge of the San Fernando Valley any ties to the hotly contested. Land Syndicate of the early century could not be found after Malone's death Los Angeles charged forward to secure its future water supply in nineteen forty one. A Dam was finally constructed upon Fred. Eaton's former long valley land supervised by Harvey Van Norman. The dam site was named after neither Eden normal honed instead lake croly took its name from Father John Crawley and Inyo county resident who spent his life promoting peaceful resolutions between the Owens Valley and the city of Los Angeles by nineteen forty five. The city had acquired eighty eight percent of the total town. Property and Owens Valley as a result of the reparations deal between the valley in the city all the properties were purchased and a mark some as much as one hundred twenty percent higher than their nineteen twenty nine values. This was the first acknowledgment on the city's part that it's water purchases had permanently stunted the valley economy decades later in the nineteen seventies. L. A. CONSTRUCTED. A second aqueduct. Its path parallel mulholland reaching from the city of Los Angeles further North into the Mono Basin watershed the nineteen seventy four film. Chinatown spun the story of Los Angeles is water. Acquisition from the Owens Valley into a thrilling detective story with references to a crooked land syndicate and drought-plagued city. Dumping Water into the see. The film carried the conspiracies of anti aqueduct socialist like job. Harriman and WT spillman into a new generation. Today the city owns more than ninety percent of the irrigable. Land near the Owens River. Most of the rest of. Inyo County is in the hands of the federal government or the State of California. A farming economy still exists. Although the aqueduct has forever changed the valley it became a desert climate with increased pollution Alkali dust storms litigation between the valley in Los Angeles over excess groundwater pumping and river restoration can still be read about in the pages of Los Angeles Times. The city of Los Angeles boasts a population over four million people and today about sixty percent of the city's water still comes from the Owens River Valley Mulholland original. Aqueduct still runs over two hundred miles. It still fed by the melting snows of the SIERRAS and it still generates conflicting passions likely never fade next on American history. Tellers I speak with Jon. Christensen and environmental historian at UCLA. We'll discuss Los Angeles California there never quench thirst for water and what it means for the future from wondering this American history tell us. I hope you enjoyed this episode. If you did have to other podcasts you might enjoy American scandal in American elections. Wicked game search for them and subscribe anywhere. You find podcasts. If you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe over the cover art of this podcast you'll find the episode notes including some details may have missed. You'll also find some offers from our sponsors. I supporting them. You help us offer this show to you for free. We'd also love to learn a little bit about you. Please complete a short survey at wondering dot com slash survey. That's wondering dot com slash survey. We'd love to learn what you're listening to. What you like. What eras of American history we might tackle next? You can also find us and me on twitter and facebook. Follow the show at AH tellers. I'm at Lindsey Graham and thank you for more information on the Saint Francis Dam and aqueduct. We recommend flood path by Jon. Wilkin American history tellers has hosted edited and produced by me. Lindsey Graham for airship sound design by Derek. Barron's this episode is written by George Docker edited by Tori. Marina are executive producers. Are Jenny Lower Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by Hernan Lopez for wondering?

Saint Francis Damn Mulholland Los Angeles Saint Francis Dam Mulholland van Norman Mulholland Harvey Van Norman water department Tony Harnischfeger Bonanza kyw Owens Valley William Mulholland Inyo county Owens River valley William H Eaton Rose Mulholland Mulholland Dam Mulholland Los Angeles Saint Francis Holland
California Water Wars - Building the Dream | 2

American History Tellers

41:48 min | 10 months ago

California Water Wars - Building the Dream | 2

"Maginness late summer. Nineteen zero six. You've arrived in Los Angeles for meeting with Harrison Gray Otis publisher of the Los Angeles Times in the receptionist outside. His office stands as you. Step off the elevator. Mr Harris. Can I bring you some water. No thank you. I'd like to see Mr Otis as soon as possible. Harrison Otis is not the only man in this building who owns a newspaper. You happen to own several including the Los Angeles Examiner The Times. Direct Competition Titian. You rode the train down from San Francisco to visit Otis arrival though a much less successful one by your reckoning the office of Harrison Gray Otis's Otis is dimly lit. The heavy curtains have been pulled strikes. US A bit dramatic until you realize. The curtains are keeping the heat out of the room. The air was gently leandra ceiling. Fan Otis cuts right to the chase speaking from underneath the large walrus-like Mustache. I'd like to know if the examiner is going to continue proselytizing against against our cities aqueduct. We have the bond. Is You vote coming up and I would like the city to be of one mind. You'd like the city to vote. Yes what Damn Right. I would every editorial your your paper puts out against it does damage to our costs. I'll take it as a compliment. That if you my examiner has such a reach of influence hogwash. People only read what the agree with. We need them to agree with this aqueduct. For the future of the city and for the future of your investments Otis narrows his eyes at you leaning across the table that that land was bought three years ago. Long before we knew about the Owens Valley your papers continue to insinuate that I had some kind of foreknowledge of this deal that I got a hot tip my papers are only printing the facts and the fact is that Potter ranch is no longer owned by George Potter. It's owned by you William. I'm not interested in land deals. I'm I'm interested in selling papers just like yourself. I'm interested in the growth of this city and keeping conservative and liberal. Intra strong together. Your friends at the Chamber of Commerce told me much much the same thing this morning. The bigger the city gets the more subscribers will both have subscribers. Who will be excited to hear about your ambitions for the presidency or my getting ahead of myself no Harrison? The presidency is certainly on my mind. Then perhaps we can talk about that at a future date but right now I'd only ask that you do me a favor. Favor drop the examiners opposition to this product. If we have water the city will grow your circulation with you. Sit back in your chair glancing up the the ceiling fan somewhere underneath that Mustache Otis has a point after all William you might want to move out here yourself. Someday you'll little house city will not forget which choice you may consider it. Excellent pass the word along. Oh to stand smiling. Broadly while you're in town I suggest you take a ride or one of our new red cars if nothing else. The breeze feels delightful through your hair on your way out of his office. He stopped and leaned over the receptionist desk. You know one. I'll take that class as the receptionist. SCURRIES off you're shackled to yourself. A little bit of water never hurt anyone. Did American history tells US brought to you by capital one. You know how it feels when you've saved enough for that long awaited rated home edition now. Imagine saving enough for an addition on that addition that's the feeling with capital one. Where new savings account earn five times? The national average capital one is helping you earn more towards your savings goals. This is banking reimagined. What's in your Wallet Capital One and a member? FDIC from wonder. I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American history tellers our history your story by September nineteen O six. Los Angeles was a city divided driven by a water crisis. That threatened its very future in response. The city had announced a mammoth engineering project to divert an entire river. Two hundred sixty miles south from the Owens River valley. After a decade of drought conditions. The city lacked the water to feed a rapidly expanding population. So it's engineers would deliver water by force force if necessary but no one could agree on whether such a massive project would work or whether the water was necessary at all and the two rival newspapers locked in a powerful awful battle for influence display the city's ambivalence on a daily basis fifty-one-year-old Water Department Superintendent William Mulholland would find himself thrust into the middle of the controversy. I'll simultaneously engineering the aqueduct himself. He would have to manage a project that crossed vast distances employed thousands of men and cost millions of dollars. There would be no room for error Mulholland a brilliant engineer who came to Los Angeles from Ireland a gone from a city municipal officer to an on empire. Builder almost overnight. You would have to balance the perils of men machine and water against the city bureaucracy that threatened to derail the entire project. This this is episode to building the dream in one thousand nine hundred five. The Los Angeles Times announced that construction of a massive massive aqueduct would begin shortly afterward. The city's number two newspaper The Los Angeles Examiner published. Its own bombshell story. Examiner reported that Harrison a notice the times publisher was part of what it called a Land Syndicate Otis and a handful of other businessmen acting as the San Fernando Mission Land Company had pooled their resources and bought the sixteen thousand Acre Porter ranch for thirty five dollars. An Acre talked in the northwestern corner of the San Fernando Valley. The porter quarter ranch just happened to be the exact location where the diverted water from the aqueduct would arrive all these men had to do was sit back and wait for the aqueduct. Completed did what was now. Mostly dry farmland would become fallow well irrigated soil and it would be worth millions of dollars the examiner run by New York Publishing Titan William Randolph. Hearst use the syndicate to exemplify the greed and double dealing on the part of Los Angeles in article after article the paper. Detailed how the Owens Valley residents had been swindled and how the aqueducts construction was a waste of taxpayer money. The timing for this bad publicity couldn't have been worse. The city was preparing preparing to vote on the sale of twenty three million dollars in bonds to fund the aqueducts construction. The Chamber of Commerce agreed. There was no room for this kind of bad press William. I was summoned to Los Angeles to meet with Harrison Otis and the Chamber of Commerce. The group met for an afternoon and the next day the examiner publicly declared it had changed. Its mind it would support the aqueducts construction after all pitching in to do their own part. William Mulholland and Fred Eaten at set out on a promotional tour of the city. The two former colleagues found themselves delivering lectures to women's clubs to school children and two meeting halls filled with working men. Once head of the water department eaten backed up the Hollins. John's claims the necessity of the upcoming vote. Both men armed themselves with blueprints and financial statements at the meetings Mulholland Bill. The vote on the bond issue as a matter of life life and death. If you don't get the water now you'll never need it. He was quoted in The Times. The dead never get thirsty by behind the scene Mulholland Mulholland relationship with his former friend and colleague was strained. Fred Eaton still wanted to sell the long valley ranch. He'd purchase while acting as a Los Angeles Land Agent and Holland still refuse to buy. Eaton's ranch was located squarely in the path of the original plan of the aqueduct. Mulholland was outrage when eaten had bought the land for himself then and turned around and tried to sell it back to the city. Mulholland felt Fred Eaton had led greed. Get the better of him and had no interest in rewarding it he wanted no more charges of graft after self interest to surround his awkward enough of those already so even though long valley would be the perfect place for a damn sight Mulholland modified his plans. The water would go around it. Still the two men continued to crisscross. The city waging what Mulholland referred to as his campaign of education. Critics of the project continued aerosol to signing both the high cost and dubious feasibility. Twenty four million dollars of city. Money was a huge burden on. The taxpayer and Mulholland ambitious is planned for the aqueduct. Looked unrealistic even foolhardy to some but on June twelfth nine thousand nine hundred seven. The crucial vote came. The city. Overwhelmingly voted yes to the bond sale by a ratio ten to one debt or no debt. The city was going to have. Its water the aqueducts. Construction would informally christened the Owens River project starting just above the town of Independence Kaku ducts. Intake point would divert the Owens River from from its course guiding the water into a canal that gradually descended sixty miles past the Alabama hills to a reservoir near the town of Haley from this reservoir. The water from the Owens River would continue south using only gravity as a descended in elevation the water would stream across the Mojave Desert and through Jawbone Canyon where inverted rated siphons would rollercoaster the water up eight hundred fifty feet and then swiftly back down again. The water would cross the antelope valley in a series of covered conduits plunging changing down through a five mile long tunnel underneath the San Gabriel mountains. It would emerge finally at the northwest corner of the San Fernando Valley where it would join the course of the already running Los Angeles River in all there would be two hundred twenty six miles of canals conduit and pipeline above ground twenty eight miles of tunnels running below one. Federal Government Engineer suggested that the task seemed as likely as the city of Washington tapping the Ohio river addressing. This criticism had a municipal league banquet banquet Mulholland to murdered the man who has made one brick can make two bricks. He said that is the bigness of this engineering problem. It is big but it is simply big. As he often would Mahala understated. The matter he knew the scale of the project would be enormous. The line of the aqueduct covered forbidding desolate terrain nearby mountains offered no timber for construction. The valleys offered no trees for shade. The temperature would drop from over one hundred degrees during the day to freezing. Temperatures is at night estimate suggested one million tons of building material would be needed and a workforce of six thousand men communication lines would have to be built and power sources. I would have to be. Summoned the workforce need food supplies and shelter and ask for moving those supplies. A stage coach or saddled horse was the only method of transportation an email sent from Los Angeles to the aqueducts intake point. Your independence would take three to five days for all these reasons. Mulholland at first had difficulty sourcing in contractors many of them scoffed at his budget for the city funded project declaring. It would cost twice as much but Mulholland needn't have worried the nineteen o seven even financial crisis sent many desperate men looking for work increasing his workforce pool by the middle of one thousand nine hundred eight year over four hundred men at work on the aqueduct. Most to them baking in the scorching Sun of job on canyon or boring their way through Mountain Mulholland knew that the way through that mountain digging out the Elizabeth Tunnel would be one the most important and most dangerous aspect of the construction. He hired veteran wet tunnel. Minor John Gray to begin work as forming on the north side working alongside his son. John Lewis John. Gray's task was to bore his way two hundred fifty feet under the San Gabriel mountains simultaneously crew held by field engineer. WC Aston began and digging from the south. The two crews would meet in the middle. It was dangerous work as cave-ins flooding and dynamite blast accident could cause major setbacks but on the bright side it was a steady fifty eight degrees in the tunnels a respite from the extreme fluctuations of heat and cold greeted the miners once they return to the surface at first work proceeded at an agonizingly slow pace but Mulholland soon instituted. A bonus system for the two crews whichever crew tunnel more than eight feet. Per Day I receive an extra forty cents per foot per man the work was punishing. The extra money was here. resistible Mulholland continued to corral his construction team and make on the spot decisions and improvements across all the divisions of the equity line trying to balance cost with speed because even with the deadline over five years away. He was already running out of time. Imagine you're a young photographer. Contracted by the Benjamin Halt Machine Company Company to document the construction of the aqueduct. This morning he rose early. Made you away from the camp down to the south portal entrance of Elizabeth Lake Tunnel You Watch Watch boxy steam powered machine holly huge beams would across the ground. Looks like a small locomotive with a kind of metal rubber band circling back wheels. You're you're just beginning to set up your cameras lags when hold representative approaches. You excitedly getting help with that. Not at all just about ready you pull out a photographic plate slide into your cameras box. That's just fine. Have you had a chance to govern the specification sheet. We sent you absolutely read them on the train. Actually you flip through the SPEC. She's on the details of the company new traction machine. They're already calling it a tractor. The memos were pretty bland. Maybe you could explain a little while I take some photographs of of course well as you can see machine solves. The problem of mud and loose gravel. Large wheels wouldn't do the trick. Just get stuck so here. We spread the way to cross a continuous continuous deal. Tread that encircles the wheels the steel tread has no beginning and no end it just loops and lucile loops. The whole company man. PADDLES on and you're starting to wonder or if he just loops and loops which you keep your opinions to yourself this like another playtex your camera this machine is going to single handedly build this tunnel. Holland himself contractor. Twenty eight of them as tragic crawls across the ground. It's slowly approaches a steep hillside steams. It's way up. The Hill can't help but it'd be impressed. That's climbing almost of forty five degree angle. Yep We're very proud of it. Thing moves a little like a Caterpillar Caterpillar. I've lied to right. Oh that doesn't sound good. Why's IT stopping? The operator must need to make an adjustment. Man Operating Caterpillar machine climbs out of his seat cursing up a storm. It doesn't look happy. Well I think you stopped taking pictures now your bats toss the cover back on your lands when you notice them. You'll team on the other side of the hill about fifty of them by your account all lash to large platform on wheels. It looks like the mules getting along. Just fine they're carrying a large section of steel pipe of the gradual inclined. It's slow business but it seems to be working. I can get a photo of that if you'd like the halt representative frowns. Oh let's not waste to fill the aren't company. You Shrug the Holt. Caterpillar machine is definitely a modern marvel would looks as though right now. It's beat by a bunch of Assis. Ask the whole company's new caterpillars continued to work near the Elizabeth and Jawbone divisions but repeated machine failures eventually forced the project to rely on more traditional methods of hauling heavy steel pipe. Lumber caused a bit of a stir because back in the city the the board of public works was shocked to discover an owner for one thousand tons of Hay to feed two hundred mules that were also being purchased. The order was processed and within the year over four four hundred mules would be doing the work that no machine could. The problem was how to move. The massive. Sections of steel siphoned their various positions along the aqueduct. Line each a section of pipe was eight feet wide and thirty six feet. Long weighing around twenty-six tons but more Holland's chief engineer designed to homespun solution teams fifty two mules were attached to a pair of massive flatbed wagons rolling onto foot wide steel wheels driven by experienced mule skinner's. The team proved more than agreeable able to the arduous task of carting the equipment through the desert landscape by the end of nineteen. Oh wait more than one. Thousand men and animals were at work on the aqueduct. The Southern Pacific Acidic Railroad was nearly finished with a new line. into the Owens Valley that could expedite men and equipment from the city. Mulholland had created nothing less than an army mobilized allies across the desert with makeshift camp. Town springing up all along the aqueduct construction line. These men needed be fed sheltered in many cases hospitalized with so many moving parts and more men joining the workforce every day while Holland was a general marshalling. An army. The last thing he needed was a mutant American history tellers is sponsored by audible. Who's issuing a challenge? A challenge to to current and new members to get listening in twenty twenty finished three audiobooks by March third and get a twenty dollar Amazon credit. All you have to do is listen. Audible will keep track of the progress for you. Audible members choose three times every month. One audiobook and two exclusive audible originals right now. I'm midway through the making of the atomic bomb. Richard Rhodes it won a pulitzer poetically describing the advance from speculative physics to Manhattan project to new world. Order listen to this or thousands of others on any device anytime anywhere audible members also get exclusive guided fitness programs to help start the new year off right. You'll also enjoy easy exchanges for any audiobook. You don't love and keep your audiobook library library forever. Even if you cancel start listening with a thirty day audible trial choose one audiobook and to audible originals. Absolutely free visit audible dot com slash tellers or text tellers to five hundred five hundred. That's audible dot com slash tellers or texteller to five hundred five hundred American history. Tellers is sponsored by simply safe. Every night I police departments across America receive hundreds of breaking alerts. But how do they know. It's not just another false alarm. All the alarm company can tell them is. 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Mulholland presented an update on the aqueducts progress to an audience of board of Public Works members and curious citizens work was proceeding smoothly. The Jawbone Division near the Mojave desert would be completed the following year in the tunnel near Elizabeth Lake crews doug towards each other at a record setting rate of six hundred sixty feet per month alongside the new southern Pacific rail line the city had built three hydroelectric plants. These these plants provided energy for over one hundred sixty miles of electric shovels compressors fans and dredges over two hundred miles of road had been cleared and a copper wire telephone system awesome stretch from central headquarters in Los Angeles to every camp along the line. All the way up to the aqueducts intake point near the town of independence. The city was producing his own cement to from from a plant just built near Bakersfield. It was in some one of the largest public work projects ever attempted by any city yet. In addition to engineering the the aqueduct Mulholland was still overseeing the water supply. For the city the Water Department was servicing over sixty thousand customers with around three hundred. New Accounts added each month. His system of water meters had brought both savings to the customer and dip and consumption still. The population was currently using forty five million gallons of water per day. Day Up from twenty three million nearly a decade ago. The city was still desperate for water and the completion of the aqueduct would be vital as the meeting was wrapping up. The Chairman of the Board of Public Works at one last question with all the projects startup costs. The city had already spent eight million dollars of its twenty four million dollar all our budget. You'd only nine hundred feet. Aqueduct actually been built. According to the chairman's calculations Mulholland was over budget by about three thousand dollars per foot mulholland pause to consider the numbers. Well by this time next year he said I'll have fifty miles completed at the cost of under thirty dollars a foot. If you'll just let let me alone. The room dissolve into laughter and applause at Mulholland Cheek. Go ahead then bill. The chairman told him. We're not mad about it. Dr Raymond Taylor had been working as a superintendent of the Los Angeles County Hospital when he received word from the Board of Public Works. The board wanted him to oversee the care of thousands of men. Up and down the aqueduct. Line Taylor just a few years younger than Mulholland had already seen much what life had to offer offer but he was up for another adventure so we acquire a small staff and began sending up nine field hospitals along the line with medical stewards at each large camp ailments were treated treated on site while severely injured. Workers had to be transported all the way back to Los Angeles the Payroll List for ninety-nine reported thirty two hundred positions on the line but over seven thousand names. Many of these workers were short-stay cres or men who drifted through took work and then drifted somewhere else tailored could not fail to noticed the prevailing conditions among these working men who stuck around then labored over twelve hours. A day slept two to a room and spent their money as fast as they earned it on paid as the the dusty boomtown of Mojave situated near the middle of the aqueduct line found its saloons gambling joints and whore houses filled with men eager to let loose one form and complained to Dr Taylor that he was constantly rotating through one crew drunk one crew sobering up and one crew working. It was understood though. Not Repeat it in Los Angeles is newspapers. That whiskey as much as anything else was fueling the aqueducts construction so the board of Public Works moved to prohibit saloon within four miles of the aqueduct. Line line though this only served to push those establishments back exactly four miles. As with their drinking habits workers could be just as obstinate about their physical health when men started coming to him with open infected sores on their hands. Taylor gave a diagnosis of impetigo realizing the infection could be rapidly transmitted when men with infected hands shared. Shovels Taylor ordered all men with infections to report immediately for treatment. But no one came. Taylor wrote later. This is hard to put across the ordinary hard rock miners resistant to anything. Whatever that seems to look like an order especially from someone? They figured did know pick ax from a shovel. So Taylor trying to different from approach convincing the toughest meanest man in each camp to spread the word themselves eventually this worked as the infected man grudgingly listened to the advice for men. They respected acted rather than orders from a distant no nothing physician Dr Taylor and his medical department was one of the a few independent contracts. The city had given out another though would be placed in the hands of thirty two year old Joe Desmond who would become the camp chef. More of a promoter older than anything else desmond had little experience in cooking let alone running a commissary department of this kind of scale but he was heir to the wealthy Desmond's retail family and wanted to approve his own business acumen to the larger world after helping organize soup. Kitchens the Fed over six hundred people in the aftermath of the Knights. No six earthquake and fire and San Francisco. uh-huh Desmond won his contract for the Board of Public Works in Los Angeles. He enthusiastically began setting up mess. Halls all across the aqueduct. Line each mess hall had a canteen. Gene we're workers could spend their paychecks on cigarettes clothing and other items oblivious to any class resentment that existed long hardscrabble workers he was feeding Desmond traveled with a chauffeur Johnson from Camp Camp in Jet Black Mitchell. Limousine workers were charged. Twenty five cents for each meal but opinions on the meals themselves varied. The Times reported that the aqueduct workers gorged on three squares a day fit for kings of the realm but a sign posted over one mess hall spoke to a deeper truth. Don't make fun of the butter and red. You'll be old and smelling yourself someday. Imagine you're a cook. Look at the Cinco Camp Mess Hall for the past weeks every evenings been the same men come in from their shifts and take their food and complaint you keep your Chin up and try enjoy. Enjoy your way through their complaints night after night. But it's it's getting Har. What color is your serving our finest vintage as always? It's grace is on the media. The meat is gray steel. I can't do anything about it. We could try keeping an icebox one especially boisterous minor. Samuels you know. No his name. My now takes his place and silence than tips trae sideways letting his dinner. Slide to the floor. I'm tired of this embalmed beef and this pissed bitter coffee you're serving during. I'm not the only one you know we're doing the best we can. But we're paying for the food and every day we're down in the minds and then we come out to be insulted like this. The least this could be edible. I've had enough of this garbage. What about the rest of you men around him or nodding furiously then another voice calls out from the back of the room meals? Tired of hearing you run your mouth in something whizzes of your head. It's an Apple Samuels turns furiously through that. You aren't waiting to find out dive under the counter as mayhem erupts in the canteen peering appearing around the edge of the counter you see food flying in every direction small fistfights broke now as man began settling old scores. That have nothing to do suffer. Thank you push through the door diving outside into the dirt. That's when you noticed limousine belong to your boss Joe Desmond. He's just getting out of the back. Backseat when you rush towards him. Jump inside there's there's a riot in the canteen sir. God Not again. I would not stick around Miss Desmond. We should get out of here at just that moment. Samuels and two other. Men burst down the canteen day. That's him him and his little. You shut the door drive. Drive Joe Jasmine in. His Cook escaped but mess hall. Rioting would continue up and down the line Desmond's commissary department had its hands tied. Refrigeration was still in its earliest stages extreme desert temperatures melted the ice and meat would often spoil even when desmond took to transporting it at night long. After the Sun had gone down. Desmond's limousine driver would later. Alright maybe the meals didn't suit everybody but there are always the best he could do if you ever want to try to feed fresh meat to five thousand men. In the desert with temperatures from one hundred injured often no refrigeration men scattered over two hundred miles. You just go ahead despite persistent complaints about the food works still progressed up and down the line mulholland system of bonuses had invigorated the workers and in December of one thousand nine hundred nine. He happily announced that the aqueduct project would be finished in the the summer of nineteen twelve one year ahead of schedule but the new decade would bring problems. Even the engineer. Mulholland could not have foreseen problems that would threaten mm to derail entire operation. American history tillerson sponsored by Babas. Some things are so basic so fundamental that you can go years without giving them a thought until something comes along that changes your perception makes you aware of the possibilities for the first time bomb. This is one of those. Something's they've revolutionized the way you'll think about socks from stuffed in a drawer necessities too. Gosh darn these are comfortable luxuries because because bombed this are the most comfortable socks in the history of feet. They're made from super soft natural. Cotton in every pair comes with arch. Support a seamless toe and a cushion foot bed. That's comfy veep but not too thick with many colors patterns lengths and styles bombs look great in the gym at the office out on the town or happy under a desk in recordings. Do you like mine are right now. Now Bama's are what feet daydream about and for every bombs purchase. You make Bomba's donates a pair to someone in need by your bombs at Bombo Dot com slash tellers today and get twenty percents off your first purchase. That's B. O. M. B. A. S. dot com slash tellers for twenty percent off bomb dot com slash tellers by May of nineteen. Ten work on the Los Angeles aqueduct was proceeding at breakneck speed. As the summer heat in in the valley rose to record breaking levels were reach. Milan's office that there was a problem. His men had been working too fast because Mulholland estimates. Now showed that the aqueduct. We'd be done a year earlier than anticipated the city had outpaced its ability to sell the bonds needed to fund. The project MULHOLLAND had run out of money in the three years since Los Angeles had voted for the bond sale portions of those bonds were sold on a set schedule by a group of New York investment bankers but the market for Bonn on sales had slowed drastically now. Those bankers thought it would be impossible to suddenly make up the difference. Their message was essentially. Tough luck even though they'd had no the problems making advance sales of your before. This year was a different story. There wouldn't be any more money coming in. And the bankers just shrugged the city would have to wait in May nineteen ten Mulholland was forced to abruptly lay off twenty seven hundred men three quarters of his labor force. Work up and down the aqueduct aqueduct. Shudder to a halt but there might have been a bright side as far as Mulholland could see the work. Stoppage also helped dampen a small labor strike. That had been simmering earlier in the spring demand for a pay raise by the Western Federation of miners had lead to a walkout of workers in the Elizabeth Tunnel but after the May layoffs. It was difficult difficult for the miners to get much traction. For their demands. Many potential strikers had already drift away to Arizona or Colorado in pursuit of more work union had perhaps picked a bad time to strike. Still Patrolman from Los Angeles were quickly dispatched to guard the Elizabeth tunnels powder dynamite stores. This was not an overreaction as labor agitation in the city was also reaching a fever. Pitch Job Harriman. The Socialist candidate for mayor had built a campaign on condemning the graft and monopolization he claimed was part and parcel of the Owens River project. The aqueduct was poorly designed. He told his supporters supporters and totally unnecessary. Herrmann was a fifth year old former minister who come to view organized religion as a trap. He saw the same kind of folly in the building wing of the aqueduct. He believed the present water. Supply of the Los Angeles River was more than enough to meet the needs of the city. Furthermore all those rumors of drought were started merely to fill the pockets of a few city businessman it was all a gigantic swindle set to enrich a few and popper the masses but it was the masses is that funded the project and its aim was solely to supply the entire city with water. But those facts didn't stop Harriman's Antioch reductive views from gaining traction after draw San Fernando land purchases had unquestionably made Harrison Otis and other city boosters. Very rich men. These clashes over the aqueduct and the upcoming election season put the city on edge then in the early hours of October first nineteen ten. An explosion of dynamite destroyed the Los Angeles Times Building Killing Twenty one people and injuring more than one hundred confusion reigned as to who could have been behind the blast but the majority fingers pointed at labor unions and their sympathisers the times and its publisher Harrison Otis and always been very loosely anti labor but the unions themselves condemned the bombing. Still when two brothers in union organizers James and John McNamara were arrested and far away Detroit in quickly hustled back to Los Angeles job. Harriman smelled a setup. Many on Aleph came to believe that Otis and his cohorts had framed. The two men some said that Otis had gone so far as to have the explosion set himself all to discredit the union movement in Los Angeles the McNamara Brothers were held in jail while the investigation against them moved ahead. Harriman rallied to their support. And the case continued to inflame the Elections Harrison Otis his Los Angeles Times and the Los Angeles aqueduct. What many had begun calling his aqueduct? Since Porter ranch scheme had become intractable symbols of the city corruption from within just before Christmas the city resolved by half a million dollars of its own bonds freeing up cash flow so that work could begin again again. Mulholland couldn't have asked for a better holiday gift calling the suspension of work a very expensive experience. He reluctantly admitted the aqueducts completion date would have to be pushed back a year to nineteen thirteen. The bureaucratic elements of construction elements that Mulholland initially shrugged off in nineteen o five. We're beginning to weigh down on on him with only about fifty miles of construction left. The project was over eighty percent complete but there was no doubt this last push would be the hardest after you're a tough year while Holland was ready to finally receive some good news. Imagine you're a minor working for John. John Gray's crew on the North Portal Elizabeth Tunnel around noon. That you wouldn't know it. In the darkness deep underground art excitement has been growing throughout the morning. Ever since word went out that only seven feet separate your crew at the North Pole from form and Ashton's crew on the south portal. Climb out of the mining car next year form and Mr Gray. He nods at the wall of rock ahead. Do you think is going to make it through. I better be us. Their bonuses to be had to the men who make it through the rock should be loose enough. Now we've just about let the whole place up with dynamite. Join the men cleaning away. The shattered pieces of rock. It's freezing cold and water. Nearly waist deep engines rattled pumping water to the surface. Hey Hey the candles moving rush over to see for yourself since this morning. A Road Kennels of in setup along the edge of the Granite Wall backup don't breathe on. Everyone gathered around holds the breath but the candle title still flutters. That's it boys. We got some airflow. Reach to grab a pickaxe before you can watch watch out the single air. Power drill breaks through the surface of the wall and it all comes crashing down as the dust begins to settle you make out to flickering candles moving toward each other in the darkness. That Aston back. I can see your nose. Can you see mine. She just fine. It could work Mr Gray with more light. You can see that a whole twenty one feet high has opened your all filthy and cold. But there's a wide smile on every face as men from both cruise shake hands and slapping each other on the back and Work Mr Aston done at highway. Finishing the Elizabeth tunnel was a moment for jubilation work had gone on day and night for four and a half years as men drills and dynamite. Mit Tunnel through just over five. Miles of Granite Mulholland gave all the credit to his Forman John Gray and WC Aston. They'd come in a year early and a half a million dollars under budget. But despite the victories in the tunnels animosity towards the aqueduct rose to a fever pitch at the city move toward the mayoral election of November nineteen eleven the Physicians for and against the aqueduct became the main focus of the campaign of both job. Harriman and incumbent Mayor George Alexander that month and exasperated rated mulholland spoke before a city. Women's Club luncheon. Never mind that. The aqueducts construction was nearly finished. He'd had enough of political distortion and flat out untruths. Being shoveled into the public conversation eighty percent of the project was complete the other twenty percent. He said we'll be built with the other. Twenty percent of the money. The aqueduct could act asserted was neither about graft norrland speculation. He told the Women's Club. Some say must not be sold to the San Fernando Valley because a syndicate owns a lot of land. Well if you sell it to Kuwait or Redondo region you will find that the land there is owned by somebody in fact anywhere you put. Someone owns the land and ask asphalt cries of conspiracy and corruption behind the bombing of the Los Angeles Times building. Events took a turn that November after nearly a year proclaiming their innocence since the McNamara Brothers suddenly changed their pleas to guilty. It was a stunning reversal and even more stunning for Heron and the Socialist Party who supported did the brothers while they languished in prison as a consequence support for Harriman's May oral bid was extinguished. The Socialist Party suffered a defeat from which it would never recover who could rally behind a political party that supported murderers and terrorists. Still even after the election shouts and speculation continued to trail L. E. Aqueduct project by nineteen twelve Mulholland had reached the absolute limits of his patients fed up. He sent a letter to the board of Public Works. A committee should would be created to research the building and construction of aqueduct. He suggested the committee should investigate. The physical aspects of the work longside field administration issues and any other other aspects of their choosing the citizens of Los Angeles. He wrote could judge for themselves. The true conditions of this work whether it has been carried on in a proper manner Mulholland Brash. Honesty was getting the better of him. He was proud of what he'd built. He felt he had nothing to hide. And if the people of Los Angeles wanted to know what was what Komo Holland would throw open the doors let them have a look. What over the next year as the aqueduct hurdle towards completion he would discover that perhaps he been too old talk to upfront? He'd wanted to throw the doors open but he was about to learn that some tours for petrol left closed. You on the next episode of American. History tellers the investigation into the aqueduct threatens to tear down the legacy of the project and the Land Syndicate and hints of corruption option become interlaced with the founding of the Twentieth Century City. Meanwhile Owens River valley residents begin to fight back to regain control of their water from. I'm wandering this is American history tellers. I hope you enjoyed this episode. If you did I have two other podcasts. You may be interested in American scandal in American elections. Wiki game searched for them and subscribe on Apple. PODCASTS spotify Google podcast wondering dot Com or wherever you listen right now if you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe swipe the cover artists podcasts. Find the absolute notes including some details. You may've missed you'll also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. You help us give dish. Oh to Hugh for free. We'd also love to learn a little bit about you. Please complete a short survey a one-day dot com slash survey that's one dot com slash survey. We'd love to learn what you're listening to what you like. What Ariza of American history we might tackle next? You can also find us and me on twitter and facebook. Follow the show at H. Tellers. I'm at Lindsey Graham and thank you for more information on the Los Angeles aqueduct project. We recommend you read rivers in the desert by Margaret. Leslie Davis Merican History. Tolerance is hosted edited and produced by me Lindsey Graham for airship sound design by Derek parents. This episode is written by George. docker ended it by four marina edited and produced by Jenny. Lower Backman our executive producer is Marshall Louis created by Hernan Lopez for wondering. Hi I'm Lindsey Graham. The host of wondrous show American scandal. We bring to life. Some of the biggest controversies in. US history presidential lies is environmental disasters. Corporate fraud this week. We're starting a new series about a car maker. The duped millions of drivers ending up in the crosshairs of the Federal Government Government. It's the story of the volkswagon diesel scandal to listen to this and other great series subscribe now to American scandal from wondering.

William Mulholland Los Angeles Los Angeles Times Harrison Gray Otis Mulholland Los Angeles aqueduct Mulholland Mulholland Owens Valley aqueduct Mulholland aqueduct aqueduct Los Angeles River Harriman San Fernando Valley John Lewis John Los Angeles aqueduct project Owens River Komo Holland Lindsey Graham Joe Desmond publisher
Pay it Forward Friday: Colin Mulholland

Hacking Your Leadership

01:51 min | 5 months ago

Pay it Forward Friday: Colin Mulholland

"Hey everyone and welcome to another paid for Friday episode where we highlight people that we feel are doing a great job. Publishing leadership content that resonates with us. We include links to their work and him on our post to make sure that they know we appreciate them. This is our way to say. Thanks to other leaders and individuals that are having a positive impact on helping others become better leaders, sharing their thoughts, opinions and ideas online for all the scene here. Chris and I have always wanted our platform to advocate for other people passionate about leadership, and give our listeners as much content as possible to help sharpen their own skills, the different perspectives and approaches. If you'd like us. Check out any one specific. Please tag them in the comments or send us a message with links to their content on this episode I WanNa Recognize Colin Mulholland. Collins. Title is the Enterprise Change. Management Global Practice leader of change healthcare. Colin has some great posts. On his Lincoln page, it has been a guest on a few podcasts sharing his views on Change Management Co, creating shared vision, aligning goals and embedding continuous feedback. I appreciate counts thoughts on how to have a systemic approach to creating efficiencies while including the voice of the employees and customers I also appreciate his definition of a system as the shared behaviors, beliefs and sumptious of a team, and that anyone on the team is in the system. In recent posts Colin shared and I quote when we show up with a willingness to listen openness to learn encouraged to co create together. We are better when we attempt to coerce or change others we are doomed to lose trust, and our best will not be accomplished. Grateful to learn from a comprehensive approach by Michelle, Kim to navigate during traumatic times key takeaway know that your team will remember your compassion, but they will also remember your silence. So. I highly recommend checking collins content in as usual is the links to is linked in profile in the episode notes Great Job Colin and thanks for helping others to Hashtag be a better leader. Thanks for listening and let us know who else deserves some Kudos.

Colin Mulholland Change Management Co Collins Global Practice Chris Michelle Lincoln Kim
Laura Harring: 'Mulholland Drive'

It Happened In Hollywood

49:52 min | 1 year ago

Laura Harring: 'Mulholland Drive'

"Hi there and welcome back. I'm Seth Bram which senior writer at the Hollywood reporter. And I'm chip pope. Or is it my d'appel ganger from us? Us. Did you like it? I really enjoyed it. Although ultimately, I'm not sure what it was trying to say. Yeah. You know, it seems like a lot of people have different theories about what he was doing in that movie. And do you like walking out of a movie knowing exactly what it was about? Or do you like that sort of open ended dreamworld symbolism of that movie? I mean is against unlike waffling, but I enjoy both of those types of movies. I really appreciate a movie ABCD the end. But I also love a movie that's just like a Z as easy Q, maybe back to a and then backwards, and then or a bunch of people doing hands across America in the ocean. I mean, I what I love those open ended movies and this week. We're going to be focusing on one of my favorites of all time. And that's what's up on it in Hollywood. One of the things I love about this podcast is that we get to revisit some of our favorite movies and TV shows of all time, and sometimes movie just hits you at xactly the right time in your life, right place, and it just sticks with you forever. And that's what this movie did Mulholland Drive. It came out in the fall of two thousand one I had moved to LA in June two thousand one and I was having the worst go of it. I lost my job. I can find more work. I was meeting the weirdest creepiest people, and it was all in the glare of this burning. Sunlight, and I just thought. Wow. This place is kinda evil, and I went to see this movie, and it kind of just reflected back what I was feeling about a late at the time. Our guest this week is one of two women who star in her name is Laura Harring. The other was Niamey watts in her first major movie role that sort of launched her career. I'd say and it was directed by David Lynch. Now, what are your feelings about David Lynch love, David Lynch is a master. He's a genius. He's an artist. He's one of the few people that really worked through the Hollywood system and was stable to do their own singular vision. And what vision what an economy class? I mean, his TV shows and movies are just completely first of all insane. I mean, right totally off the wall. But have a an internal grammar that totally makes sense. Right. I mean, yeah. I I like to think of it as he makes the commonplace things in life seem bizarre and the bizarre thing seem commonplace. I once the. The privilege of meeting him and interviewing him about transcendental, meditation, which is his lifelong practice he meditates twice a day. He credited with everything creativity. It's happiness is open mindedness, and I even took a TM seminars part of research for this article awhile. So and I actually had a practice for a little while. But I actually gave it up, but it was amazing to meet him into be up close to him. He does vibrate on a different frequency. I think from most mortal men, right? But he is so present a word that's sort of been said so many times that it's lost all meaning. But he was the most present person I've ever spoken to and it was really exciting. I'll never forget it. So having Laura come was such a treat because here we had someone who worked so closely with him who was really willing to share some of his tricks of the trade and bring us back to that other. Worldly, amazing set of one of my favorite movies. So why don't we get right into it? Laura had been missed USA, and she came to LA when the misuse say organization. Kind of relocated here. Start getting her feet wet and acting when she was here and really caught the bug. There was no Trump at this point. We should point out though. Yeah. It wasn't. 'cause he wasn't all thought that when you heard misuse say. But and actually way before President Trump was even anything in our consciousness. She avoided an opportunity to take a photo with him. So her instincts were well attuned. I think, but here's her describing pursuing acting even when Hollywood was opening its doors to her and the twist of fate that would forever change her life. I was doing theatre in the downtown arts district, and we were making our own theater, not getting paid just very. Gritty artsy, beautiful committed a large hail learned to perform there. And I just loved the actor so much I love going there. And my my passionate was like I became a real artist gritty and doing all these very dark characters. But that were funny was dark comedy and. You know, somebody called me the casting director called me. I didn't even have an agent and said David Lynch wants to meet you right now. And I said right now he goes right now, I said, well, I'm in warm ups. I can't meet them right now sit I'll I'll come by tomorrow. And then I had a car accident, right then. And there I was so excited and. Get over that. Yeah. I got a car accident. The so excited that David Lynch wanted to meet me, and it was so kind of bizarro that he wanted to maybe right now. And I was just kind of like, David Lynch, and I reread ended the guy in front of me. So we pulled over and I said, please this very important day for me. I have to go get ready. I have something very huge tomorrow. He said, no problem nothing happen. And the next day. I went to his offices and his executive assistant said have you read the script? I said, no. And she said, you're your character has a car accident in the very first scene. And I said. Kale? I I just had a car accident yesterday. When he when I was told that I was coming to see David, and I got goosebumps. I said, well, maybe this is a little sign. I don't know that just sounds like fate to me because not only is it crazy that she's in a car accident. There's a car accident in that movie. There's a big car accident wild at heart. It's like car accidents seem to be theme in David Lynch's work. So if someone walks in to your office is at a car accident. He's probably like that's great sign her up. What's even more astounding about this story is that he chose her by simply looking at her head shot. That's all he saw. And he said that's the girl. Which is. Of course, something you hear many times in this movie. Right. There's a director being handed a woman's head shot and being told that's the girl so had done. Movie with the casting director Joanna Ray, beautiful lady. And her son was helping her casts this movie and uh she remembered me, I I did the movie with her son. She remembered me as she showed David my photo and David said bring her in. And that's I was the only actor he saw for the for the role sorting senior photo, and deciding that this was the girl Lynch had the script sent to her for her to read. And at this point it was for a pilot for an ABC series the same network that had done twin peaks. That's right to great success. He had the surprise success surprise success that ABC with that. And I guess they were trying to replicate that with another Lynch series. But of course, it being Lynch didn't feel a TV show. It had that cinematic Lynch dreamlike nature to it. You know, the whole thing. Was just like the movie very haunting strange. I read it. My body reacted. Like, I knew it was a masterpiece. I started crying just still grateful. And so I didn't have it yet. But just feeling the story of feeling the emotion behind the words and everything. So perfect meticulous everything. So amazing that I just put the script on my chest. And after I read it, I said, wow, I couldn't believe it and weeks went by didn't hear anything and join a called me. She said David's, very worried. Did you not like the script? Why haven't you called? I thought you guys were supposed to call me way it works. And I just thought that was kind of funny and cute call us. We'll call you. Lynch's, please, call me. Call the. How how wonderful is that? Can. I just say how meta this is. Why don't we explain the plot? Because it is very meta. What's going on just explain the plot? But could I say one of the main elements of this movie is people coming to town to make their dreams come true? And this is what's happening to Laura Elena Harring, how she is just been plucked out of obscurity with a picture to be in this TV pilot, and she's reading it. And basically what she's reading is her own story. It's very bizarre. Now, keep in mind, he has yet to hear her say a stitch of dialogue. All you've seen is the picture. She is a hard time believing. This is really happening, but she goes in for her meeting with him. And she thinks she's going to be reading a scene, but that's not how Lynch auditioned his actresses. When I went into the room. Join array said be very simple, just very classically in very simple. So white shirt black pants and a black con along jacket, and she said don't wear any makeup. So I went clean faced and she came into the room with me. He had his share, you know, like way back and all he said was good. Good. Good. Good. Are you saying? Oh, he's just looking in his mind the way that he functions. That's how I heard that. He he works is. He starts. He see. They're seeing you in the movie or he's not it's very definite. And so I think in his mind he was seeing me in the movie, and we just started talking, and he played me the beautiful piece by Angelo at the beginning of the movie. The music is so melancholic I was looking out and he saw me looking in the nemo looking out. But I was looking out. There was a wall. There was nothing, but I didn't want to stare at him or Joanna. So it's just processing the beautiful piece of music, and he saw me in the limo looking out the window. So he plays the music from Angelo, bad lamentably, who is the guy who scores the David Lynch movies and the first shot of her in the movie is just a big close up of her face. So this makes sense. He's hiring her basically off of her face because he will soon be playing a character who is a blank, and doesn't know who she is doesn't know what's going on in her own mind. So in a way, it's kind of the perfect audition. Guess you don't really need to see that much to know. Well, this is going to be a person who is an empty. Vessel and I can just focus on their face. But still like how did he know that she wasn't going to be terrible. Actress like she had to do some real emoting in. This thing is towards the end when they're in a feeder together to sobbing together. And that's true. So maybe she worked up to that. Because I mean that was after the thing was a TV pilot, and then turned into the movie, you know, they add all the sobbing and everything the last twenty minutes, so CGI re-shoots the movie. Yeah, it was CGI. Michael bay director that part. So Laura was always his only choice to play the character known as Rita who has unusual and sees a photo of Rita Hayworth on the wall in this old Hollywood bungalow that she wanders into randomly that know me watches character, Betty is occupying. Right and the Naomi watts character. There was two actresses up for it. But after a screen test for ABC, they decided to go with the combination of Niamey, and Laura and he had also called in Naomi based on her picture, by the way, that's right and Niamey he noted in their screen test was the name of his nanny when he was a child which may have also altered the fate of now me watch his life. The truth is that they had great. Chemistry. Right. Yeah. Great chemistry. But also a lot of instinct, and whenever we get an actor in here. We're always just totally pestering them for secrets about how the director works and Laura was willing to reveal a few of those for us. So that was pretty exciting. He directs so much with his energy his hands and his voice, and he puts you kind of in his world with symbols and metaphors very easy to follow what he's looking for. So it's very kind of picturesque. Do you know what I mean like for that last part where I'm going? That's the secret garden, he said up the gun. He said walked like a kitty cat, Laura. And the board like a kitty cat, Laura. And my whole posture changed all of a sudden lung gated, my you know, what I mean? And I had that Lou flow and then. When you're walking. Yes. Isn't that awesome? Probably never gone that direction. So sweet. And then you know, when the first part where I'm kind of very troubled. He's there's always a black cloud. Very dark gray cloud following it. Wherever you go. So that's how I became so scared, right? Because how do you prepare for a role where you know, nothing? And no one knows you. Yeah. For somebody. She has no friends from the past that come at. You know, it doesn't go in a conventional way, obviously because his David Lynch. But right. How do you prepare for that? How do someone loses all of their memory? You try to put you in mind and Blanc, which is very difficult thing to do. But it's doable. I mean, if I counted three, and I just focus on the sounds in the room one two three you mind goes blank. Stories you that clock. I hear our producer breathing heavily. Exactly if that's the staying for like twenty thirty forty crew members. Well, we could just say that I think he wants audience's mind to be a blank, and then you're his hand is exactly to manipulate. And he's a master manipulator in some ways, you could say he's like a great horror director, and he knows how to build tension and dread and how to sort of use pacing to to get the motions he wants out of the audience, Brian. There's loads of that kind of stuff throughout Mahan drive. I mean in the most sort of basic way to put it as he taps into the rhythm of dreaming. That's how I feel when I watched one of his movies, right? When you're a sleep when you're at your most vulnerable. It's also dream like to me, my dreams are exactly like his movies. But it's just fear. I it's just turning everyday things. There's a lot of Mahan drive turning everyday things into fear to someone entering a room. Ten the behind diner? Yeah. Behind. How to set it up? So that the audience starts feeling something he can really manipulate our feelings through the crystal sounds, and the the camera moves that are so slow sauce law when I saw them putting rocks one day on the Dalai. So that the cameraman couldn't push it very fast. Crazy technique to. There's a couple of really weird scenes in this movie. A couple. He just had to pick one. If you did what would be your favorite. It's okay. It's hard to pinpoint them all. But I like the casting meeting where Angelo badly Mente spits up on Espresso into a napkin as if you're coughing up blood. Which is another great way that Lynch always just take something. You always wonder what his take is going to be like on just everyday scene. So it's just a meeting and the meeting comes up comes into just spitting out Espresso winter napkin, or like catching your wife cheating turns into dipping her jewelry and to paint, you know, it's cheating with Billy readily. So still wondering how he's he's into this move. So many crazy scenes what what's your favorite, my favorite has to be the cowboy scene. It's just so creepy. It's a scene where the director played by Justin through Justin throw you mean to ru. Okay. We had a whole conversation about this that we'll get to later through versus throw. But in America Canadian boy, we say throw, well, I'm from Quebec where we say through. But anyway, this sequence is amazing. And he goes up and meets this cowboy under a flickering light in this zombie like guy come out, and kinda just in a very steady voice gives them instructions about casting this woman that isn't one a cast and kind of like makes a veiled threat on his life. If he doesn't and the Hoving really creeped me out the first time I saw and still did again when I did the rewatch recently. Yeah, why just do a common kind of seen ev- exposition where you could make a guy go up to the top of the roads to talk to a cowboy about who's going to be in the movie, but why would a cowboy have any say over who's in the movie anyone exactly exactly the cowboy is awesome. You know, he was a producer. Right. Well, I looked him up last night. And. He only has producing credits. He's he was producer at a very popular production company at the time. Do you remember which one it was nobody overlapped with some of David's projects? I think I recognized if you names, but he had no other acting credits that poster boards to meet the lines. Oh my gosh. He's a producer that you know, David thought was perfect for the role. And I think he killed it. What's he not some? He did. I remember him scary me the first time I saw there was just something. So surreal about his delivery stonefaced. Phase was he liked that in person? Well, I didn't get to talk to him so much. I wasn't in that scene. But I do remember that David was so happy, you know, what I mean? So so happy if he ever explain to you what the Cowboys to represent David didn't explain anything to us. He basically said I want everyone to interpret, however, they want. So I saw the movie. Six times when we were promoting everything. And I always thought it was about something different. And that's what I think is really cool about the movie, it's like reading a book your mind makes up and fills in the blanks in majett. So what I imagined different than what you imagine that what you imagine. And I think movies don't have that too often. So Pat, tell you everything's explain and this one doesn't so Monty Montgomery who is also in wild at heart plays the cowboy produced movies like wild at heart and Mahal and Dr. How you how did he get cast? David Lynch looked at his picture and said I want him to produce my movie, it's all David Lynch. Does he sits in rooms all day and looks at pictures? So Seth what does the cowboy mean to you? Then you know, if the if everything is open ended, and no one tells you what you're supposed to think. Well, the answer lies in what the Cowboys says if you remember he says, you recasting the lead actress anyway on dish in many girls for the part. When you see the girl that was shown to you earlier today. He will say this is the girl. The rest of the cast can stay that's up to you. But that lead girl is not up to you. And you will see me one more time. If you do good. He'll see me two more times if you do bad. He does asks season again once doesn't do what he asks. He sees them twice the cowboy represents death. Whoa. The internet is ablaze with theories about the cowboy there's like a hundred Google search answers to what the cowboy means. That's amazing people have a lot of time on their hands. So that's a lot of the fun with David Lynch that you don't know what it is. It's kinda like when you watch twin peaks. You're just like who's that? What's that was this mean what's going on? What are we doing here? And that's what Mojo and drive is supposed to be at this point. Yeah. That's right. It was still supposed to be TV series that ABC's spanning seasons. Not just one two hour and twenty minute movie. Right. And so they've made this pilot. And then they got gotta look at it. And I don't think they liked it too much. So when I was told. About the project. They said the the whole thing will be like twin peaks who killed Laura. Palmer Mahan drive is going to be what's your character who is his character? And that's how it will unravel through a couple of seasons. And so it happened is we filmed it, and when we finished David said, he called us. And he said Mojo drive is dead in the water. What he goes? Yeah. ABC's gonna play it at two in the morning. Nobody's ever going to see it. It's gonna be shelf somewhere. But Meanwhile, I just said take it. I don't feel that. I really don't feel that it's the end. And for me, it was I've been very intuitive my whole life. But there's also like everywhere, I looked David Lynch characters like actors everywhere. And I thought I just don't feel that this is dead. And I kept telling David and Naomi is not is not. I just know that it's not. And then I don't remember how many months later, but. A few months, I guess a land start and pure Delman decided to put it another forgot how much but in the millions maybe one or two to make you know it into a movie, and so he calls Naomi, and I and we go and see him and he sits in the middle. And he said Mohammad drive is going to be an international feature film. Right. There's gonna be nudity. Laura kiss his hand to shake. Shake his hand. And I'm like what? Like. And so, but he kept his word. I said, I don't want, you know, full noti, and so he blurted out, you know, the bikini area, and he did that without a contract. He did he was very honorable. So when you filled it for ABC, obviously, there was probably no lesbian love scene. Yeah. I wasn't supposed to tell you that. That was added my bath. So many years. I forgot what I could say and couldn't. But I'm sorry about that. But yeah, that was added because obviously it couldn't be on a network television. Yeah. So she brought up the famous same sex love scene in the film, which is very steamy. And she wasn't supposed to spill the beans. But of course, it was not in the ABC version. So how did it become part of the movie the pilot didn't go at? So he added twenty extra minutes of script, which has basically the end of the movie and the lesbian. Love scene was a part of the new. Pages. But she wasn't thrilled about having to do this scene. They had developed a very sisterly relationship over the shooting of the film. And now, suddenly they were naked in bed together. Trying to be steamy while forty crew members were standing around them and Lynch was not on the Bullhorn. At least that's true sensitively giving his direction, but will Laura tell it. I'm not gonna lie. I felt very vulnerable. I was in my dressing room. And I was on the verge of tears. I came to the set. I was kind of like just site is hard. There's a lot of people there, you know. And it's very bright. And he said Laura look at this. And he gave me the forget what they call it. But the loop the loop. Yeah, he said you see how dark that is. That's how dark is going to be. And it looked like if you're looking through this Mike, I mean, pretty dark dark scene. It was looked like a silhouette. And so I come down a little bit. You know? And and then the last take goes Pete pump it up. So he made it lighter light. But it's fine. I mean, it was still kinda Salou Eddie. And then during the love scene Naomi were. So stiff, you know, we were we were friends. And so, you know, it was very awkward, and we kept doing it, you know. And then finally David said he came he didn't use a Bullhorn. He goes now don't be afraid to touch each other's breasts. Now. Don't be afraid to touch each other's breast. Now, then that was the last take, and that's the one he used. So it's really remarkable for her as a novice actor to get all of these emotions out in the scenes that she has to play. Yeah. This is her first role. She's being exposed literally and emotionally and another one of the scenes where she's very vulnerable and also physically linked to Niamey watch his character was in the selene CEO's team when they go to that weird nightclub in the middle of the night, right because Laura's character wakes up in the middle of the night after the love scene and starts saying bits of dialogue that you here in a little bit down at club selenium. And then she said we we have to go. Yeah. And she says right now and next thing, you know, they're in a car and they're going to this club. And I love that name Watts's character is questioning something in this movie to the fact that anyone would question anything that's going on way. What that's the craziest thing in the movie. We've got to go. A nightclub right now. And like the cowboy seen. I think there's a lot of interpretations out there. What Solent CO means? So we pinned Laura and wanted to get her interpretation on what that nightclub scene is. And she had a really interesting take on it. See to me again, silencing the mind. That's what I think I think because it's like a lot of the zen Buddhism. They say the RR tree example you see without seeing you here without hearing. Well, it sounds strange. But that to me. Saying to us or ineffectual tease, our intuition and to let something greater than us at intelligence work through us to create perfection because the universe is perfect. I mean, everything in the galaxies couldn't work if there's not something some energy. That's just orchestrating this beautiful masterpiece the universe, and I think no I bond, and yet you hear about and, you know, I I don't know because I never really asked him, and it was years later than I thought is referring to the mind. I think a lot of the movie is referring to the mind, but that's my personal opinion and your performance you had to blink out your mind to play the part right and in clubs he Lance. Yo he was telling me to cry. There's deep sorrow. Remember, we're both crying you're holding each other. So what were you thinking about when you're crying? Wow. Twenty years later forgot. But you know, what as a human? I think we all have, you know, even nobody goes through childhood and skate. So I was believed the lottery Cest remarks because I'm Latin so I can always I don't have a issue crying for the actors at can't cry. I always tell them if nothing else works like if you can't tap into your childhood just tell you body to cry. You know, if you research shows have you haunt you over and you kind of look down. You you brain starts thinking that. There's something sad. So we so you can also do the opposite. You know? And when you want more of the confidence chemicals, you know hormones, he Stanley straight, and you come across as more confident because your body is actually releasing those hormones, so in acting is very physical very physical, and I was hunched over, and I was leaning into her and the song also is kinda sat she's seeing in that live all your or to the trash. Well, it was a cappella acappella gorge. She's amazing. She's amazing Rebecca del Rio. Her voice who so crystal as she sings Desi arnez like nobody's business amazing. She's real artists. The who? Who would? Gnome ick. Him. Her. I mean that whole scene is just again, another LA dream thanked float into this club. You get told. There's no band. You right. You wake. But there's a van you here before that even you've woken up after love scene, and you're just babbling about Selassie. That's so funny shot late at night. It was a night. We had a few all nighters five in the morning stuff that the garden scene that party that was we shot that like three or four in the morning and Anneli it gets very cold. And when we shot the car accident, I remember it was three or four in the morning was like fifty degrees or forty five. It was very very cold. David had a full ski suit on. Jumpsuit, a one c and then you know, they didn't want to put that dirt on me. They said we'll just roll on the floor. You know, it was freezing. And I was just woken up because I was sleeping in the dresser. And David go. See I'll do it. And he any rolls on on the ground to get himself dirty. A jumpsuit on. So I rolled on the floor and helped it made me feel really wrecked up shoot that early in the production or yes. In the first week if I remember correctly. Yeah. This shooting schedule is perfect for me because I shot Monday through Thursday, and I had Fridays off because I would get twelve shot because I was shot in the head when I was twelve years old with a forty five. Yeah. What Ryan Ryan and drive by and drive by crazy, Texas, this big bullet this huge grazed me here. Go into your brain. Oh, the heads, very scandalous. It was like a fountain. I could hear it in my head like, blah, blah, blah, blah, all money pressing sweater down. And it was. Yeah. It was some sort of drug deal. And we were it was an abandoned it was like a dark parking lot. We are looking for the movies. I was with my entire family and it felt like slingshot. It really felt like a rock hit me. And then my stepdad said get down there shots. And my mother puts a sweater on me. She's pushing down because he's telling to push hard. And all I can hear is first of all the body has an alarm, so it's like a building alarm went off in my head loud alarm. And then I could hear the. Glueck the blood gushing into the sweater. And so I'm very quick to do kind of traumatic movies. I can do all that range. You know because. Yeah, this was a very difficult. Kind of is very it's very intense when you're so close to death because everything slows down almost like a dream really dreamy slow. And then all you hear is your thinking really loud. All the other sounds in the background. And I remember thinking. I haven't done anything with my life yet twelve years old. I was in disbelief that this was it. And so I've always been extremely grateful for everything extra innings extra extra extra grateful. So I always remember that when I'm focusing on the wrong thing, you just need to refocus a mind. I remember that it's all a gift every breath might we might not wake up tomorrow. So it took us a while. But we got to the reason why it's easy for her to access her emotions. Movie to why she can cry on cue, right? Yeah. Pretty traumatic story. I was a little traumatized with that story. Sorry, if it was too disturbing. But, you know, sometimes you have to go to dark places here on it happened in Hollywood, you know, she turned it into something positive, and that's what strong people do. Yeah. She went on to become Miss USA. Then the star this movie, and she couldn't have been more lovely. Why don't we lighten things up of it? Yes. That's a good idea. And talk about some of the other stars of the movie who went onto big things, I'm thinking of one in particular Justin through. But of course, we know that he went on to become a major actor screenwriter than he co right? One of the lender movies. Yeah. He co wrote tropic thunder. I believe but at the time he was he had just a few movies under his belt, and he made quite an impression. And I was curious what Laura thought of him when she first met, Justin. He was such a nice person. He is. I mean, I haven't seen him in ages. I saw him in the confidence festival. One time. I was dancing on the table a party, and he came up so great to see him like if you like his family, you know, we went through something together. But. Quiet. Very intellectual such an artist and just a really solid guy was he riding back. Then did he seemed just like the cool dude on a motorcycle or whatever that is now or is he he didn't seem like the bad boy that he kinda peers to be now, he's just was real intellectual artists. Quiet mysterious really, a pleasure to work with real sweet grounded in solid enough working with people like that, dude. Lynch see him as may be protege or something like that. I have the suspicion that you know, his hair was kind of similar, and whatever that maybe David never told me this. But I just kind of feel like he was commenting on his own casting process. And you know, the big agency CAA, you know, they they control seventy five. Scent of the movies. So that maybe there, you know, I heard that they kind of pushed their people people that the representing rightly so they represent them. So the very powerful, and that they you know, that maybe the industry tries to tell the artist who to put in the movies, you hear this all the time a great script. But the director can't put the the actors that he wants them because people feel they can't distribute them the can't sell them, or I I don't know. I've never been a producer of always wanted to. But it's, you know, it's pretty complicated. I think it's a miracle to get any movie made. Theory that that Justin is the surrogate for Lynch in this. Right, right. I mean, I guess it's kind of obvious since he's playing a director, but bright and really courtesy until that moment in the movie the character. It's just like a lot of things that are bad happens to him. So maybe that's what the artist type director is thinking how he's abused within the system because you think of it everything that happens to Justin Theroux is some kind of you know, he can't cast the person he wants he goes home. His wife is cheating on him with Billy Ray Cyrus. A comedy airs, which is probably what directing movies like bright. Now, it turns out another one of my favorite scenes in the movie was one of Laura's favorite scenes. We asked her to to say a scene that she wasn't in that she loved. I really enjoyed the audition scene that only did that was that was pretty epic. It was beautiful and I love that one. Because until that scene. She's just that perky. You're not sure he's a good actor, right? And then she becomes a sexy diva like in real life, or in the movie, you're just she's this weird perky girl. And then suddenly it's like where did this come from everyone in the room was genuinely surprised not just? Yeah. Backeding surprised right right to work really hard on that. She was always rehearsing that. You're still here. But what you want? Really? My parents are right upstairs. They think you've left surprise. I can call them. I can call my dad, but you. You're playing dangerous came here. Few trying to blackmail me. Gonna work. So what a crazy journey for this movie. So far that started out as a failed TV pilot? And then they add twenty minutes to it a hot sex scene of hot sex, and it's going to Khan. And who knows what people are going to think of it is it just gonna be a mess because the last David Lynch movie before this movie lost highway was regarded as a bit of a mess that he was a little bit out of control. So who knows what even the French? You're going to think about this as they sit down in the Grand Palais to watch the premiere of Mahala drive. There was a hush after the movie finished. Now me looked at me. And then I look down David's looking and we're all like. People stood up started cheering really loud. And it was then we were all looking at each other like, but he he had prepared us. And he had said, even if they don't applaud if they do you stand straight with your chin up because nobody can judge anybody else's art. So after that moment, none of their lives were ever going to be the same. Lynch was back on top as one of the biggest Oaters in the world. And both of the actresses were obviously, very glamorous. And now major stars on the international stage. But Laura was getting more tension than I owe me was she had always taken a sisterly role big sisterly role to to Niamey, but it was interesting to hear her describe sort of how the spotlight works at a big event like that. And what she advised Naomi, and well, let's hear her tell it never remember that when we were. On the stage. It was Naomi David Justin an eye and the press when we started were calling out for David. But at that press, call there were calling out my name as so I was turning on the so many, photographers, turning something sexy. I worked out for two three weeks and good. And when we left the stage for the photocall, the press started clapping, yelling my name. And the president said they would like you back on the stage. Nells I I so I came back, and I, you know, I'm down, sir. And I've perform theater before. So I was miss USA had a lot of confidence. And so I just there's something very movie stars. And did a twirl cinema kiss in left. And there was a roar of explosion of. And then I you know in the niece Montagne, they said that. Hadn't been that kind of reaction since Marilyn Monroe appeared at the festival, and I just got so much love the president was saying we're have you been all these years and stuff like that? And so when we sat to dinner one of the nights, I noticed I always brought her into the photos, and with no me, and I said Naomi 'cause I understand how life works. I said no me the sun will shine on your shoulders, the tables, always turn, and I hugged her the kisser and came back here and the tables turned, right? So by that, she means NIO me went onto this huge movie career, and she's realistic and says, you know, she's continued to be an actress, and she's been on TV and had worked. But you know, she she knows that they're stars moved in different directions. And I think you know, the way she explained it was she felt comfortable the way things were. She was very at peace with everything. Yeah. Which is inspirational because you know, no one in that movie. Really is so brazen the happy ending of Mahala drive is her and her. Attitude and her way of looking at the world, not that she didn't have a little fun the cherry on the whole mall. Drive Sunday was that the film was nominated for best director the economy awards. It was the one and only time that Laura attended the Academy Awards, and she was gonna make account. I wore the million dollar shoe. What's up that dollars handles? Yeah. They had these beautiful. I don't know. How many cares? I forgot. But on each foot, and I wore this sparkling diamond that was like the flawless Archduke Joseph x sixty seven carats worth so many million dollars and had a bodyguard. It was a very strange experience a whole thing. Oh, my daddy. No. So there was the stylist in. He Stuart Weitzman had to choose somebody to put into the stylus suggested me, and he came to fit me like Cinderella and they fit perfectly and so he gave them to me. And then the owner of the arch to Joseph was Cuban jeweler alma, Lena, and we had had lunch, and he had promised me the diamond, and then he said, you know, Nicole Kidman's team called and they wanted to use the diamond because she was up for the Oscar for Moulin Rouge sparkling diamond. So she wanted to wear it. And he goes, and I said that I had promised it to Laura Elena Harring, and he kept his word in that me use it. She's not Latin. Forget it. Yeah. The Latin bonds. Yeah. No. I just love people who are honorable. Yeah. You know, it's nice, but diamonds on the soles of your feet at all time thing. Like, I can't imagine wearing between the Toews between the toes is that strive hundred thousand dollars a foot when you're like go to the bathroom to ask. You're looking Almeida wearing these million dollar shoes? Mazing I got very lucky I've been very lucky my whole life. I think that was the first and last time I ever went to the Oscars. And I went with a splash. I was the most photographed woman that year because of the of these diamonds, I think life is a play is life is a game. And these kind of little gifts that I've gotten from the universe have made life so much fun. Some very very just grateful and honored that I even was in a movie like Mahala drive. So that's pretty crazy. Because this diamond I was looking about this diamond. It's even. More carats than she thought. It was at seventy eight carrots, and then in two thousand twelve it sold for twenty two million dollars while but she didn't get to keep it. Right. That was just a loan. I I don't know. But she didn't say that the shoes were she was given a copy a worthless copy of them, but they look like they're originals. So she likes having those memento of that night, bright. And again, what is real what is dream? What is fake? What is the notification on your phone? Who knows? Well, here we are at the end of another amazing journey. No. But that was really cool. I mean, again that movie made a huge impression on me. And it held up when I watched it their performance is more than anything just mysterious. You just wanna know more and to have her common reveal all these little secrets and be so charming, and so playful and so fun to be around. It was very special episode for me me too, especially when you think about Mahala drive because at any point anybody's experience in Hollywood can be either of the lead characters in Mahan drive. It can being going great. It could be going horribly. You could think it's going horribly, but it's actually going as good as it's going to get you could be net. You could be blonde to be platinum blonde. Chip, right. That. No, I it's just a it's just a very interesting movie because it is one of those once that's doesn't tell you. What to think doesn't tell you how to interpret it and? If you never get around to moving tale lay and devoting your life to the insanity that is show business. It's a great cautionary tale and a little dip of the tow bracket out without having to commit. Yes. Dip of a million dollar though. So definitely check it out, and you can see it on itunes. That's where I watched it recently and DVD's blue as so if you've never seen. There's a criterion collection of it. Oh, it just is that recent a couple years ago. I think well there you go. Check out the criterion version, but definitely see it. And if you haven't seen it in a while check it out again. And until next time, we'll see you mall. Holland dry. What?

David Lynch Laura Elena Harring director ABC Hollywood Naomi Cowboys us LA America Niamey watts Angelo Mahan drive Seth Bram producer Mulholland Drive Billy Ray Cyrus Joanna Ray Justin Theroux
The Insanely Ambitious and Corrupt Plot to Grow L.A.

Aerial America

03:24 min | 1 year ago

The Insanely Ambitious and Corrupt Plot to Grow L.A.

"This arid valley and the river that runs through it have played a leading role in order for Los Angeles to become one of the richest in the world it's bill and the arrival of the railway as more and more people flooded in aim the mayor of Los Angeles in Eighteen Ninety eight eaten believed that the only he would take the water from a river valley two hundred thirty miles to the north before they could take a drop of water from Owens Valley they I needed to get their hands irrigation project that would help local farmers and ranchers but by the time the next challenge was for Mulholland to get all that water down to La ears on a massive new acqueduct forty three of them died helping build the channels tunnels on November fifth nineteen thirteen forty thousand Angelenos rushing down into L. A.. They are it is he famously told the crowd of Los Angeles didn't actually need much of the water from the aqueduct in the years that followed expensive green housing lots in one thousand nine hundred eighty four developers name. It's been home to some of the most famous names in Hollywood.

Los Angeles Owens Valley Mulholland Hollywood
Learning from the Leaders: Bob Mulholland on Roadblocks, Change and the Wave Towards Independence

Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

54:39 min | Last month

Learning from the Leaders: Bob Mulholland on Roadblocks, Change and the Wave Towards Independence

"Welcome to the latest episode of podcast series for financial advisors. Today's episode is off learning from the leaders Bob Mulholland on roadblocks change and the wave towards independence. It's a conversation with the former UBS leader and current member of the steward Partners birth of directors. I'm Mindy diamond and this is Mindy diamond on Independence. This podcast is available on our website Diamond consultants. And on adviser hub.com as well as Apple podcast app other major podcast platforms. If you are not already a subscriber and want to be notified of new show releases, Please Subscribe right on your favorite podcast platform or on the the code page on our website. And if you find the content in this series to be useful and no others who could benefit from it, please feel free to share it widely. Admittedly, I feel pretty lucky the work that I do as a recruiter author and podcast host home affords me the opportunity to speak with advisors at all levels on through to Industry change makers and better yet. I get to share those conversations with all of you off which is extraordinary in and of itself. So I'm grateful to welcome today Bob Mulholland to the show because there are few people in the wealth management industry that can claim Bob's experience which started off at Merrill Lynch first as an advisor and that is head of Merrill's client relationship group with over 14,000 advisors in North and South America after twenty-five years at Merrill Bob served as the president of sound Securities and execution-only broker-dealer. Yet it was in 2009 that many field came the most pivotal point in his career. That is when his former Merrill colleague and then UBS America CEO Bob McCann tapped Bob to join him on what McCann called his renewal team at the struggling UBS wealth management unit. UBS was in tough shape following the 2008 crisis industry media reports said that adviser headcount within the Wealth Management Group dropped over the next three years from 8248 to 6756 and $32 billion in assets walked out the door. But as many will tell you Bob played a key role in the turnaround of the firm in conversation with managers at UBS. They tell me what was most compelling about Bob was his previous experience as an advisor which gave him a unique perspective to truly understand. And what was important to the sales force while it was his leadership that helped Drive positive change as Bob McCann's second-in-command as the head of the wealth management advisor group home, Bob oversaw some 7,000 advisors plus ubs's investment products and services platform. He retired from UBS in 2015. And in May of this year was named the board of directors of Steward Partners. I'm excited to have Bob on the show to talk about his long career and get his take on the wealth management World As We Now know it so let's Jump Right In Thank you so so much for joining me today. It's my pleasure to thanks for the opportunity. You bet. I want to ask you to first of all, I know that your name is a very familiar one in the wealth management space both amongst advisors and branch managers and also someone who's really very long regarded but most recently I want to just for some background you served as the head of the wealth management advisor group at UBS while the bulk of your career some twenty-five years you were in in the senior field leadership role at Merrill and there was a five-year stint between the two firms when you served as the president of an execution-only broker-dealer so would love it. If you would just take a minute and tell us about yourself. If you would what led you from Lehigh University to the world of financial services. All right, great question first I tell you that I would graduated from Lehigh in nineteen seventy-four for the wage. Students of economic conditions at the time. It was a pretty deep recession. So it's tough to get a job. I landed a job with a friend of mine at roadway Express, which was the largest Trucking firm in the United States at the time roadway did is they paid you more than I would have made at some other firms, but they made you work a lot harder. So truth be told at roadway. We generally would work sixty hours a week. So the one good thing I know about roadway and I say to people when they ask for how did that help you I said it taught me out of work heart in nineteen seventy seven three years later. I got married still am now forty-three years have two kids. They're grown. They're they're off the payroll. They have kids. I have five grandchildren. So let's just say life is pretty good. Life. Sounds really good. That's wonderful. So why Merrill Lynch then is your first stop. All right. Well after five years at at roadway, I realized I didn't want to be in the trucking business the rest of my life and I knew some folks who were dead. We'll call it the stock brokerage business and I said to myself, you know, they're not any smarter than me. I know that they don't work as hard. So I asked a friend if I work sixty hours a week. Can I make more than I do not think his answer was in The Brokerage business and his answer was yes, and that was a seminal point in my life. I said, okay. I'm in so I was told to Merrill Lynch had the best training program. I still to this day believe it's time that they did. It's an interesting story because I had four interviews and I said they just keep having me come back and come back and come back and then they screwed up my appointment for our famous Merrill Lynch simulation and I was told that you had set up today and I just went back to the office and I said I can't take another day off. I can't go back to this simulation either, you know page after four interviews whether you want to hire me or not and truth be told I never did go to the simulation. I'm the only person that I know that never went through the simulation, you know back then so I guess I was the lucky one. Yep. Into the simulation. I probably wouldn't be in the business today. It's so funny. And then you were at sound security the execution only broker-dealer and then you be home so sound Securities between Maryland UBS why the change? Yeah, you know, I like my stint that sound I was working with very good friends of mine one was my manager back to at Merrill back to nineteen eighty-two. We had a nice little firm. We were growing but quite frankly at the time. I was fifty-seven years old. I had to take stock in myself and said, you know what I still get a little gas in my tank and I have some time for one more run if I had an opportunity and UBS opportunity presented itself and quite frankly. I jumped at it and it what it did is it gave me the ability to do what I did at Merrill Lynch, which I love to do is run a sales force and I said to myself if I'm fifty-seven. I'm going to give this five to seven years. In five to seven years, it'll give me and the team a good chance to turn around a major firm. It was it was pretty exciting. Yeah, and I want to come back to that but let me for perspective also right now speak of gas in your tank in May of this year. It was announced that you joined the board of Steward partners. And for anyone not familiar Steward is what we would call sort of a quad be independent firm a firmware advisors are part of an independent Partnership if you will but have all of the plug-and-play infrastructure of a traditional firm and I imagine it'd be one of the many firms in the independent space would have loved to have someone like you join their team. Why Stewart? Well, there's a fellow that I know named Doug Kentfield and Doug I knew from back at Smith Barney and he also has a place down at the Jersey Shore near me and so the pocket of Dog and Duck said that he had just joined Steward partners, and I said who's Steward partners and he explained a little bit off. He came to me a little bit later and said the management team and board would like to talk to you about possibly joining. So I said, okay. I have no problem talking to them. And when I did I liked everything I saw at home at Stewart to me. There are things that are important in a firm. They probably picked off every one of them. I found the firm to be really client-focused which is probably most important in no specific order the management of stone not all of them were a face and I respect that and I wasn't fa and I thought it really helped me do my job Steward allows efa's to pretty much run their own businesses. They're somewhat flexible a very important part of stewards and I really like this all employees down to the receptionist our owners of the firm and there's their shareholders and they own stock. And as a matter of fact Stewart is the only firm that did a tenth of some shares in 2019, which gave people liquidity the Private Stock that they had in there, which I thought was very cool and a couple of other things and looking at it I wash Firm that was growing not shrinking and Steward was growing like a weed very very strong relationship with Raymond James and I've always respected Raymond James, you know, believe it or not. I respected the fact that I'm not allowed to have their own books. They didn't tie themselves to the books and say those are our books and I think that that shows respect for the F A's and you know, lastly that there's flexibility within Steward. You can be 1099 run your own business have your own business or W-2 have your business within Steward? So quite frankly when I looked at it Seward offered everything that I wanted in a firm wage and maybe the precursor even to that question and we're big fans of Stuart. I might add but perhaps the precursor to that question is more why the independent space? I mean, I have to imagine that five years ago when you left UBS while the migration toward Independence had already started it probably wasn't quite as accelerated as it is today Thursday. I find that most wire house managers are pretty unfamiliar with the options in the independent space. I mean your comment who is Steward that sounds about right. So why feith dependent space what did you know about it? And what appealed to you about it? Well, obviously, you know in the last five years that I've been retired and even before that there you saw a wave starting and so, you know, I still read and I still get things that I read up on Independence and I try to keep up with what's going on in the industry. And so I guess when you think about it, I've always been a fan of the old Wayne Gretzky quote that took skates where the puck is going to be. So with this bit of gas. I had in my tank I said, you know, there's been steady movement from large firms to Independence and the large firms f a headache have been dwindling and for what it's worth. I'll give you a few numbers that impressed me. Is that stewards now only seven years old and they've gone from their first FA to 130 off. Base 16 billion in total assets to billion in net new money this year which I find to be really good compared to many of the wire houses and believe it or not was just written up as a twitch largest i r r i a so it's a real firm that I saw the ability to go somewhere that was doing in excess of a hundred million dollars in revenue and down the road. I could force the multiples of that and that was kind of exciting the other reason big reason. I was very impressed with the quality of Stuart sport. You know, one of the first things I did was look at their website and say okay if I'm on the board, who am I going to be on with and quite frankly in my eyebrows went up when I looked because I said geez, these are senior Executives who have been CEOs or in publishing in HR in government in private equity on the board many people know Charlie Johnston former Smith Barney song. So I'm joining a group of really really good professionals not a couple of friends of the steward CEO and and president. They're really good and I'm proud to be wage. So that was that was one of the things that really got me to think, you know quite clearly about Stewart. Yeah, but let me ask you a question. It is my experience that wireless leaders are often very dismissive of the independent space, you know, the whole drinking the Kool-Aid thing. What was your sense of the independent space in general the advisers that you saw moving there when you were at and then left UBS quite frankly. I used to think of the independence as a place where substandard FAS would go pagal, you know, we're getting dinged by the larger firms with you know, what would be called The Penalty Box they would have a lower payout because they weren't doing enough business or whatever and it was a a landing space for them. We're dead. They can get paid more than I never really thought of them having the same quality as was in our own firm. But now now that I'm at Stewart, I look in the average fa is approximately about a million dollars per fa in in Revenue. So it's pretty much the same and I'm impressed with the people that have gone there and also the longevity of the people in large firms who have made a switch after a long time. So my view from the past has been changed hundred percent. Yeah. What's interesting to me is that the diaspora toward Independence began with advisers? Probably a decade ago and every wire house manager at that time dismissed them as just as you said, you know a place where substandard FAS went but over time it became hard to dismiss it as you watch every day billion and $5 billion dollar teams walk out the door from the wirehouse world, but the cellphone Second phase of the migration was were wire house managers began to move toward the independent space some of them because they were forced out and into it and others many others proactively because they began to see what the advisors began to see and that was exciting. So let me ask you a question. What were you hearing and seeing from advisors and managers in the field that you be off prior to your departure? What was the temperature? What was the General sort of sense of things of how happy and content and well serviced they felt I guess the big thing is that just business was getting much tougher to do every day. Lots of reasons for that some possibly corrected within the firm some not regulation had to do a lot with busy becoming a lot more onerous some of the changes within firms as I've noticed within some firms. They were allowing their firms where their sales forces to be wrong. By legal compliance for HR would be making decisions for them which let's just say don't think that you had enough input from the field. A lot of pictures in the office is felt that they were losing the authority they had or the decision-making that would get things done that everything became centralized and home office and who's just becomes an issue in doing business, you know, specifically at the larger firms that had become much more bureaucratic. Mhm. Yeah, and that's the same thing. I mean that hasn't changed in five years everything. You just said you observed has gotten five years worse and we hear that even more one of the things I'll say to you is I spoke with in preparation for this podcast with an ex manager of UBS. So a manager at UBS that had been there a long time who had the opportunity in the pleasure as he said of working under you off. And one of the things he said about you was that you were a leader who had walked in the shoes of an adviser and had run large branches so walked in the shoes of a manager and understood the pressure of manager was under and understood. Well how frustrating it can be to feel limited as an advisor and your comment thank you know in a lot of cases these firms now are being run by legal or HR making decisions for the field can be frustrating. Tell me what you think about that would have changed unbelievably I know when I was a manager I started managing around nineteen eighty-five and did that in Branch offices until mm mm once right fifteen years and I saw just a lot of changes and I would tell you that back in the the 80s and 90s. Like I looked at it as that was my Branch I did it on behalf of the firm. But I ran the branch I was responsible for those that phase I was responsible for that area moving along just because of inherent changes in the the business or as I said The Regulators or whatever a lot of it's just started to be pulled away and became more difficult to run your own show and then from an administrative or compliance point of view a lot of the compliance responsibilities and whatever then got laid on the managers who most likely had last time to spend with FAS and trying to coach and counsel them and trying to help them do more business so long hold management job became a frustrating somewhat of a frustrating job for some people and the objectives that you had to hit probably got harder. I guess I was responsible for some of that at some place. Time but when you hit your objectives, I would tell you that a lot of managers were frustrated at some firms that okay, I hit my objectives. Well, I didn't make more money either. So there's just a lot that goes in Long Branch management stuff that can provide some frustration and that's why I think some people raise their hand and said, I think it's time for a change. And your opinion Bob how did the industry or UBS in particular and the industry at large change over time? I'm going to go back to the beginning when I started and I I you know, I think about how did I get started? And I was I was a young guy who was twenty-seven years old looked like a young guy. I mean it was difficult to compete cuz they look at me and say how long have you been a business and you know went from you know selling a stock or selling Public Service Electric & Gas IPO to a group of clients and doing seminars or whatever. I mean it changed from that too from selling a stock to actually selling customized Solutions. So when you think of the the decades that went by the changes were unbelievable, I think that the the changes in technology have really been a catalyst for the change in the business I mentioned before I was young I was twenty-seven and it was really tough for young people to get started and we didn't Have teams that people could get on back then you started you started calling people right now with the technology young people can call in through the use of technology in schools. They can compete with any other FAA and sometimes even better than those that that are older but stuck in the past another big change that I see in the business is dead, you know, unfortunately or I don't know fortunately or unfortunately the fa is the average age of an fa is getting older and older and I don't know what it is right now, but I know when I was at UBS who was somewhere in the song 50s years of age and now it's probably I guess sixty years old. So there are less training programs and I worry about this gap between the newer Faz coming in and we're going to be able to be there with the firm in the future and I don't know if training, you know, the training that exists right now is most of it is just around call log. So I don't know if that's actually the best training I could say that I know when I came in I was very well trained another big changes as again. I have mentioned the decisions have been pushed away from the field. So just a lot of changes over the years and I would say the the better managers are those that are able to adapt to them and I I had a lot of changes when I was a manager to and you know what I did wrong with the flow I work with them and I just kept moving on and kept my head facing forward and saying I gotta keep moving forward and I did so I never let changes get the best of me. Yeah, and I think I you know, but I want to I want to make sure that I'm clear so I get why making white white disempowering managers is bad for a manager. But how is that bad or how does that impact the advisers who worked for them to give you an example what the first day? I was UBS. I called my fa and said what do I need to know? And he said you need to know it stuffing. Work here. What are you talking about? And he goes the all the things that you have to do to get business done is ridiculous and you just can't get things done. So I said, all right. Do me a favor. Let me talk to you age of assistance and I talked to her and I said tell me the five most difficult or what you would consider the most idiotic things that the firm does makes your life miserable. She goes. Oh that's easy. Here's the wrong things and that day I talked to five other assistance and they were telling me the same things. So what happens is all of these things, especially with the assistants the assistants are trying to get things done for clients and they see Roblox. And so what I tried to do way back then was pushed the decision-making back to the branch where the branch office manager would say. All right, here's what we are going to do and they would have to live and die by that decision if they don't then a piece of paper or an email or a request or whatever sits in dog Operations are a compliance or somewhere for a week or two where I client is waiting for an answer a client waiting for an answer is not a happy client. So that's how it impacts the F A's it's somehow it took it tends to undermine the F A's and it creates what I used to call cranky clients. Yeah, and in your opinion how has bank ownership of firms like Marilyn UBS, for example, impacted both cultural identity as well as how advisers feel about the firm double-edged sword em first, I love the fact that some of the banks came in and and I'll call it took over the firm's if they did not the firm might not be in existence today. So thank you to the firms that save that they took over now on the other hand. I've seen very few of any examples of firms that have been taking over that the integration went I guess really well. Very tough to break down this shirts and skins that exists between the two firms who won who lost or the we are the acquirer attitude. So we're going to do it our way. So often in my view I've seen I guess my view is that her face had become less loyal to the combined firms because they lost that whole that family aspect of the firm. This is my family. There's trust their culture and in too many times they've done things that that have been have negated some of that trust was a culture so I haven't seen a lot of examples, you know, I'm sure that they are out there but you know, I don't want to name any firms right now good or bad. Yeah. No no, of course and an important question. I'm curious about. What do you think of these retire in place or Sunset programs that are so popular today from the firm's perspective. They're great ways to tie advisors up sentiment has been mixed great. Senior advisors some of the next-gen inheritors don't love being tied by The Firm but examples Merrill c t p or UBS is Alpha program, etcetera. What do you think good for next-gen advisors or not song. I love the program for almost all constituents, you know the good for a phase to some extent because what they allow a phase to do is create equity in business law says that they built over a period of years. So if I was still in FA right now and I would have been in business for forty-one years if I decided to retire, it's nice for me to be able to sell the business so to speak and get what I built up like any business owner. So in that way, it's good. I think it's very good for clients and that's probably the more important part because I'm a much smoother transition where you're allowed to work with a person or a team, you know, rather than get a phone call one day from someone who says hey Bob left and I'm handling your account a little Abuja. So you know what it does is it allows for a very smooth transition to think that I I guess I'm not sure that I don't like it as much about the programs or what I like about Steward verse some others is Steward along with Raymond. James does not have a non-solicit policy. So when you're in these programs and you say I'm going to go in the program you immediately I signed your book away and your book is owned by the firmament at Steward. Your book is never owned by The Firm it's owned by you and I kind of like that because it was your book for forty years on the 40 years the first day that you signed it. I don't know why it should be, you know, anything having to do with that book can be taken away and firms could do something that you might not want to be done with your clients. So I like that aspect about about Stewart and Raymond James. Well, so you hit it on the head. I mean your comments that those programs allow an advisor to create equity in a business. They built true. But that advisor doesn't really own the business at the end of the day or the next gen inheritor who's buying that business out of his own Revenue doesn't own the business at the end of the day and it's one of the biggest reasons why folks are going independent because if they had control if the senior advisor who's retiring or the next-gen inheritor had control over the business and the things the mandates that might change affecting the business over the life of the agreement. That would be one thing but the biggest complaint we hear about it is that these advisers have no control and they're not really building Equity that they don't own at the end of the day. What do you think about that? I don't like that then then you really didn't build life so to speak because when you still have an equity interest in the business, you should have some say in how that business could be run. Right and that's the point that you're as an employee. You don't log. Really have control over how that business is run and that's the issue. I think that a lot of advisors who are mostly the next-gen advisors are worried about signing on to them. So they could take the clients through their give them to another fa if they want they could give them to a call center if they want they can do whatever they want. And I'm not sure that that's the best thing again for clients. Yeah, that is definitely congruent with what we're hearing. I want to shift gears for a minute to the independent space. So in your opinion, what do you think? The factors are that have been most responsible for driving advisers away from the wirehouse world toward Independence just a couple of things. I would tell you that I don't call around to a lot of firms these days and talk to a face. I just don't think it serves me well to do that at Birth. There's no interest in doing that. So but what I do is I clean some things when I might talk to someone or someone calls me and says how you doing and what I hear a lot from multiple firms birth. A kind of a disillusionment of what the firm used to be and what it is today and they go it's not the same and I believe when some day when someone wakes up in the morning long as it's not the same some nefes are going to say, you know what I should look under another tent and see if there's something there and I find that there's a lot of that, you know, secondly a lot of the wage movement is just the ability to run their own business without edicts from the home office and and Central management. You know, many of the larger firms have become very bureaucratic either with policies or or with pay, you know, I did a lot of things with pay a tried to do the best I can but you know some FAS have described the whole pay wage issue is death by a Thousand Cuts. So, you know, one of the things that appealed to me was to Earth is so how do you pay people they go it's simple 50% like, okay. Well, what's up? Lego nothing, there's no small ticket policy. There's nothing for discounting. There's you get paid 50% if you're an employee for Steward. So I just think a lot of the things back together FAS wake up one day and say I'm not sure if this is the place that I should be it's not the same as what I signed up for before and basically I would leave it at that and say that that's it off. And do you think that senior leadership at the big firms take the threat of Independence? Seriously, I do I think that they have to they look at the Independence. They look at the edge of Rowley numbers, you know, the last I saw us to really report it said in 2010 why our houses were fifty percent of wealth management Revenue in 2020 is 40% off that's pretty big cut of all of the wealth management revenues. That's a huge cut in there. So they have to take it seriously, you know every now and then I stick my nose into advisorhub and advise them. Has this recruiting score card in there and look and see I wonder what's going on and I can't find a wire house in the top ten and recruiting in there. So I don't talk to the the management office of the other firms, but I know that if I was there I would be taking it seriously. So I think that they would have to also and what do you think they're going to do about it? In other words if they are taking seriously, do you think that there are other things they will do to stem the tide of attrition and and or do you think that they will look to launch independent channels of their own very interesting quotes structurally. I don't think that there's much they can do what they have to do is when you think of it, you know, it's just how do I stem the tide of people leaving and when I go back home the word that I used was disillusionment. Give them hope give them a place where they want to work is probably the most important thing. They need to re-establish loyalty and Trust to keep their FA as they need to stop changing things. Every year the big firms have to work hard to establish a culture where fasr again really proud to work and want to work at and they've done a number of things that have an infilled trust your loyalty to the firm will give us an example of a lot of the the firm's will have these non solicited policies and I don't think that one hand you say give us all of your trust and loyalty on the other hand not say well, you can't talk to your client. If you take you know, if you leave the firm, I'm not sure that there's an equal sign between those so I don't think that many of the firms are going to start an independent within their firm. I just think there's too much conflict and having multiple f a delivery channels where 1fa sitting at a desk doing business one way in one is doing another I think it's dead. Right before and I don't believe it's been so successful. So I really don't think big firms are going to launch independent channels within their firms and I also have the suspicion that if they do there's a cost to doing that and right now I don't think that any firm wants to take on additional cost to reduce profitability. So I don't think that that's going to happen. So it brings up an interesting point because well, it seems logical to me and you that when I say what are the firms need to do to prevent attrition, it seems logical give people hope give them a place where they want to come back to work establish trust and loyalty yet what they're doing instead of doing those things or taking actions that would instill more trust and loyalty instead. They're seeking to time organizers up via this these retire in place programs. And again while the retirement Place programs can be very good for senior advisor. It allows him to monetize. His life's work it is dead. Always in the best interest of the next-gen and certainly shouldn't be the only way it certainly doesn't do a lot to engender trust and loyalty. So it feels like they've sort of got it wrong. Do you agree with that? Yes, there are there are two things that they can do one is just toned down the bureaucracy a little bit and I'm not saying blow up compliance or regulatory or whatever maybe even it's it's more communicate better as to why they are doing some things or why they have to do things. I think communication is a major part of off of trying to establish trust and loyalty within the the ranks. So I do believe that there's a lot to do that have nothing to do with making major changes in The Firm. It's just has to do with showing respect of essays in what they do and make sure that the FAA is know that they're important and feel loved. Yeah. I think that's a good respect is dead. In word, I think that a lot of what goes on in the major firms feels like a lack of respect and the advisers feel more like a distribution mechanism as opposed to a person that the firm, you know really cares about. Let me go back to your role at Stewart's so I know you're on the board, but how involved in recruiting or day-to-day operations. Will you be I don't think that any board member of any firm should be intimately involved in the day-to-day. So, you know, I've kind of been there done that and it was very clear when I came onto Stewart. I don't intend to run the day today. I don't intend to jump in front of the senior Executives who were there who have done a very capable job of Growing the Farm and running the firm for the last seven years and they've done really well in the board is very very supportive of them. So if one of them calls me and says, can I run something by you? I'm certainly going to help answer the question, you know, like a lot of what I have is what they call institutional wage. Areas, a lot of things that they run into I've probably run into myself over the last forty years and I'm happy to help and I'm happy to give them my opinion if they accept my opinion and should be fine. If they don't accept my opinion and do something else fine, but at least I offered the you know, the the bigger issue is, you know, they'll be responsible for their own actions. They are responsible for running day-to-day. I'm responsible for more or less just for them not the whole firm and about recruiting bomb. I mean, I have to imagine that there are plenty of advisors that read what I read when I read that Bob Mulholland joined the board of Stuart I said, wow good for Stewart, since you've joined the board with some of the advisors that know you and respected you while you were at UBS reached out to you and what are you hearing from them? I've talked to a bunch of advisers from Stewart along the way we had a call I gave him my phone number and say if if you're interested, give me a yell and so a lot of them took me up on it. I'm glad that they did because it gave me the opportunity to talk to them about how we doing. What are you doing? If you were me, what would you relay to the Senior Management? So all the people that Stewart I found are they're very happy. They and I'm not saying that to try to you know be the salesman or anything but many of them are long-tenured FAS who are at home either firm for ten twenty thirty years and they just figured out I want something different and they came over and now they say look I love it here and one of the reasons is they were all owners of the firm Ware shareholders and that's important to them and it may be in a smaller firm. It's different than you're a stockholder in a larger firm, but they are owners and everyone is owners and they feel as partners dead. A lot of them comment to me it's much easier to do business here, you know and then they say, you know, I came over and as I got here I realized I should have made this move a long time ago when that really solidifies with me that right now we have a pretty good place to work which makes me proud to be working here. But what I was getting at was how about recruiting advisors to Steward coming from the wirehouse world. Do you hear have you been in conversation with any advisors that are considering Independence or considering leaving? And what do you think they value most or what's on their minds the most? Well, I'll answer it this way if you're saying to me have I talked to any potential recruits? The answer is yes. I don't do it everyday if asked I will I'm a shareholder of Steward if I talk to someone on the phone who did she say based on the conversation that they might have had with me. They'll come that's going to help the firm grow. Hopefully it helps my stock in The Firm a little bit. So I have talked to a handful of recruits off. Most of the recruits that I talked to ask me about things generally they asked about the industry. I don't get down to specifics and the way that I used to recruit at the other firms, which was much more detailed much more involved. I don't get involved. I have never talked to anyone at this place about a deal. I just basically talked to them about the advantage why I came to Steward five managers that I see with the firm the things that I like about the firm and I leave it at that and I think that most people are more interested in the thirty thousand foot view than you know, like right on the ground and that's what I try to give them food. So when those folks ask you, you know, hey you've had for decades of experience. Where do you think the industry headed? I mean, it's changed a whole lot in the last four decades. So how long do you think the industry has headed? And what do you think's coming next again? Another interesting question and when you you sit back and I think about my career and you know, the number of years I look and I would say wow what I did when I came in and what the f A's are doing today is entirely different. I came back. I only did transactions. I'd call people on the phone and Thursday we have the best research so that will help you with your stock-picking. We've come a long way from there, you know the next big thing in the industry and a call them seismic shifts was the whole issue of faith during and and actually paying FAS based on the amount of assets. And I think that that was a major change in the industry what international investing was big we very long Did anything International Way Way Back when fee-based became very very popular late eighties Financial Planning and the nineties holistic comprehensive exam after that and right now I just think that the biggest thing moving forward is going to be the way that the new tools and the way that we will use the technology tools. We have to complement personal advice. So Bob with respect to technology, do you think that the big firms and the independent firms are on a Level Playing Field? Do you think that they can compete easily with each other? I do believe that the big firms in the independence are on the Level Playing Field because we can go get about any technology that is available today. The larger firms will have it in house and we will go out and get the best that we can so yeah, I do believe that platform. Technology, all of that what is available at one place at a larger firm will be available at a smaller firm and that's what one of the reasons that have phase are saying I get the same stuff but I can run my own business. This is a pretty good deal. When I look at what bigger firms or doing these days and they're spending a ton of money on technology. So I would say that you know, many of the bigger firms that our technology is is very robust. I mean, well, we've tied into a bigger firm with Raymond James but the difference in the technology package between the bigger firms and the smaller firms like a stewardess. How do you use the technology? And how do you allow your FAS to use it? So I just you know, he was one quick example, I guess this social media social media is very very difficult to get into that arena with technology at a larger firm. I think that wage With a a Raymond James, you know, but more specifically with a steward social media and use of things like that or marketing campaigns or whatever. I think are a little more flexible than you're going to find it the other at the other larger firms. So again, it's this layer of bureaucracy and policy that gets thrown up thrown over everything but I do believe that the the larger firms have done a an outstanding job of increasing their technology abilities. Yep. Let me add something. I think the oldest big thing is the wage thing that is here to stay and what that is. It's called personal contact and advise, you know, when I think back to the late 1990s, I shuddered one day when I looked at magazine off the cover of the magazine was entitled death of the stock Brook and it was at the Advent of all of the Discounters who were going to undercut all the prices and they said that they're going to drive the stock birth. Out of business. Well, it's twenty-five years later and they didn't drive the stockbrokers had a business as a matter of fact, it's been one of the best businesses to be and ever investors to me. I think it's important that they talk about their big decisions that they have someone who's a trusted partner and they want to be comfortable with these combined decisions that they make with their financial advisors. I've always told groups of a phase. You know, what you sell you sell comfort and that's the best thing that you can sell. So to me this convergence of Texas in personal contact is a huge deal. I'll give you a very striking example right now how many people who are in the business a year ago thought that they would be down the number of Zoom calls that they're going today. Nobody. They probably didn't even know what Zoom was now Zoom is a major way to contact and advise clients. I'll tell you what When the pandemic is gone, hopefully sooner than later Zoom is still going to be here and the essays are still going to use zoom. So I'll just use that as a as a way to say. How do you combine technology in personal contact that to me is one of the most striking examples. Yeah. So let me ask you a question. If a youngish advisor someone who was you know, in the early stages of their career with real potential came to you and asked for your advice on Career strategy. What would you tell him or her so if the choices were stay at one firm for the whole of your career choice to make at least one well-timed move and take the biggest recruiting deal you can get three is go independent for is go into management and 5 is anything else? All right. I'm going to pick five final answer. Okay, anything else you may not like this? But every day that I've spoken with and tried to counsel over the years. I've always told them concentrate on the task at hand work on today don't have your head up thinking about what am I going to do? Next year? What am I going to do here just concentrate of what you have to do and things will come to you and they'll be good but I would tell them is if they ask what how do you think I get in? I would say join a high-performing client or off the team. I think the aspect of joining a team is good that they help integrate you you get trained better on the team. I believe in you're going to and most likely in the call center jobs. I would tell them to try to develop within that team a strategy where you could fit in to help them grow. Whether it's I'm going to deal with the children of the the more wealthy birth. Boomers that you have and I'm going to try to bring them on and make sure that we get the the those that will inherit the the assets later. I might think about having them specialized. I think I definitely advise them to get a cfp because I think it's important and I think that labels are important to tell you the truth when when you're trying to sell yourself to clients home. I talked to them as if you can and your community and in most communities you can find out where some of the diverse populations are. And so if you have a if you have a Spanish part of the community, there will be a lot of wealthy people there too. So especially if you're Spanish speaking work on Spanish-speaking clients, you know, it's another angle but try to find your own Niche and again just with your moves keep your head off work hard do your best and good things will come to you. I think that's a great answer. I love that answer. Yeah. No you asked about management. And here's what I would tell you about management back in town. 1980 the managers that I had in my office asked me begged me pushed me into management and I said, okay. I'm going to give it a try and you know what it ended up a long time later. I guess it was a pretty good move for me. I would say that I've really enjoyed helping FAS grow get a huge kick about that. I found it very rewarding, you know, so but in in management your rewards don't come from specifically what you do they come from other people. So what I would say is if you're thinking about being a manager you have to be wired that way that you're probably more interested in other people then personally yourself I did this I did that all of my business was through everyone else the all of those people were the ones that raised me on their shoulders and and woke me up and so, you know, I can't say enough about the people that I worked with that they they responded they were great. Yeah, you know, it's interesting to me that you still have that perspective mostly because when I stop In this business almost twenty-five years ago. The job of Branch management was the Pinnacle like when you reached success as an advisor, you were really successful when you went into management, but as a management in the lab Branch management became more disempowered and things became more bureaucratic and advisors became more sort of wholesale frustrated or disenfranchised. The job management was a lot less fun. And I think there are a lot of managers not that they're regretful. I think they'd say the same thing you say that you know, I I'm filled up by the by the the facility stating the success of others, but I'm not sure that it's quite it's viewed with the same sort of aura that it once was That's probably true. We we talked about that before and if I'm talking to a manager on the phone who says what do I do and you know what? I'm kind of disillusion and whatever I just I tell them you're looking the wrong way you're looking up and you should look down concentrate on your people in your job will be rewarding and just you know to me that's one of em, I you know, one of the axioms that I've always kind of lived by I tried to make the best decisions that I could over the years. I'm a firm believer of the three-legged stool them make a decision. I have to make a decision. That's good for the The Firm that's good for the FAA and it's good for the client. And when all three of them are treated equally and fairly the stool doesn't fall over if one of them is treated to fairly or unfairly the snow falls over and I would explain that to people too when I talked to them. I go ideal. I I'm a three-legged stool principal guy. So this is why I made that decision. This is why it's good for clients FAS and the firm and I have to stick with it. That's the way that I think so. I just think if you're honest with people as managers, they'll cut you some slack and they'll they'll be okay with many of the decisions that you made off one final question Bob and I'm so grateful for your time from your perspective having seen and witnessed firsthand so many advisors businesses over the years. What are the things that you think the very best advisors do again? I'm going to give an answer that I am not sure that you think is the the pat answer but the best advise it's not about being the smartest. It's not about being, you know, I use the tools the best or I'm the best asset allocator, or maybe even the Dead You know best performance performance does help and it's really important but I think that best advisers what they do is they relate and if you can't relate to your clients, it doesn't matter what your performances what you do nothing else matters. You have to relate you have to develop really strong relationships with these clients. So there's a very psychological aspect between an fa an adviser and a client and probably the most important thing is that the best advisers develop trust these their clients trust them implicitly and there's a bond with the client and I said this before and I'll I guess I'll leave with with it is the best advisers simply give clients Comfort package and what a wonderful thing to say, especially in the midst of a pandemic what more could an advisor do than give their clients comfort? That is that's true. And that's why that's why I think I ended with it. Yeah. Well, thank you Bob. I can't thank you enough for your perspectives for your your graciousness and sharing them with us. And certainly we're excited to see what's to come with Stuart and wish you all the best. Bob shared many Pearls of Wisdom, but it was perhaps his perspective on what wire house leaders can do to Stave off attrition and create more trust and loyalty amongst the advisor force that was most interesting that is to give them hope respect more open communication and a place to come to work that they enjoy sounds pretty simple to me. I thank you for listening, and I encourage you to visit our website Diamond consultants, and click on the tools and resources link for valuable content. You'll also find a link to subscribe for updates to the series, and if you're not a recipient of our weekly email perspectives for advisors, click on the blog link to browse recent articles. These written pieces are an ideal way to stay informed about what's going on in the wealth management industry without expending the energy that full-on exploration requires. Feel free to email or call me if you have specific questions. I can be reached at 908-879-1002 or by cell at +973-400-768-5008 or by email at em diamond diamond. Please note that all requests are handled with complete discretion and confidentiality and walk in if you enjoyed this episode feel free to share it with a colleague who might benefit from its content and a special thanks to advisor hub.com for sharing this podcast with your viewers and subscribers. This is Mindy diamond on Independence.

The Firm advisor UBS Steward fa Bob Independence Stewart Merrill Lynch Steward UBS Steward Partners Bob Mulholland Raymond James Diamond consultants Stuart Merrill steward Partners Lehigh University senior advisor
S3 EP 111 Going All In & Discovering Self Love with Gillian Mulholland

Go All In

1:01:53 hr | 10 months ago

S3 EP 111 Going All In & Discovering Self Love with Gillian Mulholland

"Welcome to the golden podcast host Rubber Bras and today on the show we've got Jillian Mulholland Jillian Mahala Dot Com Jillian Hawaii Great. Let's database or hit. Welcome to the show today. As you know I tell and shape these will in stories to inspire people a one you the. It's not end the viewer to know that you can succeed. No matter how you feeling about your success in life sometimes. It feels like everyone around. You is winning winning at life and you can barely shoot a single damn video to put on your link Dino your instagram because it's so tricky and so difficult sometimes. Well I can tell you that everybody everybody starts somewhere in. Today's podcast is all about remembering you roots and taking a moment to reflect and to see just how you've come going in and doing whatever it takes to succeed is inspiring and are now you're GonNa Love Jillian story today before we get into the show. Just take a little picky. You find hit. That's subscribe button on the APP. The LESEAN on and if you're watching this on Youtube to skull down and the subscribe button it and to get to ring the bell that why you always have a little bit of motivation and some lava right there in your pocket. Lastly if you're lucky you heat that I please shit in this episode with your friends and your family Jillian has an important message to share it if we can help. Just one or two people right through their barry is in get on stock then we would have done our job here on the podcast today around. Let's get into this. Julian Holland is a singer. She's a performer. A mental and a podcast house. Who's he'd is? Spread the message of self love so you can level up and leave your loss of full potential Jassem really great and challenging questions which are really love. Some other questions Do you ever have that feeling deep down inside of you that you could be doing all that you have unique talents and ideas and thoughts that you haven't even scratched surfaced to unleash the power that you have inside of you. Well Jillian is an expert unlocking these hidden superpowers within you and focusing them into tangible and real skills that you can use in the real world you're about to be inspired and reminded that you so much more than you think you off an an unlocking that potential we'll take you to the very next level in your loss excited. She's here so please help me in welcoming Jillian Mulholland Jillian Holland. Welcome to the PODCAST. It's an absolute pleasure to have you here today. Thank you so much. I'm really excited. This is amazing. We've been chatting back and forth on linked in crazy people and which is a really good thing and social media. You Meet New People but the listeners. In the views of this show. I don't know you so let's get to know you a little bit. I whereabouts are you from. Where are you in the world? I'm in Melbourne Australia at the moment. It's raining which is very Melbourne. Then but yeah. That's where I'm from so from there. Did you grow up. They grew up in Melbourne. I've lived here my whole life. Yeah whereabouts In Saint Kilda. Say think of it which is great. You're in the thick of it there. That's such a beautiful in hip plice in anyone. That's listening watching. That's never been to Australia or come to Melanson Kilda's definitely on the on the list of places to visit right. Yeah absolutely. You've got Lena Park and yeah that for sure down there. It's great if beautiful part of the world absolutely and I love it down. There is kind of walk more second by always think that might Audley CD and moves to Queensland or something like that but it's just too hot there. Yeah the coffees locked terrible. Yeah I've always wanted to move it. Woma the climate to be honest that say what happens in the future are delivered his group but when you go and execute on what that no I saw that used backward spent Spoke about three weeks straight on the Sunshine Coast and a love that I love the lost all of the location. The papal everything that was just like dying in the humidity everyday just really unpleasant pleasant. Really Yeah right yeah. It's the rug up jacket the code. Yeah it's a dry hate. I've always wanted to move to buyer and feels like Melvin and then got better weather and yet do Glenn how. How long has it been since you've been doing this? Coaching thing. You've got going on now. It how long have you been doing it for. It's not been that long. It's been just under a year brand new. Yes so brand new but it's going really well you join him. Yeah loving it loving family caplis. You did yeah. Yup what did it take so long. Why did it take so long because well the thing I talk about the most is self love dodging love myself so self once you you come from a really strong place itself Love You build your worthiness you're confident So yeah that's that's not show but obviously there's a big backstory. Okay but I just didn't. Yeah in fully love myself so I played small. We're going to get into that a little bit. Because I need a little bit help their ah I wanNA have these guests on these shows. You know especially these. I don't want to stereotype. But I'm GonNa you know these women coaches that dual this touchy feely each you stop and like many feelings Nazi. Oh my goodness listening to this podcast. Look what what is this that you out right now on and having a nice feelings come on yes stay with us. Jillian people come on over to the podcast to learn more about others. That have gone all in few could. Could you please share with us your goal in story or stories and the lessons you've learned from your commitment to success. Yeah okay so I've gone sort of only my whole life so I'm a singer and and I've always performed so I've had that that part of me right so I've been able to push myself to go to auditions where I saw ct and I kept going and going and going and Singing on stage and bans ends and all that kind of stuff. So I've sort of done that. But the most recent one which is crazy to me is I went all in on linked in video so at the time I had I was working full time and my friend. I wanted to start a youtube channel but my friend suggested I go cultivate. My Personal Brad ran on linked in because of the platform Nares real organic rich and a lot easier than youtube at the moment so i. I thought that was a really good idea but I was very scared to show up in front of like my colleagues and friends whatever. I was nervous which which is crazy to me now because I do video all the time and it's no big deal That changed everything so I feel like that's my. That's one of my stories at the moment. It's a really interesting thing in preparation for this interview. Our soul that you've written something like that and I was like finally something like real people get people get like scared and have these like big Health challenges in their loss. I get cancer. I get sick if somebody dies will really major life events but you'll want is is really kind of vanilla but I would suggest you probably one out of ten people. Would they feeling the same way about putting they're fun. They're talking to themselves like a witch. I'm sort of Weirdo and feeling they've got nothing to sigh. And nobody's everybody's GONNA listen anyway. Like what the hell tell me. Tell me about the process that you went through because you your mind you've been on stage for years and years. You're not scared of public. Speaking performing Knicks level type stuff is performing but then then you get scared of you. What the Hell I know? I sound so crazy. Even when you're talking about it makes me you think I know how silly but yes I was so nervous and I know a lot of paper who who want to build their personal brand or even talk about that business linked in is the the best platform at the moment to do that and I know a lot of people are really scared to show up so he scary. That's fine but yeah you have to break through that Seabury epoch. So I was just really concerned about what people thought I was very very I think about is what what are they going to give me one if I saw doc what if I can't keep it up because I knew if I was going to do the video at WanNa go all in and I'm not stopping so I needed to know what to say I guess a little. Oh bit but at the the first video was made at the surf. H Down the cars with my surfboard. Saying Hey I like surfing looking forward to connecting sorry simple. My friend grabbed the fine. She stated I was starting to this weird that I'm a performer. And I got nervous but I think before I taken a big break from what I was doing creatively so I'd sort of being in a bit of a rot stock and ready to take the late. Say Yeah and told me it's a bit of a loaded question but I think it's funny You said to me you so worried about what everybody else was thinking. What was I thinking? A I mean like in my mind are in like what would they actually thinking thinking loaded. I never know what this guy while she's cute stupid. You're an idiot On how embarrassing you know in my mind I was thinking about what. Oh my work colleagues would think and I was doing before what we doing before this I was I worked for off to pay. Yes so I I was. Yeah I was thinking that I would think why she doing that. She certainly a pistol for why she trying to be famous. What a lose That's what I was thinking. They might think which is horrible. That's Australian toll. Poppy Rot is the minute that you come out from behind your brand where you do something like that people criticize you bought what I discovered. Is that the people that hiding on. You lock the people that you think are going to hide on you like that. Actually Doug produce anything themselves. Well that's what I've noticed since I've started doing all this stuff and in putting myself out there when you're in the ring you you cheer for everyone in the ring with you right. So that's I used to be that person that's probably why I and I've learned a lot about judgment now so I used to be that person that would point and say Oh my God. What are they doing? Why doing that? But that's just jealousy. Let's see and that's just yeah judgment and fear of your are in power really. So how many videos were you in and I love this. Because it's so practical you suck for the first one or two twenty and went went. When was it the economy side? The feel comfortable. Yeah sucked for the I it. Well fifty luckily because I've got my performance background I kind of it came very naturally seemingly naturally to me but what I did people started asking me to sing on linked in because I'm a senior and I had written a profile than on Messina and I was that was another stick of reflect. No I'm not going to be that weird person that sings on linked in that's crazy. That's just stupid. You know the the same fees and then I did. I started seeing unlinked din and it's amazing because I've done it almost. Oh I've I've done every week for the past eight months. I think maybe more so nearly a year. I've done a singing video on linked in and I've got a Hashtag Jill sings and and my I'm getting better like I'm I'm getting better at singing just because of it. It's just it's just a lot. Yeah it's all in. I'm yeah if if I could think of something that was mall con. Think of anything. That's more all in and singing on linked in of all things. Yeah Yeah it's funny but I can. I can actually feel the energy of the listeners and viewers of this show I got. Oh my God I am not getting only Joe. You're crazy. I'm not doing that turned out to that but yeah just getting the best way to do it would just be Stott. That's what I say to everyone. Now you just have have to start your first podcast episode is going to suck. Your video is going to suck you first. Song is going to stop that. You can't do the fit lucky. Jackie Cockatoo the fiftieth without doing the fist. Exactly exactly I said to my daughter the other day. Why are you so worried about doing? Not Just you've got to learn learn new skills and you've got to be you'll be brave enough to suck it something and laugh at yourself and to you acquire the skill and then once you've quads skew. You won't even remember how bad it was. You might look back at it and cringe at it but you don't remember why it was so bad because you've got skill in your Ibew to move forward and I can tell. Is that what personal experience has been no different yours. By the way and Y- Y- McCartan might sound like Robinson crusoe on an island over. They're worried about getting on video and booming yourself but actually it's I think almost every single person that's on social media trying to create a personal brand from cells has gone through that exact feeling when we kicked off my podcast. Did this cost and pied all this money and Mississippi. You know this guy named Brian rose. He runs his thing called London. Ondon real and I was like yeah. I've seen I've seen some of that stuff she had. You should go and do that. Why would I do that? 'cause you know like thousands of dollars and just just learned to podcast on Youtube. Will you to me for twenty bucks you know why would I spend thousands and she said well you know. You don't have a mental there and the very first hosting and I've told this story before and this podcast very thing that I ask you to do when you're in Nicole so you're all excited committed to it by Damani and I'm on. I'm all in and the first thing that I want you to do is to facebook. Live and tell the world that you going to start a podcast and I just went. I'm not doing that. Yeah I ah why why not flat out refused and I have this really good program London Real in how they take you through this accountability document. And you're in a team of ten other people and you see these other people turning the excel sheet from a red cell to a green cell. Meaning they've completed that particular task and everyone to complete the tasks that may always too arrogant and too much of a smart ass and had to be an ego to get there and do it and eventually all sat down on the on the little couch beside behind me. And I did it and people walk. That sounds awesome. That sounds glad to hear that it was that were really encouraging of me and and I think I was pretty kind of gentle about it but I don't know what always get although I was just saying that was coming up. It wasn't arrogant too is mafia terrified. Outwardly saying that now it's funny when you look back at it raw emotions that you go through and you know we don't know each other that well but you can kind of laugh at me idiot. It's not an ego. That's just lying. Fee Yeah it was scary. It is scary but it's not after you've done it at all. You know. I think we all recognize as business business owners entrepreneurs and even as employees that video is the future the vast majority of the content you consume online is video based if I'm not watching something on Netflix will pirating something down from some other website that I shouldn't be doing not from on probably. I'm probably what she something on Youtube. That's that's that's the entertainment factor. That's going on there for me and I are recognized understand that video is the number one thing that you need to do in business to progress. Russia Postal Brandon. Might that happen but the reality is it's so many people's Kryptonite. Yeah and it's a trust factor when you say someone Invidia uh-huh oh I feel like I know them very powerful but I understand it. It is hot but that's the way you just I mean you just I have to go out and do it but come you need to come from a place of I. I couldn't have done it without building myself up from the inside myself. Yeah I think the the The key if they would be a cave they was one or two key things that you could say for me. Personally I'll be interested to hear your thoughts on You just have to be yourself and you need to be authentically you because you can't try and create a persona about a postal brand or about something and then be. He's something else off camera on camera or I am. I'm Pretty High Energy and loud and fun and crazy and one thousand miles an hour in real life. And that's how I kind eh on. My podcast is icon. Come to my podcast and be some other way like end. What what would you say the other one or two key things that you've got to do in order to actually actually be successful with it? Yeah yeah definitely by yourself because it's really obvious on camera when people were trying to base something they've seen and they're trying to copy Bay south but you've got to pretend a little bit like you're on a shower attain show getaway. Oh the service solicited Some kind of show. That's what I at the spot I used to think I did do video. And it'd be so flat and it kind of boring and no way on like just get the energy up and then the more you do it like. I don't have to do that anymore. Just used to it. You just have high energy anger pretty high energy as it stands but that make sure because some of them are sorry a quite boring because we need a reason to what she. What do we want people who need to be drawn in the first few seconds Every now and then I have a podcast guests that comes on or asked me and I know them right on no them from a referral also hiking. You interview this Dude Rub and I'll looking go. Yeah and I'll just everything 'cause I just do a sat brian mouth thing they're not connected something and then. I'll look at the topic of what I do. And I'm the go-to might that interesting into a goal in story act by myself. How am I gonNA might recruitment sexy? They do it. I'm good I can do it and the reality is it doesn't matter what somebody does for job of what I do do from living where all just people and we all have. The same will have very similar fees and similar designs and once in age we all want to contribute to the well to Mike it a better place and experienced the the freedom that we're looking for for ourselves and we all want to contribute. That's the most important thing I found that when you can kind of strip back lack all of the things that you do in this while podcasting so much because you get to spend a decent chunk of time with somebody getting to the bottom of what it is. That's driving them and making them go choline that you can get to the heart of what it is that they looking to try and do and really. It's assignments what I'm trying to do signs what you're trying to do. Simon is the thousands of people listening to this podcast. Do we all want the same thing. We all want peace and security. We don't want to live in a in a chaotic world and we want to experience freedom. That's a really really simple thing to do. And I love your philosophy of self love. So let's talk about that. Take me tight me through self love and and your. He's on on the most uncomfortable accountable. Dude in the world by the way Yeah He. He's he's a challenge. Boy I'll throw down the gauntlet FLACCO. Say Well we'll how would you feel if you looked yourself itself in the mirror and said I love myself is that does that make you feel awkward. Oh can you could do that quite easily. Your face the nicest saying that's all quit. I don't really have an invoice ahead. One of my friends told me that one. She's American. She's lot a you you've got you've got to dial back. The front that you put up that your old successful this paratrooper. God is tough guy. That has no feelings. That does all of these things and I'm like Woo. Maybe how she's like. Listen to this Brunei Brown stuff and I'm like an vulnerability. Yeah that's that's exactly what it was wrought and and so I listened to it. And that's what you want me to do about it and then how you got to listen to this invoice in your head then you got you. It's almost exactly what you assign. How would you say if you looked in the mirror and you said that I'm like having you voice in my head I'm operating on? What a pilot for ninety nine percent of the Diane? We're not sit down and actually have to think about something. It's usually related to work or finances or life in general. It's really related to me. And I think that's kind of the hot of what you're describing and what my other friend was describing as well route. Yeah well I think for listeners. And Pap- paper listening. I mean it seems to me that you come from a strong place of self worth and you're doing what you love and there's nothing really holding you back right so you're probably not my ideal client but I think most of the listeners. If you it's it if you can't look it yourself in the mirror and say I love myself without feeling a bit of e or you know. I don't WanNa do that or whatever. That's a good indication that maybe you need to do some of this work so I believe that everything that old stuff like confidence and where the Innis and I know that comes from when you truly love yourself deeply. You're able to do these things like get on video do a podcast it. It then flows on because you can put yourself out there because you have your own back and you're not these thoughts in your mind saying Oh you can't do that. What if this as happens? Oh who said what if they say is so all the limitations taken away once he come from the Solo Place of self love. And that's what happened to me. That's why I preach about it so much and do know what you mean by those living self beliefs do have I guess. That's where I do have that a little bit of voice and yeah I I think. It's the the Masculine Mile Egos side of me. That says I don't have any voice feelings. What are you talking about? You know. It's it's really kind of blow key. Rot Typical Ozzy bloke. And it's a bit British as well you know what Steph. Yes they're very British but the reality is our. Do you have a little bit of self sabotage stuff that happens sometimes like we all do I look. I should really finish that quote so tomorrow morning on the head of the curve can get ahead of those appointments that I've got going on on Tuesday sort of thing but that netflix thing looks really good. And I'm GonNa Watch that instead and that's a bit of self sabotage yourself. Why did you do that? Didn't stand that taught or do you let yourself go and say that's fine. I wanted to watch the maybe I rationalize it like starting like forty five minutes earlier in the morning or before. I A gallon train in the morning. I'll sit down and I'll finish that quote. Oh Go to the gym and then come back into them set like all. I'll slaughter Akane also need downtime as well you know you can't work for twenty Seattle's die you need to your brain scrambled eggs off the wall. So I but I do know that does happen or not. Do Heavily yourself talk at that point. Yeah way say I shouldn't. Yeah and that's the thing it's good to get out of that. I mean if you if you make a decision and just have your back with it and treat yourself like you would treat a friend doesn't it doesn't matter. People are really hard on themselves on the very very where. It's so hard on ourselves. I I still oh do it as well after. Pick myself up every day. It's it's a constant battle with your mind but if he can control your mind you can do whatever you like. How many many years ago when I was in the military I was in the navy? I and I wanted to to being the army but I wouldn't do an inservice transfer also had to get out of the navy and then apply and then get back in and the story goes that when I finally got to the interview the too cranky old worn offices on the other side of that. What are you duty might and I was like well? They wouldn't do it in a service transferred on the forms and get connects taught thing but actually had about six months in between and the whole time that I was there in that six months to get this crappy retail job to pay the bills and keep things going always gone. And at the time missus was a wipe. She was awaiting CG working places and she was gone for three or four months or something. Now that Song's on my own and all I did was go to this this crappy job in dialing Haba come home and trying and I distinctly remember myself. Talk there that I would. I would joke to the pool which was pretty close as on probably about a kilometer wide a swim two kilometers upstream like forty laps. And then I'll get out of the pool and all would run on what ten kilometers where the where the pool is located. I could run down to train stations. Run back up. Four train stations and our bay running around the Train Lockerbie Oval Gustav thing and all of a sudden fit superfit. But every every time I do that I would get to these really big hills and the self talk that went on inside and my ahead was like I'm on and how are you going to cut it as a soldier. If you can't even run up his damn hill and muscle up reflecting on that I'm looking back at that more social who's really negative towards myself like how you GonNa do this. You associated this. You're never gonNA get any good at this. You're never going to be an always myself. Talk was around down the wrong way. It should have been more encouraging comment you. You're you're on your time is like twenty seconds slower than yesterday Komo put it a little bit here and push auto auto but are never had anybody coach me. I was just trying to myself. Yeah that's amazing because you can still have that motivation coming in a positive way like come on. You'll be an amazing soldier. If you run of this little bit further just flipping it on. Its head is so important. And it's damaging toll petit yourself and then it comes goes out into other people the way interact with other people judgmental by the people save judging other people you judging yourself basically I remember When our realized what I was doing to myself and not that you know talk of never never ever been able to to exercise to do cardio top exercise with headphones and back in the day we never had bluetooth lock do today and it was? I think that's why a conduit and do it. 'cause one tile off growing up was without music. If I was in the gym will something at this music on. Yeah that's that's completely no more foreign but even today alcon joke with headphones. It just can't concentrate on what I'm doing and back back then are remember thinking The turning point was always going for the workout and thinking thinking. Oh my God I have to do this again. And why am I ever going to get there. Might be able to handle this war an unquestioning itself doubting myself constantly constantly and constantly and then I realized that I was doing not actually hang on a minute this is this is progressed incredibly. Well my swimming fitnesses amazing and my running fitness was getting good on to start working on these other things and then I realized that always having this negative self talk inside of my head and so you know this is the job of my dreams that I'm going for and if I don't get this wrought and one way to do with my life I know for Heaven Sake. So a really focused in hot auden flipping not around. I can't remember a time since you know that was was that my God ninety seven ninety round then and I don't remember from all that time ago ever having not negative self talk with myself anymore because I realized always doing enough flipped around. Say you just did it yourself and literally. They flipped it like that easily. Well I remember thinking that I wasn't enjoying these workouts and always going to these workout sinking and this is such a slog but actually wasn't a slog physically. It was okay I was in my mind always might immemorial does making this was about to go running and give myself the hottest on in the world and if someone's months giving you a hard. Do you feel coach. Who stay in your workforce you're using you would feel worthless it would be horrible and that's what I was doing to myself route? That's so great great. You had that self awareness. Though I think a lot of people go through life without thinking about what their thoughts so amazing fee to pick that up and flip it around feel benefit and I can remember. I remember what had happened because it was a negative experience in my lawf- and you remember those things. Yeah Incredible Joe Tell me about your your journey from the corporate world into this world last self love because it takes a lot to takes a lot to goal in and step off the edge in Iran thing in Jurong Gig without a paycheck without all of those things to make that happen. What was that Jimmy walks you? It's been interesting it just that the because I found through the self love and through putting my self out there on linked in and then starting my podcast and doing all the things I realized I found my purpose. So it's very easy for me to you. Know what I had to shop in the world for and that and to me it's this self love I will talk about it till the end of the earth breath because it may I was repeating patterns in relationships and I was trying to outsource. Oh my happiness to someone outside of me when I when really have to get it from within and we all say that and I just never heard the right way until someone told me I I was watching Youtube and this woman was talking about self love so much so that I couldn't ignore it any longer and I was feeling terrible and I started doing the work and it changed everything so and now I'm going to be doing my one woman. Show this year and Melvin and it's all centered around the self love finding love within yourself and not from outside of you. So it's it's an it seems like an easy transition from being stuck in a corporate job that I wasn't fulfilled and I knew I was just kind of drifting to this where I'm Ladakh and I'm just happy and and getting invited onto cut costs and and it's just crazy it did it. I feel like in your corporate job that you just had more offer. was there more to loss this water to feel like to you. Yeah you missing. Absolutely absolutely I was so bored. I think in the corporate world and offense to anyone who's listening but it's they wanNA keep you in a box and it's it's very hard to fly when you're being creative and and can I just say that creativity in the corporate world is an asset. I I was always kind of dumbing down my creative side and I thought well 'cause when as a performer. I sort of grow up the tall. Poppy thing and you you. You don't WanNa promote yourself because you don't want to be out that that's a common between musicians and actors I say but anyway so I thought my creativity wouldn't fit in the corporate world. When in fact I find the high you are the say levels the executives academia? They are creative. They've got creative minds because they have to think outside the box in innovate right so Unfortunately the middle ooh section is not as creative so they wanNA keep you in that box and I definitely felt like I had way more to give and I still wanted to utilize my performing skills that I didn't WanNa do weddings. I was doing wedding gigs. As a wedding singer and and that was boring so yeah it was just a transition into living how I am now. Well it's the ultimate dichotomy. Isn't it because on one saw you go to the Corporate Job Way Way Your Business Palace suit and get on the train and go to work then drink drink fourteen bees as before you come home and this is why Sprint Corp.. By the way I was doing the same thing I was drinking all the time as well paid. Allied wasn't even interested in it was awful. Will I've lived in a corporate world as well for the wall and I enjoyed a lot of it I I was. I was lucky I had the freedom in creativity to do what I needed to do. In a more senior position but reality was our still boxed in you know the minister used to working for somebody else to doing things for other people. And and that's hard Hot and not always having an inkling and it's always starts with our. He's a contract that you can work on from a digital for digital contracts really. Good 'cause as you work those contracts you get paid a lot of money and you get out of there but then the contract inevitably often known inevitably but often comes along and says hide. You want to do some more. We we love of what you doing. Do you WanNa do this. a-rod small and then you want to do some more. Why don't you just stop what you're doing and come work? He has the the people that in in a the people people that are employers are always looking for talent and the talents that they looking for usually works for themselves so bringing them in in folding them in I You don't have to worry about those things anymore will give it over. He for you and it looks really attractive. that's what happened to me. I was I was seduced by the corporate world. If you all I can go to narrow name was like knock me up in a giant. There's no windows. There's no walls and yeah I remember the contract coming to an end them saying to me. Hey we suppose you want to renegotiate your Your fees and you pie and all that sort of stuff and I was like not Mattie a leaf hundred hundred and fifty something thousand dollar job whatnot. Matty's they let a war because you buy me just shackled with golden handcuffs. kind of your is It is hard to stay in that if you're if you're an entrepreneur entrepreneur in Ukraine creative and. That's the dichotomy raw day. Is that you you're out on the weekends running around with a microphone in your hand on on stage Doing your thing. And that's the ultimate outlet for creativity performance and then on the on Monday morning. You put your shoes on you and you call close onto. It's like the two opposites the two polar opposites of your personality. And that's a hard thing to deal with. It is and even the people around like a lot of people in that work quite set in their ways and don't really like to get out of the conference I need so it's it's hard when you're doing it yourself off and there's no support it just this weird person that's trying to make a better place you're not turns out your not normal. Not I'm not sure the you think there that we does is actually the Delaware River. Exactly how long was it off. Do you stepped off the the Edgy Ryan Business. Before you started to gather some clients. I was still working so it wasn't it wasn't that long only about three months pretty quick. Yeah pretty quick. Yes contacted me and wanted me to work with his staff so that was really good. And what did you have imposter syndrome there or you lock lately. All you did was still there. Well I mean because I hadn't done on it before there was part of me. That was concerned that I if I'd be good enough and that's why the perfection stuff comes in. I've always been a bit of a perfectionist actionist and worked on that as well He can't be be a perfectionist. It's just it's boring that yeah I mean Oh always every time you take a leap this. There's always going to be that FIA and you just take the leap in all. It's it's fine. I put some words woods around that just in the last maybe month or so over the Christmas break that we had time to reflect and are being picked up a couple of times. I'm sure few different speaking gauge paid speaking gigs about podcasting and thought the first couple of the kind of long though is like I'm not. I'm not all that foster. I was speaking. Some people love that stuff. I would rather do this arrived. Abuna podcast with one other person share story have a conversation gets now you a little bit. We build on WANNA relationship will be mites forever now and then share that with the world you now I feel like I can reach more people that are going up on stage and speaking but it's not something that actively seek out to do anyway a couple of people. Pick me out for some gigs in another one recently and I put some words around why they were doing. Not because I'm I'm just little old may overheat. When you see somebody up on stage you you tend to put them up on a pedestal? A little bit and you think they extra ordinary but they just ordinary people like you. That have done something a little bit extra to get. There is sort of how I site and if anyone's listening to this old watching watching this and they're about to Tyco leap into something and they're not sure if ready. This is what I use. Maybe this will help you as well authority to myself. Why would they ask me of all the people they could ask about podcasting? Why would they ask me? And then I pondered and reflected on that question and where our raw was under on the Pasta and I have a business In around the podcasting spice in a lot about podcasting. But there's plenty of other people out there that know plenty of other stuff walk that as well but but what they don't do is they haven't haven't yet formulated an opinion about things in an around that industry so in your circumstance you talk about self love and all that stuff that you talk about Olas really great things. You've studied that enough and lived it enough to have really good opinions and you can articulate titillated and you could talk about if the DIS dis days and we just bought Goss could go for days because you so good at talking about it. And that's what I realized was the tipping point for me was was I'd I'd be now with a form expert opinions in and around the topics that I'd been that had been picked up for. That's why they picked me up because I saw swamy as the expert and I was able to deliver a compelling message to them I was able to deliver with professionalism and expertise and clarity and now how I can move forward with a little bit of trepidation in always that little bit of self doubt like who monitored you that you know just an ordinary go on just a normal person. Actually no in the eyes is of those people. They see me as an expert and I think that that kind of really helped me to realize that I was growing as an individual in this chosen path that among yeah amazing ising that. That's I mean you just have to start doing right and then and then that makes you better than the rest and I want to say that. No John we're not special or you're not special. I'm not Special Nolan new special. Where all the same? This is all available to all of us it is. It's just simple simple as yet getting a cartridge starting or changing your way. Thank you know when you go on your runs. It's simple simple things things that it takes consistency and you've had consistency in Yukon. Cost if you if you find yourself Ibuka formulate opinions that others can't really get too and when you're talking about it I look at you. Go Man you know a lot about that stuff. Wow you're an expert in that that means. Is that your growing as that expert and keep doing what you're doing you're on the right track. Yeah anything joke. Tell me a little bit about going all in and if somebody's nobody's listening to this end or watching this and they're teetering on the edges of doing something. Because I get a lot of feedback this all the time of the feedback that I get is high. I loved did you podcast. What a great guests walk right energy all those sorts of things? But I can't quite get there. I don't know how to go all in one or two things. Well maybe three things that you could share with us about actually just doing it and just getting on with it and going all in yes. Well I would start. My one of my practices says is journaling which I love and one of the things I do is scripting and so I often script and which is You write in your journal as if it's happened already so stop writing. I've just did this video. Everyone and comment on it and then you stop feeling a lot better about it all. I just started my podcast. And it's had a million Leeson's go all in with we do what you want it to bay and stocking your head around it and really I mean at the end of the day. It's just stopped but there's little things like that you can do to make you feel a little bit more comfortable about the process but at the end of the day you've just got to stop They're done it's the most people right in all. I'm a big believer that everything happens to us In the end I because your mind can't tell the difference between actually talking about it and going through it and meditating on or actually in reality and you see Athletes Stewart all the time you see tennis player bouncing the ball. You know doing some funny things because if visualizing that sort of gone across the net and seven an ice and you say football players do it as I put the bowl and kicking today about to keep all off to somebody scored a try. There's a bunch of things as it happened in sport like that but I think we forget to do that now. Everyday law that links. Everything does happen to US A. That's a really really powerful thing to do with that. Generally yeah. Visualization is really important. Even if you're lying in bed at not visualizing what you want your life to be what you need to do get it done and as AC- say athletes do it. That's that's what tiger woods. Whatever they save themselves crossing the finish line I yes I absolutely pretty powerful? Everything happens to us by. That's what about you comfort zone. I'm comfortable where I am. What my i Brian is is keeping me Siphon secure but my conscious mon wants me to go over there and do these things and are one of the things out of life but the reality is subconscious mind is keeping me comfortable? Okay of his looks on many guys love that stuff or anyway what do you do with all that. Yeah about that. Well getting out of your comfort sign builds confidence and I often. When I'm in that moment of on? It Really WanNa do this. I I can tell it's May getting out of my comfort zone and so I saw two lane into those feelings a little bit and just forget a trying to forget about it and then after sure I think That was totally may being a bit nervous scared and the more I get out of my comfort sign the more confident I become and that's one of the first things you need to do is get out of your comfort sign. Even if it's the smallest thing like commenting on a post on linked in or whatever it is the tiniest thing sayings on. Aw I like your hair I like your shoes or small little things even wearing wearing something different. If you don't have to get on video we adopt talked about that a lot but wearing some bigger earings so something get out of your conference iron and the more you get out of your compensating you just raise the bar each time. Yeah absolutely and again. It's the stop stops most people. You just gotTa stop to do that and the more you do that the easier it's gonNA become are really are really the thing that always most excited about in today's interview as this was coming up whereas as always kind of looking at socials and I was looking at the material listen to some of your podcast and whatnot as well job. By the way thank you enjoyed that they feel like and you said a couple of times. You've it's like you finally found your purpose if somebody's listening to this or watching this but then I really know what their purposes have. You got some. Maybe some ideas about how can help how you can help them find their purpose absolutely so firstly you have to come from a strong sense of of self love so if you're not meditating earn his. Yeah you gotTa Stop Meditating and I always always talk about how meditation doesn't have to be this Yogi kind of monk vibe. It can be just lying down and guided meditation. Nation is very easy to start with if that's fine. What works if if a meditation doesn't work and your board and joint stock off? Meditation is what every successful person does. So you need to start doing that. And then and then yeah as I said get out of your comfort comforts I and once you build yourself up from self love you'll start to the thoughts in your head if you're thinking. Negative thoughts will change. And you start to have your back and you'll save ways and things you can do and that would be. I would help you get out of your comfort side which will then build up your confidence and then your mind will open to possibilities and ways of doing things on performance but I never knew I would love podcasting acting style. It's crazy but because I got on the video link Din. I didn't have enough time on linked into talk only a minute video a otherwise people switch off so I was like I'll do a podcast amazing and now I'm obsessed and. I had no idea that that was hot. So yeah that's it's it's really. It's really important to uncover those things that you find the passionate about and and then that'll help you find your purpose because you start testing things and you might do something and you'll hate it and I don't want to do that but you've tested it and because you not scared to file on the perfection isn't Aero you've just given it a guard you can pivot and because you'll try and you'll say to yourself in that cool I've got your back. Let's go to the next thing rather than saying. Oh my God you screwed that up. I can't believe don't try anything again. Dan You Lisa how you ever going to be a soldier. It's terrible it's not fun I do it. Yeah do do that to yourself. You know why. There's been several weeks in my journey of this podcasting thing and I haven't been doing it that long really in the scheme of things by there's been several weeks route what do four or five interviews and the last interview inevitably is GonNa Fraud. I before awakened or something like that where it just about breaking a kind of finish each what I'm doing. I get it all uploaded in Seoul in the machine to get produced and whatnot and it's been a couple of times where I've gone. And what an epic. Wait that was and I'll just look back and forth. That is a billionaire. That woman was a world champion choosing an Olympic athlete. He had cancer. Her sister died at all. And I'm like Dion Liane ruining my lawf- do something with my life and it was an actually pulled me down because he's always watching telling the stories on this podcast of love. These incredible people doing incredible things. And I'm just sitting here in my studio walk having conversations with people thinking man I got to do something with my lawf- and someone said no no never let alone. That's what you're doing with your life. You telling those stories you sharing those stories and it wasn't until that post and said that to me I must've been about seventy episodes in when I realized that Knows lock something to that enjoyed so much lack. Seems like you'll purpose to be vehicle for these stories to be shed because not everyone. Everyone wants to have a podcast. Not everyone that people need to share their story so that we can listen to them and and resonate and relate to them so that we we can change the world right. Let's go to bed. Apply said love it. You tell me about your business what you business called. It's called your nine Roger in Tacoma. That's where people can find you. That's right yes so I do one on one coaching in various different ways. He's To release you're in a bad ass. Basically and the mainly working with at the moment I met with women who've experienced hot break and maybe a bit stuck in the relationship cycles. Maybe they want the ex pack just to build them up and to make them feel sexy bad ass and confident to get the life. I want whether that's in the relationship or whatever it is and what's that feel like for you when you're when you're winning with those clients. Tell us what that feels a lot for you. Well it's like almost like a rebirth. The maybe the same thing happened to me so i. That's why it's all brought it back to what I went through but it's it's incredible. Oh when I see so much potential in everyone that so much potential in everyone and just simple consistent work it changes your life and so and I say that and then that that transformation happens and they demi flowers and you know it's just signed us us. I love it beautiful beautiful when I when I was thinking of a name for this podcast the Golan show the golden podcast. That word potential was Cape. That was not on the on the Piper on the white board. And all the things that you're trying to come up with when you building a brand and and what I realized that would potential has a future tends to it meaning. You have the potential to do anything. You have the potential to be the prime minister if you want to do that but you have the potential to do that if you wanted to anyone and when you saw I'd when you decide that you're going to go all in your potential goes from the future tense into the present tense and when you give your best to the world when you go in on something you living up to the potential that you've got what means to me. Is You giving your very best just to the world. When you give your best to the World Mike in the world a better place just incrementally one by one person at a time like that in my definition initiative that has been something that are kind of live by and that's the definition that are created for myself as well and it sounds to me like you see that in other people as well which is enormously empowering Aric? Yeah and as you say it you'll potential. It's just it makes you feel better as well apart from changing the world. You feel a lot better eh in yourself so I mean that's what we all want right. It was funny wrought. Anything to you ever wanted is because young young one thing you want the feeling that that gives did you exactly exactly is nothing more rewarding than helping another person a good Austin you and for for what it is that you do thank you. I love it the Glenn. This has been a fantastically empowering and uplifting experience Somme are really enjoying our conversation. If I met you eighteen months ago how would you have been different eighteen months ago. Yeah I was very I was I was I was probably at rock-bottom as very different obvious. Shy a nervous yes. Nah I'm serious. I I wasn't sure of myself. I wasn't confident. I mean outwardly. Maybe be I would be able to put on a front but inside I was I was lost. I was yeah feeling. Pretty twisted up I was drinking a lot so unless you met me hit the ball. We wouldn't have met and yeah just was not living. My purpose was not living. My full potential So a lot can change in a very short amount of time. Let me tell you absolutely. It's not it's not a long time I'll ask the question. The other way What's on the horizon for you for the next item months? Well I spoke about my Shar so I'm doing my one woman show which is like a cabaret in Melvin the in the middle of the YEA and. I'm so excited to do that because I've wanted to do that for probably like eight years but I haven't had the confidence haven't let myself so do it. So that's all happening of written it and that's really exciting and just more of the same so more coaching and building add Speaking gigs and also to stuff. So just watch my Janney crazy. Sounds exciting. Sounds very very exciting weekend. Well Again Julian thank you so much for coming on the show in sharing a little bit of a window into your world particularly around the mindset in philosophy but I can't let you leave this. This podcast is we're bumping up against an hour here without putting you in the goal in podcast. You're ready. You'll be a fine bit random yet yet to one fellow Ozzy to another is there. I favored holiday destination. That you've got problems. One of my favorite things. That's why I love to ask the question. I love travel but yeah I spoke about it before Byron Bay burned by by. That's as good as I. I think I've been all over the world. No New York New York is one of my other top. Yeah pretty produce ended that awesome awesome. Hey what say what's a skill that you've not yet mastered a skill that I haven't masted on so many I'd really love to skateboard. Yeah I can't do it. You have to learn that when you're a kid you're going to need to get those Brian Connections when you're a kid that's odd the loan when you're not exactly. I tried the other day and I was too scary off offers skateboarders little kid in Majorca one of the one recently and we go to one and when she wasn't here took it out and all went and went and wrote and neely elite. Newly Brockman break everybody. My Buddy on the concrete icon to Kogo. What's the best piece of business? The business advice that you've ever recieved than I've ever received stop before you're ready love. Yeah that's been the theme of this podcast. pinks stopping for you ready. I hear that a lot. It's yeah it's really important to just get going or some Alava or Jillian if people want to connect with you and find out some more about you. What's the best way to do that? So you can follow me on instagram. And I'm Jillian Mulholland and and of course go to my website JILLIAN MAHALA DOT com of mailing lists. You can sign up to all linked in. I'm on the link Din and my podcast is his jill chats so this plenty of ways to contact me when it was to reach out and if you're listening to this podcast take a little peek at the show notes on the APP that you're you're listening in on an older links to jillions website and who's socials will be right there. See One have to go poking around in Google them. And if you're watching this video on youtube to scroll on down and all of the links are right there might chore you head over to Archie stitcher or to wherever you get your podcast and listen to the Joe chat show and hit the subscribe button when you're over there as well Jillian. Thank you so much for coming on the goal in show it's been an absolute pleasure to host here. It's been a lot of fun before I let you go. If you go to a potting comment some final wisdom I just love yourself lackey. Life depends on it. I love it I love it. What a nice way I to close out the show? Thanks for coming on. We look forward to speaking with you soon. It's now by. They added folks folks. If you want to connect with Jillian just take a little taking your phone. And all the links to her website and Ho- socials are right there and if you're watching this on youtube to scroll on down and the details right there in the show notes as well now if you've got a message Oh some feedback to the show you can reach out via the go in social so we can send me an email at anytime. Just visit our lean dot calmed to find out more. Well that wraps it up for the show today so whatever it is that you working on whatever you're doing get busy get to it and go all in. I'll see next don. Don't do so now. Cho's phone Again uh we ooh the. Yeah

Youtube Melbourne Netflix Brian rose WanNa Jillian Jillian Mulholland Jillian Hol Melvin Julian Holland Jillian Mulholland Jillian Mah Australia Dan You Lisa Jassem Saint Kilda barry Lena Park Rubber Bras Sunshine Coast LESEAN
California Water Wars - We Who Are About to Die Salute You | 4

American History Tellers

41:31 min | 10 months ago

California Water Wars - We Who Are About to Die Salute You | 4

"Eh maginness a cold clear evening in early spring nineteen twenty-three you ventured to the home of waterson. He's been having a little trouble with his car. Brand Brand New Stanley steamer. Since you've diagnosed a few tricky automobiles in the past you offer to help care for some refreshment. We're well past five o'clock clock. You Wriggle your way out from underneath the hood as he hands you a glass mighty kind of you George so any guesses. My guess is are all worn now. I'm just loosened this valve to the boiler then tight end up again not telling much of a difference either way what you don't want to say though is that you think George might have lemon lemon his hands. Well isn't that just fine news. You like George. His family the Watterson or what passes for old money and Owens Valley. He may have been here longer than you but unlike some of the others up here he doesn't care where you came from what you did before you arrived. He's a nice guy but George is the kind of man man who buys a lemon and it goes well for. He's got some sixth sense about these things. I swear I bet he's probably just trying to rub it in my face his Stan Dan Lebron's like the wind. I doubt he's doing on purpose probably just out for John. George Wilfred is Georgia's nephew Wilfred Watterson and his brother. Mark Run five banks up and down the county there. The family success. George has never managed to be. You've heard all the stories. Nice just like this sipping Whiskey in the garage. How George Awards would've won that mining claim until Wilford outbid him how Georgia's landholdings don't develop while Winfrey's pan out huge now? This business with the car. George takes another big SIP and looks quizzically. Well what if I told you I was onto something big about the river. I guess I'd ask you if there was money in it and then I ask you if there was money in it for me no. This isn't a joke. I've been talking to some very well connected people in Los Angeles and I'm going to do some work for them up here your interest. This is Pete. Georgia's is Sparkley. What kind of work you talking about? I'M GONNA buy the McNally ditch and then I'm going to sell it to William O.. Holland and I'm GonNa make some some money want to help me you're taking back. The McNally ditch is one of the few large canals off the river. That isn't owned by the city. Few things at this community the aflame like water rights. But it's just business right supply and demand. Let me think about it. Why don't you climb up there and give our start? See How she sounds Saffir. Pretty good right does sound pretty good. And you like George Waters. But if what he says is right residents of Owens Valley your neighbors are about to be torn apart American history tellers sponsored by mail chimp. The strategy sets. Everyone's on board. You've got your way forward. It's time to grow your business now. 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That's what for more at mail. CHIMP DOT COM from wondering I'm hi I'm Lindsay Graham and this is American history tellers our history. Your story mm-hmm by the early nineteen twenties the city of Los Angeles in the communities of the Owens River valley were at an impasse although Los Angeles needed water from the Owens River to feed its ever-growing population. The valley residents had decided they'd had enough through a series of violent clashes. The two communities fought what would be known as California his civil war this war would set l.. A.'s Water Department Superintendent William Mulholland on a collision course with heavily armed ranchers and farmers. But the Owens River Ravelli families would find themselves divided as well. The waterson family in particular would find itself in a bitter dispute and its members pitted against each other. This says episode for we being about to die salute you by eighteen sixty Pi. You try tribe extended through a stretch of central California countryside. The Sierra Nevada mountains rose to the west the flat desert landscape stretch to the east between the into a river ran through the valley the by built an extensive irrigation system using the waters of the river to feed fields of wild hyacinth and yellow nut grass which helps sustain their diet they farmed and hunted wild deer and ducks that migrated every year to the edges of the riverbed but the land they lived on was good for something else as white settlers and prospectors descended upon mining camps in nearby Nevada. The Owens River valley became a path through transportation and communication between the minds and California via the same grasslands the pie tailored among became excellent grazing lands for nearby cattlemen's herds by eighteen sixty three a series of heated battles finals. Left over one hundred fifty Tae Dead White settlers in the American military drove them and other tribes. Like the Shoshoni Cowo- issue south in claimed the valley and it's rich water source as their own for the next forty years. The Owens Valley remained a haven for cattle ranching and alfalfa farms. Two young brothers Wilford and Mark Waterson were brought to the valley by their parents in the eighteen eighties. The waterson family settled in the area and in the early nineteen hundreds opened the Inyo county bank wilfried and mark while still in their twenties became president and treasurer handsome and friendly. The brothers grew their banking businesses by investing in the residence of the valley they they were laxed about enforcing repayment schedules. and loans were rarely refused with their casual attitude towards money and their confidence in the people of the Owens Valley. The brothers. There's wall love by the community. They supported their young uncle. George Waterson only ten years older than Wilfred took a different view. He saw his nephews. Moore's competitors petters that has family George work in town as postmaster notary public over time he acquired parcels of land but while wielfried in mark began to make a name for themselves themselves in the community George kept his head down in nineteen to the federal reclamation serves brought some excitement to the Owens River valley. They promised an enormous warmest federal irrigation project. It was big news. The valley might actually become a draw for tourism and if nothing else the government could potentially force a rail line to be drawn up from in Los Angeles. The people of the valley stood to make a lot of money but that never happened instead. The reclamation service offer collapsed and Los Angeles quickly brought up the available water rights. The aqueduct the city built diverted the entire flow of the Owens River into a channel that spend the water over two hundred miles south to Los Angeles in the years during and after the aqueducts construction. The residents of the Owens River valley watched and waited the city's incursion had happened and there was nothing more. They felt. They could do you. If there was any bright side it was that Los Angeles used only excess surface water from the river leading most families with well enough to live on and during World War. One the Owens River valley economy prospered greatly from selling crops. The waterson brothers prospered as well Wilford in mark now owned five banks in Inyo county money. In addition to extensive investments in local tungsten mining operations. Uncle George had not been as fortunate though his land purchases allowed him to raise and sell cattle Hannele. He felt that he was always coming up short in comparison to his younger more socially adapt Ken. George had put in bids on several mining camps. But each time he was beaten with batter offers by his younger nephews but George did have his own social connections. He was an officer in one of the local companies that have bought up. Some of the remaining water rights in the wake of Los Angeles is one thousand nine hundred four acquisition in Bishop thirty miles north from the codex diversion point. The Owens river still flowed freely. It's runoff was diverted it into small canals referred to by locals as ditches and when the demand for water rose yet again it was to George Waterson that the city of Los Angeles and William Mulholland came calling for help by Nineteen twenty-three Los Angeles found itself once again in the grips of a multi a year drought and once again Mulholland found himself searching for solutions with over a half a million people. The city had grown not only in population but also an acreage each from ninety square miles in nineteen ten. The city was now nearly three times that so many outlying towns have been annexed that Mulholland presented city leaders with report port begging them to stop the only way to stop. The city's water problem he complained privately was killed. The members of the Chamber of Commerce drawing desperate for water once once again another plan that involves an eastward expansion to the waters of the Colorado River was explored but then shelf twice once by private business interests. And then and by the defeat of a citywide vote so once again agents from Los Angeles ascended to the Owens Valley. They lowered pumps into the ground to help augment the aqueducts flow. The city began wholesale purchases of land near the river using checkerboard pattern that focused on strategic claims leaving those who didn't sell cut off from water sources and with dwindling property values when George Waterson was approached by Mulholland for his help reaching out to Owens Valley residents. He readily accepted Mulholland invited him down to Los Angeles for dinner at his club. The plan was simple. Mulholland would use Georgia's local connections in the Valley to help ensure that Los Angeles got the properties in needed. Leave none of the ranchers out Mahal and told them we want them all but by this time Wilfred and Mark Waterson knew what was coming and they had a plan as well. The brother other went door to door drumming up support for what they call the Owens Valley Irrigation district a political body. That would lock down the four major irrigation ditches flowing from the Owens River River and give Inyo county a strong unified front from which they could negotiate with Los Angeles but before they had a chance to call a vote on the matter. The watterson brothers awoke woke on the morning of March Sixteenth Nineteen twenty-three to surprise the rights to the McNally ditch the largest of the four upstream canals had been sold to Los Angeles airless for one million dollars. Their uncle George negotiated the sale in less than twenty four hours. The United Front Wilford and Marco Ford and collapsed apt ripped down by one of their own kin. Furious owners of the other three canals upstream of the aqueduct began flooding their districts. Gulping up Los Angeles Angeles's water until the aqueducts slowed down to a trickle equally furious Mulholland from his office in Los Angeles ordered his maintenance crews in Inyo county to counterattack right at abandoned. The Big Pine Canal Los Angeles owned earthmoving equipment began digging a diversion canal in the opposite direction. If big pine unwanted to waste water in the city of Los Angeles would simply move the river. Imagine it's nineteen. I'm twenty three. And you've been sent out from Los Angeles to manage the new canal operations in the Upper Owens valley but this morning. Your orders changed the superintendent himself off call and told you to begin digging a new version ditch right off the band of the big Pine Canal. You sounded angry especially when you reminded him that. You technically be destroying private Robert Property but he also promised reward pave you got the job done now is just past noon and the sun is blazing overhead. You've only dug around ten feet of canal. Now when you see a man stay on the end of the Canal Hemi sat in a loose suit and a tall hat. He's yelling at you. Hey why don't you point you start take for a second so we can talk. He doesn't look like he's going anywhere until you obliged so you shut your machine off. Stay in your seat. You're well aware that life here for an outsider especially one from la can be risky. Thank you that's better do appreciate it. Didn't want to have to keep yelling. Well you want sir. Well what I want is for for you to stop digging that ditch and go on home freight. I can't do that. Four other cars. pull up alongside the ditch now. You really aren't inclined to step abound sir. If you have a problem you can call. The city worked administration. I have all the permits and paperwork for what I'm doing. I'm just a man with a job around a dozen men end step out of the four cars. Well see that's just the thing. where with the big pine ditch? We've got an injunction to stop the word. The men walked towards you slowly menacingly. It's broad daylight. They're moving like they have all the time in the world breath as again a little closer realize why they're armed the man that's been speaking to you gestures to the weapons. Well I guess you could call it a shotgun injunction. Really you quickly decide that this is not your fine. Okay okay. You've made your point. You climb out in the machine and put your arms up to show. You're not about to make any sudden moves all come on son. Don't be like that. Put Your hands down down. The men holding guns don't look especially angry. heavyset man pulls out a handkerchief and wipes his brow. Why don't you just go on into Bishop and get yourself a beer you you can tell him? It's on us one of them and breaks apart from the group and heads towards your machine Ali. But but I'll have to take my machine with me. No No. That's that's not how it goes. You go get yourself a beer. Your machine goes in the river you stop and glared each other being pushed off your job is one thing walking away from company equipment. Specially inexpensive new digger. That is something else you think about reward pay superintendent offered you then you catch the sun's Glare off the guns in the men's hands you break your gaze with the man and walk away without looking back behind you. They drive your machine into the river all this over water. But you're not interested in water right now. You'RE GONNA go get that beer. The citizens are the Owens Valley had drawn the line. They would no longer be taken advantage of by the big city down in south the next day a headline appeared in the Big Pie newspaper. Los Angeles it's your move now for many Owens Valley families. Their routes ran indeed through generations. They raised their children bill. Churches planted crops and carved out a life in the valley sucking the water away. Threatened all of that when a reporter Order Asmaa Holland why he felt there was so much resistance in the Owens Valley. He responded angrily dissatisfaction as a sort of condition that prevails there like foot and mouth disease soon but Mahala knew that money would always win out. He directed his city agents in the Owens River valley to keep the offers for land coming and despite the protests S. of Wilford and Mark Watterson the other members of the Irrigation district decided in the end to take the city's money Los Angeles paid around two million dollars for the water all right so the canals wilfred mark forced to recruit. They couldn't fight their fellow. Citizens Have Owens Valley but could certainly find the city of Los Angeles. All the money in the world wouldn't sway them to change their minds. Only in this coming fight they wouldn't use politics. It would use dynamite American history tillerson sponsored by simply safe every night. Police departments across America received hundreds of breaking alerts alerts. But how do they know. It's not just another false alarm. All the alarm company can tell them is. The motion sensor went off simplisafe home security is different though. If there's a break in simply simplisafe uses video evidence to give police an eyewitness account of the crime allowing dispatch up to three hundred fifty percent faster than normal burglar alarm and simply safe. Security is comprehensive comprehensive protection cameras and video doorbell stand guard outside entry. Motion glass break sensors protect inside simplisafe. Also protect your home from fire flood and carbon monoxide monitor. Twenty four seven by live security professionals. You can set up your system yourself like I did know tools needed. Or let's simply safe's experts to for you and it's the only fifty cents a day. No contracts visit simplisafe dot com slash tellers. You'll get free shipping and a sixty day risk-free trial go now to simplisafe dot com slash tellers hellers. So they know our show sent you that. SIMPLISAFE DOT com slash tellers. The summer of nineteen twelve proved to be just as hot and oppressive in the Owens valley as it was two hundred miles south in Los Angeles for the waterson brothers. It was a summer of discontent. The the city had purchased a majority of the remaining water rice in the upper valley. There was little in property. Values laughed and now the valley is business. Interests were about to become as dry as the ground on which they stood good. I'll May twenty-first Group of Owens Valley citizens stole away from their homes late at night after their families were fast asleep they broke the locks to the waterson brothers warehouse and disappeared with three cases of dynamite. Then they drove to the Alabama Gates Spillway near the town of loan time and set the charges for two hundred pounds. Dynamite might just before dawn. The charges detonated. The resulting blast shook the earth and blew apart one hundred foot section of the aqueduct. The flow of water south abruptly halted hearing the news in Los Angeles. William Holland was enraged. He immediately dispatched maintenance crews to repair the section elsewhere in the city. New District Attorney Eisai's saw an opportunity to make a name for himself. He dispatched detectives to the river valley in an attempt to figure out what had happened. who was to blame? Witnesses reported that a caravan of cars had been seen the evening before the explosion. The Caravan travel from Bishop and pass through big pine growing larger as it went at the crime scene tire tracks and footprints indicated that as many as fifty men might have participated in the early morning bombing but in the weeks following the blast information tried up locals proved close. Lift and intractable disrupting any attempt at further investigation in the community. A small as the Upper Owens Valley someone ought to have known something but no one was saying anything another explosion at Lone Pine Canal. Just a few weeks later breached. The Canal Wall evidence showed that as many he is twenty cars were involved. kyw's private eye glumly predicted that the bombers would never be brought to justice since no grand jury Inyo County would indict no court in that region would ever convict they ally district attorney fumed at a press conference that the Owens River Valley residents knew damn well who had done this but his tantrum led to know New Orleans leans meanwhile Mahala was receiving hundreds of death threats by mail and telephone and his office in Los Angeles. Undaunted he traveled to the Owens River Valley to assess. That's the bomb sites himself but it wasn't until he had returned to the city that he lashed out in print against the farmers and ranchers that had become his northern enemy. He half regretted he. He told the Los Angeles Times that. So many of the Owens Valley Beautiful Orchard Trees were gone now as there wouldn't be enough left to hang the troublemakers. Who lived there? In the Owens Valley itself suspicions ran rampant city agents. Were still in the midst of the bombings quietly trying to purchase more land. Neighbors suspected neighbor of being the next one to sell out. Rumors circulated that Los Angeles was planning to invade the towns or more likely to start condemning hamming properties adjacent to city landholdings. One visitor to Los Angeles wrote suspicions. Our mutual and widespread the valley people are suspicious of each other suspicious of newcomers suspicious of city. Men the Owens Valley is full of whispering monitoring's and recrimination 's George Waterson with his magnificent sale l. to the city just one year ago at also become a target. He was now struggling to keep a low profile receiving death threats to although his blood relation to Wilfred and mark offered offered some protection but Georgia's business partner a local lawyer named Lester Hall would not be so lucky. After the McNally Ditch Sale Hall had been bluntly told to to leave the valley and never return he had left valley and then for reasons. Unknown returned eating dinner at a restaurant one night all was kidnapped dragged out into a car. By a group of hooded men. The men drove hall to the end of a deserted road and strung a news over a tree. Blindfolded and Frantic Hall managed manage to slow the proceedings by using a secret freemason distress call one of his assailants was also a Mason and agreed to let hall plead his case all eventually convinced the man to let them free on the condition he leave for Mexico and never return. Tensions in the valley continue to escalate until the fall of nineteen twenty twenty one when Wilfred and Mark Waterson finally decided they'd had enough imagine est nineteen eighteen twenty four a bone chilling Sunday morning November just before dawn. You're riding in the backseat of your father's four. Besides you is your brother beside him your a cousin. Normally there'd be chatter joking and jostling for space but this morning known as talking. You're headed to the aqueduct. Pure out the window is a car's headlights. Appear on your left. That's Mister Taylor. He's coming down his road at the wheel. Your father was fawns just him. Don't know it's only one car though. Father says nothing turning around in your seat. He watches the headlights. Mr Taylor's car. We've down his dirt road stop then joined the caravan of cars behind and you. That's twenty five by my count. Twenty five cars seventy five men seventy eight county you your brother your cousin. You'll be sixteen in December. Her mark. Watterson the banker is driving the lead car just ahead of yours. He brought his sons to a long caterpillar of headlines. Stretch down the highway. If anyone the city aqueduct guards were to see this. They've definitely sound the alarm. But that's the point. Your father talks without taking his eyes off the road. Now when we get there I want what she poises. Stand the car but you almost laugh. There's no chance you're staying. Karn your rifle is in the trunk right along side. Your Father Shotgun. You all came armed. The convoy finally arrives at the Alabama Gate Spillway with light just beginning to form on the horizon. You can see the bridge. On the Small Triangle Roof Gate Gate House that sits straddle across it. If you butterflies in your stomach but you push them down. This is about maintaining a hold on your community. It's about at life and death. The city has always taken what I wanted. But now you're going to take it back as your father exits the car and grabs his shotgun from the trunk voices erupt in the the distance. Where you are what you down? We just want the water. But you're focused on your father standing with his shotgun. I'M GONNA go in with mark you all stay here. It shouldn't take long to get the gate wheels. Turn the guards. No we outnumber them so. Don't do anything stupid okay. We're not here to hurt anyone understand non if you understand me. Your father joins Mr Watterson. They set off towards the House with a triangle roof. Pair of lights are blinking inside inside. But it's hard to tell what's going on in the distance you grip your rifle tied to your chest glance at the men around you. No one is speaking. Your job is to stand I ant here and wait I the water will come then. The men from the city will come. That's all part of the plan. But what if the plan goes wrong at dawn. On Sunday November Sixteenth Mark Watterson led a caravan of cars to Alabama Gate. Spillway along the aqueduct. Line line in the past. When the aqueduct flow was running to hi- the gates were used to drain the excess water into the Desert Valley but now waterson? His Caravan sees the gate house us and turned the five huge wheel. Sending thousands of gallons of water destined for Los Angeles spilling down the hill washing uselessly into the desert. When this has been done done the men stayed setting up armed guards along the perimeter the La Aqueduct have been seized by the citizens of Inyo County? If the city wanted their water back they would have to come come and take it in disbelief and rage. Mulholland sent armed guards from Los Angeles North immediately to retake the gate house but when the guards arrived they they found seen very different from what they expected. Several hundred Owens Valley residents including women and children had gathered around the gate house. They were singing songs and cooking. Food food local law enforcement through their hands worn for arrests were simply tossed into the river. The county sheriff openly declared his support for the blockade dumbfounded the Los Angeles guards retreated wondering what they were supposed to do. They couldn't murder hundreds of women and children so for four days. The seizure of the Los Angeles aqueduct blossomed listened into a giant campsite. The entire Owens valley rally behind the action nearby ranchers offered cattle for barbecues Western film star. Tom Mix who was filming. Nearby halted all work onset brought his crew in Mariuchi banned in Bishop someone painted a billboard that read. If I am not on the job you can find finding the aqueduct. All throughout the celebrations. Not a drop of water was headed south to Los Angeles back in the city disgusted. William Mahone saw that even the Los Angeles Times had sympathy for the blockaders writing. These farmers are not anarchists or bomb throwers growers. But in the main honest hard working American citizens they put themselves hopelessly in the wrong by taking the law into their own hands but there is still a measure of justice on their side. Well mark led the standoff at the Alabama Gate. His brother Wilfred traveled to Los Angeles to meet with a group of city. Bankers negotiating on behalf of the Owens Valley or Gatien Asian District Wilford asked for nine million dollars in exchange for collective land and water rights. Along with the money the valley would be developed to make it more attractive to tourism mm-hmm. The bankers were excited about the prospects in a telegram to his brother. An enthusiastic wilford wrote if the object of the crowd at the spillway to bring their wrongs to the attention of the citizens of Los Angeles. They have done so one hundred percent so after four days the standoff at the gates came to a peaceful resolution Wilfred Fred boarded a train home. The bankers known as the Joint Clearinghouse Association had accepted Wolford's terms of sale when he was in Los Angeles but by the time he arrived and bishop they'd changed their mind. The Joint Clearinghouse Association abruptly announced that nine million dollars was too much to pay at the present time. No other explanation was offered. Wilfrid was devastated. He had put his best foot forward for his community and been let down. He felt that was the last chance for meaningful compromise. Despite the failure the Owens River valley community remained resolute in their opposition to the city of Los Angeles for the next three years city agents continued to buy more land while farmers and ranchers took matters and explosives into their own hands and the spring of nineteen twenty twenty seven the remaining members of the Owens Valley Irrigation Association pool their money and bought an ad in the Los Angeles Times. It read we the farming communities of Owens Valley being about to die salute you but it was not a capitulation. It was a battle cry a month after the ad appeared. One of the largest Just steel siphons along the aqueduct line was blown up the very next night. Another explosion ripped out sixty more feet of pipe. Los Angeles responded by deploying private the detectives to the Bali armed with winchesters. Tommy guns orders that they could shoot to kill anyone loitering near the aqueduct but more dynamiting sprees followed fourteen fourteen explosions and just two months by the middle of June. A train of one hundred aren't Los Angeles Reserve guards rolled in the Owens River Valley William Mulholland and the the city would not tolerate this behavior. If it was wore the valley wanted the valley would get it American. History tellers is sponsored by audible. You like listening you like learning. It's not too hard to imagine that you like listening and learning at the same time me too. And there's no better place to do both than audible audible members choose three titles every month one audiobook and two exclusive audible originals right right now. I'm almost finished with the making of the atomic bomb by Richard Roads. It's a fascinating history of the Manhattan project going deep into the science politics and big personalities behind behind the bomb he won a pulitzer to fantastic book. 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What's in your Wallet Capital One and a member? FDIC by the summer of nineteen twenty seven. It seemed as if everyone in the Owens valley was armed and ready to shoot with Los Angeles Guard station across every part of the aqueduct line and the threat of further dynamite attacks from valley farmers. The atmosphere was thick with dread and anticipation. Anticipation of something terrible. Just about to happen in the town of Bishop George Waterson had once again taken matters into his own hands estranged from his nephews still still clinging to his family name for protection. George was still in contact with William Holland after years of feeling left behind by the success of his extended family it. It looks like George would finally get the chance to open his own bank mark and Wilfrid with whom he'd been in such ramp in competition already owned five banks in the Owens Valley but four years of conflict and rapidly declining business and left their inyo county banks drained and weakened when William Mulholland offer George position at a new eubank was planning to open and bishop funded by the city of Los Angeles. George didn't have to think twice. All had to do was put the application in his name but the plan was brought to a halt when the State Banking Commissioner Decline Mulholland Georgia's charter application. Wilfred waterson testified that his uncle was acting in concert with the city of Los Angeles and therefore the bank would never have the Owens valley best interest at heart but during the process of the charter. Application Malone's team. I'm in Los Angeles had gained access to detail statements about Wilfred and marks banking operations. Something didn't quite seem right ever helpful. George waterson volunteered appeared to investigate. What the other side of his family had been up to magistrates summer? Nineteen twenty seven. You're a Los Angeles city auditor. Who's been working with? George Waterson to investigate the bank holdings of his nephews Wilford mark. You're seated at a folding table in a small dusty room in his house surrounded by boxes of bank files. You don't much like it up here in Bishop. There's a hot tension that seems to follow you around and it's almost like you're wearing a sign that says I don't belong here but thinking about it George. Waterston seems to be wearing the same sign just then he bounds in his room. Well I was hoping by this time when I came back you'd be done. You barely look at him as he fiddles with his lighter when I just finished sorting all these deposit receipts I'm starting. It gets very strange numbers. They we should have some more people on this case. Maybe George to do some of the work himself. You thank instead of sitting around smoking those foul-smelling cheer route cigars. No I think you need to sit down and take a look at this when you first started. You didn't think you would find anything. The whole job felt like a giant waste list of time but after a bit of digging you found it look here. This is the third instance I found these deposits from the INYO county banks. Ledger were never received on the other. End Breath here. You've got withdrawals against that same amount for Wilfrid tungsten mine operation. Everyone knew that mind would go bus eventually. That's why I didn't bother investing. No George that that's not the point. It's the discrepancy. See this number two hundred forty five thousand. He doesn't exist. It's been loaned out get your nephews. Bank is stating here that does exist. They've over leveraged by at least a million dollars okay. We'll tell me why that's good. No it's not good but what banks can't report funds. They don't physically have debt or no debt. What they're doing is lying to embezzlement? George looks up to you and then his face breaks into a slow strange smile. Well I guess I'd better call Mr Mulholland. Let him know. I'd say you could call the police for the state the commission if you had a mind to. I don't think I'll do that just now. That's fine anyways. I'm going to get something to eat. We can pick all this backup in the morning. You walk outside and take a deep breath shake your head thinking about the Watterson in their bank. All the trouble. They're about to find themselves in. But mostly you're thinking about George. What kind of man goes after his own famously? Just as on August second. Nineteen twenty seven William Mulholland presented. George Waterson evidence to the State Corporation Commissioner. For at least the past two years Wilfrid and Mark Watterson banks had been using money from the deposits of Owens Valley citizens to hold their own failing personal investments their mining company planned vacation resort and a mineral water company. Were all part of the scheme. The INYO county banks were in the whole for more than two million dollars on August fifth. The doors to all five watterson brothers banks were locked by August Tenth Wilfred and mark were arrested and face trial. The prosecuting attorney was a longtime friend. Both brothers if he had not been prosecuting against them he later said he would have stood as a character witness on their behalf. He wept openly during his closing arguments against against Wilfred and mark and the all Inyo county jury wept as well the Watterson brothers done it for the good of the valley. None of the money had ever crossed the county line. It had simply been reinvested in the community with no irrigation economy left. The brothers have been looking ahead to mining and the possibilities of tourism but good intentions did not change the legality of what they'd done Wilfred Mark had always been the heart of the Owens Valley business community. Now they're going to San Quentin for ten years ears but the WATTERSON brothers weren't to blame. According to Valley residents the real enemy was a metropolis two hundred miles away. A Colossus that scooped scooped up their water and natural resources. Post on the door of one shuddered Inyo County Bank was a handwritten message. This result has been brought about by the last four. A years of destructive work carried on by the city of Los Angeles with Waterson out of the way William Remo Holland felt a deep satisfation that events in the Owens valley had finally sorted themselves out now. He could turn his attention back to the engineering projects undertaken during the years years of strife. This brought him back into contact with his erstwhile friend and former colleague from the water department. Fred Eaton Eaton has spent the last seven years on the sidelines. Lines of what had come to be called California civil war he still owned the perfect site for a hundred and fifty foot. Damn just what Mulholland wanted for the city and even window Mulholland had always felt that Eaton's one million dollar price tag was too high. He turned around and spent more than twice that in the last seven years on his alternative route the mcnally now in big pine ditch purchases both Eaton Mulholland were in their seventies by now but both men proved a stubborn as ever when Fred Eaton lost over a half a million dollars after the collapse of the water since bank. He suffered a stroke even though his son attempted to parlay between him and Mulholland all. The negotiations proved not neither neither man would give in so instead of the Long Valley Dan that he privately wish could be built. Mulholland commissioned a work around with a pair of additional reservoirs along the aqueduct line. The first was two hundred foot. High One thousand foot wide concrete dam nestled in the hills of the Hollywood district. Christened the Mulholland Reservoir. The second check in was a larger project in San Francisco Canyon fifty miles north of the city in the San Gabriel Mountains. Name the Saint Francis Damn this structure would be one one hundred seventy five feet tall holding back thirty. Eight thousand Acre feet of impounded. Water as construction began concerns voice that the dam itself was not built high high enough so the height was raised twenty feet but unfortunately there was no corresponding increase in thickness dams base undeterred. Mahala impressed on the dam was fully operational by the summer of nineteen twenty seven past seven years of conflict with the valley had been chaotic and turbulent but still they were years filled with accomplishment assessment Mulholland felt satisfaction knowing Los Angeles now had the water at needed the city's holdings in the Owens Valley were secure and with the collapse of the WATTERSON brothers banks. Thanks the valley had lost. Its will to fight elsewhere opportunities. Were finally beginning to open up from all Holland's long dreamt project run an aqueduct east from the Colorado River River but he began to receive troubling reports from the Saint Francis Dam site. The dam was leaking water. Additionally cracks had begun to appear on the East assigned to the dam's foundation you ordered fixes and promised to monitor the situation closely. But what the Water Department Superintendent did not know was that in less than a month conditions at the Saint Francis Dam would rapidly go from bad to worse next on American history tellers while Holland find his legacy. Threatened by a disaster could not foresee as a devastating flood risk through the southern California Canyon community from wondering this is American History Tillerson. I hope you enjoyed this episode. If you did. I have two other podcasts. You might enjoy American scandal in American elections wicked game search for them and subscribe wherever. You're listening right now. You're listening on a smartphone TAP. Swipe over the cover art of this podcast. You'll find the episode's including some details. You may have missed. You'll also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. Can you help us offered this show to you for free and if you did like this show one of the best ways to show your appreciation is to give us a five star rating and leave a review. I always love to know your thoughts. Reviews reviews are some of the best ways for others to find. Show tell your friends and family and showed them how to subscribe. You can also find us and me on twitter and facebook follow the show at AH tellers. And I'm at Lindsey Graham and thank you for more information on the conflict between Los Angeles and the Owens River Valley. We recommend Cadillac Desert. I Mark Rice. American- history tellers is hosted edited and produced by me. Lindsey Graham for airship sound designed barbaric barons. This episode is written by George Docker ended by Doreen Marina. Our executive producers are Jenny Lower Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by Hernando Pez for wondering.

Owens Valley Los Angeles Owens River valley George Wilfred William Mulholland Uncle George George Waterson Inyo county William Remo Holland Owens River Upper Owens valley Inyo County Bank watterson Los Angeles Times Owens Valley Irrigation waterson Bishop Owens River Valley William Mul Mark Waterson Wilfred Watterson
California Water Wars - A River in the Desert | 1

American History Tellers

41:49 min | 11 months ago

California Water Wars - A River in the Desert | 1

"Imagine it's March. Nineteen O five. You're young engineer with the Los Angeles Department of Water and power. But you barely spent a moment indoors at your desk since you started the job. It's late at night. You're knee deep in. What's left of the Fourth Street sewer line? A two day storm flooded the reserves. And you've been scrambling with other city Workers Chris to try and repair the damage take break got a tent. Set up outside and coffee after hours working the foul smelling muck. You're finally relieved. You make your way towards a makeshift tent and try unsuccessfully to warm your hands seated next to you is a fellow engineer named Harvey. He's older and higher up the water department now here with him in the tent trying to think of something to break the silence. So some drought Harvey squint and looks at you possibly seeing you for the first time. I thought it was a good idea to build a city here. He sounds tired like a man who has spent all his time dealing with the same problem over and over no oh freshwater anywhere except a tiny river that spends most of the time bone-dry then immediately floods anytime at drop rainfalls totally asinine either. There's no no water at all or just too much for ten years. Los Angeles has been under drought conditions the department instituted water rationing. But it hasn't helped though it doesn't look like it recently there simply isn't enough rain. The population is growing fast. You try and introduce some levity maybe time travel is a solution like got one of those H. G. Wells books. Sure I'm all ears. What do you got? It's easy go back in time about one hundred years when the Spanish star building the mission Russian you tell them don't bother try San Diego San Diego's worse off than we are. Besides the solution isn't south. It's north leaned forward interested. You mean north the Owens River Kid. Now we're that is shake your head. Two hundred miles north giant river the feeds off the Sierra Mountains. snowpack magic water source that will never run dry. Sure but I thought you said two hundred miles away so easy we just build a two hundred mile. Long Act no great shakes. RV starts to laugh again. But you can't tell if he's joking or if he's upset or if the strain of his work is is finally getting to bill. Mulholland already got the plans laid out. I tell you it both turned around I. You can't believe what you're seeing being two blocks away the support of the Sixth Street Bridge Collapse you watch as the middle of the bridge drops into the raging river. At least no one was on the bridge edge with the mall closed down this evening. It's going to be huge cleanup John for someone probably you. But you can't stop thinking about the plan. Harvey mentioned if the the only true water solution lies far away in the eastern Sierras. What's IT GONNA take to get it whenever I can? I tried to make the ads. That run on an American history tellers interesting. Maybe I'll tell a little story tied into the show's content but no matter. How well do? They're still ads. But there is a way to get rid of these interruptions because American history tellers is available ad free on one three plus and in addition to getting ad free episodes of American history. Tellers wonder plus also offers tons Hans of additional and free wondering originals go to wondering DOT FM Slash Ahd plus to upgrade your listening experience today. That's wondering dot. FM Am ht. Not P L U S from wonder. I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American history tellers ours our history your store on our show. We'll take you to the events. The Times and the people that shaped America and Americans are values are struggles in our dreams will put you in the shoes of everyday citizens as history was being made. And we'll show you how the the events of the Times affected them their families and affects you now. At the turn of the twentieth century the city of Los Angeles faced a crisis tourism and land speculation accusation had caused the population to increase by leaps and bounds. The growth was welcome but natural water. Supply was running out. The solution would be found over two hundred miles else away in the waters of the Owens River running clean and cool all year round from this year amount and range to get water. Los Angeles would engage in some questionable land speculation speculation of its own ultimately raging farmers of the Owens Valley and setting up a bitter dispute to take on the monumental task of engineering this water relocation. The city city turned to water department. Superintendent William Mulholland his. Aqueduct would propel the growth of Los Angeles from an unremarkable wild west town to a bustling metropolis. But the community of the Owens Valley would find their own water supply sacrificed and they would fight back. This five part series explores the politics and pitfalls of Metropolitan Collagen growth and the price. One man would have to pay. This is episode one a river. In the desert in September of eighteen seventy six the transcontinental railroad finally arrived in Los Angeles. After years of waiting the mostly agrarian former Spanish mission was connected to the rest of the world once known as El Pueblo de new estrus in your arena Los Angeles Dila Porcelain Cal. It was still commonly known as the PUEBLO. Los Angeles was ready to grow as fast as the new trains could run. The young city was a jumble of different types appealing to both the romantic and ambitious travelers. Those who sought a whole new beginning one of these was William Holland. He was twenty two years old handsome rugged with a thick head of swept back. Hair born in Belfast Ireland in eighteen fifty eighty five. He'd left home at fourteen and spent his early years. Criss crossing the ocean working on merchant and military vessels in late eighteen seventy seven. He stepped off. A southbound southbound Union Pacific train from San Francisco and took a look around Los Angeles he later recalled was the most attractive town I'd ever seen. There was plenty to do. And Fair compensation sation offered for whatever you did. Mulholland was being charitable what he actually found was a dusty dirty crime infested city of eight thousand people that was currently in the grips of a smallpox epidemic. But perhaps due to his time on the ocean he immediately noticed the city's only fresh water source is the Los Angeles River as a beautiful Olympic little stream with willows on its banks but again reality was quite different. The river itself drew from a natural system of underground aquifers fed by an inconsistent supply of rain. Too little rain and the river would dry up too much and it would overflow flooding across a dry arid land game within a year. The young Irishman found on himself a job related directly to that river digging ditches for the Los Angeles Water company word ditch was actually the technical term employed for the system of thin often open air canals at aggregated. The city they all sprung from the Los Angeles River and its main distribution. Line the SONDHEIM Andre or mother ditch. People often wash their clothes. I was in the San hose or even bathed in them but he was Mulholland job at a dollar fifty a day to keep the Sun Home Andrei clean complaints about the water in the eighteen eighties range from descriptions descriptions like warm and nasty to so offensive to the taste and smell as to be undrinkable and positively nauseating the L. A. Times reported that fish would appear in customers smersh. Bathtubs one story went that a main had drowned in a reservoir and simply been allowed to remain there that the story was unproven. Didn't make it any less repeated variations nations. Replace the dead man with a dead cow or horse or sheep. Depending on the teller the company responsible for the water supply had a relationship with a see. It served that was complicated. Needed a best. The Los Angeles Water company had gone private in eighteen sixty eight signing a thirty year lease and paying the city astonishingly low price of thirty three dollars a month for complete access to the Los Angeles River. And it's capricious water supply one of the water. Company's founders prudent. Powdery had gone on to become mayor in the eighteen seventies. Another water company president. A cabinet maker turned lumbermen. William Perry also served on the City Council's Water Committee. In an audacious display of corruption. Harry had the luxury of setting rates and civic policy for a private company. He also happened to run when the city complained about the quality of its rationed. Water supply the Wander Company would simply Lee Shrug. It charged extra to customers with bathtubs in argued against having to pay for fire. Department water or for St Sprinkling in town besieged by dust so much dust in fact the one disgruntled visitor from Iowa wrote in one thousand nine hundred four letter to his hometown newspaper for seven months out of the year. It is a wonder you can see anything at all by the eighteen eighties Mulholland advance in the water company. Earning a foreman's position and moved into a small shack by the Los Angeles River during the day he cleared brush. And debris often having to fort dead animals out of the Stream at night. He stayed up reading. Thomas fannings practical treatise on hydraulics and John trautwein wines civil engineers pocketbook. According to one librarian Mulholland was a constant presence at the downtown library checking out and renewing massive books that no one announced wanted to read. His ambition soon led him to work on a much larger project. The building of the Buena Vista Reservoir. Reservoirs were the only way to control the feast east or famine nature of the Los Angeles water supply to store water for later. Use the Buena. Vista Reservoir was nestled in the southern Lisi and hills and was the first and largest of its kind mind working on the project for four years. Mulholland came in contact with another engineer. Named Frederick Eaton. Both men were the same age and both shared a common love of engineering. Yeah nearing Eaton was born to a wealthy family of southern Californians whose land deals would eventually form the city of Pasadena he'd received a head start financially and educationally but he and Mulholland got along well and when eaten left the water company in eighteen eighty six Mohammed took his place as superintendent moving into a set of cramped offices downtown Elenita street for the next decade Mulholland set to work balancing the needs of his ever expanding water system with a budgetary concerns of his boss. William Perry Mulholland on helped build a power station to serve as the Buena Vista Reservoir and by the late eighteen nineties instituted a system of metering so that each customer's water could be read and build accordingly. But by then the water company found itself assaulted on all fronts. An eleven year drought had begun in eighteen. Ninety three the streets remained unspoiled and still still fish. Were coming out of the plumbing. Demonstrations against the quality of water were being held in the city's Central Plaza on Olvera Street and to make matters worse. The company's thirty year year lease with the city was about to run out in eighteen. Ninety eight it was a foregone conclusion that the city would have their water company back in municipal control but arguments erupted it over. Just how much the water company it's reservoirs and underground lines was actually worth a system that had begun in seventeen. Eighty one with three miles of wooden pipe type had grown to three hundred twenty five miles of iron pipeline carrying all the city's water water company. President William Perry held firm what he considered a reasonable Komo valuation of three million dollars. City Engineer Henry dockweiler asserted. The numbers should be only one million and so a board of arbitration was drawn up to put an end to the disagreement as superintendent. Mulholland was forced to wait into the politics of his profession. I imagine it's eight hundred ninety eight you've been hired by the city of Los Angeles to attend the arbitration hearings regarding the water company. You're an engineer. No stranger to civic works projects in this matter seems relatively open and shut the water company. People want more money but you don't think they're entitled to it today. You're taking the lead for the city. Several other engineers are seated around on June. The hot stuffy hearing room across a long table sits a group of water company men and their superintendent a relaxed looking man with a moustache. Frankly you've grown. Tired of his know would all attitude need like nothing more than to put him in his place. You lean overpass. This geographer to catch his eye superintendent Mulholland. I'd like to ask you about these water. Orbiters Happy Lancer. Can you describe for us. What one is what it does well for what it is? I ask you to refer to section one of the annual fort of eighteen ninety eight specifications vacations and all that you can find on your own as for what it does. It's a system by which the city water company can put accountability to the users of its water and each residence is required higher to have a meter each one to have meter. We're still rolling them out. Some of our customers aren't very happy with them. They would prefer trust them for their bills. I prefer we trust science so you can't explain to me how they work. Oh I did already. I wrote the report if the matter you referring to is. Will the customer overcharge if a meter doesn't work the policies if I'm guessing guessing here no go ahead. I'd love to hear the answer. Well the answer is he. CanNot machines built so that if it malfunctions it will simply cease to take readings. Malfunctioning meter will not cause caused to be higher in fact just the opposite all right then. I'd like to turn my attention to the actual composition of the water lines underneath our city. And what exactly would would you like to know. Well we'd like a complete list. The length of pipes their size character and age. We also want to know the number of gay vows and all about them as well as the number and position of fire hydrants and other structures connected with water system. And you'd like this less now while we're willing to adjourn for the next few days. Let you collect your resources. No need find him out. Show you eventually. A map of the city is unearthed and spread out on the long table. You and the rest of the room watches Mulholland sketches out in detail. All the items. You requested. begrudgingly you're impressed. Well Superintendent Mahanta thank you for for that but I don't think this arbitration should rely on memory alone. Should it very well. Why don't we start digging around up some shovels? If you'd like in your face goes a bit read. It's been a long time since you've actually done any digging on your own. And you've no desire to start now MULHOLLAND HAND-DRAWN MAP proved to be accurate over two hundred points. Along the waterline. All dug up and examined and they all confirmed what he agenda down from memory his deposition cemented his position as an able company man who kept a staggering number of facts and figures in his head. His quote ready quips helped ensure his name would appear in newspapers. Whenever the topic of water was brought up ultimately the water company was sold back to the city for two million dollars in Mulholland? Kept his job superintendent. You would later say when the city bought the works. They bought me along with it a year. After the sale in July eighteen ninety nine a series of earthquakes wakes shook the city. These were followed by Torrens of rain. That caused a washout in the city's main tunnel in Los Angeles. All the water to the city was shut off for two weeks while Mulholland and his men waded into repair the damage. The city and the water company put aside their financial differences and work together to prepare the damage but it was just another reminder that los the Angeles could not sustain itself for long not with a dwindling water supply. Something needed to be done in American history tellers sponsored by quip the makers of the quick electric toothbrush and they want you to know the one thing that matters most for your dental care if you have good habits you're good that means brushing for two minutes twice a day and flopping regularly no matter what brand of US quick though makes that simple starting with an electric toothbrush concealable flaws and anti cavity toothpaste quips. Electric Brush has sensitive sonic vibrations with built in timer and thirty second pulses to guide a full and even clean the quick floss. 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You can adjust each side to your sleep number setting so it's just right for both of you and sleep number beds. Don't just allow you to adjust adjust each side for the ideal firmness comfort and support for both of you the sleep number three sixty smart beds also since their movements and automatically adjust to keep you sleeping comfortably through the night it plus with sleep. IQ technology inside the bed. It tracks. How your sleeping and give you personalized insights for your best sleep? Discover proven quality sleep and save fifty fifty percent on the three sixty limited edition. smart bed now during the ultimate sleep number event only at a sleep number store or sleepnumber dot com slash tellers that sleepnumber dot com slash tellers in nineteen to William Mulholland presented his first report on on the State of water in Los Angeles in three years. His system of metered water readers had helped reduce consumption and lowered their customers bills by half this despite a water department in customer who had filed a restraining order against the city claiming the meters violated the Fourteenth Amendment by depriving him of his right to liberty and property that case went nowhere fire. The city's consumption stood at two hundred gallons of water per person daily. This was an improvement Mulholland wrote from the last year's figure of three hundred daily gallons which had been one of the highest in the nation but he noted the Los Angeles River. Now carry less than half the volume of water. It had just nine years earlier and thanks to a steady stream of boost tourism prism from the city's Chamber of Commerce. The population of Los Angeles had soared to over one hundred thousand doubling in just a decade with no end of eager families coming from from colder mid Western climates. Mulholland was at an impasse. There just wasn't enough. Water combined rainfall for the last two years had yielded only thirteen and a half inches his yet. He couldn't seem to convince the city that is water. Supply was desperately limited with an offer that leak groundwater in every direction rainfall was almost impossible to store underground around all Holland could keep building reservoirs. But they wouldn't make a difference within a constant dependable water source yet after every big rain self styled experts wrote editorials Torius insisting that the water crisis was simply manufactured but for the majority of the people in Los Angeles. The question was academic. Who could remember when it rained when it hadn't certainly no one had moved to Los Angeles to think about rain when one spring storm brought ten inches in one day Mulholland lamented to the water board? One of the trials miles of my life is to make people believe we've not had a very wet year. The city can't meet the demand with less than fourteen inches then a week. After we spoke it rained again but by the winter of nineteen three less than half an inch of rain had fallen eight months. Dry winds swept brushfires through the city. All the way to Santa Monica reducing homes and property along the way to ash between the fires the dust from lack of rain and the wind sweeping the dust up into the air. The Chamber of Commerce warned that the tourists were being scared off and by the next year. Nineteen O four. The situation had not improved and in fact only gotten worse. North of the city cattle herds and antelope valley were starving starving. Without anything green to graze and nearby Lake Elizabeth had dried down to a long sheet of mud in the hills of Los Angeles Leeann Park. Pine trees were turning Brown On January tenth the city's clergyman called on everyone to pray for rain. It was around this time. That Frederick Eaton the former head of LA's water company had an idea. Since leaving the water company in eighteen eighty six eaton had spent the intervening years jumping from one opportunity to the next. He didn't vested in real estate developments and then in the Pacific Electric Streetcar System which dotted Los Angeles with. What would come to be known? As the red cars with his handsome boyish good looks and well-spoken air eaten had been elected mayor it served a two year term and overseeing the water company sail back municipality but now he was almost fifty recently recently divorced and living at the California club on Hill Street with a woman twenty years younger. Still Eaten was attuned to the city's water problems just like Mulholland was and he thought he might the found a solution eaten. Had I visited Inyo County California in eighteen eighty with his father. The county was two hundred miles north of Los Angeles Nestle between in the eastern Sierras and a forbidding desert landscape. The Owens River ran down through Inyo county fueled with a year round supply of runoff from the mountains the pasture land surrounding the riverbanks was lush and verdant. And when the southland was hot and dry the Owens river valley was where the cattleman drove. They're hungry herds. Eaton's father even took measurements of water on all the streams as they traveled with an I somehow transporting the water to his family. Vineyards in Pasadena Eaten had returned to the Owens River valley in eighteen ninety two after leaving the waterboard but this time he noted something else at an elevation of over four thousand feet. The river's water could be transported easily down to Los Angeles at sea level using gravity. Gravity loan. All he would need was a giant tunnel eaten spent the following years telling his theory to anyone who would listen but no one would finally. He headed to the offices offices of the Water Superintendent to offer his proposal William Mulholland heard him out and was curious but he wanted to get a good look himself so in the fall of Nineteen O. Four the superintendent of the water department and the former mayor of Los Angeles rented a buckboard wagon and pack the supply of beans camping equipment and whiskey for the the next five days. The pair travelled up over the wooded. newhall pass down across the sunbaked vistas of the Mojave desert then ascended through the Sandstone Canyon of Red Rock to forty four hundred hundred feet above sea level just south of town of Lone Pine. They stopped and Mulholland got his good. Look what he saw was a solution to his city's water problems problems at least four hundred cubic feet of water flow to the Owens River every second. The plan was impressive in its simplicity. Just a river fed from mountain runoff. But it would be enough for two million people let alone Los Angeles. His current two hundred thousand and Eaton was right. Gravity would carry it all the way back to Los Angeles. Not One watt of power would be needed. Mulholland also noted that the river was dead and in into the seventy three Acre Owens Lake an inland alkaline. See the High Hi soda. Content rendered the lake useless for irrigation. All that water was just going to waste. On the way back to Los Angeles Mulholland took measurements and sketched out diagrams grams. He began making plans to actualize. What would have to be a steel aqueduct? Over two hundred miles long. It would run north to south through some of the most forbidding terrain in the country country and of course there were the residence of the Owens Valley to deal with. They wouldn't want to sign over the river to some far off city but that was not mulholland problem. You would leave the acquisition business up to Fred. Eaton and the city of Los Angeles Imagine March nineteen o five. And you're a rancher in Inyo county just above the town of Independence Times have been hard these last ten years you started out running seventy five head on about two hundred acres somewhere along the line your heart fill out of it. The money just wasn't coming in like you thought it. Would you started selling off your studs now. Just a couple dozen lonely beasts in yourself for all the noise. The town of independence made about turning into a booming hub of rural commerce. Just hasn't but today you're not in the pastors. You're meeting with a man come up from Los Angeles who wants to get himself into the cattle business this router. He's more fresh face than you remember wearing a pair of glasses. Fred Eaton hand you a card. The says the mayor of Los Angeles. No no I was. There wouldn't recommend the position this throws throws you a bit now when we met in town you told me you were looking to start cattle ranching. That's right and from what I understand about the same skill set. I didn't realize I be negotiating with a mayor of any city rightly taken me by surprise. Well that's why I came to set the record straight. I've been traveling in your county for about ten years now always seemed to place place onto its own. I've had enough of the city all the talk. All they do is talk and when we met before. I didn't get the chance to give you all my particulars what you did. Tell me you'd have a number number and I do the two of you walk into the yard. The Sun is already down behind mountains. The number is ten dollars an acre. Ten dollars you figure this city slickers either crazy or stupid. You paid fifty cents an Acre in eighteen eighty five but you keep your face neutral. That's respectable number but I'm GONNA and have to think about it. I also wanted to ask you if you heard about the. US reclamation service moving around these parts sure people talk they wanna make it into some kind of irrigation experiment. I don't think they're going to alternately. Annexation is too expensive for the boys in Washington or at least I think they're gonNA find out that it is so I should probably meet with them as when I'm thinking can perhaps they've got a better offer. Mr Banner I promise you. They won't the federal government doesn't usually make offers. They arrive declare eminent domain. Would you rather Washington made money or you. You take a deep breath. Why not get a bit crazy yourself? See how far you can push this guy. Actually it's going to be fifteen in dollars nature. I'm only going to take your money if I can say right on a railroad train out of here. That's a lot of money Mr Browner. You're the mayor of Los Angeles. NOPE I was But with twenty five hundred dollars enough to divest you from your heard as well again. You can't believe it. He met Erase Mr Heen. It's all a yours authorized by the city of Los Angeles Fred Eaton and other city agents quickly moved to scoop up the Owens River valley properties. They bought everything and anything attached to the river or irrigation canals eaten knew they had to work quickly and quietly. If word got out there would be a panic and the ranchers would inflate their prices. Beyond what the city could pay. But it wasn't the Inyo county ranchers. He was worried about. It was the federal reclamation service created under Theodore Roosevelt Nineteen ninety-two reclamation service was designed as a national irrigation project that aim to turn naturally dry areas into wet ones and the reclamation service had its own I on the Owens Valley. They thought it would be an excellent site for their research. A full year before eaten and Mulholland took their trip up north worth a reclamation officer named Jacob Clawson took surveys and sent a glowing report to his superior. Justice Lippincott have finished reconnaissance. Large Reservoir site Clawson wrote in the fall of nineteen o three all patents for dam site sixty thousand acres public fifty thousand acres private land irrigable Clawson had found on over one hundred thousand acres of land that was connected to water. In addition to a perfect stretch of land on which a dam could be built. It would be perfect for the government's purposes. But we didn't know was that Lippincott while contracting for the federal government also contracted as an engineer for the city of Los Angeles and Lippincott was a friend of Fred. Eaton didn't now over a year later. Eaten new all the reclamation service had to do was decided to step in they would purchase the private land and declare eminent domain on the public land plant and that would crush any chance. The city had of trying to get the lambs themselves but Eaton was able to move fast. He had the full advantage of survey maps and land records and rights information already gathered by Jacob Clawson and the reclamation service. He knew where to look and who to ask. And how much to quote in the race for the water of Owens Valley Roy Eaton was GonNa make sure that Los Angeles would beat the federal government. American history tellers ehlers is sponsored by Ziprecruiter. It's a New Year brand new. Start Brand New Vision a great time to figure out what you can do for Your Business to make twenty twenty a better year by hiring the right people but finding qualified candidates can be challenging ziprecruiter dot com slash. Ht makes it easy. Ziprecruiter says your your job to over one hundred of the Web's leading job boards but they don't just stop there with their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience. 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Echoed Louder when when an article appeared in the Los Angeles Herald the headline nine million gallons of water wasted. But this time the headline turned out to be true. The new pumping station at the Buena Wayne Evista Reservoir had recently been finished and around this time Mojo noticed something odd. His numbers were coming out right. Water was being wasted somewhere between the station nation and outlets. Who was supposed to be eating while Helen couldn't understand what was happening? The city should be getting more water not less and his reservoirs were starting to dip below their usual levels. It took him over a week to discover the cause leaks and an outfall sewer had been enlarged by the powerful new pump and fresh water was gushing out to see through the Paul sewer line. All Holland himself told the Los Angeles Times using the error as an opportunity to illustrate the precarious condition of the city's water supply. The problem was is fixed but the idea of a city flushing away its own water remained indelible the minds of many Angelinos in March of Nineteen Nineteen O. Five Fred Eaton wired the city that the last land purchase was made at Long Valley in Mona County. Just above the north. Most point of the Owens River he bought a vast has track of ranch. Land from a cattleman named Thomas Ricky. The Long Valley property was shaped like a giant catcher's glove. It was the perfect site to build a dam. Just above the aqueduct. Eaton was an engineer after all he knew the value of the site for the city but he also saw the potential for a little bit of profit on the side as agreed upon he would sell all the writes he purchased to the city of Los Angeles at no markup but he'd been working awfully hard these last few months and the entire notion had been his idea anyway so he offered the Long Valley property operative to the city and what he considered a fair price. Nearly a half million dollars. Mulholland was apoplectic. It was not eaton's price at angered him. It was the principal. Oh it was unconscionable that Eaton would hold a piece of the city's water project hostage. The Long Valley site was not necessarily immediately to the city's plan but owning it would keep the reclamation nations service away along with anyone else already thinking towards the future Mulholland had sketched out plans to build a one hundred fifty foot damn on the site it would allow the city to store store water year after year independent of snowfall in the mountains. He couldn't understand why eaten had chosen this moment. That throw a wrench in the works but eaten held firm telling a newspaper. I simply wanted to retain the cattle which I had been compelled to take in the deals and mountain pasture land of no value beyond grazing purposes. But there was more to it than that Eaton's pride and his greed had gotten the best of him. Mahala refuse to indulge and rejected the offer. He would work around. The Long Valley site eaten. Could keep it and enjoy his new future as a cattleman by June. Nineteen O five. The city's plan for Owens Valley water was becoming one of the worst kept secrets around. A consortium Orsha newspapers swore a gentleman's pact not to run the story until June thirtieth but the Los Angeles Times published one day early and got the scoop of a lifetime. Titanic Panik Project to give a city a river trumpeted. The headline it went on saying option secured for forty miles of river frontage into Inyo county magnificent stream to be conveyed aide in conduit two hundred and forty miles long stupendous deal closed the paper detailed how eaten and Mulholland had secured the land purchases and that the aqueduct. They were planning would cost. Twenty four million dollars to be funded by a series of bond issues voted on by the city the enthusiasm of the times and as editor Harrison Gray. Otis could be felt in in every hyperbole sentence one front page piece crowed that the price paid for many of the ranches is three or four times. The owners ever expected them to sell for everyone in the valley. Ali has money and everyone is happy. This last assertion would not prove to be entirely true in Inyo county residents discovered. They'd sold the properties not to land mad and city people but to a city itself they became enraged maginness June nineteen hundred five. It's nighttime nighttime. High in the Owens Valley the oppressive summer air has cooled enough to carry a breeze through the windows of your new ranch house. It was your fiance Fred. Eaton's idea moving up here from Los Angeles and you thought it'd be an excellent way to start a new life with him to get away from all those wagging tongues in the city and who cares if he's twenty years older you certainly don't. It was exciting at first meeting. Everyone in town. The other ranch wives getting invited to bridge clubs and Fred was busy working on his city contracts but now you hate to admit it things. Things have gotten a little stale saying cattle. Same House. Same Games of Solitaire while Fred does business in town money. You're right your rising from the chair just as your fiance Fred burst inside the house of thank. God what is it. has anyone been by just misses tensely this morning but you need to get out of suitcase. Impact yourself up. We're going to San Francisco what's wrong you look scared. We should leave as quick as we can. You and Fred Frantically throw what you can into a parable volt heavy trunks. You won't answer any of your questions but finally once you've loaded the wagon set off into the deepening darkness. You finally response. Please tell me what's going on. A group of ranchers corn me at independence this evening just as I was leaving the land office they read the Los Angeles newspaper. They said I built them. That I misrepresented ended. The city's land purchases when I tried to explain. They made it clear they were not interested in anything I had to say. What about the ranch? We'll come back I swear. Where will it still be there? Fred doesn't answer. They say I sold them out. That I'm only interested in the water and if I come back they'll drown me in the river in this moment to hear something the sound of horses gang of them coming up in the distance. Take the rifle out from behind your seat hold it across your lap. Steel feels ice cold in your hands. Tense Up Fred tries to keep you calm. Just pretend like nothing's wrong not going to sit here and get shot Fred. I think they just WanNa make sure we leave. Did you make a terrible mistake trusting your fiance in the Wide Open Canyon. You close your eyes and listen to the sound of the wagon wheels and the buggy sign underneath the weight somewhere behind steady hopes of a policy following you out of town Fred. Eaton and his fiancee made it to San Francisco but it would be some time before eaten could return to his cattle ranch. Ranchers there's and farmers had actually done quite well in their transactions. They'd made one point five million dollars. It was the ones who hadn't sold the ones who would put down roots and invested in the growth. Oh so they're small community who felt cheated left high and dry certain that their land would soon become a desert though the purchases had been perfectly legal it was the methods that that they thought were despicable. They suffered yet another humiliation. When President Theodore Roosevelt stepped in on the side of the city but even after its sweeping land purchases is the city's plan still could not move forward it? I needed to gain a right of way. So that work on the aqueduct could cross federal lands. A bill was drawn up in the California State Eight House but Representatives Sylvester Smith of Inyo County added an amendment stating that the city of Los Angeles would be able to use water from the Owens River only after the the irrigation needs. The Valley were met additionally Los Angeles could use the water. For domestic. Use Not Irradiation Smith knew he wouldn't be able to stop the city from drinking and bathing with Owens River water but he could at least keep the city from turning and Agricultural Prophet as with the arbitration hearings over the water company. Mulholland found himself having to testify testify once again only this time. His audience lived in the White House. After long meetings and deliberation President Roosevelt would decide in favor of a city of a quarter order million people over a valley of just five thousand. The interests of what Roosevelt termed the few settlers in the Owens Valley were genuine but he concluded they must unfortunately Lebed disregarded in view of the infinitely greater interest to be served by putting the water in Los Angeles and for the residents of Inyo. County insult was added to injury when Roosevelt savell also ordered the creation of the INYO national forest to speed along the aqueduct. Right of way claims. The so-called forest sat on a wide swath of clear treeless. I land outnumbered and outmatched the citizens of Inyo county found their interest disregarded and would have to retreat and regroup. The city might have won this this battle but the war was far from over as nineteen o five drew to a close Mulholland had begun assembling the pieces of his Gargantuan Creation. The city's he's path to water was now wide open. The aqueduct would require system two hundred twenty six miles long. From Charlie's Butte in Inyo county to the San Fernando Reservoir in Los Is Angeles roughly twenty two miles of online canal one hundred sixty four miles of concrete conduit twelve miles of steel pipe. Twenty eight miles of tunnels all for the cost cost twenty four million or about seven hundred in today's dollars. The only thing he had left to do was built on the next episode of American history tellers. Mulholland begins the multi year undertaking of Engineering. His ambitious aqueduct. Meanwhile in Los Angeles campaign bills to discredit the entire operation and threatening his dream in the future of the city from wondering. This is American. History tellers. I hope you enjoyed this episode. If you did. I have two other podcasts. You might like American scandal in American elections wicked game search for them and subscribe on Apple. PODCASTS spotify Google podcast wondering DOT COM or wherever. You listening right now. So if you're listening on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover organs. podcast you find the episodes including some details. You may have missed you. Also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. You help us offer this to you for free and if you do like the show we love you to give us a five star rating and leave a review. I always love to know your thoughts to reviews are the best this way for others to find. Show tell your friends and family and showed them how to subscribe. You can also find us and me on twitter and facebook follow the show at AH tellers. And I'm at Lindsey Graham and thank you if you like to learn more about early Los Angeles and Mulholland aqueduct. We recommend William Holland the rise of Los Angeles I Catherine Mulholland Collins. American history tellers hosted edited and produced by me. Lindsey Graham for airship sound design by Derek. Barons this episode is written by George Docker ended by Dorian. MARINA ARENA ARE executive producers. Are Jenny Lower Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by her non Lopez for wondering. Hey I'm Rufus Chris I'm the host of wondrous show the next big idea each week on the podcast. We bring you ideas with the power to change the way you see the world. This week presidential candidate Andrew Yang he has a bold idea for remaking the American economy and bridging bridging our cultural divide he wants to give every citizen one thousand dollars a month no strings attached but would that really stem the tide Hyde of automation unemployment and despair to find out. Listen to our conversation by subscribing to the next big idea from one DRI.

Los Angeles Superintendent William Mulholl Frederick Eaton Owens River Mulholland Owens Valley Los Angeles River The Times Inyo county Los Angeles Department of Wate Los Angeles Water company engineer Los Angeles Times Fred superintendent Owens river valley Lindsey Graham John trautwein Los Angeles Herald
INSPIRATIONAL INTERVIEWS| DEBBY MULHOLLAND | LIFE STORY

Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

1:44:32 hr | 6 months ago

INSPIRATIONAL INTERVIEWS| DEBBY MULHOLLAND | LIFE STORY

"I look what I'm doing, look! Look where I've seen. Look what I'm. Do you know it was like I? I I had analysis conversation with my mother every day. You know that I was in Europe She would be I. She was my Go-to Kussin. and so when I saw yeah, and it was like losing you and being in Europe and not having that goes into Essen. Is like okay. I need to go and spend time with my go-to, and before it's too late. Bringing together keeping it together keeping it. Together. I sad like Eddie Murphy and both guys. Keep it. Keep it. Together keep it together to the kids like. Oh I call it my mental health wagon. As my mental health wagon is like when when things get too much in the dementia department I'm like going to the beach. And a started out and I drive and then I. Yeah, I, go fishing. I N theater. I'm afraid I am yeah, it's just it's my blood is just it's it's my blood. That's what makes me. What makes me tick? If I want it. Maybe somebody else wants it. And, that's with it comes down to you know, let's see effort. That gives me joy. Maybe it'll give somebody else joy, and and you know that whole thing of. You, know create create something and people will come. BLACK STRETCH LIMO was a show they're. Taking me out. And driving me to Luxembourg. To get for the. To Do to be on a film shoot. and talking and the. Talking in this stretch. Me On the phone. To get to all the girls gang had the guy and the guy you was amazing. Amazing, we got standing ovations. What's your story? Welcome to inspirational into this. Way You will discover everyday bravehearts connecting with the truth. Find what inspires them to do what they love how they got yet and why they never give up, be inspired by these stories to create your beautiful life. Was Your hearst Jan Rot? Hi Guys Welcome Becton Special Interviews Conway to kick own with this conversation with a good friend of mine who is from New Zealand, but lived in Amsterdam for many years. She was a real dream catcher. She Ain't out there. Mate Yeah. Life happened for herself she she's an artist, an actress, and she went and studied all around the world in London in Paris and yes, she's just. Braley made a beautiful life for herself. She started an acting school in Amsterdam, the only and renowned English. Acting School in Amsterdam. Which actually is way? We ended up getting when I moved to them and you know just. A beautiful story about someone who just want the and created a beautiful life for herself, and you know things happen in life that we don't always plan and we don't expect and often things happen that we don't want, but as my dad always says you gotTa Roll with the Punches, and in this instance she made a call to leave the school vibe e life of hers behind an Saddam and moved back to New Zealand to take care of her mom who has dementia, so it's an amazingly beautiful life story, and I'm looking forward to connecting in with that as soon as possible, but before I do that just a quick one. Go check out my instagram page. Inspirational interviews with Jan Rod. Always things going on there go follow me subscribe whatever drop me a note to say that you're. You've checked in I, always like connecting with people who are listening to the show as well off course they different platforms, but yeah, if you are listening to the podcast, shows then go check in with my instagram page, and then also subscribe on my website. Inspirational interviews dot com, because then you'll receive the life stories in your mailbox once a week, and then yet S- nice. You can just click into it and. Incorporated into your routine. Whatever you do, if you're. A working person on your commute to work, or maybe if you're apparent and you have kids, you can always plug and play these life stories in the background, and had the son with France guys shared with a friend who can share with friend. I'm growing the show Ganic. Leigh's are always really appreciate. People share this on and last so grateful for all of you guys who are on the show listening to the show because I've got. Yeah I guess from. All over the world and I have listeners from all of the world's sorry. This show is growing, and I'm super excited about it and I'm mostly super grateful for all of you guys who are listening and super grateful always for my beautiful guests that come onto the show and shave their amazing life stories with us so without any further ado. Let's yeah, it's click into the amazing conversation with deb Mulholland deb's. How're you doing my sweetheart? Sweetheart. You're good tips. Just go in here and it's just tell our listeners are the reason why I want to. Yeah the reason why I invited you onto. The show is because you know you've always been on this journey the acting journey of yours through this you know you've you've become entrepreneurial and started your own acting school, which is like in the acting school for English students in Amsterdam. Even the Netherlands actually right? and yeah, that's how we met basically Sir I was living in Amsterdam. I hooked up with you through the well via the school Initially it was more sort of. Let's see. Maybe we can collaborate way, but then I was like actually. Hold on, let me come and join one of you. My Nick losses and then Yeah, well, you know we kind of thing. Got You know each other from their an actual? We ended up becoming good friends. So that's sort of how we know each other. You're from New Zealand I'm from south. Africa's are yeah, we we kind of just had a click right from the beginning. Yeah Yeah. That's for sure I'll never forget how this meeting bagels and beings. We. I think we were we were meeting for like fifteen minutes and four hours later. We were so chanting. Moscow must go. In the paper the ICONIC PAP- of. Beckley. and. That's kind of how the how the rest of our meetings ended up right, it was. Good long conversations always. Always yeah always a lovely times. It is right. It feels like a long time ago. It's funny when you make a change in your life, especially territorial changes you know. Geographical changes. It really then reshapes your life. That's for sure your life, changing jobs and things like that know if you still living in the same country or you know in the same city. Obviously it alters your life on a on a sort of micro level, but when you really move country again or I mean I must be honest. Moving to Harlem also was a huge. Mental Me Man Amsterdam to Haarlem is like young Yang, cheech and Chong. Whatever you know, it's two different playing fields. Yeah absolutely. So. Tell us so. Let's sue fatherless-ness. Let's introduce you to how how would you describe yourself debuted? How would I describe myself? I know it's. It's like seven o'clock. New Zealand time so. I! Well the. Actually I made a strong coffee and then on my way to the candidate Nice. Today. So. It was like just go back. There was a little bit listen the pause. Night is a whole foods and so How would I describe myself? Oh, I. Don't know I'm a clown. I'm a comedian I fumble along and I get inspired by something and I take off. And I do lots of stuff from work and. I guess some actually. I did a works out a local workshop here Last at the end of last year it was fantastic. It was like all the big improvisers of New Zealand came together and It was so nice to have been invited to that and we were The coach was kind of going. Okay, let's see who you wa. You know these excises and and everybody in the room agreed that I create worlds which was yeah, and so that's what I do I create world. I get yeah. I guess inspired by something. To know. Everything about it, so it's kind of like an engineer. I engine as Brian But but The engineer's brain doesn't fix like mechanical things at It creates opportunities that creates worlds. You know so. I don't know like. So, for instance if I, all of a sudden I'll get my my honest and I want to know everything about how to create A. Project theater you know projection or shadow play, or I mean I studied comedy, the Asia years. You know and I kind of. Race I I. Out every all of the best teaches in the world to go and train with so that. I knew you know I knew that I was getting the right education with the right. People so yeah so I. Have I have a very very rich theatrical family? you know all over the world? Really and then and then there's the teacher a knee so I have to give that. No, the thing I've got to go. Who else wants to have a go, you know. By the way. That's a radio. No, it's really cool Teaching me, and I have to give it back I like how that sort of made a a nicer to flow in the brain processing. You talk about all this acting and how you studied from the base, but there's this teacher in you, so you have to give back like it's such a nice way of. Looking at your specialization with your an artist or actor or business owner, or you know someone that has the own goal, just coffee ball, or you know it's like you go and you study and you you, you know you gain the best information that you can, and then if you do have because not everyone has the teacher them right, so it's interesting how you say you have this teacher in use, so you need to give it back, but it's the fact that you say you have to give it back. Allow. A like. Sort of? Yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's very true and it's it's. Like cannot, but now I need to give it back. You know it's like it's yeah exactly. Yeah, yeah, but it's also an so what it does. Is it just at what happens? You accumulate cumulation. Will this different information and then a? Kind of pick lights and you like in a good coffee. picky lights, and then what happens, is you create your own? Your own urine bent. I guess of you know, and and that's how. innovative theater is created. It's like you go and learn five different. specialities, and then you mix it out. You know and then Create something new yeah. Yeah, but for me I was away. I've I've always been a teacher. Always at when I was I think eight years old I was teaching choir at school. Was Ridiculous, and and the Land Tarit was like I was doing I was in class, and it was like. Oh, my gosh, maybe a little KID GIVA! Who couldn't be in the class, so it was like I looked after the junior. Even, though I couldn't sing, but. Why why did you study acting? Then 'cause Y'all you studied Austin, didn't you? What famous place in Paris called! Jacklyn Cock School. Yeah, you went there as well. Yes yeah, yeah, well I was I was at university in New Zealand. And I wanted to be a writer and then. I was I was studying writing at and then? I didn't know all of a sudden. I woke up to win. Okay, what is the one thing that East ut? To admit to yourself, you know what does it? What does it what because there was something that wasn't quite clicking with the writing? There was a nagging know and and I really made tasted on that and and basically I told myself. you really want to be an actor. And at that time there was only one acting school in new. Zealand and they only took twelve students, a year and that was eight men and four women and they were from. That time, it was very very much. You only got to go into that school if your parents were Were great actors. You know what I mean it was. It was extremely elite. building. well that point. I think it was the New Zealand drama school. it's changed now. Of course you know now. This goes everywhere but the and that was a very long time ago, so I thought okay. Where can I get my best study? For that, if I can't do that here in New Zealand. And it was London and married with my wanting to go and see my. At my English family and my English heritage. So I kind of packed bag and and took off to London and. twenty four, okay? So so I started my training, London and while I was studying, an improvisational teacher came. To to the school to the drama school. And and I invited me to join his company. So yeah, and that was within three months of being London so within three months of being in London I was performing for the next four years and all the co on all comedy stages of London, Doing Improv. Yeah, and and then I and then I saw someone performing, and I was like Oh my God. That's the performer I want to be. And I stand with a trained and and they told me that they trained in Paris at the. School, so so i. applied and got a place. And went. There to study and interestingly just yesterday One, of the one of the guys in my group. at Jack Recall. Santana and email and we're going at the end the whole class. We're having reunion on zoom next week. Wow, from yeah, yeah, and it's an international school, so you know people from Canada, Australia and just everywhere. We're all GONNA. Meet on Zoom. Again at like same for me like seven o'clock in the morning. HOW AMAZING! Oh Wow, that's cool and yeah. I guess that's what Coronas during right it's. Making, people suddenly realize like actually now you're in contact with the whole world are these? Buddhas. but dead, and which school you training at in London. I went to was a place. What was it cooled? I think it was called the studio. Can't remember and they three months courses. Yeah, and it was an of course I was waitressing. You know so. It was like every every. Every penny like city is Winton to my training everything that I made. I was always saving up to do a class, so I think I did initial three months class there, which was Po-, Time and then I took a six month class. so it wasn't like an official drama school, but it was a drama school. But like the actually the Mulholland Academy. is. I designed based around that that that studio in London. And Yeah, and it kind of looked at what they had to offer because it was really for. The what I wanted to create was a school. That wasn't a drama school that was giving people who couldn't afford to go to drama school. The same opportunities, okay. Yes so that you know night classes so that if you're working during the day. you could come or a weekend class or or masterclass or a weeks intensive and it's. It's growing now that we have students who have been training with us the to two years you know and the beauty of the the academy to was because I was always changing it up and going okay I'm going to create a workshop and was GonNa Learn about shadow play, so I had the same students coming back. For sometimes is that disappeared for six months and then let's come back into a class and then I wouldn't see them to two years and then that pop up again. You know and so they. Have that. That'd become very very close friends as well as long term. Students who keep coming back, bless their hearts. became, well I mean became a community. Actually, it became yeah. Yeah became sort of a family community, because a lot of them were also foreigners in Amsterdam Netherlands right. Oh absolutely, and a lot of them went off and forge their companies to give together they go married had babies they mission class? It was yeah, and it still is I mean you know? I. And the funny thing is I. Did it all? And It got too much for me because I was working easily a hundred hours a week. You know just trying to. I was running running running and now eight people doing the job that I did. Well, eight, yeah, eight people eight people doing the job that I. Yeah, but it takes. It takes F phenomenal person to really start a company and build a successful company run. You know what I mean like it all comes from us, so I you know i. get that and I get how it can be. Dispersed too to eight people, but let's just full. Everyone in here basically saw so. Yeah, you're you're you're an actor actress? What do you decide actor actress? I mean. How do I know well? No, I mean I'm just. Do. They even use the word actress these days. What do they say actor? Both. Anyway Yeah. You're trying to actress. Came to Amsterdam and basically. Right now just just tell because you talking about the academy and the Mulholland Academy. So you have your own acting school, which is what you've been talking about and basically you're running the school over the last several years, and you are now back in, New Zealand and you handed. Your responsibility over to other people, so we'll go into a little bit deeper. This is ready to. Get your full life story because it's just super cool that you. That, you just you've followed this path and you've created your path. You know so and I know that, but everyone else doesn't, but just so everyone knows right now. Also yeah. You started acting school in Amsterdam but. Now, you actually have actually. Moved back to New Zealand with APP Acting School. Still going and you've got other people sort of em- place doing various jobs running the school. Yes and then yet exactly at but I consult and also I was very very lucky I was so lucky because. when I realized my mom was not well and I I needed to get back here to look after who it was. I. It was very timely, because I felt like it was time to come hose, know and and the school was getting too much for me, and I really just wanted to. Separate from it because it was too much and so I, approached a good old friend who I knew I could trust and he was, he was running. Corporate Workshops Robert and and and and then he and then he pulled in another friend, and so they became my partners. so I've got a WHO's who looks after Oh my gosh, so he's looks after the finances and he looks after. you know like who student payments and then voices and stuff and Os, and at at the beginning he was looking after the website, and then I was looking at The curriculum the teachers and the students student applications, and I could do all of that from my computer here in New Zealand and Robert was on the ground, so he was like the host, so he would open up. Ivan venue you know and and create keep that keep that beautiful community spirit going going. and so now we have Now we have people doing publicity and marketing we had. We have another guy doing website and three teaches. Yes I three teachers, and then my to Patas, and so actually it might be like. Eight hundred nine people, and then we've got the hosts. so each teacher has an assistant who looks after the students and make sure teach has everything they had and they get. They get free classes. For taking on that role. Okay, so yes, so We've had the same host for about Korea's now. And they just keep attending the classes. And, they just yeah they keep. Yeah, they just they the three I. think three of them and they kind of Whatever the the teachers are offering. They'll go. Oh, I want to do the on camera class, so you and one of them will say well. I want to destroy big. You know so. So they they with the three of them themselves and we've got camera. People who come in as well and they'll they'll. They'll do the. Camera Work in class so yes, so it's a real community at the you know, and they make their own little movies together and. And go off and get married. All of that stuff. So Dave's. How is it now like? How Long Amsterdam for what was it twenty four years about? and. How long had you had the school? When did you start the school? I I sat at the school about. Twenty. Twenty years ago. But it wasn't. A school wasn't a schooled in it was. I arrived I studied in Paris I came back to 'em today. I can't remember when it was nine, ninety, three, nine, hundred and ninety three. And I wanted to keep on training and the as an actress and I wanted to build my keep building my training. I wanted to work on text and there was nothing in English at all and. So I, thought okay. What do I need is an actress so I made list. we know want to right. I want to devise theater I won't Voice I. Want Movement. I won't take work. and so I created. A I think the first creation eight week. Class. three hours a week. And, my fist class. It was a ten week ten week. Course, yeah, and my first class. That I status I thought well. If I need it, maybe somebody asked that needs it. So I kind of put the word out and my first class I think I had eight students. And then? Yeah Yeah and then the next class I offered. It was like fourteen students, and so then I offered another class and so bill you know and. and Bill. To the point, where now we have easily a hundred students a year, yeah. Yeah with the different classes so it was very organic. You know and. You you put it out there back then so twenty years ago. Did you put it out there on on sort of facebook groups all. No faithful didn't exist in twenty years ago and I don't think. I would well the thing is. I was right at the beginning of facebook. But my first class was just an email out to the English speaking community that was around town. Really it was just you know If you know anyone who might be interested passing mellow, Yeah Yeah Yeah and get them to get in touch with me. and also I think it was. I think seem to message to an players. which is an English speaking an English speaking that was an English speaking community, so I think the first class was very English, but then the international community it would. Then all of a sudden I got emails from people saying you know I'm Italian but I want to learn English text. Can I come and join your class? Like yeah, sure yeah, and so so then the the international community grabbed hold of that, and then the corporate community because it was like well. I'm doing Krizan -tations I want to learn how to. We can in front of an audience You know so it really kind of. Yeah Cavity, and then at that point at that very beginning point I was teaching A. Theater acting, and they and everyone was saying with the sesia acting wreck, and I get a job and I was like no, you have to create your own. There is no such thing as that. an Amsterdam. You can't get English speaking paid acting here. You have to create your company. And do not so I was teaching people how to create your own work and had to create their own companies. but then it dawned on me that my students were about two, thousand, two, thousand and eight I think I realized that my students would think holding. To to act international movies and so it was like. Oh, my Gosh I. Don't know anything about movie acting so that when I started researching and and that's when I I went to New York. And I met a an Meisner teacher. There and the Meisner was very very much. The way into film acting because it was the the naturalism. And I invited Jacqueline, who've had who has since passed away, you know. so I invited Jacqueline and the first few times she came over the twenty plays. US. Jacqueline mclintock's she was. A beautiful is in teacher from Canada. Yeah, so I would bring her over and and have masterclasses and she would. Stay in your house, right? Oh. Gosh yes, Yup, yeah, we were great friends. Fantastic friends and together we created the curriculum for the Mulholland Cabinet Academy. so you know so that those were skype calls at. Six o'clock in the morning then way back then you know skyping to Canada. And we would just be going, and it was like she would always say as monks work as monk's work and I go I know we should be acting. We should be making R movies, but what we doing with Second Edmund. And I think that's the thing for me. The ADLEMAN. Just became this monster yeah! And so I had to choose. It was like I couldn't teach. And and be Adleman was just like okay. and also, and that's actually what happens right I mean that's what happens when people start there and company is that. You you started for the skill, and for the love of whatever it is that that skill is often. I'm talking about sort of these more ganic companies. Obviously, if you're going to start like a a bigger operation, you know, you need to get a team and you know if you if manufacturing something or whatever it is. But I mean in your instance. Your company started. As you, said earlier and then yeah, yeah, then you do end up doing everything you do end up doing the Adleman. You you finance your HR. You everything in one everything everything. Yeah, yeah, absolutely, but so so then what actually happened then? If you you, you couldn't do both, so, what did you give up? I first of all I. I gave up the teaching. Yeah I decided that what I would do. I felt like I. Had who? All that I had to teach. and it was becoming repetitive for me because. The teaching was becoming repetitive, so I didn't feel fresh anymore and the teaching and I didn't have time to go off. And and and you know it studies the as he is an I. There wasn't anything more that I wanted to know about that. You know and and the Edmund was just the Edmund was becoming this huge monster that I didn't know anything about, but you talk about the reason why you you retracted and left the school, or are you talking about a different stage? Yeah, no, no. I decided to bring in teachers who knew more than I did about the Sephardic about specialists. You know it's like. You flying specialists to go deeper into the different subject to so fulfill for Meisner training or or the different trainings of acting y'all. Are Okay so which I mean. That's a good skill ruts. I mean that's good to know when you get to a certain point, but and the thing is. You had already bolts up your student base so so you had the income already, so you could afford that next step of then getting specialists in. Or is, but I always said. I always had specialists, and that was the thing. I would basically I would. I would go okay What does this class knee? What do we need? We need you know for instance with the shadow play. It was like okay. WHO's based F-? I'm going to create this workshop. WHO's the best person in the world to? Bring. To teach this you know, and so I would find the very best teacher, and then I would find out what the price was and then I would cost the whig show based on having the you know based on being able to pay for the travel. Looking giving them a a what is it called a per diem a podium a day so that they had spending money day and soon. Yes, yes, you know and and food. And, because I had my my beautiful big mansion in the Pie I was. You know. I'd have to. Charles's go. Yeah, it wasn't mentioned. That wasn't mentioned. Yeah, and it would be like okay. You know therapy and us for a few weeks. Can you gone visit your mom, you know? So Use me so. Just end it flows, and you know and I had a huge big garden. So obviously, it was perfect for the students, and we would make films and became like a a studio as well. You know an Apache has. It was a patchy half. A. Usable Oh my gosh, a beautiful guidon. I. Just Out of curiosity, what have you done with that house? Oh i. gave I had I gave the house back because it was was what you call it Has It was a humane to your? It was a part of the municipality and yes, yeah. They don't actually easy to get those houses where they sort of. It's like supporting. Seconds supporting. Campaign or something way? They offer a few houses art at a lower, but the house can be amazing. You know it took me. Twenty took me a long when I first. went to them. I was squatting and old school and with and. You know that was very. That was like New Zealand. Is there their South African new alien that you know? It was very much a community. and I was visiting a friend there. Staying in his room, and then a Swedish go was leaving, and she said do want my classroom because we were you know at had already being a squawked between two years Do what my classroom I said okay, and so I signed in. Two you know, so it was you have an address, obviously an Amsterdam in Holland? Yes, so all of the so I was given an drink and and so then I think I. was there about a year and the the guarantee commander came to us and said we want to make this official. so we will rehouse you and we will fix the school up in two separate apartments, and then you can come back in so. Luckily I had signed in to that because then I was officially. You Know Pat of that group. That was then re housed. And so at that point they wh what? The commanded were doing was they were cleaning up squatting community you know. Yeah and so so I think we were Rehab, we already house and two little like one bedroom happens dotted around Amsterdam and then a year later, the the school had been transformed in each classroom became A beautiful studio you know because when it was a squat I think five of us and on one level sharing one kitchen, you know. And there was one shower. For the whole school. and they were fishy. Six people living in the school. it was yeah, it was. It was quite. It was but so did you. You didn't move back to the school. Yes yes, yeah, yeah, so then. I moved back to the school and then You know there's always kind of some pretty crazy people around that squatting and I'm from. I'm pretty mainstream like you know. Suburban New Zealander. Who Who Kinda found that quite scary. The mental illness that you find often guys community. so I wanted out because I I just. I couldn't be around. It scared me. I could watch it. But I couldn't be part of it. You know what I mean so Yeah so I. Put my name down and I and I had accumulated so many points I think. And with the points that I had accumulated I could. I could apply for initial. Studio apartment in the pipe, and that's the area that I wanted to live in so and you know these the loon bone krant that comes out every couple of week. The newspaper at the then you yeah. Yeah newspaper, so yeah, the the main newspaper that tells you waters available that you can apply for and. so this? Ten thousand is hundred festive hutments. That might come free. Couple of weeks, but these ten thousand people wanting them So so it took a year and a half for me to. Get to the top of that list. Kind of for what I was looking for and and it's because you. You were ready in this. In the system now for free housing so and I'm not not. Cheap housing okay bit quite cheap right? I mean like income by comparison what you had. In Amsterdam in the PAP- area. I mean like it dramatically hover. Oh my Gosh! Yeah, I mean so so. so I went to see an apartment and I was. Sick lists. I was taking on the list and lack early for me. The the people who were fished on the list and I loved it. It was just it was a beautiful little studio apartment on the face floor, and the people the number one people. They didn't want it, so I got offered that so I grabbed it. And and this is the thing, and this is how the crazy luck of them. They say Amsterdam gives you things and takes things away. Okay? so I signed that hey pie, and then they said okay, you will be re housed in a year and I was like Whoa I. Just I haven't even moved on yet, and I said you. You have signed into a condemned building. And I and I was like okay, and they seem which means that because you've agreed to live in a condemned building, you will go to the law to the talk of that list. Of Ten thousand people and you'll have the pay of water wherever you want to live and museum and and Amsterdam, so then after it was actually two years I was re has again. an Chinese. Department and I watched as A. Completely gathered that whole Series Of. houses and rebuilt them and And I'd say it okay could I. Please have a grand through comment with Guidon. New Zealand I need a garden. And they said all. You have to prove that you can afford to live there because it's at the top of the. Spectrum it was nine hundred euros. A MONTH And at that point, the academy was doing well. I had shows that I'd created. That were doing really well in the corporate. Sector I was role play actress. So you know it was working really hard. And and So, I basically, my accountant just went. Yeah, he. He's you forecast for the next year and so they allowed me to have that ground floor apartment was. A HUNDRED AND OH GOSH! Two hundred and twenty square meters, and the garden was one hundred and fifty square meters was massive for it was. An incident and I felt that it was. Haymond. You know or Agai-. For, All the work that I had done. Culminated and being able to live in that that extraordinarily beautiful place. and I was there for fourteen years. You know which was and. Yeah and and it just It was just the perfect place. It was the perfect place. Because I could then open it up and. Invite people in China Yeah Yeah and I. That place allowed you to bring these teachers in from all over the world because they stayed. Yeah, Y'all in your place. You went playing for for hotel fees or anything like that. You know what I mean they. They had exactly a really nice place to stay and so DEB's like it's quite interesting because you talking about you, you know your apartments an. It's funny while you're talking about. That really makes me feel like it's such a long time ago. Like it just. Yeah! It's life goes so quickly and now. Maybe, it's also because I lived so closely connected with you while I was in Amsterdam as well I mean we saw each other almost every week. Yeah, so actually talking about this and it feels like another lifetime universe or you know looking back. At. Even though you still connected with your school, which is amazing, and that's a whole nother conversation to get into just now just in terms of like. What. What is your plan with us? You know you now based in New Zealand and you. You went back to New Zealand because you want to support your mom looking back now at what you've just been discussing with me. How does that make you feel universe senior life back then and. Said no incredibly incredibly proud. Incredibly end fortunate. You know and just. I Dunno know brain. Very brave to. Yeah, just just to kind of be that open. To allow these. Sometimes. Tornadoes experiences to wash view and you just you have to ride with it and just go okay. We'll just trust trust just GONNA Trust. The Universe as as taking me on this journey and It will be okay, you know The interesting thing is that? Along the way it was like I accumulated all of this and I was able to share it. And Just everything all the experiences I. You know just the community I I stayed in a community. I stayed my space. I had my school. I said my my teaching. and created opportunities for people to meet each other, and you know I mean. What's the the Soga the the show? I, think well. Let's talk about because people don't know what this is. I mean I was fortunate enough to perform. My weight at my wedding is a gift. I mean it was just phenomenal, but let's tell tell tell the listeners like what is your silver tubes because this is one of other projects that you had on the side. Yes! Yeah, that was. That was kind of So I've been in your studying I I'd gone to I fell in love with object he is. that was. My huge thing and I think like somewhere in there twenty years ago I tried to come home to New Zealand and I was living in Oakland and I wanted to create a show for festival I needed to create his show. I want to be asked and. King and and I kind of it was funny. It was that thing of. And this is also another thing that really worked for me. was looking at what was going on and what was missing. And I've been to few festivals and Oakland and I kinda gone. Something's missing. What does it? What does it and and strangely enough I always get my best ideas in a shout when I'm having Shalah. Ration- just washes over lean. Times never happened to me so I. Don't have that. Chamois show magic, but Yeah, yes, if it's a thing. and. And and I just went. Oh, my God, this no total visual theater in New Zealand I have to create something. I have to create something that's going to wind. Everyone is go my God I've never seen that before. And of course I had fallen in love with a Swiss company, Moumen, Shantz and they a total visual theater and and and as a performer also. I had created a street shows and the worst thing about create being out in the public is. When you're in the theater, the doors are closed. The audience can't go anywhere you know. Gets up to leave. The. Whole audiences watching them and nick say will be shown. On the street when you're doing a street, so they come and go as they lead. The performa you devastated, because it's like Oh my God. I can't entertain. They don't you know and and crashed me like crashed my Egos to watch these people coming in and only for half of my street. Show who you know what I mean, so it was. It was at home when it was a combination of Okay. I need to feel safe and that I don't want to see anyone. Leave my shows. And okay, so I'll create something where I'm inside something, do all these different marcus and so then and I remember the one. A to industrial air, conditioning ducts and Women Sean show due having they like they had. They were to at two actors or dancers movement people in these and. And industrial stocks and they had a little tiny one, and they play piggy in the middle, and they had a balloon the into you know, and that was the show and so just explain this for for for everyone listening so basically what David is talking about is Yeah, if you can imagine like you know those things that go down the stays like you put them on the stage, and then they kind of worm the stays they flop over slung case. Yes So if you can imagine, these things stretched off, but then covered in foil. Basically you know so. conditioned. Everyone knows what yeah, but I think everyone. Knows, what these little things! Anyway, but basically it's these things really stretched out and then sort of. Stuck that way, yeah, they don't suddenly shrivelled back to small, but they and then, but then they flexible, and they can move and. Yeah Y'all so and dawn spacey so basically you've got you inside. which is like the little deb and then? Somebody else because you had to. And then every movement you make this whole sort of tunnel. Moves with you in you create this, Don so! But yeah. Yeah Yeah and And at that time an Oakland I had made a dancer, and I invite I said you know I'm GonNa make the show with these industrial air conditioning. Choose and we're going to get inside, and but I haven't decided what the show is, and so I said. Do you WanNa? Come and just experiment with me, so we kind of we went into a rehearsal process and she put up a piece of Beautiful Phillip. Glass Music Opera, and and this moonshot say don't use music. So this was a new this. was you know a news anyway? And then yeah, and then I kinda. You, know another Shalah moment was once the oldest What's the oldest story in the world? And this was something that We were told the recall school when we were we were. When, we were studying mass quick. So the oldest and we had to create a P. At school and with masks I think around the same. So, the oldest story in the world is boy meets girl. Girl meets boy. Boy and Girl Fall in love, boy and girl kiss. So, it was like okay, let's why don't we create this? Okay? So what happened so? So. So then we started experimenting with the idea of one was a boy, and one was a girl, and the and and they were alone. You know and their own little world. And they saw each other, and then they were curious about each other and then they got closer, and then they got, and then they fell in love, and then they kissed, and so that is the story of the SOBA tubes, and we've, and we put that story and movement to the piece of music and but then it was like okay. We need to sell this and that time you as fish company, you could only. And we put that on the street and we were on national news within a day. That shows a New Zealand. and and the other thing was. It was like I tried to sell it to festivals. Never like. Wow, we, we only take half now shows, and I was like listen. This show is seven minutes. You don't need more than seven minutes. This shows people will remember this for the rest of their lives. You know and and that show is still being played day. And that was I created that twenty five years ago. So when you say so. Did you started in New Zealand? I started it in New Zealand. Yeah I started that show an Oakland when I was living out there and nineteen, ninety, four, five, nine, ninety five, Jimmy. No I had been given that frigging apartment. I haven't given that classroom. And Amsterdam after I so I left the call and ninety three went to Amsterdam ninety four, and then I thought. Okay, I'm going home, so I so I I let a friend of mine actually to be honest. It was the Croatian Yugoslav. that. That war was happening on a was that and refugees came in and a friend of a friend they were. Refugees and they had no always lived, so they look after my apartment I came home, and initially I came home to six months just to see what milk fly, but then I created the shows, and it was such a huge hit, and I took it to the Wellington baseball and I played and every frigging performa pretty much at that Wellington International Festival with from Amsterdam and they. They went debut gotta bring that show back to Amsterdam Oh. Wow, and I, yeah, and I already had an apartment there so I thought the show to Amsterdam and I put it in the Rotterdam international festival, and it got the People's Choice Award and then I got the biggest agent in Holland Get in contact with me and for the next fifteen years. That show traveled around Europe you know and He saw that show and we. We would sometimes doing. At one point, I had three. crease it. And we would be playing in three different countries at the same time. So I had like six performers. Performing and we call each other with like. HOW WOULD YOU GIG? And, so we you was this your show. We you getting like a the majority percentage of the commissions for the. So how did that work? now I. Yes, so what I did was It was a toothpaste shows and I split fat three ways, so it was like so was a third to Adleman. and then you're booking agent. your booking. Ain't no. No no, because the thing isn't the beauty in Holland, they don't take They don't take the percentage of the the performance catch they added on. To the client. Okay, so so my a was nine hundred euros I would charge for a seven minute show, so the two actors would get three hundred, each and three hundred would go to Edmund. who was me so I would get to? I would get two-thirds and then the actor Full full for the Edmund plus the actor role, and then the other. Just for the actors role Yeah Yeah Yeah and obviously we always had travel and accommodation paid on top of that. Yeah, yeah, yeah, so, so, Dave, so you. You said to me. That you came from the Cock you came back to you in Amsterdam and ninety four. You were given you will. You got onto that list miraculously to get that amazing apartment? And then you say you went back to New Zealand for six months because you said that you just want to have a look and see what it looked like. What did you mean by that? Whether or not Whether or not I was ready to come home. Okay, because you know had received all this information from London and then from London to Paris and then from Paris. It was like you came through via Amsterdam. But did you not plan to stay in? Why did YOU COME TO AMSTERDAM? I'll roll. Interestingly I was in London and I came to. Ninety eighty, nine I came. Nine, hundred, eighty, nine an old New Zealand flat of mine. She was living in Amsterdam and was pregnant. And I was. I was living in London. She came to visit me in London. And then I came to visit her and Amsterdam and she was squashing in this school. Almonds. Pregnant. and. Basically for everyone listening squatting is it's not necessarily to suggest that you're a Hobo. Anything like that, not not at all talk. Contrary can be quite well educated people that are squatting in place. It's just such a bad tomb squatting especially when you South African. Squatting squatter camps. You know what I mean it's. Too! So squatting is where you stay in a building or a house or apartment, or like grapes is an old school or sometimes these old hospitals way. These buildings are empty. The isn't a fixed resident in the building at the time, and the actually accompanies that arrange for people to go and squats in these companies, and then you can pay like ten euros. Sometimes you the is always is very small exchange. I think like if it's a euro, ten euros, or whatever it might be, but it's called squatting, so it's just to avoid. Some other people moving in where it actually does get. Completely taken over. When people do move into a building. You can't actually ever kick them out if it's there. If if it's the place of residence Holland sort of protects residents, yeah, but anyway so that's what squatting is, but you a squatting in an an agreed? Contracts should we say. Yes! Yeah, the the yeah, and the thing is it's it's. It's very in Holland extremely political. A very political and you have to be. You have to be invited. Sly or you have to be voted in. You know you've got to have the right. And the the thing is eighteen like me. Because I I was not political at all for me. It was like I'm coming out of that to this. This friend of mine This friend of mine's pregnant. She's got no support. I'm GONNA come over and help you. Have this baby you know and so I was in the spare room I was in the guest room and the squat and while she wa-, she was having this baby. and. So you came over here to support her, so then you. We have for just under a year or something. I was there for a very short time. Yeah! I think it was the three months and then the Swedish girl she was leaving one of the classrooms, and you said you pass. It just made, and the thing is. They had a cat on How long somebody was allowed to stay in the guest room? So, it was like yeah, okay, you know because I was really setting to love the lie and Amsterdam, so I moved into the classroom when the Swedish Google and and I think I inherited a catch. As you do. So that's what that's why you were in Amsterdam. Anyway. So then you went back to new, Zealand to check it out, but then while you were in New Zealand you came across this whole Silva troop idea, and then you launched it while you were there. Yeah jags months basically, and while you launching it at one of those biggest festivals they happen to be. People who, at the same faced of on they said you need to come back to Amsterdam and do a taste so. and. That's what I did. Yeah, I was like amazing like your life has been very. Young crazy, but also very beautiful in in the sort of the dots, connecting the dots and seeing how these these dots were very. All connected I mean and I believe i. read you know Yeah But. Okay so that Passover tubes and that was also just a great money earner for you and also just a great creative. Let and you're on my. Have A. Yeah Yeah and I got to me. I mean facebook facebook. It's like now I'm here and like. I hatch so attached every single person that I have made. You know what I mean. It's like every GIG that I did in Europe at like I'm connected in terms of like. You know like even even yesterday a friend of mine posted something. air woman. Who's WHO's a fantastic performer in Holland. And he he had posted, he said. You know I'm very sad to say, but the full. My has died. You know listening to community. And and the and then he and he gave this gorgeous. Eulogy about this before Ma who I had seen in the streets, of Paris when I was studying you know your. Seal the street, performers, and everything and here. Twenty five years later as Eric. Saying remember this guy who used to do this juggling act and I'd go and I was like yeah. I remember that guy. And then he was saying, and we would see him different faithfuls the Europe, like that's the whole community, and then this is like these all these gorgeous community that, but why don't you talk about you talking about three? You'll school. Are you talking about? No, that was through this over. Choose a cut this hall. Is this whole? As like this, the everybody you know you, have you different communities and and Yeah, it's like, and I did stand up comedy, and and you know it's like I didn't provides ation and. And it was I mean I I was on zoom. Call the other night and I'm I'm I'm writing I'm writing short fell and they were talking about genres and one of the guys and the class, said because one of the one of the guys in the class had risen Hara any. Students on Amsterdam. No, no I'm. I'm doing a writing course here in Zealand's and Wellington. You giving a writing course. No no I'm taking it. Okay. I I'm studying. Yes, Oh, so that's it so I'm. Right Geno full circle as like I, went to university, he to become writer and less than became this performer, and now I'm home. Doing rushing cools again like city. Five years later saw. As crazy, but and this guy he was like. Oh, Jordan Peele, you know he's doing horror, and and honestly I was able to say Oh, no Jordan Peele. You know I know he's. got. No through improvisation, thirty and improvised station, community, and Amsterdam you know I know I was a comedian comedian and he was working for them. Chicago and he was teaching might year. You remember my good friend, Tanya. he was teaching tenuous improve group. And to them you know we should the same rehearsal space? Yeah? I and you are now. Puzzling to go back to new, Zealand for quite some for quite a few years. Actually, it was sort of on your mind, right it was you know everybody came back? Yeah, nothing nothing happens here. It's like it's like. It's like moving from Amsterdam to. I don't know. Some sleepy little stereotype rights it said stereotype of. Boy Goal leaves the the the whole. The hometown goes to the city becomes big comes back and everything's still the same. Yeah exactly and the thing is and the other thing is. It's like they don't the ones with Stadia. They don't WanNa know what you've done, so I don't actually gave get to talk about my life. Yeah So so, this is an this is an amazing gift that you've given me just because I. I have a very polite person and I'll always is an APP a compensation. So how you doing you know so, what's been going on? I also grew up in a small town and. I feel what you're talking about but you know you did leave like such an exciting life and you loved Amsterdam I mean, and you had such an amazing community of friends, and it's like you say you you just. Your House was open to everyone and it was. Lots of parties and you know you loved your harm. You left Amsterdam. You left always going into the restaurants there and. I love my life and my life. How's that how? Yeah. But. I mean yes, so the thing is the pool to come and look. After my mom was bigger than all of that of course because she was my. She's my best friend and my rock. And I could see that she was. You know slipping into the dementia and I I, and of course I always just WANNA give everybody time, and I thought I'm GONNA. Go and give her a good time before it's too late. So that's my impetus like my the essence of me is just. Let's have a good time. That's just have some fun and I wanted to come back, and and and give her that guest before it was too late, but then when I got back, it was too late and that is the that stuff. That's the sadness. Pets So! That's where I am at the moment. Sorry right now. I'm getting emotional. I have so much admiration for for for the fact that you the this is a part of the reason. That I wanted to just connect with you now and to to hear your story and give you the chance to tell you a story and I have. Just have so much respect for people who connect with truth, and this is one of the Truth and truth isn't always an easy decision. Oh my Gosh, now who knew? Yeah Yeah. It's It's been quite quite say. Different journey you know because. It's not going to end well. and when I got back, she was addicted to sleeping polls. And she was hallucinating and. Life was an absolute mess. When she learned. No, no, no, I don't think so. No, she was just disorientated. Medically you know she was Oh for goodness that she'd had a massive heart attack She was yeah. I think I think. She had a a double bypass and I thank something went wrong and and that. operation. And, at and at. At Bruce on. Early Dementia. yeah I mean. It's a threatful dreadful disease When you watch somebody that you, you know. She was my rock my whole life. She was, and she was, she was the essence of me and that it was a wise. Thank you south up. Have a good laugh. Move On. Yeah, you know. Pick yourself up. Cry. Get over at. HEVEA move on. because she was such an action, woman, my mom, and like you and your mom, you know. and. Yeah, and so when I saw. That there was no one around. To checking I mean I have my brother, but he's Dan and and he was kind of taken, so it was like I need to come back here and take care of my family because they're not going to be able to do this alone. yeah so Yeah so and it's great because. In one way of reconnected, all of my family together and become that decision you know who who organizes the holidays and the family. Get togethers and make sure that everyone's got to birthday cake on their on their birthday and you know that I'm that person now. He is my family. To try to keep that glued together, because that the the older generation than now leaving, you know and so now it's my generation now my job. The. Next generation to to keep that family glued together so. So that they can go off and have adventures. You know and have someone to come back to. Serving the role is the MOM in a way. Bringing it together yeah, yeah. Yeah. Bringing it together keeping it together. To. Get. Bad like Eddie Murphy and both thing. To keep it, keep it you get. Here Jeremy that maybe. But I, but I can remember it through the way you just explained it. You can see Eddie Murphy in his big mouth like. Yes. Yes. Sir Tips. Yeah, okay, so I mean. How how do you? Keep it together I. Mean How do you cope with like suddenly living in complete? Suburbia I'LL I. Mean you sitting now. It's quite funny picture. Zealand's like typical green everywhere, and yes, Dave sitting in her Little Caravan, having my conversation with me. Yeah I call it my mental health wagon. It's my mental health. Wagon is like when when things get too much in the dementia department. I'm like going to the beach. And I started out and I drive okay. I go fishing. Yeah, no, it's great because it's like you know. It's like you've gotta let things guys anything to come into your life, and so for me where I am at this point about letting us and letting other people. You know, take on! as delegation if you. If you think about your business at some point, you've got the you to be able to look after one thing you've got to delegate. Somebody asked to take the role that you've you know. That you want to give up and And that said it's like delegation. It's like have been delegated the role of. You know being. I've always been the peacekeeper in my family. 'cause I'm the Child yes, so that role has become more important to me than anything else and I do. The covert thing I mean my Gosh Have so had from my computer. It's like I've seen judging Film competitions and I've been making national movies for A. Little movies I've been. zooming and skyping with a guy in London and we created the P the movies for a festival Poland. Of you know what I mean crazy I'm meeting my English family who I had all my Christmases West I remember that it's you know yes, well. We're now meeting every Sunday this fourteen of us and the dossier all over the world and they're all in lockdown. And we do a family quiz on A. On a Sunday morning so Saturday night for them wherever they are. Okay, so they'll having nice toots and winds and things. You're having a coffee again I my coffee and my campus then. Dead so that's amazing that you also can't. You know connecting with with that family as well. I mean here you are then you'll be in your camper van. Connect with. yeah, connected create. Yes. Connection with the world. Yeah, then your mom, your mom will be inside the House that she inside the house most of the time. Yes I've got her because she's. She's a painter, so I think too often I get who painting every day, okay? Now and but sometimes see the thing with the dementia is the part of your brain thing destroyed as decision making. so she will go over and I've and I've I've neither and she will look at books and choose. A show. Cheers, the ideas the painting. But then of course, you'll forget so she'll have to go. She'll so sometimes. It will be two weeks three weeks. where she's just going over and I have to say okay. This is one that you doing. I've got to make the decision for here because she can't decide what to pangs And she and say yeah, so and the same thing with with eating, and this is the problem with dementia. They stopped eating because they can't decide what to eat. It's horrific. That's. Yeah. So and and the and you can only three things on their plate because they can only comprehend three things. If you put more than three things on the plate, they won't eat anything because it's too much information. It's insane. It's quite. It's a study. Yeah, and it's the same with painting, so it's like okay, and at one point. She said I can't remember how to use the NEIGHB- rush. You know so. It was like okay you. You paint painting here and then. Yeah. So but I you know so. When I came back, she was an excellent missing. I've kind of cleaned. Will of that happened? And She's off sleeping pills now and because she was solution, aging and It was stripped. She was having tantrums and arrest really horrific. but that's all good now. So this is a part of your process. You know this is a part of your life. Story is your mom and your. This is a part of it. You know the the the inspiration within your life story is is what you living out right now is the fact that you actually you left this life behind that was so. Yes. VIBE E. Yeah colorful vibe exciting tasty. Bring out every positive fund word there is in the dictionary and that was your life exciting just? Conquering. All these thing, yeah, at this. This is a part of your conquering. You know is yes yeah. I think the thing is. It's like you know like when you're out in the world. This old ways that one person look at verse look what I'm doing. Look, mom, look where I've seen. Look what I'm doing. You know it was like I I had analysis conversation with my mother every day. You know that I was in Europe She would be my. She was my go-to person. and so when I saw yeah, and it was like the sort of losing you and being in Europe and not having that go citizen. As like okay I need to go and spend time with my go-to before it's too late. You know and the other. The funny thing is like because she's an ashes passive. My dooney over all of those years. was going to the Mois amazing art galleries in the world, seeming postcards, sending her inspiration to paint You know there was one point she came to Europe I took her to Monet's garden. And and you know and and and. took her to the Rights Museum Tokyo. To the take to the Tate and London so? Pat of Al Junie. Junie is the Atis and now it's like I'm now. Teaching at two children as my little part time job here at the local. And actually at at the art gallery where my mom and I used to go and When I was a young teenager, we would go and do classes together. And now I'm yeah, and now I'm teaching kids. At and that. You know kids are amazing. So yes, so teaching I'm teaching something that I've never taught before. so I'm learning a new skill. which is you know at so and I've it's always been. as I'm teaching. I'm learning as each teach does yeah, yeah, so so it's Yeah, it's all at Yeah, so I've come back home. To when I was a teenager. When I was a teenager the at Gallery here. was where the was a cafe here and all all of us teenagers. We hung out there at the. Gallery in this cafe and when I came back, it was the first place I went to and amazingly the guy who are that cafe. We were teenagers together, and we hung out in that cafe I come back and he now owes cafe. And I was like. I was like Hey Robert. You Got Jog. You like. Yeah, did yeah, so I was. About about home ground, right about yeah, being on home turf, and you know I I have that same sort of synchronicity and chemistry. That happens when I go back. Remember I got that acting role when. Back. Back also you know, it's just. There's something about being on home turf that that creates a sort of magnetism, or there's a chemistry anyway. Yeah. Tell me what you know. When you wound home, so when you creating cavity, Silva tubes originated in on home turf. But when you weren't home and when you were in Amsterdam and you created all these opportunities for yourself. Why do you think that they worked? You know. How do you actually get it from inception to to being paid for it? Oh. No I didn't know I dug. No I, you know the thing is, it's like. My father was musician. My mother was the pain to. Father was a composer. the at the APP is in me as my blood You know my English family this. The competitive spirit the other thing. The the other thing is the shock school is is. Basically the best article in the world. It's an that school. It's not. It's an acting school, but it's not. It's not school as well and and passionate. His teaching is. And this is the magic as he believed his philosophy as a you take everything in the world. Into your body. It will come out now. I can honestly say. Before I went to that school, I could not paint. I could not sculpt when I came out. I could scope and could paint. And it's because. you take everything into your body and you become that it's like the the very first week of the school. At you, you were looking at elements, and so the you know you take, and you have to research the wind. You have to research water you research earth, and you take all of those components, and you mimic that and you become that. And then the next week after that will be materials, so how does pay a move? and then animals how how different animals move? And and you go through. It's just a weird thing. And the other thing is you have to create a piece of USA? in a week with a group of Ken people with ten different nationalities so you have to learn how to communicate with everyone in the world? Yeah. Yeah and and you have to create a piece of theater at and you have to create a piece of that is so good that you won't be basically shunned off the stage. Yeah 'cause local. a piece of it isn't working. He's like okay. Stop that set enough. You're wasting time leave. Leave the stage. No, you have to. You have to create something that is so good. that. It will be allowed. That will be given to owner and allowed to stay on stage. And I think that really really really high level of education that I allowed myself. Gave me the tools and the the site because it's he teaches you. How World? As an ashes. And is no. And the other thing is you have to go well? If I want it. Maybe somebody else wants it. And, that's with it comes down to you know, let's see A. Gives me joy. Maybe give somebody else joy, and and you know that whole thing of. You know create create something and people will come. That's what happened and that. Yeah, that was also part of your your energy your psyche in in doing these things it's. It's also backed up your backed up your 'cause. You know having that psychiatric behind it. Yeah that that confidence just go give it a go, and if it doesn't work okay fine, try something yeah. But it's very much. It is very much like if I like this, you know if I need us then, maybe someone. Yes, well. Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly and that's and that's enough of the kernel of an idea to start something. But how does you know 'cause? This is one one question is creatives always struggled to make money? Yeah, Like while if New Zealand, because they were no agents here, there was no undersell. My shows there was only a festival circuit that lasted. Two weeks in a year. You know and I was like I. as an attitude, I can't survive here. I have to go to Europe. With the audience and the other thing is as summer was leaving new, Zealand's Somma was arriving in Europe. And as a before, my US follow the sand. And why do you say that? Because that's when people are out looking at theater. On the street. That's where that's when the forman's happened You know people don't go outside matching the winter. So I would. I would come to New Zealand to festival season here. Yeah? Yeah, yeah, and then, and then as everyone was going to sleep. For the winter. I would go to them and and start the season there so for a few years it was like New Zealand six months and then six months bag here back there. That kind of thing you know but still. How does an artist case? Because they were no agencies, so was getting an agent. was that you I really of of becoming more commercial with your craft? What a what a did which what what it did was. as an office I didn't know where I was going to be from one GIG to the next. Okay, so having agent. He was booking me a year in advance. So I knew where I was going to be in a year. So I had to stay. Because I needed to be in Europe so that I would be available to do that. GIG and a years time you know he had. He had booked out for a year in advance, and was this just the silver tubes was just it was that was the Soba chewed, and but then it carried then it carried on, so then I had an. Aunt animation and to everything. Everything yeah, so I would be booked up. You know and the amazing thing is that sometimes somebody would see me and they would. Say Oh I I've got a winning. You know in a year's time or you're going to be around. It's like yeah okay. You know or and then that person I would we would format their wedding or something, and then that call and and two years later, and let's say you. My Grandmother's having her eightieth where you come out and for for your birthday. So it's like the the client you then you create a client list and use. And then you become friends, and then you know the community grows and i. mean this is this is the thing again I. Bring it in. You know which is why wanted to have you on? The show is because. You. You know you really. You are what you do you are. You are your craft you are. DEB is like you are so transparent. You are you are what you do like I am young. I am. I'm afraid I am. Yeah, it's It is what it is. It is what it is and Yeah! It's it's my blood is just it's my bladder. That's what makes me. What makes me tick? Yup. So what is your merced proudest moment looking back on your journey up til now? What is most what price proudest moment? Oh, my God! It's been so many. I think one of my favorite I wanNA say proud because I'm proud of everything. I think one of my favorite moments was WAS A. New Easy. A New Year's Eve. Doing a Silva tube show in Rotterdam. Finishing at. Finishing at eleven o'clock at night. talking to U2 cat who was in Germany and I think Emma. Who was? London somewhere all performing. overperforming the choose yeah, and I and I and I I. Maybe I was Utica in Rotterdam yeah, and then she took the silver Christie lives in Rotterdam says she didn't so shapes, so then there was another capital in Germany and then another couple of London and s stretch black. Limo was they're. Taking me up and driving me to, Luxembourg. To get therefore the morning to do to be on a film shoot. and talking and the. Talking in this stretch limo. On the phone to get to all the girls gang had the guy and guy you with. What is this amazing regard? Standing, ovations and Blah. And just seeing them as the frigging shy for with his Hash, on as driving, driving me to film, Sit. Oh Wow I right. Yeah. And I think now the moment another massive moment was Dresden was performing on the stage and raised and with two thousand people in the audience and having the set that was built around the fit costs. Seventy thousand euros. The fit the lighting the lasers that the. Show the that they'd created for this particular revenge. just the lighting Greg was some you know was like seventy thousand. So I can't imagine how much for the food and the catering and the passion and everything, and Yeah and and just have and then having a German agent and performing and and a touring show. codes the blue one the the Blau on the blue one the. Performing with different people. From work just just showing up and villain and and doing. Performance and you know what is that you know? Were they put things? Will to you and you Moose and the next minute? You're catching Yeah, those. Animated. Stuff as I can visualize. It almost looks like you you you getting those little. The little pads paddlers prepared yet. And you yeah, and then go to green screen behind you, and then you become a yeah, yeah. To become you know they they did that. You can see that quite a lot with avatar actually. Quite out of Work a lot to be seen the way they made tarp, but it's the same thing. They put those pamphlets on you and but yeah and yeah. Those things. Those are performance sooner, but you know. I think I'm proud I'm how this? I tried with everything, but yeah my friendships, my relationships. I. Family just just. You Know Very Austin I go. Okay this is it. This is an I die today or tomorrow. I Thank God for my life. Thank God that I've had this life. Thank God. I allowed myself this line. You know and I've got memories as long as I. Don't have dementia or get dementia. I will have memories to keep me warm Frieda. So. Yeah. You're, GONNA come back to Amsterdam Dave's. Do you have plans to come back like? Would you want to come back or is it i? mean it sounds like you from now. Twice, not to leave your mom. Yeah No, I'm here. That's it okay. I'm here. I HAVE TO CREATE A. You know. The the nature. It's just like I'm in love with this country. Okay? Oh, my God! The beaches are a you know the nature of gorgeous. The beaches I'm loving the silence. I'm loving the left. I'm loving, not having my house be a train station. Yeah so, I'm actually really enjoying the solitude of being back here and you need that after. So much action. You need that time to reflect. Yeah, you know and and get all your you know. Get everything strong again for the next time you you go out and take the world. But I'm not ready to take on the regain yet I'm I'm writing scripts and. If I get funding, for it, That's what Jacqueline and I used to say to each other. We should just be making a movie. We should just and that was. It was like we're doing all of this stuff this Edmund the teaching with our can. This is why I had to walk away from it because I was losing my work, and as an artist It's like the administrators look after the administration. I WANNA. Get back to my work. And so and so yeah, and so I'm I'm actually writing. A script a short film script, and it's like I've got a really crazy family here in new. Zealand I mean they're really crazy. So what I've done is based on a funeral, but as based on. Four family funeral. And I've taken the craziness of each of those funerals to create one very crazy funeral. It's a little bit of comedy haven. and I'm having I'm having so much fun with. So so I'm having so much fun. Writing it and I of course I, love slapstick site as a lot of visual gags. And crazy characters. DEB'S MSP on as I do have a very warm feeling in my heart, you know listening to your story and visualizing there in Camp Van you know. You've got. It's a beautiful life story that you as you say, you've allowed yourself and you've created for yourself and you've had a full life. Massive. Yeah, she needs like. Fifty lives of you know fifty people's lives as far as I'm concerned. It's Nice, and closing is just to leave the listeners with like yeah. Like one of your profound life. You know like we all have these sort of MANTRAS but. We have sort of a stored list of. I call them mantras in our pocket. You know that we. Out to get us through or to help us connect with our goals or to. Help keep us on our journey. What's been your sort of mantra? I didn't know just Give it a go. You know just like just give it a go and see how it goes, and it doesn't work. Fine at least you've given IT A. At the New Zealand. As as a very key, we kind of thing, it's like give it. A guy may doesn't work fine. Gundy something else. Oh that's. Close on that DABS. Thank you for giving this gift on play. Thank you so much for? Knitting me. Share your story and fostering. Yeah. We'll speak again. I I feel like I need a coffee, but I need to go to bed. How go just was that story deb's. For coming onto the Shar and yeah, it was so crazy because it was early morning. Your side midnight my side and you know it's such a strange dynamic to be having A. And you know. While you're having your coffee and I'm sort of Hof Baid. But. It was such an amazing conversation I. Just WanNa say thank you so much for yeah. Opening up and being so gracious with telling us your life story, and you know it's so beautiful when when human beings do open up and laugh stories all vulnerable and. The truth of our lives are always vulnerable because there's always something that's going on in a human being's life that Yeah. That's actually not always easy to share, but it's so inspiring and connects all of us. You know when you do. Share these amazing stories and. yeah, be vulnerable with people and for me I'm just always grateful when I have guests on the show, who who just share their amazing stories, because it's like you said you know sharing and giving back and I think that that's one of the most amazing things that human beings can do is to share their life experience, and give it back to other people to learn from so yeah thanks Dave And Yeah now it's time all. the show that I need to introduce my next guest. Two guys. My next guest is actually a cousin of mine, and we grew up always seeing each other as kids sort of you know having cushioned fights on the beds, that kind of cousin, relationship, always laughing and joking, and then of course as you know, your parents move in different directions, and then you never see the cousin again well, that's kind of what it was like but voice. Voice sort of followed him on social media, and he's just done such an amazing job with his life, and he's just come out with the book he's. He moved into the Biblical world actually in his studies got his PhD etc, he's now actually lecture will responsible for the course content at the Boston Campus University in Cape Town and on the sidelines. He's actually written a book on. Your on masculinity from a religious perspective, but what's interesting is what he's explaining is how? It's It's sexual diversity. which he is now bringing into light of actually how the Bible does refer to sexual diversity and empowers that's perspective, so it's yes super interesting conversation I love it when people going out there and conquering the world, even against all odds, and certainly within the religious realms. There's a lot of odds to be conquered so It's an amazing conversation. Such a nice fun vibe person as well so chicken with that conversation next week. Guys in the meantime. Yes, subscribe to instagram any of you. Guys who need an interviewer do interviews for people as well So, give me a shop there. Jen At inspirational interviews dot, com and Yeah, see you guys on the flipside Ed.

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Ep. 25: THE STRETCH  Cubs vs. Brewers: The Rivalry is Born

90 Miles Podcast

41:53 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 25: THE STRETCH Cubs vs. Brewers: The Rivalry is Born

"Woah, too. It's ninety miles the threat. Good afternoon baseball fans. We are taking a stretch back to the very first ballgame between the Milwaukee Brewers and Chicago Cubs. Now, this is not your nineteen o one Milwaukee Brewers that would later become the Baltimore Orioles. Right Ryan, right. Right. Not that, right. Jesse and Ryan or here. No, not quite that. Although we might do that one. Yeah. Yeah, we'll do that a different time. But this particular Milwaukee Brewers club. We did a stretch opus owed previously, and we've mentioned it before where we did the very first brewers cubs National League's central game. But today we are doing the very first Bruce cubs game of history. This occurred on June thirteenth nineteen ninety seven to twenty two pm local time at Wrigley field. Wrigley field of day game, of course to twenty two pm kind of arty cover that thirty six thousand one hundred seven and attend. That's the Milwaukee Brewers were sporting their other league green and blue logo. If you listen to our previous stretch episode we go out about that for a minute or two. But these two clubs nineteen Ninety-seven the first year that they met in interleague play that Ryan. Yeah, pretty wild. We, you know, they I guess it's interesting that they did very first year interleague was introduced, it makes sense being central respectively center, ninety miles and being ninety miles apart. Yeah. Definitely makes sense. You know. So, yeah, I guess let's you know, jump in into it here. I mean it was. Yeah. Day game. We were at Wrigley field. And I you know what was it? Well, seventy three degrees and sunny. Just a light wind seven miles per hour. From right field, dry beautiful beautiful June day in Chicago. Can't get any better than that. And yeah. So, you know, starting out here, top of the first, let's talk about the stars who's on the who, who was on the hill for the for the cubs. That Terry Mulholland was pitching. All right. And yep. Yeah. He you know he played. He played for quite a quite a while quite a few years. Hey, at a twenty year career some might remember him. Well he was with a lot of different teams. He was with that Lanta for a little bit Philadelphia. But yeah, he, he did spend a little bit. A time with the cubs and ninety seven you know. He was. All right. I don't know. He was he was. He was good in a long career. But you know enough he made an all star game in nineteen Ninety-three with Philadelphia other than that, not nothing of note. Really? He spent sure. I got he was on one two three. Eleven different teams. So if that tells you anything. A couple of things, but is best years were with Philadelphia earlier, on, he was had a three eighty one, a over six years with them. But, but anyways, who is anyways, he would be facing a yeah. He was up against Jeff DEA Meco kind of just a another guy, right? He had a career four six one ERA spent several years in the big leagues mostly with Milwaukee, you know, one two, three four five six seven eight about eight or nine year career several years in Milwaukee just a another one of those mid nineties pitchers that, you know help keep things kind of steady. The brewers were you know, they weren't good. But they weren't bad around that time. So that's kind of who was up for the brew crew. Yeah. To go top the first you had Mulholland facing some brew crew batters with they were gonna lead off the game with Gerald Williams. Felled by Mark Loretta. Who was a second baseman, Jeff Cirillo? Well, no name, Bruce history playing third base the four or five and six hitters were Todd done Dave Nielsen and Matt Miki. Nielsen AMIS skier probably somewhat familiar names. Mike Mathie knees name, everybody should know who's betting seventh for the brewers. He was the cardinals manager up until the middle of last season. This is we're recording this in twenty nineteen. So the middle twenty eighteen is when they find the can, Mike Metheny. Oh, no. It's. Thanks. Ninety seven right now. Will all? Yeah. I mean yeah. It's nineteen Ninety-seven we're recording. This is stretch has never mind. Twenty nineteen. What are you talking about? I don't even know way in the future flying cars and cubs. Yeah. By then I bet and stuff like that. Yeah. Probably Hawaii dragons or something. Right. Right. All right. All right. Let's get to the top of the since Gerald William. It's the brewers batting. Yep. Gerald Williams gets up to the plate. Terry Mulholland induces him into a groundout. Yeah. The next batter. Mark Loretta singles to right field on a line drive Loretta, yes. So Mark Loretta another name from brewers lore ended up with a very nice little career to ninety five batting average bum seventy six bombs over that period of time, not bad. He wasn't it up with. No. He was very. I mean for a second baseman, you know, no PS around seven fifty four for your career is very good at a long time as well. His Ben years, probably remembered, yes, a lot of people probably remember him best, I think for playing with sandiego. That's how I remember him best. Although I remember him obviously as a brewer before that. So Mark Loretta gets a pitch to. Yeah. Yeah. To right field had a couple of good years in San Diego. I just know. Yeah, but yeah, Yep. Yep. So he he'd lines one to right field gets on base that brings up surreal. Oh, Sorolla gets into a full count situation and just as everybody would hope he would if you're a cubs fan, he strikes out swinging and Tut Todd done who I know nothing about, even as a brewers fan ended up grounding out to third base, and that wrapped up top of the first inning. Well. Sounds good. Sounds exciting. Yes. Time to go get a go get an old style between innings here now. All right. So bomber the first now the cubs are up facing Di Meco and cubs got their lineup. They have just run down there lineup real quickly talks about some of them as, as come up. Brian McRae, leading off. He let off a lot around that time you know he had he had a little bit of speed. So he was kind of one of those pro typical leadoff hitters at the time speed. You know, not maybe you know, not a bad on base percentage want better. But he definitely was one, you know that if he got on base often with stealing, yet, a nineteen Ninety-six yet thirty seven stolen bases. But in any case, you know, he's up. I now. Ahead on the others as as we go here, but. He comes up and he hits a fly ball towards center field. And it is an out. So Gerald Williams reels it in. Yes. And so next Brant Brown who I know nothing about, and I'm pulling no he played for five years in the majors from ninety six to two thousand very rather short career and ended up with two forty seven career batting average seven forty six oh p s a negative point nine war in his career. So, yeah, not not much there. I guess I don't know played for four years, Takagi years for Pittsburgh. And I, I just the name is sort of a millionaire, but obviously. Looking at his numbers, I can see why perhaps he's little forgettable. But in any case, he comes up, and he ends up swinging strikeout. So so much for that filthy d'amico stuff. Yes. Yes. So that brings up mar grace baton third for the cubs and, you know, he obviously I talked about him. He ended up with a career three three batting average career. Eight twenty five Opie PS very solid player. One of my favorites at, at the time for sure, you know he was he was good. And he played thirteen years for the cubs, and he comes up, and he's able to draw a walk off of d'amico. So, you know, maybe get something going. We got a base runner and, and that brings up the cleanup hitter and Sammy Sosa, which I think people probably have heard this heard of him. He's a bit famous for a few thing. Yeah. Yeah. Well, he's got an eight seven eight anything. Yeah. I know didn't say anything. Don't dare. Right. You say that I, but I see a lot of home runs in his future. That's what I see. Yeah. My crystal ball here since it's ninety seven right? Yeah. Well, it's ninety seven ninety six he had forty home runs. You know, it's like, okay, he's a good power hitter. Yeah. But that was that was just a little touch of what he would do later years, ninety eight sixty six ninety nine he had sixty three two thousand year two thousand one hundred sixty four to did you did you go? Did you get biff sports guy futures? How do you know all of this stuff? Oh, wait. I've never mind. I'm just under these are just predictions. I making predictions, yes. Yes. Spoke away. Yeah. To the future. Almanac from two thousand right? What happens with what happens with swing and Sammy here at the bottom of the first innings quite a quite a sports almanac has says baseball reference dot dot com on it. I don't know what that means. What's what anyway dot com? Okay. All right. Sosa's up and you know, so. It's one of two results, a lot of times, neither it's a five hundred foot bomb like Jose can Canseco or it's a. Strikeout. He plays softball. Strikeout swing. Yeah. He's he was one of the early on. True three outcome. Guys. Not really though. Sammy was had a pretty good batting average. But that brings us into the bottom half. Or I'm sorry. The top half of the second inning. So Terry Mulholland is back on the hill for the Cubbies and that brings up one Dave Nielsen for the brewers. This is the catcher goes ahead. Steps into the play. Dave Nielsen, we've talked about. And I L S S O N. We've talked about him a couple of times before on various moments in the stretch episode, not a bad career at all. If I recall correctly, I wanna say he was Australian-born spent his whole career with Milwaukee basically, eight full seasons. And yeah I'm looking at the same weird reference guide that you have apparently. Yeah, yeah. Average to eighty four Opie Essa eight seventeen. So very solid player. That's very good production. I feel like out of out to that particular position. But he was playing first base today. So I think he started as a catcher and moved. I that's something I'd have to look back into anyway. He lines out to center field. So Mulholland gets them to, to hit one into the middle, but not good enough met Miki follows in he singles to shortstop. So a shot to the whole between shortstop and third gets knocked down, but me ski legs it out. And that would bring up one Mike Metheny defaced Mulholland one out, one on Mulholland delivers Mathie with a line out to center field, and that brings us to one Jose Valentin also somebody, we've talked about previous moments. Not a bad ball player but not a great ball player. Just the nice little career the number eight hole hitter today. The delivery from Mulholland on two one pitch. And he gets a hold of it. And it is deep left field. Line drive and it is in the bleachers. Oh a two run shots. Yes. To go pro. Maha scores Valentine. That's what you get what you walk a guy. He didn't walk you get when one goes into the hole, and you can't throw them out. So there you go. Valentine takes hall in deep and that brings up the pitcher, which is nineteen Ninety-seven believe me the bruise pitchers. Weren't taking a lot of adding probably not know they were an American League team. This was a brand new idea, and shockingly enough. Jeff d'amico? Goes down on strikes how, but the damage is done. The damage is done to hits two runs. Nobody left on base in the brewers jump out to to nothing lead in the top half of the second inning. Now. Yeah. Well, yeah. That was awesome. Awesome. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Whatever. So a beautiful data put one in the bleachers. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah. So as we move along now they got some work to do. They need to put the bronze on the board here. So let's see if they can do something here with sambergen coming up Ryan sambergen. So we didn't get to talk to about him as much before says is going to mention a couple of things. Nineteen ninety seven was his last season. He retired after that. He was my favorite player growing up. So he had he had a very solid career. You know he had a career to eighty five batting average in seven ninety five Opie s he had a sixty eight career war. In the end his is numbers was enough to get him in the hall of fame and he also won nine Gold Gloves seven silver sluggers us an all star game ten times. And also won the MVP in nineteen Eighty-four. So anyways, this is right at the tail end of his career last season. He he had an okay season. He batted two sixty four at a seven eleven opium. Yes. But the, the cubs huge power numbers. What's that, not huge power numbers? But yeah. Still a very solid. Yeah. Yeah. I mean you know, he he had been his homerun tolls have been going down a bit in at this point and stuff. But, but yeah, right. So he's up to bat here. He's gonna face Emeco and he hits a ground ball to third base. That's surreal low. Right. And yes, surreal is over and Thirdly up. And he's nags it throws the first to get the yes. And that brings up Kevin Ori who. Kevin Oris interesting. You know, I. You know, it's kind of interesting because he's one of those players that maybe in some ways remembered, maybe kind of for not such a good thing, although I you know, it's questionable on the whole thing anyways, but he he only played for years couple with the cubs. But the his name to me. I you know, Kevin ori- comes to mind, he was the one that Kerry Wood's twenty strikeout game in nineteen ninety eight the one hit the one hit in that game, which would have been a no hitter. If it wasn't for this was either, either a it winded up being ruled a hit although some say, whether it should have been an error on Ori, but in any case, he's a little bit known for that probably more so than anything else, given that otherwise general he was, you know, he's a career to forty nine batting average. He played, you know. You know, any only played for for four seasons, so. Yeah. And that's not the not guys that only play for four seasons. Get to the big leagues is amazing. Oh, yeah. Just lighting our favourite and the best players. One for your career in the big leagues. Man, you're a heck of a ball about it. This is best to the best out of oil, many people, it's incredible. I mean you get even one at bat. You get one little taste of the majors year, one of the best you're like the top. You know, one percent baseball players in the world. You know what I mean? I mean that's exactly so yeah, I just wanted to throw that. No. I just want to say that because I don't wanna be like, we're we aren't shortchanging any of these guys when we bypass them. Like, hey I, I don't know who that guy is. That's not what we're trying to do here. We're bringing back and breathing some life back into these games. And it's really cool to see some of these names that you only heard once in a while realize how incredibly difficult it is to have a fourteen year career something like that. That's that's amazing. Yeah. Yeah. Well, you know, and I think with him, I mean, he's not as I mean, it's not as it's not as much of like a Bill Buckner thing, you know. No, no, no. I mean, Bill Buckner was really good player. He should certainly. Be more well known for his career, you know, and he. He's the batting champion. He won a batting title. Fantastic ballplayer Bill Buckner, and yes. Recently passed actually. Yeah. If you're if you're listening to this in the future, it's been within the last, you know, few days that Bill pass. Yeah. Yeah. And he was he played on the cubs as well. And that's probably another another episode or something there. But in any case, you know, Kevin ori- unfortunately, Ninety-seven. Yes, yes, we're in one thousand nine hundred seven anyways, give it Ori? You know, I guess, in some ways is known a little more for his maybe air or whatever in the Kerry wood game. But nonetheless, I think he's known I think he's known for striking out in this at bat against Jeff d'amico. I think that's what it ends up being the result of this at bat. So, unfortunately groundout strike out, and that brings up Scott service, and, you know, Scott service. He played. He played for eleven years. He you know he was a catcher. So it takes you know takes a little bit of the weight off of his hitting performance. But he you know, he was he was okay. He was. All right. Again, he is one of the best baseball players in the world. If you look at everyone that's ever played baseball. But, you know, but as far as a major league baseball player, you know, he had a career to forty five batting average six eighty one Opie s you know, in a three point one war cumulatively over eleven years, which is like half like what the typical MVP does in one season. So I guess the put it in perspective. He was he was your average replacement player, if you wanna look at it, yes, yes. And, and any was, you know, being being a catcher, you know, there's, there's other skill sets involved there. So. Not too correct diminished, too much. But in any case. He's up to bat Andy. It's a pop fly and it's in the infield. And it looks like the shortstop is going to catch Valentine Jose Valentin the up grabs that doesn't note to to at the top of this inning. Jeremy burnett's did replacement Miki in right field. Germy burnett's is a name that we do remember. Well, yes history, and I think believes Colorado, he ended up with two. So all of that going on that puts us through the top, or the bottom half of the second inning, we're going to kind of skip along a bit. Yeah, nothing, major happens. Next couple of innings actually to wrap up the third inning. Both teams ground into double plays. So the brewers ground into the alley the cubs grounded new double play to wrap up those in we can play, you know. Yeah, we're really picking it up now flying. Yes. All right. So. All right. Back to Terry Mulholland on the mound. Dave Nielsen back at the play at the first baseman for the brewers. He works at two two oak and singles, the left field seeing I single grown bowl, Jeremy Burnitz. This is why it was important. We mentioned that he was in the game now for me. Ski looks like Miki maybe came out with an injury. Burnett s-. He gets to the plate, and he had a heck of a nice year, actually hit a heck of a nice career with the brewers just to touch on a couple of things for brunettes really one of the better known names in brewers history. This particular career nineteen point eight war, three hundred fifteen career home runs and Opie s of eight twenty six so some very good pop in his bat for Scher, a big key guy over Bruce history. Well known played several years in Milwaukee fourteen years total. So the bulk of his career was in Milwaukee, but he did bones around play from the Mets the Indians. The dodgers the rocks. The cubs included in two thousand five as well back to the ball game though. Yeah. Singles and that brings us to Mike Metheny, who I'm predicting in the future at some point may manage big league ballclub, because that's kind of the kind of guy he is. It's nineteen Ninety-seven. He pops. Seems seems like he's got the characteristics to be a major league manager. Yeah, it's amazing. How that happens, isn't it? Yeah. That's a good. I wonder if that'll happen within a catcher, maybe manage a team in the in the National League central which doesn't exist yet. Anyway. So that gets us one out. And that brings up one Jose Valentin boy. Valentine again here we go. Yeah. Yeah, he already homered this. In this particular season would hit Hollin seeing Mahal and pretty good. So that he's got them kind of locked in. Let's take this. I it looks like first pitch is is a ball. Yeah. I think Bohol trying to stay out of looks like he's trying to work around around a little bit, and then strip. The next pitch is also a ball and here comes the third pitches that bad. Both three so three in. Oh, okay. Well, that we don't like that. We got runners on first and seconds one out. I don't I don't know. You know, this isn't Barry Bonds up here. So, you know, I think we got a I think he got a get one in the zone here. And, you know, you gotta go after gotta go after them. So go ahead. Tell keep in mind, Jose Valentine's, a bit of a free swinger, be careful here. Yes. Well, what go ahead and take it from there. What happens on the next pitch? All right. Mulholland into the wind and delivers. Well hit to left field. Ground balls screamer. Nielsen is going to turn the corner. Score. Bernez out his way to third. Looks like the left field. It turns throws it into second base. In the brewers have runners on the cast lead three to nothing Terry Mulholland having a lot of ground ball, success today at times, but that one squeezes through hard on the ground driving in Nielsen. Yeah. That takes boy joy out of a nice summer day. I Wrigley, but all right, fine. Yeah. Would it would? Well luckily enough. Maybe the reason that Mulholland was working so carefully developed teen is that Jeffy Emeka was on deck, Bruce pitcher and look at that he works to, to, to coat and then strikes out swinging. Yeah. That's the second brings up top of the order. Yes. Top of the order Gerald Williams back on the top spent a little bit of time. And we'll. Walkie. Not a not a huge long career. But a nice ball player playing centerfield. Pretty good glove. A little bit of speed gets up. Fly ball to left field, is it? No. It's not. It is out. Number three got to three. Oh count. Let it rip. And the free swinging brewers are done for the inning. But the tech a run one run on three hits. Yeah. No heirs to left on base. Milwaukee takes a three to nothing lead against the Cubbies. Yeah. Now three not, then, that's not not cool. Not, not good. So we're going to jump ahead. We, you know, cubs another. Another double play in the bottom of the fourth, and the bruise. Rapid up deco is going. Well, he strikes out Sammy Sosa looking the app that puts us into the top of the fifth one to Terry Mojo settled down. Yeah. Got the three. Oh counts. Did he seriously? Get to a three oh. Count three times in a row and get outs on every one of them. Wow. I'm sorry that just caught me off guard. Where are you see? All right. So the top of the fifth inning Terry Mulholland gets oh on drew batters into three oh, Kono. Those swing. No. Those, that's the no that that you're looking at all. The cubs three dollars. Nothing for you to go, go check. Oh baseball reference dot com. It's really cool. But if you're not careful you you'll screw up, what you're looking at like I just did. Yeah. Well anyways. Yeah. Looks like it was I. And then one to count. But yes, so let's go to the bomb of the fifth inning brewers are winning three to nothing and the samba is up here. So and I pitch is a ball. I seem to recall oftentimes sambergen like taking I first pitches. So in any case takes the first pitch for a ball and the next pitch comes in and boom ground ball to third base. And it's a double. So looks like they may and knocked it down. But then it sprinted over to the wall, or it was down the line. How's that? Got a piece of the glove, but then slowed down, so Sandberg stands on second alone. Yes. On a little bit of a, a funky double funky double, their get samba dissected base. So here we go. We're in business. We got no outs run around second and Kevin Ori is up and I pitch. You know he gets to a one to count one ball to strikes and here comes the pitch and boom. Wow. Right field. Fly ball to deep right field down the line, and it hits in the corner of Wrigley that, right? Field corner is a triple producer. And sure enough samba easily scores and ori- cruises into third base with the triple, and there we go on the board. So we got something going on here. Now, finally, so now Aures on third base still no outs. And we got Scott service up. And Jeff d'amico. He's got some, some issues years throws to gets to one count and boom, wild pitch orey scores from third so we'll take it. That's fine. So now, now we're, we're in business. Now. Cubs got to run so against the brewers three and Scott services up he grounds out to third race. Anchovies is the only other one I wanted to mention about on the with the cubs lineup today. He is up to bat here and he ends up getting a single to center field on against Emeco race anxious. He, he played he played for fifteen years. He played for the cubs for seven years. I, I remember that basically well nineteen Ninety-one through ninety seven. Yeah. You know not bad. You know he had a I don't know he was. All right. To sixty two batting average, six twenty seven PS. You know, I guess. With the eight spot in the batting order about about. Right. And any case a little bit on race Angela as some of you might remember him. And then brings up the pitcher Mahala and here. And you know, with with just one out, of course, Mahala is gonna try to bunt Sanchez gets to second base on the bunt. But then Brian McRae is up. And he hits ground out for the third out so nothing more, they're tying run wasn't scoring position. But could not do anything with that with two outs. So the Cubbies leave one on base. But accumulate two runs on three hits. Yes, indeed. All right. Top of the six passes without anything of dire. Interests. Same with the bottom of the six so Mulholland and DEA Meco, both with a nice job. Through those Ania long they're being boom. That's right. We get into the top of the seventh, and it's Jose Valentin back to the plate again, till you're Mulholland has struggled Falintin today. But in this particular at bat, does get the popout looks like a foul pop fly into the catcher's mitt, and he is done that brings up Jeff diem Meco the slugging pitcher of the Milwaukee Brewers. Andy strikes out swinging once again that does bring up Gerald Williams. And I did want to touch on Williams. I said earlier hit a nice little career. It was better than nice. And it was better than little. It was a fourteen year career. It was brief in Milwaukee. Okay. But he did spend a lot of time with both Yankees spent some time with the Braves bounced around the league. But overall pretty solid ball player ended with a six point five career war about a two fifty five batting average seven eleven PS. He was an outfielder is a pretty solid fielder. It's good to have guys like that around for Milwaukee, he didn't have a particularly. Huger but it was definitely solid in nineteen ninety seven more, I think he was more there for his glove and his twenty three stolen bases than anything. But that brings his brings us the his at bat here we are he's facing Mulholland, and we get to a one one pitch and hard hit ball to the right field. Corner line drive right fields. He gets around the corner and gets in second safely sliding so Gerald Williams puts a double into play the bruiser up three two with a man in scoring position to top of the seventh that brings up Mark. Loretta in that moment. Cubs manager, switches pitchers Holland's day is done. They bring on Melrose. Yes. Yeah. I don't really know a lot about him. He he only played for the cubs for one year. And sure, you know, he spent a lot of time with Montreal before that. But I not too familiar with him. But yeah. Fair enough. Phil garner leaves Mark Loretta into bat against Roe Haas. Loretta works row. House two three to count. And there's a hard hit ball to right field line. Dr Williams will score from second. Mark Loretta thrown thrown out at second base. He was trying to extend that make it the run did score before he was thrown out. The brewers accumulate. One more run on a couple of hits, nobody left on Bruce. Take the lead four to two adding a little bit of an insurance run in the top of the seventh inning. Yeah. Now, Meco will start the bottom of the seventh. Well, and you know. Yeah, and, and the Emeco gets a one two three and we let's you know, we jump ahead and nothing. Nothing much happens. Cubs can't seem to make anything happen. They have a couple one two three innings. Let's and we jumped to the bottom of the ninth. Brewer's are up four to two last chance for the cop to Las last chance for the cubs to do something here, and, and Brant Brown is up facing Doug Jones. Doug Jones, the Burs bring in their closer. Doug Jones, who actually had a nice in a solid career. We've brought him up previously. I think he was the closer ninety eight as well as just take a quick peek at some Doug Jones numbers in nineteen ninety seven Mr. Jones is loading on my magazine called base. This is loading. Loading doug. Jones is numbers. Sure. So Doug Jones had actually a really solid your that season two point zero to ERA is the brewers closer, his career, high and saves would be achieved actually that's incorrect. He would equal. No, his third highest saves. We're really prepared for this moment. Let's get in. Let's see if you can accumulate another say Brant Brown comes to the plate. Doug Jones, the hard throwing right hander. He brings one in full cow to count. All the cubs need to. Yes, exactly. Get you know, you got Brant Brown. You got Mark grace. And then you got Sammy Sosa. You got a chance if Brant Brown is can, you know, even if it's a walk, or whatever it is get on base. You got a full count here. But what does he do ground ball, the second base, and it's an out and Loretta throws him out to first Nielsen puts the put out on him and that brings up, Mark gray gray. All right, Doug Jones versus Mark, grace. This should be interested comes to a couple of pitches comes to full like a one one cone, the F full cow. We get all the way to another full cone cubs are working Doug Jones, pretty hard, pretty good, both being patient, and Mark, grace, very patient, hitter, good, batting average. You know, he's, he's good one in this situation, he just needs to get on base, because you never know what Sosa could do, of course, at that time, you know, they didn't realize what Sosa would become. And neither do we know already hit forty home runs. See certainly is power bat there in the cleanup hitter so full count. And it's a fly ball, the left field and it's playable and outs. That's right. No that that s so got the leather on that one right now, Sosa just needs to get on Ryan Sandberg following Sandberg's following in the order orient has a triple on the day. Yeah. Let's see what happens. Doug Jones working hard here already thrown twelve pitches ahead on the count one and to count on Sosa. And, and here comes the pitch, and it's a swing and a miss, and Sosa goes down swinging strike three that's Broers. Yeah. The brewers win rather Doug Jones locks down the save Jesse Emeco with the victory. It's a beautiful day in Wrigley field. Brewers fan. Welcome to your very first victory against the Chicago Cubs and their very first game at Wrigley field. Yeah. Oh, beautiful as well. You know, at least the brewers have terrible logo so. You know, whatever. Yeah. Harry Carey he can go. Grab another beer. He'll feel better in the morning. It's fine. So there you have. It's. All right. Well, Bruce and cubs fans that was our ninety miles the stretch episode for this week. The very first brewers versus cubs game occurred at Wrigley field. It was the date of June. June thirteenth nineteen eighty seven. Yes to our to our thirty five minute game. And that concludes the game and that concludes this episode of the stretch because I'm going home. I'm done with this. Yeah. Well, we gotta go out and get a beer now. Go brewers. Yeah. All right. I guess that's it. So, yeah. I cubs Burs game ever this current brewers franchise anyways. That's right. That's right. And the brewers would go onto a seventy eight and eighty three record finishing third in the American League central their final season in such division, Phil garner managed them. And it was it was a solid team but not anything particularly. Yeah, but that was a pretty special. Pretty special game for two teams that would become rival. For to distant future, eight ninety four that season and. And that's about that. That's about it. Yeah. This is probably the most historic thing that happened that season the two teams and the ad not, not, not it's up there. But. Now. But that's that. And that's the graph on the stretch episode if you want to get at us, I'm at winning on Twitter Ryan. Where can they find that wraps his cups win and go to ninety miles podcast dot com? All kinds of cool stuff there bunch other stretch episodes, and yeah. Joy the rest of the year. Recipe or whatever it is. Whatever time it is. Yeah. Good night. Good morning. Good afternoon. We'll catch you later.

Milwaukee Brewers Chicago Cubs Terry Mulholland cubs Milwaukee Bruce pitcher brewers Gerald Williams Sammy Sosa Mark Loretta Jeff d'amico Wrigley field Dave Nielsen Doug Jones baseball Jose Valentin Brant Brown Mike Metheny Jesse Emeco Milwaukee Brewers club
Mulholland Drive

Ghostwood: The Twin Peaks Podcast

1:57:53 hr | 4 months ago

Mulholland Drive

"The. Change. Between Hello again everyone welcome back to ghost with the twin peaks podcast. I'm one of your co host Charles Skaggs. Waiting for ghost. Would force to reopen. Months. That and waiting. I know it's getting Kinda tiresome, isn't it? would be open if people would wear a damn mask right right, so we're not here to preach, but we kind of are we to? Wear a mask, okay? Apparently we are. Is Coming for dinner. Where a mask exactly all right so I guess we are. I stand corrected. We are here to preach. But because we went up reopen. Ghost would force you guys. We want to go outside and do all that so so everybody be responsible. Be Smart. Be Safe. Okay! All right in the meantime as we wait for everyone on the in America to Kinda, get their acts together. talk here episodes of nine. Is something that we've been waiting for to talk about for quite a while. You know we bring it up here. We bring up there and here episode seventy nine. We are finally got to talk Mulholland drive. Oh Holland drive yes, the two thousand one new noir mystery film written and directed by of course David. Lynch because that's what we do here. And You know we're going to be talking a little bit about the criteria, but mostly we're going to be saving that for our follow up episode episode eighty as we need engine a special features. But the criterion collection was released on October Twenty Seventh Twenty fifteen. We are so behind Charles I. Know Right. This is one what we spent the past year discussing the return so. Right. So that took a little while because you know, we're on a two week schedule. Anyway so? So. This is something we've been wanting to talk about. Obviously, you know there's a lot of connections to twin peaks actors in this and I just this is a film that Lot David Lynch players here and you know, and but a lot of new ones, too a lot of ones the people that he hasn't. Hasn't worked with before this one like Laura Elena, Harring or Justin throw although he worked with. Just throw later on in. Do you, do you mean? The Countess. Exactly exactly. So. Now, obviously, this is a film that's GonNa. Take a little. Effort on our part to try to discuss. Yes, this is another David Lynch film like eraserhead. That isn't exactly linear and David Lynch's not explaining it no. He's just saying you know this is. This is a love story in the city of dreams, and that's all he's given, you know. Although he did you know? Apparently? He gave some clues in ten clues. I wrote these down. That was in the original DVD release. There was like a little card insert. Right David Lynch's ten clues to unlocking this thriller. The question of course is. Can you actually trust what David Lynch's telling you? No No No I don't i. don't trust what David. Lynch's telling me because. David Lynch shows me what he wants me to see. And the rest of it is up to me is how I feel about him as a director and that's part of why Lovin. I mean you know? You don't I mean as David Lynch Fan. You know I know personally that. He's not gonNA explain everything. Because Hey I've watched three seasons of twin peaks. And I know I'm not going to get all the answers that I want I still don't know what's going on. You know and I've watched other things like blue velvet or This film Mulholland drive while at heart take your pick. Inland Empire Oh. Yeah so. Just, you know there's a lot of films that you know especially of his that he's not going to give you the full story, and because he may not even know the full story he just. He knows the kind of story he wants to tell. Right that maybe came to him in a dream, and he's just trying, and he's trying to put it up on screen for everybody to share with right. He wants to show you something. Yes, and whether or not what he wants to show, you is in a linear fashion. Is Neither here nor there. Yeah, exactly so so. I'm here with my wonderful. Coho, Zan and then sprouse and We're GONNA. Try to break this down as best as we can. So bear with us as we go through this because. What I think is GonNa? Be a lot of fun as we talk about this. And Sheriff we got a lot to talk about because. There's a lot going on in this movie. And so we might as well without any further. Let's start. Let's start breaking his damn a little bit. So. I should mention that. Of course. This room movies like two hours twenty six minutes. And and it's first two hours are apparently want story, and then we get a completely different story for that final half hour right right? So that's GonNa take some explaining obviously just when it starts to be porn. Does a one eighty on you exactly so. Porn and then flips it right. And you fell for it like the fascist are so. Little Nell That line. And when that was good pinkie. So Little bit of A. Notes about awards that were film received so. David. Lynch apparently received the. Hope I'm pronouncing this right pre deal. Love me's own seen. Apologies. On. San I'm very. Thank you for granted you. Did Not Take French German high school Susumi but that's essentially the best director award at the two thousand one con film, Festival. Y- and of course Lynch was nominated for best at the Seventy Fourth Academy Awards. But lost to Ron Howard for a beautiful mind. Fill that is a decent film in my opinion, but nowhere near. The level of this film, Mulholland drive I mean. Don't get me wrong. I've got nothing against Ron. Howard I like him as a director, but I feel like David Lynch. Does a little bit more with medium of film than most directors do right and when you see somebody like that. You know I would like to see. I would like to see more recognition for. The creativity behind it and I think it's I think it's hard for some people because it is so non linear. and. A beautiful mind either. I mean I am not going to try and sit here and tell you that I don't wish I haven't been wishing I. Was Jennifer. Connelly since I was eleven years old? But that's. You know it's not one of those room like what really? That's what that's. What really? I mean like I said I. Have Nothing Against Ron. Howard is director. I think very competent director. I just don't. I just don't think he's obviously as imaginative as David. Lynch, or creative. David Lynch I think he's a fantastic. Your teller traditional storyteller. Right and I think he does a great jobs with and there's nothing. There's nothing that. Of Real. Of Real a true stories like a Apollo Thirteen or A Beautiful Mind or That boxing one. Oh A. With. I know here talking with Russell Crowe again yeah. Okay Russell Crowe and Renee Zellweger and he's a boxer. I can't remember Al.. Blurted out later when it's inappropriate, yeah, I just know that obviously Ron Howard. Did he directed Apollo Thirteen? And so low, believe it or not so yeah. Which I love. Your fans at hated it, but I loved Solo. So pretty underrated personally and one of my all time, favorite comedies, which is ridiculous, but I love it is night shift. Did he also. He also jerked splash. If I remember correctly, he did direct splash. which is probably my favorite role that John Candy ever did. So I mean John. Candy Great in. Uncle Buck but my favorite is probably splash so. So obviously nothing is Ron Howard. He's a perfectly acceptable director. Nothing against him. But I obviously. We're favored toward David Lynch in that regard. All right. So I guess some Trivia on this one and. We kinda talked about that a little bit before started recording tonight, but This movie Mahone drive originally was conceived as a TV series. And back in ninety, nine, nine, hundred, ninety, nine, they did a ninety minute pilot produce for touchstone television intended for the ABC television network. Right and it was also going to be attended for it was a French co production, so it was also going to be on French television, right and TV executives said yet. No, yeah, yeah, so apparently Lynch sold the idea to ABC suits. Based solely on a story of read emerging from the car accident. Her purse, containing one hundred twenty five thousand dollars in cash along with the blue key. Right in in the premise was. Betty would try to help her figure out who she was That's the that was the elevator pitch. Apparently and I'm sure that ABC after having. Twin peaks right. They were probably asking Okay David to find out who she is I mean. Please tell us we're GONNA. Find out who she is. RIGHT SPOILER ALERT! We don't so. I think that might have turned them off. A little bit I might have turned off ABC because they've done that before. And they had great success with twin peaks, but they done that before, and they'd gone down that road before and I don't WanNa. Do it again now. From what I found out from, my research was that Lynch showed ABC a rough cut of the pilot. The guy that they picked through watch the pilot needed. In, ABC immediately cancelled it. And then Lynch goes around and you know it talks it over with I guess a French investor or something and and. They decided that they live basically re. Re mench rewrote. The script expanded it. When they decided to turn into feature film at that point. Nice Yeah. Now interestingly on a twin peaks trivia note. Supposedly Sherline Fan. Yes, that Audrey. Horne Sherline Fan. said in a two thousand fourteen interview that the original idea came during the filming of twin peaks. As a spinoff film. For her character Audrey Horne. That's interesting right, so we got another right, which makes me wonder why maybe that's why Lynch did what he did to Audrey in return. She, the little girl who lives down the lane and this one mean interesting. We get another car accident your with. sherline fan that'd be interesting, yeah. Right yeah. I would have watched that I'm sure you would have watched that because I know you bet big lottery hord fan you're. A Big Fan. Fan as well. Would have been all over the as well. She's one of the greatest humans that has ever graced the earth. She's the sweetest woman. So if that's the case you know, somehow that evolved from a Audrey Horne spinoff into. Something completely different. So. Now for Different. Well at the time that Mulholland drive was being done as a TV show. Sherwood Fed was working on rude awakening for. was that going on at that time Yup an interesting? Helps Yellow. This connects a little bit. So! So speaking of twin peaks cast. We run them down. Because Hey, we're twin peaks podcast right yet, so the actors that. Appear in this one. The only watts, obviously I and four course as inland empire exactly then you. Does the dual role of Betty Elms. Or Diane Selwyn take. Your pick. In this one of course, she played Jenny, Jones and then we had Robert. Forster turns up as detective McKnight. So share free. Truman right there. Share Frank Notice for curate. When you said Frank I saw Harry in my head. That's really weird. Right probably listening because normally when you say sheriff. Harry S Truman. That's probably why. Shouldn't be too hard to remember that. I was just dumb on my part. I'm sorry that's right. We've been talking just went brain. It's I. Have Quarantine Brain, which means which means drink every night brain exactly so. You're you're you're you're podcasting with assisted? chemical podcasting. Yes, this is. Mike cast your adult podcasting. How's that? That makes it sounds so much sexier it's. All Year. All right so we also had dead is huge podcast. There's no reason for you to sleep on the couch, right? Well obviously. We'll talk about that scene late. We're GONNA talk about that a little bit yeah. Yeah because I'm sure. A lot of people didn't see that coming the first time that That, they watch this film. Brent Briscoe as. Detective, Dumb Guard, and. Of course. Yeah Recipe's detective. Right, yeah, sadly, we lost briscoe not too long ago, but yeah detective Dave McNally and the return. now had ngelo battle Amenity as Luigi Castellini the espresso hating mobster. Tends to. Voices displeasure with Espresso by spitting it out into a Napkin bidding it into a Napkin. Yes, and I remember seeing these news to the time list at least user Napkin good friend I just remember watching this movie The for singling but. This is so great exactly so our favorite twin peaks. Composer turns up in acting role here so. In addition to doing the music for this film score. Nothing against Dean Hurley, but he's our favorite. Come on. We know we were. We were Angelo. Fans before your Dean Hurley fans, so that's the thing de knows that our heart is large enough for the both of us were. Just know your place. Dean Hurley that's. Dino's yeah okay. there. We just needs. He needs another twenty five years. He'll get there exactly exactly so Rebecca del Rio. Who of course is one of our favorite roadhouse seniors the return? Makes her appearance as herself. Sorry. Issue there so. Yes. She said she's one of your favorites. Oh Yeah, yeah. I loved her performance of no stars, and you look address the Chevron Dress. I did yeah so. But Yeah I really enjoyed her performance. No Stars In des No surprise here. She does incredible. Performance of Spanish version of Roy Emerson's crying. We'll talk about that. You can sit there and listen to it and not start crying. Like Laura. Harring and Naomi Watts I. Think you might need to check your pulse. Of course. Is it live or is it memorex as we'll discuss who cares? It's beautiful. I know. Michael J. Anderson turns up. As to Roque as rock. So let's rock I guess I know. Let's rack so Of course he played the arm. Slash little man from another place. In, the original twin peaks series and Hey Dunkin Todd shows up and form a Patrick Fischler. He does poor per Dan. Yeah, put shows up. Is Dan the guy who gets basically scared into a parent coma by. Yeah. It's a heart attack. Yeah, yeah, by the bum behind winky's. Who obviously. We're GONNA talk about as well Oh. Yeah, for sure so we have lots of things to talk about other cast of note of course Laura Elena, Harring or just now, Laura. As, reading tests yes, as Rita Slash Camilla, Rhodes one of you calling her the Countess because. She, married the great great grandson of Otto von Bismarck. Really Yeah So. Trivia point his full title is Count Karl? Von Bismarck shown housing. So. They were divorced. Let's have a really big business card. Siri. It's like A. It's like a three by five card. Say. Here's my business card. It's like this is an index card. Now. You gotTA. You gotta you gotTa. Put in your briefcase. Can't you put your pocket? They they got divorced, but she kept the title of Countess. Trusting so yeah, and she also not not in twin peaks, but also inland empire. So you've got so many people that were in something tangentially. Does something Lynch Definitely Lynch even. Even Monty Montgomery Yeah Yeah who played the cowboy. He Produced Wild at heart frontier and hotel room. Right I didn't know about hotel room. Yeah, he did Hotel Room, interesting and. Vincent Castellanos who was Federico and twin peaks. He was ed the guy that That Joe the hapless hitman shoots at the very beginning right. He's there and. Just throw. Just throw yes, up in. Devon Berk. And he's off the Adam catcher yeah. Yep Scott coffee is trick in twin peaks also window empire. Was He trick? I didn't realize he was trick. He is also my favorite student. In. Ben Stein's class. In Fair Day off Oh okay? the. The Holly smoot Tariff Act Oh. It's anybody you know. Vice President Bush called this in one thousand nine hundred anyone. Is he the guy that just kind of like with his head on and like he's looking down gotta like is. He's the with his head cocked like. Mouth Breather. Got It so. He's. so He's been around, so yeah, there's there's a lot of. I looked I liked her. But didn't see her right so I need to. I need to pay closer attention, but PHOEBE Augustine isn't clubs, Olympia somewhere. You know who else is in clubs Lindsey Oh. Who Else Shirley? What I didn't see that Oh. Yeah, she's there. When when the when the? It's only obviously just a quick cameo, but yeah, when when Betty and Rita walk into the theater and they start going down the aisle toward their seat. Even notice that she's off to the right. See you guys we got to. This is why your own DVD's? You can watch this kind of look for this. This is why you listen goes the twin peaks podcast because we tell you stuff like this. We tell you silly tree like. Did you know Charles Yeah that Angela Battlement T. Did the. Ninety two summer, Olympics. I did not know so he did the opening. Did you even? I I if I understood correctly the opening theme to the Nineteen Ninety two summer Olympics. You got it. Yeah, so take that settled. And for all of my Elvis Costello Fan friends out there. He's done some projects with. Not Elvis Costello. CRANBERRIES fans. No relation Stella's ex wife but delayed. Projects. You know I'm a big. Fan so that's cool. I didn't know that. Yeah he sure did intend with Tim Tim booth from. From James. Bond, okay, yeah, there was a delayed album song late. No, no, no, it's called. It's called booth. The Bat Angel Okay. Yeah, so I recommend looking at his. James Song I know is laid. You probably know. Sit down. Oh yes, yes. Sit Down next to me, yeah. Yeah! Okay, got it. Yeah and. Jeanne Bates. Yeah, there, you go Jeanne Bates one of the people that meet betting on the plane and one of the little tiny people at the end, right. Is Mary's mother in. Eraserhead, Get up I didn't know that that's her. Yeah, she plays. Mrs X. in I learned something today. You guys she. She knows how to cook just like regular chickens. So? Yeah, there's a lot of lynch players all over this. Yeah, well. One of the great things we talked about this in the pocket David. Lynch is obviously extremely loyal to his actors. And probably you know, imagine like He. He knows you know what they can do and he knows. The kind of roles that he probably wants or. The type of actors that he wants for this type of role, so he's like okay I've got my stable of actors. Let me see if I can get so and so to play this role. Right right he's. You know he knows what he's looking for, and he gets. I think he gets what he needs out of who he works with, so so if if so basically, if you're you know if you're good in and Lynch legs, Love Your Work and you like him, and you get along I. would say you know you got at least the occasional work coming your way if you get the lynch process yeah. I think that's probably a big deal to him because he is so. UNORTHODOX, with his storytelling, and some actress can't deal with it, they don't like not knowing what script about and stuff yeah. Not to not to speak ill of the dead or anything like that, but I don't think he's you know. I? Don't think you know. Chad Everett is your you know no, David Lynch cutting I. Don't like Chad Everett at all so well. Somebody, we should probably mention because one of the things about this is that he brings in a few kind of old Hollywood types Sim classic Hollywood people. Yeah, so so we including Chad Everett who plays Jimmy cats in this who is just? A wee bit ski in this. Chad. Chat ever ski like. I always felt like Chad. Everett probably is in real life, the type of character he plays an airline to probably we should. Obviously that's where I primarily know him from Simon Kurtz in airplane to the sequel. Simon's turned to jelly. The, greatest sound effects in history out of What are the best lines in that? Whole you. Started Jelly, His whole like, but he's going to be in charge of babies, Mr Mrs Simon Kurtz and that's an order. I'll bet he's really liked that in real life. Because there is that there is I believe it's a Dick Cabinet show where he talks about how he has animals, but his wife is his favorite animal. He owns Oh really oh. Yeah, look that up on Youtube where he says well. My wife She's my. She's my favorite animal. That I own and Lily Tomlin was also on the show. That you own. Oh, I have to leave and then Lily Tomlin just up and walks away interest, and then he makes a comment after it's gone. That I. Think is a dig at Lily Tomlin's lesbianism. Okay where he's like well. My wife really does does enjoy being cared for by a Man That with a woman like I think he's. He's really kind of I think she likes being cared for by a man. And I think he's really digging it Lily Tomlin when he says that she wasn't open back then, so this must have been. She wasn't necessarily, but I still think you know. into the public and open in Hollywood or Hollywood people know. Tell me that people didn't think the tyrone power and. We're. Friends. Like. People who knew Cesar, Romero and tyrone power. They knew it was going or rock Hudson for that matter. You'RE GONNA. Tell me that doors day didn't know what rock Hudson was up to right. They were like besties. Of course she knew all that stuff so anyway. I felt like it was a little bit of a day, but yeah. I feel like Chad. Everett is probably that he's probably probably exactly. I've and that's why he was so good at it because he he's primarily. But he because he is that guy, and Miller turns up as COCO. The did you know the end Miller has a pair of tap shoes in the Smithsonian? I believe it yeah. Yeah, she was choose dancer, and so yes, she was in the films. Kiss McKay on the town. Easter Parades Parade Yeah. There's a whole list there, but she's got a star on the walk of fame exactly so, but apparently. This is like her last film. It was exactly her last film, so she didn't really do anything she didn't do any film. From nine hundred, seventy six, until this movie I think she did the occasional TV spot, but this was her last right first film appearance since nineteen, Seventy six, her last film appearance at before she passed away. So also in in that same apartment. Yes. Leader Yeah so Damian's bomb turns up. That's how Damian's. That's Davies an thorn. Stevens mob Damian's mom. Or is it? All. We know I'm taking. A stand up at stake wreck. What you're right, so, but what deeming ends up getting sent with some relatives write in the sequel. So you're right. It's not his mom. Oh okay, but but in four and. Again I have like so it's like an. Honest Lebron is. Absolutely. You had me second guessing myself again. You know it's okay. I totally apologize but so. I know relation. No relation. But yeah an thorns, probably like an aunt or something of of Damian's that. Probably. Hey the parents are dead, so somebody's gotTA. Take this kid right. Yeah, yeah and know. But. She was like in the heat of the night, the nineteen sixty seven. Film classics. Yeah she also was in. Shampoo. FOR WHICH LEADING! Won An Oscar for that, so yup, and let's let's let's not forget James Karen. Who I don't know if you're a big poltergeist, Fan Turrell's. I'd like poltergeist. I'm not a big Fan, but I like poltergeist. Yes, the original began for guy so the guy that Criti- Nelson is screaming at son of a bitch. Move the cemetery, but you left the bodies. Didn't you all? That is James Karen. Yes, that's cool. I just found out, yeah! was good friends with Buster Keaton at the end of towards the end of your life. He was a good friend of author Keaton's interesting. Yeah, so now an actress that. Is has a pretty notable appearance in this Melissa George. Now? A lot of people don't know her. Not Familiar with her, but I became a fan of hers when she was on the TV series alias. She's. It didn't watch that. Yes, he and she's in season she's. She's primarily in season three, but but she's really. She was really good on that. Recently, if you're a star trek discovery fan like I. She played the modern. You know the the current version of Veena. Who is one of those characters? That appeared in the original star trek pilot the cage. Captain Pike original people exactly so so essentially. This is Pike. Pike is in season two as captain of the US discovery. So she gets the acquainted with. Veena. So. Played this time by Melissa George. That see that's one of the cool things about that. Show is just that you know you're really were warded as a star Trek Fan yeah exactly and I'm hoping that will continue because now. Pike's getting his own TV show. With strange strange new worlds, which is the title? I heartily recommend because. Yeah! I was published in Star Trek Saints. New Orleans back acts really. Were Title. Yes, she plays Camila roads before. Yeah, she's the short hearing place. She's the original. Camilla Rhodes or That is the girl. Yes, that is the girl she's. The girl appears she was the girl the first time around. Yes, Djilas the girl that all this mobsters one in who Mr Rock, wants exactly initially yeah. Actor that turns up. That's in I. Think is particularly fond of this film, Billy. Ray Cyrus. Billy Ray Cyrus is one of my favorite parts of this movie as loved? Guy. I got the pool. She got the pool man. I wanted to buy that judge of Rolls Royce. I Love Billy Ray Cyrus in this movie because it's at the time. When this movie came out in two thousand and one, we really hadn't heard from billy ray Cyrus, right. We're four awhile. And I don't even I. Don't even know where we were in. The scheme of things isn't comes to him and this. Is this obviously after breaking hard? Oh Yeah. It was like ninety, three, ninety, four or something like that. Yeah, and so everybody knew billy ray Cyrus Ganz before. Hannah Montana, though see I think yeah. I think it was close to being because I think around this time. Hannah Montana wasn't around yet, but I think it was still lizzy McGuire type of world. There's usually only one. Thousand Six sitcoms that would have been five years after this. Yeah, so we really hadn't heard too much about billy ray Cyrus, but the one thing we knew about billy ray Cyrus is that he has the most epic mullet in the history of mullets. It's up and it's. Who's got a better mullet billy ray, Cyrus macgyver. And don't say Simon Lebon macgyver her close to like here. Billy Ray. Cyrus is all like. It. Depends on what you look for in a mullet so I I think you're selling. Your mullet's too short. That's what I'm saying. I don't know. I'm loyal loyal to the macgyver mullet, but. Dini Anderson I'll Richard Anderson mullet. Okay, that's a good one. That was pretty iconic as well but. So I remember when I first saw this movie in the theater. and. Adam the. CASHERE- Yes, yes, the amount of cash director character just. Just throw his character. Comes home after having a bad day on the set. and. He sees the Pool van in his driveway right, but he doesn't see the pool guy anywhere, and then he goes and finds the pool guy in his bedroom in his bed with his wife. and. He just says you've just got to turn around and forget about this man I mean he's just so like nonchalant. He's like I'm doing your wife, but you just gotTa. Deal with it, man. That's how that's how it works. And she's laid back just he's just like okay. You know this is happening I know this is happening, so let's just talk. Frankly, yeah, let's I'm not even going to pretend yeah exactly. So it's negative, hide under the you know in a in a bedroom or something. Yeah, yeah, exactly so. Front. And then, Adams wife is like. Why are you even here? Like she's really horrible to him. It's a lot of golf because you get the first of all, you get the impression that house. was bought because he's director exactly. It's. It's. That he, he's he. Paid for it. Yeah, it's probably it's probably his. Work that paid for it. I don't know if the house was there before she was there or what, but you sort of get that sense especially when you have. Two people who were kind of just shitty people, yes. There's there's probably a real superficial nature to their relationship, right? But. You Know I. Am not going to sit here and judge what other people do in their marriage. Okay, yeah, you want to have an open marriage. If you're polly, I don't care. That's your business. But it it takes a special kind of goal in my opinion to have an affair. In your own house in your own marital bed. Okay, yes. Have you ever seen in cool look like know you're going to have an affair ticket elsewhere is what you're saying. Or as Ironically as. As Dana. Carvey used to say take it to Mulholland. I! Don't know if you've ever seen the movie. Silver linings playbook yes. Well the Bradley, Cooper character is in a mental hospital. Because he almost murdered someone, he almost beat somebody to death. And I'm not saying he should. As Chris Rock likes to say I'm not saying he should have killed him. I'm just saying I understand. and. He said what happened was is Bradley Cooper comes home. Finds his wife in his house with another man having sex in the shower, not only are they in his house. His his well. It's. So he comes home. Finds his wife in the shower with another guy and in in their house in their married house. Yes, and the song that played at their wedding for their first dance is what is on the Stereo right? And he loses his freaking mind and goes off on this guy. Understand the guy. The. Guy Has the gall to look at him and say. I think you should leave. To somebody in his own house. And Bradley Cooper goes crazy on and I can't say I'm shocked I mean that's. That's some goal, so she's got some goal, so he takes her jewelry. Adam takes her jewelry. goes to the garage fines paint. That looks like PEPCO abysmal. Yeah I don't know what. Serious Pink. Yes, it's a serious pink. And just Joshua box the the pink room. It's the pinker that's that's what's in the house. Yeah, there's there's you know. He's got a string bass player. In this room. Pours the pain all over the jewelry and she's screaming at him trying to get him to stop so billy ray Cyrus comes out of the bedroom. Picks him up and pushes them out and says. That ain't no way to treat your wife man. I don't care what she's done. Larry. Is the best three minutes at this whole movie The deadpan expression. Most, it's the funniest three. It's whole movie I love the palate cleansing nature of the Billy Ray Cyrus appearance in this movie. Because, there's obviously some very dark stuff in this movie, but Billy Ray Cyrus, but Lynch. Lynch has as a way of like. Maybe he realizes that okay. This movie's getting even a little too dark for me. We need some comedy here. We need billy. Ray Cyrus his. Exactly, so so here's another. One of those where you're like he's. He's a perfect character. Because he has that. Reputation as being kind of a hillbilly. So it works for him here because it really works for. The bill, pool guy. He's the Hillbilly Pool Guy, but he's also. A lot bigger than Adam and a little bit more manly than Adam. So Shaina guns big time in this movie. Sons out outguns out and he's also very. I! Don't know what I want to say I. DON'T WANNA. Say Moral, but he definitely has. A code of conduct that I know your wife cheating on you, but you don't propane on her jewelry. Interesting. Interesting set of morality. Yeah, and so he's he was very recognizable. And I hate to say this because it sounds more elitist than I want it to okay. But. When it comes to David I. Don't think there were a lot of David Lynch fans who were big achey breaking heart fans. I think that's a safe assumption I would bet that a lot of people who were watching David Lynch movies when the whole line dancing craze came about, they were very dismissive of it and sort of looked down on it, so yeah, that's. Not exactly the same crowd really right. It's nice crowd any had that. You know noth- nothing against it, but definitely. It was a different the same way I think the Achey. Breaking Heart would have thought that they did. Lynch crowd was Weirdos exactly. So you know in in general like stereotypically in general because. These two groups do not meet on the ven diagram, not usually. Although apparently, they do here at this one in this one scene and it's one scene. Yeah, like I, don't I. DON'T WANNA. Say Uneven where the circles overlap. Yes, I don't I. Don't want to be a person that ever says that anyone. Creative Endeavor is inherently better than another one. All I know is I got so damn sick of that song. Just because it was everywhere, you and a lot of people don't worry I. Think I could listen to that song sooner than I could listen to roll with it by Steve Winwood. Okay, because that is the song I always go to when I say I can't believe. I listen to the song. Thousand Times in one week of a summer. That was overplayed so. Interesting so there are some songs like that where I'm like I. If I never hear, that's. Too soon and it can break. Your heart was one of them because even even. Achey breaky song by weird. AL, Yeah Okay like thirty seconds entered on I can't. I'm out I heard this one way too much. Memories, and that song is about how that song was overplayed. Even that I'm like I gotTA. I gotta back away, so he was, he was recognizable from being gigantic like five years before. So, everybody sort of I think there were some people when I saw the theater that we're like. So people started to Giggle and I know this is. It fear out like what Oh. My billy ray cyrus like everybody figured it out because he was everywhere for a while. Yeah, so I mean I. Essentially Billy Ray Cyrus as the last guy. You would ever expect to turn up the David Lynch film. And these. And in the. David Lynch film in the bed of one of your main characters. I will forever have a soft spot in my heart for billy ray Cyrus for exactly that'd be really re Cyrus. Another one is another country I. Do not think country musicians. Get enough. Recognition for being good musicians. He's a very good guitar player. And so. So I'm not trying to slouch him I. Just really hated that Song! I'm sure I'm sure Dj. Nick would agree with you on that one. I Dj Nick should at least understand what it was like in one, thousand, nine, hundred hundred. Show. The show, he should at least understand what it was like. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, two to have to be that was that was pop radio that was country radio music. It was your grandma liked it everywhere, but I will forever have a soft spot for Billy Ray Cyrus because this movie, okay? All right so. The other cast members of note that you want to bring up before we move on well I. Did want to bring I wanted to go back for a second. To Jeanne Bates Mary's Mary his mother. was in a twilight zone. And the you of course being a huge twilight zone fan, big twilight zone fan, and this is an episode that most people know it's a good life. Oh which is the one with the little boy who can wish people into the cornfield with bill mummy. Me As a little boy? Yeah, interesting. In that in that episode? All the families all get together. His his mother is played by. clarks Leach men. But there's a group of neighbors that all get because of course anthony. Street is the only street left in the world, apparently according to everybody else so because he's wished everybody away. So. They get together. For somebody's birthday party and the guy whose birthday it is, he just starts yelling like. Why are we putting up with this somebody? Pick up a table or chair and hit him in the end it and then Anthony wishes him into being a Jack in the box. Yeah! Jeanne Bates plays the wife of the Jack in the box. So, she's. Just wanted to shout out to the twilight zone episode. That's cool. That's cool all right. Now obviously, we talked about. This is GonNa be really hard to break this movie down, so here's our attempt. Okay so. Break this into like five topics maybe six depending on how we do. In how goes topic number one? Let's talk about Betty. So Betty Elms in Rita. In what we might as well call reality number one. Reality Number One. I was originally going to call the dream, but Zan corrected me wisely and so. How do you know what's the dream on the re the real world? So that's the thing. This is David Lynch I. Don't know what's the dream and what isn't because it does. Not to get too far ahead of ourselves, but it does feel like something happens, and then we wake up into a more gritty reality. And I think that you know because especially right now in this time of just living through horrible nece all the time. That I feel like we are conditioned to think that the grittier the reality of the more real it might be. Right. But. What is with Irene and Irene's husband, being those little people that come out of the box who come? Who are who are running around Diane's apartment like that to me, makes this all bets are off? That's why I don't know what to dream in. What's real so you like you said reality reality to or what I was saying pre solent CEO and post. And that's and that's another great way to put. It is because. because it almost with clubs, and unless he has seen we're going to. We're obviously devoted segment to that, but. It almost like that's kind of like a transition between these town realities now they do tend to kind of crossover. these two realities back and forth a little bit right we've got. We've got glimpses of the second year in the first reality. We've got some similar names you've got. The waitress who starts out as Diane, but then she's betty later on right. And the Real Diane shows up in in the betty reality as the dead body that Betty and Rita come across in. Yes, the apartment right so. So. Yeah, there's there's a lot of criss cross a little bit here, so that's. These these these two realms, these two realities kind of Blur into each other at times. That's obviously going to make this a little challenging to talk about so bear with us as we try to break this down. Watching David Lynch. You know how to keep up exactly exactly. This isn't your first Rodeo I'm sure now, so so should we just try to run through this as? know the film goes, or how do you WanNa do this? I think I think the only linear way we can do. This is chronological now so all right so the movie opens. After a little bit of a jitterbug sequence. Right which doesn't really come doesn't really make sense until you see the Sylvia. North Story Right. And even that we don't get a whole lot of what's going on with that why I think it also that we don't get until we see. Naomi Watts Diane where we find out that she wanted jitterbug contest and came from Canada. She wanted Jitterbug. Contest came from Canada, and it starts out. You're thinking okay here's this these nice. Sixties. clean-cut kids, yes, and then cut to betty getting off the plane. This clean cut kid. Yeah, so maybe you're thinking that, and then you see the Sylvian North Story and you're wondering is this. Does this something to do with that? She's going addition to that. And then you find out what the jitterbug contest you're like. Oh, it's. It's all just sort of tangentially just sort of right. It's the I just thought of this, and I probably said it before, but I just thought of it again with this particular movie that David Lynch plot is like Sam Beckett's theory of time. It's. Here's the beginning of your life. Here's the end of your life, and it's not just a big string. You crumple it up and all the pieces touch each other right. And that's what's going on. It's there's all these tangential things that are touching each other that don't necessarily relate to one another in an that's something that's very common with Lynch obviously that. These little tidbits that. They're not directly related to one another, but they like you, said tangentially you. Touch one another a little bit. Yes, exactly all right so so. We see. This Limo this Cadillac as we're told. Going along Holland drive above Los Angeles. and. Then somebody is frigging tailgating, right? and. What have we learned from David Lynch movies about tailgating? Don't tailgate. How many currently? Keep your ticked to stop at a safe right to see if we stop otherwise Robert, Louisiana is gonNA. Lay into! Yeah, you know how how many currently so you need to stop safely when you're going fifty five miles and her six six, frigging curling's okay. I want you to get a manual. I want you to read that mother effort. Exactly now, wish you tell me you're not gonNA tailgate. We really need to discuss that. That's so need to discuss that. So this is where we're. We see Laura Harring as. At this point, we do Brunette getting the limo. The driver stops gets her out of the car at gunpoint or tells me get out of the car gunpoint, but before she gets out of the car. The. Wacky teens that apparently drag racing or something. plow into the Limo Yep. So the drivers were told her killed, but. the woman. Brunette gets out of the CAR. She's kind of obviously affected by the accident. Starts walking down the hill. Toward! Like like you know it's. It's kind of like on. The road is kind of like alongside this kind of Cliff, mobile and drivers in the Hollywood hills. Yeah, exactly so she goes down the hill. Yes, yet toward toward the city. Braved the distance because and then she ends up going to this -partment complex. And then she sneaks it to one of the departments that belongs to Ruth Elms. Ray Betty's aunt Ruth Betty Betty's aunt, Ruth. We find out later. WHO's leaving by this point? And because her her niece, betty is going to be coming to stay, so she ends up. Hiding in. The apartment passes out. and Later she's been. She has a head injury. Yes, exactly. So so essentially, maybe a little concussion do who knows. And then, of course we've got some police detective that kind of later, come across the accident and and one of them. You know probably I think it's rob foresters. McKnight. Kind of. He kind of like gets the feeling that Oh. Hey, she must have walked off into the woods that way. Down the hill. Seeing a David Lynch movie who would walk off into the woods? What's exactly then never? That never happens characters going. Right that's you. Have you have a? Midnight Dom Guard which are not exactly the most. On it always officers right exactly. It's not exactly the shield is. Let's put it that way. New or the wires yeah. So Betty. We're introduced. Betty, who shows up? You know rise from Los Angeles from Deep River Ontario. In she's exactly like your ideal actress from fifty s Hollywood. Why and just so happy why? Got She's got the the tight pink sweater. Looking very much like you know, just someone just stepped right out of that era. She kind of reminds me of like what have what would. You must have been like for lifebeat beater down exactly before before she hooked up with Dougie, I hooked up with that whoring gambler shown exactly. Yeah. Maybe maybe that's another reality. Where like you know, she ends up. Becoming Gene Jones in that. One day. I just blew your mind and I. Yeah, there's one more waitress it. winky's named Janey and Her to Or maybe the DELARE, ooh, ooh, see, that's the thing I mean. David Lynch movies are nothing but diners and awesome furniture. Why can't live in that reality? Show right well. Part of me wants to, but then part of me thinks about all the horrible stuff that goes on there, so maybe I will onto. I just want to be somebody innocuous like like. You know yeah. I just wanted like. I. Just want to be one of the customers at the diner. A double our that's. Yeah or Heidi Heidi. Yeah, there you go, you know he all the time hey GEICO. German I could do that there. You go there, you go. You know that's a good life goal I think. so she's She's apparently I think she must've spent the flight with these this elderly couple this older couple. Yeah and yeah, and Irene and Rearend, husband and She's talking about how like you know. She's hopes to make it big as an actress and her aunt. Ruth is allowing her to stay at her place. And, so they kinda part. Betty goes off in a taxi cab or something, and then we see the couple. Going off their taxi. And they had and they have the creepiest. Ask Big grins on their face. Something is up with them, and I just wonder if play. unnaturally distorted into these large smiles. That kind of this very black hole sun smile. Video. Yeah yeah that. that. Video where if you haven't seen the video, I would highly recommend it because it soundgarden. It's very good, but right because he's really exaggerated. Smiles that are that scared the crap out of me. When I first saw that video again got turn. Turn the channel so I wonder. So, what do you think they were smiling? I have a theory. I think they're the key to all of this I think they are to. The supernatural force that's behind all this day they are the firemen, and the and the Daito this. The senator died Daito Yeah. Yeah, and the reason I think that and again I'm not trying to get ahead of myself, but this is David Lynch. It's not linear thing no. When? We later. See that blue box. Yeah, you know. When we first opened the blue box and we just go right into it and it goes it goes. Right sexist didn't now starting to become gotten different reality, but then we see later, and they come out as these little tiny people that are just laughing hysterically like under the door. You know because they're so small. Kinda like cackling maniacally, go he. They're I think they're the key to everything. That is what that's. What starts this? Yeah, so so maybe this was just poor. Betty or you know in this in this reality at least runs afoul of these people. And they decide to like. Oh. Hey, let's just mess with your life. Yeah, it's just you know if if. It's a bad encounter. Let's put it that way. Just like Bob you know all it takes is one camping trip when you're fourteen and your life is ruined. He just kept flicking matches at me. Yeah seriously. So yeah, you know all it takes is one bug to go and your throat and run guide work. You're screwed. Pretty much so all right so she. Yeah so betty shows up at the apartment building her aunt, Ruth. How apartment she meets Coco. Played by Miller who's like I love Miller she's a great. You know like really friendly landlady type. She's really friendly. She's very caring and. She says you know. If they weren't any good, they wouldn't be living here because I'm a good judge of people. and. This is. I don't mean this in any offensive sort of a way, but. She is very classic old Hollywood right. And so you get the feeling that COCO is. You know who? She is in real life. That, she's classic Hollywood that she was in the movies, and now she owns this property and takes care of people here. The. Go ahead. Go sorry, go ahead and the reason I say that is because, and this is something that I have seen in older old Hollywood people. There's just way too much makeup because Hollywood is so dysfunctional, especially for women right in the sense that you can't look old, and you can't look fat in. You can't look short, and you can't look and other still Cetera et, Cetera, et, Cetera et, Cetera et Cetera, and you. You have to look like whoever it is at the time, and whoever it is at the time can can change. So. So the fact that Koko. Has That jet black dyed hair and way to Jamaica up? Just reminds me of just obviously not looking like her natural self would write just reminds me of classic classic Hollywood. These are women who just were used to getting dolled up all the time. And the ring too much to look younger, and they're dying their hair to look younger too much hairspray too much everything and I'm thinking if somebody like A. And again I don't mean to be an insult. I think it's I. Think it's the systematic Hollywood machine that makes people feel like they need to do this in this, and they are known no less beautiful, because are amazing women, but I'm thinking if somebody like. A Debbie Reynolds Aurelien Mary weather. And I hate to say it, but the last time I saw her a gates McFadden. Way Too much makeup. Shame, but that was, but I think that's the thing I mean that's that's the thing you have. Hollywood, everybody's got an expiration date. Until you are like Betty White. and. You're like this this. Quirky thing. Especially women have a real expiration date in Hollywood and I feel like she I feel like the way. She looked really told a lot of a story about her past that that David did necessarily give us yeah, but I think she had been. She had been betty at one point she had come to Hollywood. Well, there's some stuff. That's one of the things you know now that you bring it up. That's something that I kind of noticed vibe that I got. What I think would lynch was going for. With Betty, being the like aspiring actress that new like Wannabe New Hollywood. So essentially what you had in coca kind of looks out for for betty she really so essentially. It's like old Hollywood. That has been through some things they seen. Some things seen some things. They've already been placed. They've already been places and so so coco was kind of like only Hollywood. Looking out for new Hollywood a little bit. Yeah. So that's the kind of vibe. I got from that. I think so too yeah. so. She kotex Betty to her aunt's apartment. Betty goes inside fines Oh. Hey, there's like naked Brunette in the shower. Which I think is I think it's interesting because. Naturally assumes like Oh. Are you like a friend of my aunts or something? That's weird to me. I mean I. Right I feel like somebody. Would have told me that I feel like my aunt would have said. Oh by the way. Read is GonNa. Be there to like I would have been like pretty sure. What mentioned that? Yeah, yeah, but I think because. First of all the Rita character was naked so obviously very vulnerable and not a threat at the time. And! Maybe better being. To a little bit that is naive, and but also read it being injured and beautiful right? She seems a little. She seems a little less threatening. You know, so she's and. Again Benny probably thinks you know. Oh, cocoa knows everything that's going on in here. This is probably level. There's probably a lot of things going on with that, but yeah. That I'd be like the hell. Yes that that would have free freaks me out if that happened yeah! Now obviously you know, I might have a different reaction, but you know. Hey, you know finding naked Laura Harring in the in the shower, but you know I think you finding naked, Laura. Hearing the shower is going to be a little less terrifying than me finding could. Probably I think I'd come to it with a much more practical from a practical standpoint, yeah! Maybe terrifying. If you're like my wife, Lori was there and they can Laura. Harring was in the shower, but It'd be like yeah yeah. We should call the cops. This isn't this isn't right, is it? Yeah exactly you'd be? You'd be like. Should. Do something about this you'd be. You'd be like Seth Rogan in. A forty year old, virgin right there in the bathroom with Elizabeth banks as we should go from here. Michigan far away from here. We should get out here and he's like getting undressed is saying. We should. We should get out of here. so they talk a little bit. Of. Door hearing comes out and after seeing a Gilda movie poster. Starring of course Rita Hayworth. Nineteen forty six film. which was hanging up the bathroom? She calls herself Rita. She introduces herself as read it, but then later admits I. Don't remember who I really am. I don't know my name I have. So, we'll come back to the seventies I have Amnesia exactly. Yeah, same nausea was not a plot point that we'd seen. While no, but it's obviously something that comes up a lot in like. Soap Opera Troupe. It's a soap opera tope I feel like it was like a three's company type of. Like I feel like in the seventies. It was it was nothing but. In quicksand. Quicksands Echo in this going. Yeah it's. Yeah, if you've watched any episodes of Charlie's angels from the seventies, you knew the angels Scooby Doo. Like quicksand was everywhere, and I still didn't even know we're. Well the yeah. Yeah Amnesia for sure was it was a big one. So. Betty. Trying to help you that it's like okay. We need to figure this shit out. And so. They try to open a like looking at purse like okay. Maybe you've got some info. Identification and somebody can figure this out. One hundred twenty five thousand dollars exactly Oh, in a bizarre blue key, a blue key. That doesn't really look like a key. Yeah. So. Apparently the this is important to something. So what we do, we decide. We're GONNA. Listen to put in a hatbox in stored in the cloud. We're GONNA. WE'RE GONNA hide it in the closet. We don't know who's might be coming after this. Yeah, I'm sorry if you make one hundred twenty five thousand dollars in cash, and you don't know who you are. You can probably expect that somebody bad is looking for you, yeah! So so but meanwhile. They One of focus tenants Louise Bonner played by Lee. Grant shows up. Tries to warn betty that. Hey, there's trouble in there, so someone's in trouble. which has ever get signed a David Lynch film? When when a woman dressed up like stevie nicks with like a black veil over her head. Yeah, I'm so your apartment and tells you that there's trouble something's wrong. Yeah, yeah. This is like a Mega Goth Cenex. Secrecy, that's possible. Stevie Nicks. The and the and the psychic grandmother from A. PHANTASM. Up into one character here. Yes! Like stevie nicks went to hot topic, but basically. Yeah basically burn down hot topic well, that's a whole different thing. Sorry, that's the whole, yeah. so cocoa basically apologizes say look. Louise's clairvoyant in her warnings are often correct. Yeah, so you careful I don't know what's going on but I am going to trust you to take care of it exactly so this is apparently the you know. The big warning signs. Something's up here. Now her Betty's eight ruth range for an audition for Betty And so re runs lines with Betty. and which they think is Kinda funny because of that dialogue. It's not a good ice. Makes, it nearly watched us. Such a good performance actually makes it a little bit better than I think it really. Well Yeah, you know so so basically Betty shows up at the audition. And then we talked about Chad Everett, so his character is there. And She's supposed. Betty supposed to act against him in the scene. De Really GonNa chat ever total Chad Everett in this scene. He is so perfect for this because he's got really do believe. Chad ever is probably the kind of guy that would have sex with his best friend's daughter. And Chat ever it in the scene is rocking the Donald Trump. ORANGE, skin! If? He's like weighed ten and he's like fake tans way, too. Touchy feely with her before they even get touchy feely. Yeah, exactly! Yeah, it's he's. He's just kind of so because she does a really really good job because the scene is basically. What are you doing here? My parents are upstairs. Why are you still here and We should not. We should never have done this year. My Dad's best friend. This is terrible I hate you. I hate us both and just. Kill you and I love that where she it starts to get really passionate. It gets very erotic. It's erotic where she's. Like. She's like I. Hate you hate us. Both and she's. She's breathing really heavily, and it's a phenomenal acting performance. It's fantastic, and then it's like. To get out, or what right are Kellyanne? Yeah so good, right? Just memorizing of obviously the everybody else in the room thinks so as well. Everybody else is dairy by this air balloon away with andover with an erection. because. It's a really erotic radically done seen, but they're grabbing their scripts going like I'll just kind of. Script in front. In my lap here for a while. Anyway notebook as I walked to class. So. So. But, but apparently betty does so well that One of the agents there. Decides to take her to go see Adam casher. Who is casting for the Sylvian north story exactly so they go over there and. You know. UNBEKNOWNST to Betty. The part has been earmarked for Miller roads. Earmarked by Mr Rock and all the other exist. Mobsters. There's something really yeah, we'll talk. Separately but yeah. But essentially sort of like like Johnny Fontaine deal. With. Exactly exactly exactly. Now interestingly, Betty, Adam kind of make eye contact for a little bit as she walks and. Adams kind of looking at her like well that should be the girl, but I can't cast the garage. Yeah, because otherwise you know the cowboy will like. Destroy? Cowboys Toby which do in somebody who's frozen, my assets and stay in a crappy hotel exactly and I can't go back to my house because the pool guys there with its pool. Guys there and frankly, there's just pick paint everywhere. It's a mess and I don't want to clean it up. It's damned if I ended up. So, but betty panics a little bit. She's like. Something you know after that look. She panics and she's like well. I need to go back because hey. I need to keep this date with Rita that we were gonNA. Go check out Diane Selwyn place I had. I promised a friend. I'd help her I have to go I'm sorry I have to go. Yeah, so so she ends up back and they go. Betty Rita go to the park number twelve. which weird about that though is, it's almost it's almost like betty can sometimes smell a bad scene. But not enough. No, no, you know. She should be able to. I I feel like she should have been able to smell her way out of Danielle apartment. Cheryl yeah, exactly because you know. Hey, there's a corpse in there and sure it didn't smell very good. You think you. Would have been noticeable before they went inside and even just the whole when they get there and there's. Two guys case in joint and yeah, exactly yeah I think she's just caught up in the mystery of Rita I mean. Rita is serious very. You know very sweet and very beautiful, but very mysterious, and there is an air of danger around her that I. Think Intrigues, Betty. It's kind of like what happens with Comic Lachlan's character Jeffrey Beaumont and Blue Velvet. Exactly what happens? This dangerous, but this woman is mysterious. She needs my help. She's beautiful. I've got I've got to figure this out I. figure out what the Hell is going on here. Yeah, you're right. I didn't think about that. That is exactly the same kind of thing, yeah? So. So, he ended up apparently. Of Women Answers, but it's not Diane Selwyn. It's a neighbor. Who tells them women all? Hey! I, switched apartments with Diane. She's number seventeen. And I want to tell her that he still has some of my stuff. My plates maybe. Like I want my records back, okay? so they go to number seventeen. Knock on the door. Nobody Answers surprised because. Hey, there's a dead woman side so they betty breaks in so like a whole breaking and entering thing going on. And then it's all dark of course and disturbing, and because hey, it's David Lynch right so they go in there and they find Diane Sell One's body laying face down on the bed. Yeah, it's not a good scene. Yeah, and yes and this. Apparently has been awhile because their chorus is pretty emaciated. It's kind of blue and starting to dig. Yeah, it's. It's a little bit. It's pretty nasty yeah. So, apparently, some time has passed. and. Actually they? They kind of freak out a little bit. Go back to their place. To. To the Betty's apartment. And restarts like going into the bathroom and trying to cut her hair. And Let's see so. Betty's like that. He tells her known. Don't cut your hair. Just wear this blonde wig for some rea- now. What? She's worried that whoever is looking for her is who killed Diane Selwyn. Okay, so it's so. It's more like you know the guys that might be after that money. Right! Disguise you you're gonNA. Wear this blonde wig right because those guys were at Diane someone's apartment complex, and then they find Diane so when dead so I think she's afraid. And she started. Her. If she, starting to remember the bad things were going on that you don't. You don't usually wind up one hundred thousand dollars in cash after eight night of being a level. So I think she scared and she just wants to, she wants to. She wants to put on a disguise and hide herself as much as she can. So at this point, this is where it. Kinda turns into a letter from penthouse forum. This kind of thing has never happened to me before. Actually you know what I'm talking. But I was in bed when my. In she was sleeping on the couch is she's on complete like she takes off all her clothes and Clinton the bed with me. She comes in with a towel and I tell her she shouldn't sleep on the couch anymore, so then she takes the towel off. and. We totally do. Exactly, so so read. It gets into bed. They make love. And Betty Tells Rita. She's in love with her. Okay, so at their. Go ahead. It's easy to fall in love with the mystery I think right. Yeah. I mean you know she's very like you said mysterious enigmatic, and let's face it rather attractive woman. She's very beautiful and she. Thinks she was. Laura Harring was a former Miss USA or something right something like that. Yeah, and learn hearings character. This version of Laura herrings character. Is Very honest and is not using her at all. She's very grateful for that. She's helping her. She's to have a front end. They're very sweet with each other, and so I think there's no. No apparent ulterior motive going on no. I think it's very easy to fall in love with with mystery like that. Yeah, so. So at two o'clock that night. and. Here's where we kind of. Do our little transition. Suckle your seatbelts the one eighty digression exactly. Exactly yeah. So Betty. Arena wakes up speaking Spanish. And even though it's like two o'clock in the frigate morning. She's like. Hey, we need to go to this club. You need to come some place with me. It's two in the morning. You need to come someplace with me and the Club is club Salena Zito Since you, which of courses. Espanol for silence. A. So. So redesign her blonde wig. Looks a little bit more like Betty at this point. Looks a little bit more betty, but it's funny now that you mention it. That dress Kinda reminds me. Of Isabella Rossellini stress when of her cocktail, yeah. Yeah. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's not it's not blue, but it's. It's the sort of black one with with the high neck, open openshaw. Exactly. So. They go to this club. and. Real. Yes. Isn't the itchiness is really bad right now so there you go. Come back all right good. Okay, so so they go to this club and I lost I lost. I lost you I. Don't know what I don't know what happened, but it is windy we in. It's supposed to rain all this week's. Who exactly and then you know. We're getting close, but. So. As they after walking down the aisle and walking right past Laura Palmer. Like tossing, which is awesome they sit down and also. There's this performance going on stage where this MC comes out. Talking different languages about everything being an allusion. Which? which is essentially Lynch talking to the audience? Right at this point? don't get attached to anything exactly it's. Like, you know it's like it's basically like the Beatles saying nothing is real. In strawberry fields for so. Rebecca re del Rio comes out. Liftings a Spanish version of Roy orbison crying. He's one of the greatest things you've ever heard in your life ever ever. which is something that you didn't know you want it in two? You heard it. And then once you heard it. You didn't just want it. You need it. To be joyful, pray much because it's so powerful in Rebecca del Rio's. We talked about on this. You know has a three reactive range. So she kills it literally. It's one of the greatest covers the history of cover songs pretty much pretty much. It's fantastic. I never knew I wanted that, but it's not like. Orbison is some slouch when it comes to vocals either. Is a tough one to sing. Yeah, so just kills. It feels it so. She's obviously in that ballpark. And but then she s, she's seeing. She collapses in an but the audio still playing, basically revealing Oh. Hey, it's a recording. It's illusion. It's allusion you can't trust anything. He can't trust anything and Betty Rita or in the stand in the in the audience. Watching this and they start understandably crying because very powerful performance. It's IT'S I. I wouldn't be surprised if that. was a real reaction to them hearing that's on. Yeah, so so That, he reaches into purse finds a blue box. So. We have a blue key now and a blue box. So hey we got to get these two crazy objects together right. I think that would be extraordinarily bad. defined bad. Fuzzy on the adapting. Exactly yeah exactly. That sounds like a text message exchange. Like. They. Did they find the box and Diane Selwyn apartment? Well later you know what you mean when everything they disappear. I can't yeah. I can't remember no. Okay. They don't even find the box. Yeah because it shows up in the. Aunt The, aunt shows up and. It's like she hears the Thud because when the box drops. She walks in. She doesn't look like she sees the box. There's air it's like. It's like aunt. Ruth never left. Yeah, exactly. So, yeah, so but yeah, so so essentially this is. They go back to. Base apartment take out the key the hatbox. that. He suddenly disappears at this point. From this point on, it may all be different exactly. Exactly. Yeah, talking about you know. We've talked about this with the return here the episode Mardi Eighteen When? Cooper in Diane how to cross that threshold? So. So very similar theme there exactly. Gird up surveying, there. The box. They put the key. In. Of course, the box seems to swallow. The bedroom drops to the floor. We talked about that now. It's dark now. It's dark. And then Diane someone's apartment we cut to that in the cowboy shows up telling you. It's time to wake up. so presumably. It's hard telling, but presumably this was a dream. Diane Sell Dream. Well that's. Because of him telling her to wake up, but the question is well. Maybe it's a dream within a dream. See. That's the thing I because. Did we switch realities and she just happens to be asleep in this new reality when we get there. was she having the linear dream of? Of Rita and or Or was it from this point on, it could all be different is is that what happened now? It's different in. This is just what we're seeing. Yeah, no! That's the thing I don't know and I. Don't because I feel like. I feel like her waking up. into reality. Is Too, facile David Lynch. Yeah like I think there's there's more it's too straightforward. Just straightforward to linear I think there's more going on here who? Yeah. Yeah, there's more going on. Than just. PRISCILA NCIA was a dream and postal NCO's, real. Even though there are so many parallels. It's almost like. You know because what we find what we find out is. Rita is now canola. And so she is the girl. And that audition went badly not well and. All that, so it's almost like. A good version of what her life could have been a not so. Easy version of the way her life could have been so it could be that again like I said you've got. Irene showing up tiny and now I! Know All bets are off so I have no idea no idea. Yeah, it's. It's almost like you have to put everything on a big spinning wheel and like okay. This is the answer for this as you spin the wheel, and whatever comes up comes up because I. Don't think there is a clear cut answer here it. It's almost kind of like you know this this. Really Complex tapestry that fold on itself. Like a pretzel. And And It's nothing clear-cut here obviously so. so, what happens at this point now that? We've shifted. We're shifting from one reality to another reality. because. We wake Diane Selwyn wakes up presumably. Right Diane Selwyn. is now played by Dami Watts, so betty is now, Dianne. Right for the and so this is where it gets a little tricky kids. So. In in this reality, Betty is era. Excuse me Diane's. Confuse. Diane is a young Canadian woman who wanted to Jessica. Contest came to Hollywood looking for that fame and fortune. and. In? She hears the sound of someone pounding on her door. So now, Dianne. Does it. Look nearly as clean cut as betty. She is looking a little CDC like she had like a really bad night. In a bar, three M or a Meth, habit or a meth, habit or something, yeah. And, looking really rough at this point basically She shovels to the door. It's seem neighbor that Betty and Rita met. Still looking like wants the rest of her stuff from Diane's apartment. It's been a long enough, Diane. Where am I plates? Exactly so she gives it up. neighbor, Keser gather upper things like it's there on the floor in the box and then leaves, but she also mentioned. Hey, those two detectives came by looking. Yeah, so again. This is where the movie criss crosses realities. Because the cops there. Presumably we thought were in a dream. are also in this reality. Right so it's like a wizard of Oz kind of thing. We're seeing people just in different roles. Right exactly yeah. Okay you were there. And you and you were there when you were there, yeah. So at that moment. Diane notices the normal the Dorky colored blue on her coffee table. Blue Keys again blue keys a different key because the other one was kind of like stick like. That the one of the box, but this one is just a regular kind of standard Dorky. In it's under coffee table She then sees that Camilla Rhodes. Who is now played by Laura Harring. Melissa George. is in the kitchen. Overjoyed and so she's like overjoyed to see her. Then realize Oh, it's a hallucination. And then, from that point, we kind of we start to get the story. That apparently Diet and Camilla met on the send again very similar story, yes. Yes so. Yeah, we find out that apparently. They Diana met on the set of a film. They both auditioned for the lead role in the Soviet nor story. but the role went to Camilla. They end up became coming lovers. And in this reality, Camilla manage to like get some small roles for Diane, but then she got kind of bored. With their relationship. Broke off right. And the director didn't like our in that kind of. So. Diane obviously didn't take this well, and it didn't make any matters easier because Camilla's like opening like. Has this open flirtation with Adam? Director on the set right in front of her. Yeah! There's a scene where like sitting in the car and. Adams trying to show the lead actor how to kiss. Camilla You know like. She her head. Just kind of falls into you know your shoulders or whatever you know. It's yeah here and you. And Diane can stay and has to watch this. Enraged about it seems likely so. So that obviously bothered her understandably, and then she gets. Camilla invites Diane to a dinner party at Adams House on Mulholland drive. And see all of this is just so. It's it's. Pretty EFT up really. It's cruel. Could. Be Upset but. Yeah, it's like yeah. We used to be lovers, and I'm more successful than you, so please come to my boyfriend's house for a party. It means a lot to me that you see me doing better than you I. Mean I think it's been cruel. Yeah, and then once once she's there after being led up this like secret pathway to the house. Kisses another woman. WHO's. Played by Melissa George the one that played the original Camilla. Yeah and then she announces her engagement to Adam in front of Adam's mother who cocoa? COCOA AND COCOA STILL? Is Very caring she's. You know when when they're doing that weird thing where they can't even get out the fact that getting married, they're just giggling. and. Cocos Holding Diane's cocoa knows that like my son is kind of Shit yeah, basically. But. But Essentially Camilla in atom. Has Zero ass as far as Diane's concern at this point for sure. Yeah, they're just they're just. They're just being nasty. You know they're just kind of amused by the whole thing by dance suffering about the. Yep. So Diane who's understand pissed at this point. Goes to winky's. And hires a hitman named Joe eats up with Joe. Joe That we had seen earlier in the film. We haven't talked about Joe but. Is was really bad at being hitman. Yeah his his gun just goes off. Yes basically this comedy of errors that we see, but apparently she hired him to kill Camilla. Yes, and this actor has a history of being a bad henchman. He's the big Lebowski. He's one of the rug pictures. Big? Hey isn't this guy supposed to be a millionaire? Is that actor yeah? So so while she's there in the booth at winky's, and this is the same booth that we had seen. Dan In. The other guy I forget his name. Herb Earlier in the Dannon talking about this dream and see that's another thing like. What's the because Dan starts us on the dream part of it, so yeah, this is weird. This dream even start. Things get really circular at this point. Obviously yeah. So and it makes to make matters worse. She served by a waitress named Betty. Right. It's the same actress playing the waitress, but instead of having the name Diane. She has an embedding exactly so they basically swapped identities at this rate, right, yeah, and So. Let's see in the Joe Tells Diane that he can. Once he completes the job. You leave a blue key in her apartment. Next is so that's is apparently the same key that she finds in her coffee table right so apparently the job was done Camilla was killed. Right it's or so we think. So. Diane, you know. Starts to become wracked with guilt over this. She starts kind of like imagining. Camilla desert. There's a very unexpected masturbation scene. That takes. And it's because she she loves her, but she hates her for being right. As cruel as she is, she's she. You know she. She hates it. She's so cruel, but she can't help but love her, so it's like she. She's trying desperately to be with her even though she's not really being with her at this rate. Yeah, exactly so she's a imagining herself. She's got champagne fantasizing. Yeah, she's got that sort of. Love One can kind of a thing going on exactly so. While so. This she starts getting being the guilt I. Think kind of our Zor. She knows that the police are kind of closing in. So. She ends up going in committing suicide. In the head, and then collapsing dead on the bed. Just lays down. The corpse that Betty and Rita found in the, but in reality number one, and she starts going crazy, and that's when she sees the little tiny people, the little tiny Irena everybody got that. Every getting this far CH- just checking. Yeah, so if you're lost, that's understandable, but welcome. Welcome back. Welcome to the club right? Welcome to the party how. Committed the coast. WE'LL WATCH MAHINDRA WE'LL. Have Left. Exactly so So. That's three topics right there that we went through. And and we still have like even more to talk about. So the question is so the question is. Do we want to like? Cut It here and follow this up in part to. Or, do we want to keep going? Well the movies almost over, so let's finish the and we'll talk. Okay worry. We'll try and hurry this. We'll talk a special features next time all right so So probably the next thing we should talk about at this point is adamant. The cowboy. Yeah. Having the Cowboy Cowie, so we've always seen what Adams kind of up to In the way we're kind of introduced him is like He. He has this meeting downtown. Back in reality number one. Ray with his. Like a couple of producers, and then the the Castellini brothers played by Angelo, bet debt battle, the mentally and Dan Daya. Right and. The brothers Kinda show Catcher the hitch of the actress named Camilla Rhodes. WHO's played? This is the girl. Yeah, they basically say this is who you're going to cast for your film and was like no, no I don't think he's. F You and then they. Freeze his assets, and you know just basically make his life very difficult. Yeah, this is after he gets pissed and goes out and smashes up their limo. Before driving off in his. Yeah right exactly so. They're so sort of Johnny Fontaine deal. That's happened and that's. And that's what he goes home and finds Lorraine with gene. Pool Guy. Gene Pool Guy. We talked about that. And then like some goons show set by the casting the anti show up, beat up. His wife and Jean. The Pride of I love her jumping on the guy get of here. Yeah it really. Is kind of like picks her up because he's so huge and she's so. This guy is like as tall as why. He's not short, so he's just kind of like like it's like he's one of his kids off of his shoulders. going. Get off me and we're not punches her her off. That's right. Because this kind of like backwards punch. Face And, they're just like matter of fact. Just throws her the wall in the floor. She she doesn't have enough of a healthy sense of what's actually the right thing to do. Well to be fair. She kinda had upcoming probably but in. She's well. She's a terrible person, so she can't figure out. Like. Don't jump on a mobster. Maybe especially higher. Higher Dunes higher good yeah. Do I, tell you how to do your job. Scenic, that's how you do Simpson's reference. There you go. That's how it works. That's that's how it's done my friend. All right. So adamant lies low in this like CD. Low Rent Motel. And we're still in the first reality with right, yeah. So you we find it and finds out that basically he's broke. And his he calls his assistant. and. She tells him that. Who Secretly in love with him. Yeah, exactly so basically like you can come over and stay at my place. My place and an atom is like that's really not a good idea. Well, what I think is interesting about. Staying at that really seat you motel. Right, he's been there. He's been there before. Oh, I'm sure. Yeah, because he knows guy the guy. Yeah know his his his wife cheating leading with Billy Ray. Cyrus is not the first infidelity that has happened in this marriage. No I'm sure he's like he knows this place pretty well. It seems like yeah, so any feels must have felt safe to go there, so yeah, he. He's been there before he feels at home. He knows he can lay low yeah. So, Adams Assistance Cynthia tells him okay. This guy named the cowboy wants you to meet with him at a corral at the top of Beechwood Canyon. so Adam is is like okay. The cowboy, what's up this a corral? And tells me. Yeah, just just be there. I'll make sure the meeting happens if you. Go, so he goes. There meets with the cowboy. And the cowboy is very like Mrs tremont kind of character. Very epigrammatic. Cryptic and very. Here's what you need to do. And once he talks to the cowboy. He does what he's supposed to do. And then everything's kind of okay with him. He cast the right girl in the story. And, because from they tell you threatens them says like. If you're told in, you know you're only see me once, but if you don't do what you're told, you'll see me twice two more times. To more times. Yes, yeah, so which obviously a very veiled threat. You were going to be visited by three gifts. Because a little little gets a little Dickensian. They're a little bit. Just a bit. So so basically. We find out that you know later in the film. when when Betty shows up. That's when he tells like he does what he's told. He's like I. Guess I guess I want my stuff and my money back so okay. The girl, this is the girl in, so he gives Camilla the part. and. and. That's you know that's basically what we find out a part. You know we don't see any more from Adam. Until about avenue field with like we talked about his story is the same. In both realities. The only thing that's different. Is the Camilla. Yes. So so apparently, he's consistent. So that's again why I'm like okay, which one's real yeah, and is is any of it. Even real is all of it still just Dan's dream well in the second reality kind of fills in some gaps of information about the first reality. Yeah, as far as Annan's concern, right in. So! So There's that we need to talk about the bomb behind winky's. We gotta talk about the behind Leakey's. Yes, the behind Wiki is terrifying if you'd asked me. As we started out with Dan because big big like. It's a it's a real real. Jump scare yeah, and So Dan. Is, in Winky's, and he's talking to her as I had a dream and you were in it and we were in this booth. We were in this diner and this happens, and then we go up and he's like it will show me what happens in the dream. So you see them walking to behind a dumpster and then this? Filthy looking bump comes out. This monster kind of looking character is pretty superhuman character, sub-human, looking character, and and it freaks out Dan so bad that he has a heart attack. And then. When everything is done at the end of this movie when we think Camilla's may be dead and Diane Shot Herself. We see it's nighttime this time. Yes, so we go back around to the dumpster. winky's and we see a very similar looking character, yeah! So in in at this point. Creature for lack of a better word. because. It doesn't really look human. Funding a blue box. That's the blue box. So essentially like you know if you're wondering where that would happen at the box, apparently, the pump gets it and so is it the bums dream? or Maybe. This is the third reality. Where Betty disappeared and began. Does she. Maybe Betty becomes the bomb. I don't know that's that's the that's the thing about. This is the key. Yeah, and not literally that is the key to this whole story the box. Yeah, is it? Is it Dan? Is Betty the bum? What you don't know? There's so many different elements you see like maybe like red herrings. Possibly? The first time I saw this movie I saw that bump handling. That box I just thought to myself. I have such sights to show you. What the Hell is going on. With this box and get no, that's that's a rule. Apparently, the bum is a center bite, but the bone I think is a Senate bite. I and I think the bum is a prototype for a woodsmen from the return from twin peaks their return, just with the Y-, just the dirty. Filthy face yeah, all of it is is like that so I just this. That's a great great observation. Because Yeah I. Mean I can totally see Lynch being fired or just. Saying. That's the kind of character. I want yeah right, but just let this be a lesson to you kids if we learned anything from the movies yeah. Mysterious boxes don't touch them yeah. Don't touch him well. There's two things we learn. Don't go behind back in behind a restaurant in the alleyway behind the restaurant. You know what's what's behind the dumpster behind diner, the grease trap. Yeah, okay, it stinks back there. You don't want to go well especially as I grew up in a restaurant. Okay, a family restaurant. But. especially if you're having a dream. that. There's something horrible back there. There's GONNA BE! There's GonNa be so. The grease dumpster. It's GonNa. Be raccoons something bad? Don't go exactly so you know like if you have a dream about it in your frayed about it. Don't go looking for it. Just leave it alone. You know move on with. A mysterious box. That's not yours. Yeah, don't touch. It is going to change your if you're gonNA. Change a reality for the worst or at the Senate bite right. Okay, and nobody wants that. Yeah, no, it's not a good look. No so. So, yeah, you either end up as Diane Selwyn or your. Bone behind the dumpster or Or something or your Doug Bradley! Doug Bradley exactly. With puzzle boxes, yeah, exactly. Yeah, no stay the hell away. But. It's got pins on your head. Go Fix. Or Your Catherine Martell and your brother is Danaher real he. Tried to figure out if it's your birthday or ECK, hearts, birthday, or whatever and you and you know what it is. It's a key to a bomb all right. Stay away from mystery boxes pretty much. Yeah, yeah, gives you nothing but trouble so nope. Important safety tip thinks in. Art That's bad. We should try from. Talk a little bit about Joe the Hitman. Because Joe, the Hitman has a very funny sequence in the first reality. Yeah shoots. Think is going to be his partner. And then accidentally shoots the woman the next office. Yeah, 'cause! He's talking with this guy in any supposed to like. We find out that he was looking for this black address book. so he shoots that guy. But because of his competence he has to like. He shoots. Through the wall into the next in the office next door or whatever it hits this like. Heavy set lady. She's it's. It's one of those like rent an office type. Expect like Sam Spade to have an office in this building and she's just. Like something bit me. Something bit me bad. And he could have just left it at that, but he wants up shooting her winds up shooting the janitor shooting the vacuum clean right right because it keeps making noise so like and you know, and as he shoots the vacuum cleaner that sets off the fire alarm Oh my God. It's so it's like something. If essentially like right now. The naked gun so bad he's he's very much. The lebowski henchman this. You just can't do anything right so that's part and part of me wonders. Did He Kill Camilla? He's not good at his job. So I don't know. Will. Maybe in the second reality, he's better at his job that he was the first one. And again in. Reality than. I guess I guess Diane has to know him some way. Right to hook up with him to hire him to kill Camilla. But. It's like I wonder I mean that just seems like an interesting side note for a dream for her to be dreaming about Joe Right. So. I, don't. Just. It's all just very very strange. It is, it is and. And we have another set of cops who were never going to solve the crime. Because yeah, completely. We have no idea what happened to. To To McKnight and his partner. That terminate terminent Backley. It's okay. We're just call Frank Franken MAC. But You know. There's no resolution to that storyline at all. And it's like even if they weren't looking well. Presumably you know the the they've zeroed in on the Real Diane. Right, but yeah, she kills herself and so they. Don't really. Yeah exactly so now have another corpse in their hands and more mystery I guess. So so. I know is confusing to hear this breakdown. Confused as we went through it, but. I. Hope I hope we at least addressed things we needed to address. And he knew this was going to be dill difficult, but Hopefully we helped a little I don't know what do you think? Well I think we certainly give people something to think about when they're watching this, yeah! Maybe, yeah, maybe we did, but hopefully we had some theories. We had some Trivia I. Think we did OK okay all right so. There was a deleted scene, but I think we can save that for when we talk about the special features I would agree. That's a special feature all right, so Do you ever rating for this movie? Yeah I do I love. This movie Yes. I think it's great, and I'm going to give this. Nine out of ten Hollywood sign font. That? Yes, if you notice the credits of this movie, you're done in the Hollywood sign fund. So that was good. This is I. I was talking about this with Chris, when I was watching it and I think it might be my third favorite David Lynch movie after Blue Velvet Inland Empire interesting yeah. Yeah I put the second. After Blue Velvet. It's number one. Yeah. Okay, so we're at least. Probably next wild at heart loses a few points because I have to watch hillbillies. Fan of that either. I Love I love wild at heart. They are some some shit. That's characters. But but yeah, it might be might be too for me. We'll. I also giving us nine out of ten. Give it nine out of ten jump. Scare bums behind winky's. That's a good one. Yeah, yeah. Interesting, though the the bummer supposed be male, but as played by a female actress. Right so the bone I feel. I feel like the BUM is sort of gender fluid. We'll see that's why I kind of wondered. If the bum is actually what happens to Diane. Who knows is. Or is that? You don't know you just yeah. Yeah, we'll see but anyway. Now normally I was mentioned that. Hey, we've actually have some mail. Hey Rock on. Yeah, we got two letters. Believe it or not awesome. But the question is. We're kind of running really long here. So shall we say those for next time? Yeah, let's see if this next time because I. don't want people who were letters to feel like. We're rushing through their letters right so I wanNA give apologies to Matthew Curtis. who was kind enough to write in? Got Your email got the g mail. And also a certain DJ Nick. Who wrote in a review of his review of Mahala drive? Teaching that sounds familiar. I'm so right. We want to give Dj Nixon time. Reside have heard yet heard something about it so. so we don't have to rush through those when we say this 'cause we're gonNA. Talk more beholden drive next time, and since you know doing letters next week brightest one exactly since we'll have some more time if you want to be like Matt Matthew Curtis in Dj Neck. Please do write to us. It goes to a podcast gmail.com. Ghost with podcast at gmail.com we'll reach out to us on twitter at goes cast on twitter. Or facebook goes with twin peaks podcast. In working at work, can they reach you? Facebook, as an sprouse, or the twitter's in the instances Odin axe nineteen right. and. If you more. Movie Trivia especially about classic Hollywood right now. You can hear me with Dj Nick and Rachel Friend on the gold standard podcast and every talk about grape Oscar winning movies. Yeah. Big Fan of that podcast I listen loyally. Thank the really enjoy it. You guys are awesome on that. And Zana's obviously this big fountain of Knowledge in has the perfect. To to deliver, said knowledge everybody so I. Think Rachel both like doing the research and getting little nuggets trivia and learning about learning about honestly learning about classic Hollywood because. You're not something. You're more familiar with a she is I think. I I am a big fan of classic Hollywood. I am a big fan of silent films and. Rachel is sort of coming into that she's. She's learning I think she's a fan. She's A. She's almost like your protege a little bit. I Yeah I grew up in a house classic Hollywood. Are, old movie, buffs and stuff like that so I a lot of these actors I. Have seen in. So just sort of learning about. you know what's going on in the studio system at the time and things like it's been. It's been fun. FACTOID 's and. So obviously if he's toys in here, you need to be checking out gold standard. So just you know, or or if you enjoy talking about movies, but David Lynch is a little beyond you. Well. For one thing of David Lynch's in. In your wheelhouse. Why are you listening to this podcast? Just kind of my mom does not listen to this podcast. She's big because she's like. I cannot get a frame of reference. I have no idea what the hell you're. So, but she she does like a gold standard for that reason because she can get it yet. Get a grip on things. What about you Charles where you think your mom and my wife Lori are pretty much in the same boat. My mom in your mind. Your wife should get together and go bowling pretty pretty much. because. It was pretty interesting while I'm. Doing this Mahal and Dr Rewatch. Laurie Laurie watched it along with me. She did other things she looked up and yeah, I would tend to have a catcher looking at things. You know every so often. As, I was going through the movie. The movie was over. She didn't say a single word about it. Like nothing and I and I said. Should I even bother asking you what you thought of this movie and she said nothing. So so. So. I left it right. There didn't even follow up on that I. Guess. My guess is her thought is I am so glad that Zana's there? These midnight movies with him. Because this'll be torture right pretty much pretty much. Zanan Mike to do. Exactly. But as for me, of course, actual skaggs on twitter. At Shell skaggs on Instagram Goo skin. FACEBOOK trump skaggs in Hilliard Ohio on facebook in my blog, geeky things. Debut coffee and hats. We're talking about all this stuff we talk about here. And also like news, my other podcasts they did for southgate media including next up everywhere. The doctor who podcast which. Was On recently, talking survival from. Semester McCoy era, and then the female podcasts that do Jesse Jackson we're right now. We're talking star girl that's on. In the CW and that just got picked season to. Really, that's great. Yeah, so it's a fun little show and. So! It looks like we'll probably be talking more star girl eventually if they ever like restart Hollywood production again. And then. Of course, Titan Talk Titans podcast. Currently hosting with DJ Nick. Maybe you've heard of him. As we're talking to patrol season two, which has been last because he is, his enthusiasm really comes through as you probably know so. Oh, yes, Oh, yes, so! Yeah, we have a ball. Talk in that so. If you enjoy that. Please check out my podcast. PODCASTS definitely appreciate it. In the meantime next time I would. Episode Eighty. Can you believe really? Eighty, these letters and special features y'all exactly so essentially. This is going to be the. Criterion episode. As we go through the special features on the criterion release. And Booklet I'm sure we'll talk about. We're going to talk about the booklet. and whatever random thoughts we forgot to talk about in this episode here so we'll have rent. We will have random thoughts and I'll hopefully like. Zan mentioned that hopefully, some other people right in about maybe their theories on Mahal drive for sure so Please do please. Explain it to us. Yes, yeah, exactly theories because David Lynch isn't going to tell us. We have no idea you just listen to our pockets. You know we have no idea what's going on so. What explained to us, please. We really appreciate it all right so Thank you guys for listening. Zantac is always because you're fabulous to talk to you. Thank you. You're awesome to talk to you as well I really have fun and I love doing stuff like this with you. Everybody thinks you get and come back time. Criterion as we talked a special features right here, ghost with twin peaks podcast. good-bye everybody. into. Her On

David Lynch Ruth Betty Betty Billy Ray Cyrus Hollywood TA Charles Yeah director Adam Laura Harring Mulholland drive Ray Cyrus Jeanne Bates Betty Elms Rita Slash Camilla Melissa George Charles Skaggs James Karen criterion collection Empire Oh Billy
228 - The Season of the Abyss

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

1:40:30 hr | 5 months ago

228 - The Season of the Abyss

"I. This is exactly right. The fall line is an investigative show covering unsolved murders and disappearances in the southeastern United States particularly cases, involving communities marginalized by mainstream media or investigation through intensive research and compelling narratives. The fall line builds the knowledge base on little known cases. You can listen and subscribe to the fall line, and all of exactly right shows on apple podcasts stitcher who wherever you like to listen. Hello. and. We'll go favorite murder the podcast the podcast that you tune into every what Thursday morning. Best afternoon nowadays maybe Friday. Maybe a Friday evening. Sure life is life is changing. Your chains are busy. Who knows what day it is? In this season of your life that you know that that's what the influencers are saying now like the like the lifestyle influencers are calling like the part of your like the in this season of my life where it's like. have to ask you to check out of whatever that entire culture is that? You're talking about recalled alright. It sounds horrifying. These I'm in picturing lot of felt hats, people speaking that were wearing felt hats at the same time. That's right. The word Tom comes up a lot probably even when it's not autumn. People that pull their sleeves down over their hands to talk. Yeah, yeah, no, thanks! No, thanks! THAT'S CANCALE! Gareth Oh. That's Georgia heart start. Hi, how are you? What's going on? just got back from a nice trip with the fam- and again. In this season of my life, it feels like. I can't tell how much time is passing, so I literally one day turned to my sister and went. I've been here for three weeks like she's like I. Don't Care Air I was like no I can't I can't leave my home and Doug's and life. Yeah, but it was really nice, so I got to be up there for father's Day. A lot of lovely well wishes on twitter for home gym which he pretended he didn't care about, but the had already looked at the time. I got to his house Tom Dinner, no, he does. He's he. He's now a legit twitter. lurker like I can't really be myself on twitter our no, because my dad's there. What if he just doesn't follow? You like lurks everyone else's. He's really into Chrissy Teigen and all the things she makes in her kitchen. She's gone. She's legitimately funny. Yet, that would be. So typical. This season of my life. Season is it winter. What. Winter of my life in existence in I am in pajamas right now. Stay in home. I mean. It does feel like a lot of people have decided. They're just not quote unquote doing Corentin for. A while the numbers skyrocket out of. I mean. It's almost like the layers of this seven day or layer dip of horror the. Cheap! Coming where it's like I thought ready head Guacamole. guacamole horror where people are pretending the pandemic ended 'cause they want it to i. read like some quotes like there were these gals in Florida who like sixteen of them went to a bar when they openly all got it and the delayed the the Gal was like I was just done. I just needed to get out I was done, and it's like, but but the global pandemic isn't. So? It doesn't care that you're done, and also we're all fucking, asshole. No one likes it. Okay like no one like you know what I really west I miss missing Vince. I, Bet I bet I wanNA. I. I went down to record just. Give him a kiss, and I was like miss you, and then I was like, will you? Let Your Best Amiss Vince this in this nice. You know this'll be our first three hour. My favorite murders just so you can miss him a little bit more heavy great. Thank you so much. It's very strange. It's like what was Nice in northern California. They're not doing up there. They've been very serious. Since the beginning I understand that thinking of like I can't do it anymore or I need to socialize the people in their twenties like if I was in my twenties and corn team. My Guy I would have gone insane, I hope. I would have absolutely so it's not like there's not empathy, but it's also like to. are dating APP still like happening or more than ever now more than ever now more than ever How would I know? I don't know I know. You I want to ask you. I do I love to know I would. I would love to know I just. Yeah, I could never I couldn't do it even just to be just a peak around. You have the gossip I now. Come on make up a name and and let's I mean look by the end of this I might have to. Simply because you know being cut off from humanity. Really it really Put Your you know helps you put your pride aside our. Own you know I have no. No pride left. I looked at myself in the mirror yesterday when I got up and I was just like. You can't go another minute without shower. Looking at my hair and I'll do i. have this thing where I pull my back in Palma pony tail in doesn't matter them. Here is a greasy mess. It was my hero just like It's there's not A. I forgot what real my sister's real clean cleaner clinic real She her stare sizing cleaning is her. It's nonstop. It's year round She did not like. My should always be like Eah. Take a shower like why we're going to safeway like who cares. But she was not into it, so that was kind of it was good to be around. People and it was good to kind of have that check every day of. Why not put on a little lipstick not? Give up just because there's a pandemic and. Social upheaval in the exposure of a of a completely white supremacist. System and government. Government and people who are resident to be our peers, and we're like who are you, are you now? We know, but but but we have to talk about. We have to keep it positive because the best thing that I would have never been able to envision for this season of our live I. Have Never. I've never been able to know that this was possible? And the the TIKTOK. And the K- poppers made it happen. They put in, and everyone already knows a story but I just want to say it anyway if you've if maybe you're out on the Tundra and you haven't heard about this for the Tulsa trump rally, which was such an offense was so gross. They originally planned it on June eighteenth June nineteenth of this year, and they did it in Tulsa, which is a day of emancipation that emancipation went through, and in Tulsa. You were saying it. But it's true I mean like it's the kind of thing where it it's almost like. Facts of reality of what. This guy these people do and how offensive it is, and how gross it is, it just doesn't land more because it's one thing after the other, but I I was like Yoga. Is some kind of serious rioting because of this. It's deserves. What kind of fucking bullshit is this at? They're like Oh. Oh, we're going to go to Tulsa Oklahoma where the Black Wall Street master took place on June teen and we're GONNA. Have a trump rally ladles if he's a fucking on purpose and like a fucking, fuck you to lack people. Then I don't know what is the season. Of the abyss has happened and turned. Yes, right now, slayer song yes. Season of the abyss Salah. High School Boyfriend's song. He was a black metal head, and so slayers seasons of the best cars some. Girl just I'll just bust it out avatar. or He'll start singing. It now busted out on Air Guitar. This season at the list. Right fuck slayer. Get your felt hat on because. Here. It's here. Get the patches sewn into your sweaters. It's mad here. Make. Your is slayer. The woman had that s that was a line and thank. Yeah, that was all over. That was carved into every desk in my high school. Failure was big. Big My high school. Well, it's funny. You mentioned that because I have a show. The perfect segue. It's funny. You mentioned that okay, so there's a new. Did you know there's a new Perry Mason like a remake of Perry Mason wait? Is it already yeah? It just started this last week. 'cause. It's the guy from the Americans so awesome that Matthew Reese. Yes, you think he's I think he's Welsh holy crap is a good. Okay first of all, there's no. They didn't I'm going to go ahead and do what they should have done. which is trigger warning dead baby like full-on trigger warning that. No, it's very, it's. It's a really gruesome like dark show. Right. Now Oh l., it takes place in L. A. and the twenties. It's nothing like the old Perry Mason. He's not even a lawyer he's like. Cool Okay Yeah It's dark and good, and it's like no war, e and a little over the top, and then you remember that it's Perry Mason, and that was a little over the top, so it fits. It's not it's good. I like it. It's like I. WanNa, Watch all of it and get into deep dark depression. Well I feel like you know. Yes, like a period piece depression. Yeah, it's yeah. It reminds me of Boardwalk Empire which I really want to watch again for the outfits outfits Falcon everything. It's good. Do you do that? Were the are their shots? Of La, where you're like I know that spot that there are remaking in this being on, yeah is. There an angel fly. In when they show it with the buildings around it, because that's that's how it used to be. It's exciting I. Love It. It's good good old new our La stuff perry. Mason. That's amazing. Oh and sure they're warning enormous. Surprise Dick. Don't ragged around. You'll see. Take take a shot. The surprise, enormous de. Now is it what is it? It's skyscraper high knows. How big is it big I don't WanNa I. Don't know. I mean you know. Do you know what channel IT'S ON HBO? So we get gritty reboot, apparently ready I wish I could get down there for that pitch meeting. People are like. Yeah, it's not what I expected and it's. It's good I should be a to counter. That I should be talking about Marcella right now. 'cause season three is out I watched one episode at when I was at my sister's wait till more went to bed because I don't see anything bad. On of course, I fell asleep four minutes in because they all have Irish accent was like. It was like meat meal, grandmother Lullaby Anita Sleep. Or I just always go to sleep at ten thirty. But I did last starring for true escapism. There's a television show. It's British, but it's on Netflix and it's called one hundred percent hotter and it's like a makeover Shimono. Hundred percent hotter they get these British people and I think I I, not to say that Americans aren't absolutely like this, and you couldn't absolutely cast this show in four minutes in Los Angeles but. There seemed to be a lot of people in England. Who are lake decided that they're gonNA be I was. What's that girl's name? There's you know how they have like the page. It's like the page, two girls or something from the tabloids I. Don't know if that's the right page. Number says basically like it's like super sexy. Where like you save up all your money to get? Yeah, humongous implant. You're like you're like A. Like Kim Kardashian type. Right her fict- but like a Brexit A. Way Yes. It's a brats dull going way over into the lake. Performance taxi like beyond. Yeah, and so they take a couple of people like that. Then there's a couple of people who just have very strange styled. There's A. There's a girl who's doing a full on new look where she has two different color contact lenses, and like Hello Kitty stickers on her cheeks and ship, so they take people with a look with a with a really extreme look, and then they make it's. It's the classic like reality. Show, then they. There's people on the street looking at pictures of them and suspiciously all of the people on the street giving ratings like I would give this a three out of ten and the people are shocked. They're like what. I'm really H-. How could I be at three year? Whatever the people on the street that are being interviewed? About the ratings, all are wearing scarves different beautiful scars where I'm like sorry ear cast. Starve commercial I it's. Is this sponsored by scars CETERA. Store. Scarves etc card anyway, yeah. But it's a good like just put it on him. Here's the thing it's an amazing makeover show because at the end of the day, who doesn't love a really good haircut and really good makeup, and the and also the outfits are amazed. Turn them into like. Classy classier look. They basically try to take what they want to look like on. Just make it more like if you're walking down the street, people won't run into a poll because you are stickers on face yet or because you, there's one guy that is like the one like an industrial goth where he has. A WIG of Like dreads made out of rubber, oh. No, you know that kind of thing. That Elliot Oh yeah. That looks it's pretty extreme that sounds. They re just redo everybody, but what it is is just awesome. Makeup awesome hair. It's just really satisfied. The hairs yoga girl when she gets redone. Everything is like it's gets very philosophical where we're all wearing. We're all wearing. Masks but like the hairs Yuka girl she. Gets out takes all her stuff off and make up. Women's like look at your is. What do you do and then gives her this? This makeup were in. The girl. Is just like this really beautiful young girl who goes I? Never thought I could look like this again. Staying on. What's it called one hundred percent. Hotter hotter and the hair guy is such a legendary hair guy where he himself has my sister's hair from nineteen eighty-nine ladies like a spiral Perm I thank amazing hair guy, and he gives the best hair cuts. What about the show? I get turned into a club kid. That's what I want I. Want The opposite. I feel so you're walking boring now. You want to go back. Go back to when I was sixteen and had huge fuck fucking cramped pigtails Yup I. Cut your bags all fucked up. Okay, my pants great and then yeah. I would put stickers on to really -solutely. That, was that the drugs telling you to put the stickers? On Dot, your style join. The drugs were the stickers. Oh, they're. Going through the skin. Absorbing it. Yep. Okay. What else well? There's season to dirty John has started. Okay, I haven't done that yet. It's the Betty Broderick store. You did I did it. She's the woman down in San Diego, yes, and it is. It's very dirty. It's very much dirty John. Season One this style about it, then kind of like it's outfits and it's. It has almost. Feel to it, yes, 'cause this. It happened in the. Everyone is real eighties outfits. The problem I have is. Amanda Pete is Playing Betty Broderick and Betty Brodrick one of the main issues going on in that relationship was her husband was leaving her for a younger hotter. Ryan right and No one's leaving a man never ever. Like she is, she's Hollywood perfect Shia, so I got that. She is a great actress and she's playing the intensity, and she's really good as a character, but there's a whole piece of that character that is, that should be there. Yeah, and I think I wonder if it's because they didn't WanNa like in the year two thousand twenty put someone in like a fat suit or Farah like that's part of the issue and part of the story yeah I there was a mom and you know wasn't tiny wasn't rail I. Don't know I mean after Stevie for you. They TV to betty and then vote and in doing so in my opinion, she doesn't even resemble. She doesn't even resemble. Her may not even a little the brown hair I guess. She's a barrage usable on his blonde hair. Oh. Yeah. But it's good definitely. Watch it okay. Good story in its and you know it's Christian slater in Amanda Peet, so it's so watch. Yeah, guys, unless you hear that the amazing music that Stephen puts under an ad. We're not this. Is Not US pushing? Any of we are being paid zero dollars by Amanda Pete for Talky. Be has never worked for us a day in her life not once says she called. I've asked her to cats it. Fuses, take. CARE scared of her? Own she was so good and togetherness. That's still on. Can you find that anywhere? Remember that show the The duplex brothers vehicle. Yeah I I don't know. She was so good enough so good in most all things I see her. Boss, her heart. Paul I don't know 'cause I. Don't watch TV alone anymore. There's no like like neither Vince, nor I watch what we want to watch because we're always watching together. You. Know what I mean. The I'd be careful of that. You get a second TV. We have one, but then it's like. Go downstairs stare. Yeah, could yet and it's like. Yeah, it is there. It means you don't want to be around me. Say if you're mad, saying. Do you just totally time, look. Follow the kitchen I. Don't admit it. Can I tell you that I have cried more since I turned forty than I did my entire thirties. What's going on two weeks three weeks? I don't know PMS. And then I also found a new psychiatrist, so my meds are getting tweaked a little. Oh yeah, so. That's fun to be like that. Those two weeks of like willed air. Won't they work? Or kind of insane side effect. Is it going to give me? That I that I won't remember is is a side effect shall be like I can't stop sweating. What's wrong with? Well then cry. Here's your at home. That's. What? I was say oh, but you meant for Vince like it's. You're next to him watching TV on the couch only. Oh Life Oh, and the excited for the. The, Golden State Hiller show. That one cancale Gareth friend. Best friend podcast friend of the POD. I'm an insider. To say I've been listening, says the episode one. That's right. I haven't seen that trailer yet. I'm to. Keep it but yes yeah. I've I've heard a lot of feedback. That people are excited and excited to see. You'RE NOT GONNA. Can you watch yourself? Are you GonNa? No, no, no, no, no okay. We'll do it for you. You please do and then just say nice things. I don't care if course here I don't care you don't like. Only complements only I. Used to say that after my standup five is like going somewhere with people afterwards. I'd be like compliments. Only I only want to hear if you thought it was the best one on the show. Yeah, keep it to yourself totally. Yeah No, thanks! This isn't. This isn't fucking critique time unless you're funnier than me, no critiques. should we do exactly right? Corner Chur so our podcast network. Exactly right is the thing. Isn't that great? We love it and we're adding shows just by three months every season. He's turn. There's a new show. It takes so long guys. GUYS, but they're coming. They're coming there in the works. Were you know they're all great and? the newest for example, the newest I said no gifts has the Great Andrew. Mishaan on it who is from podcast, but outside that I a podcast. I recommended on this show long ago. but Andrews a great stand up. That's friends with lots of people in. So and my friend, my friend Mary. Hart is on Bananas This Week and she's been friends with Scotty for decades, so they your decades. They're so young. A decade, probably sure sure one just one and she money so listen to bananas and They Oh God. The this podcast will kill you is. They're talking about what's the disease that it's affects cows. It's called rinderpest rinderpest yet so I haven't listened to that one and I'm really looking forward to it because that sounds like the worst being of all time. Ranger Path, you know it's not the worst thing of all time is from our one of our favorite podcasts. Do you need a ride? Christopher banks has a new standup special. That's coming out called Rescue Cactus, and it's available for rental in digital download. Now on what is it on? Nice one. Thank you, boy. He's a new stand up special yet. Look up Chris, fairbanks he, so if hilarious Hazel is, it's He's I'm sure it's on his twitter or his instagram and we can, and we will. We'll put it on websites that you can find it. My friend was there. He filmed it in Portland and so my friend Jason Our stage mother Jason Hill always the. Show love him. Tex Notes Francis even He went and. Watched it, and said he it was so great and met at the end he cried. That was because there is like a touch way Chris. Kreider Jason Cried Jason Okay. Good, but there was like you know they're yeah. Touching I watch one joke. I watched just a quick clip of one joke, and it's was one of the best jokes I've heard the master the masturbating line with the parent yeah yeah. He's really he's really legendary I, mean he's. You know he's the Chris is the real deal. Really is like one of those truly unique comedy voices I. Mean Like you don't get the sense of it on our podcast because we are taught, are constantly interrupting each other and and. One person is trying to tell a story, and then somebody else starts starts on something else, but when Chris Stand up. You know I've seen him in like. Aside from being on the road and stuff in rooms around Los Angeles like him destroying a room when he's just up to ten minutes set. It's one of the most like thrilling breathless amazing things you ever seen because it's very hard thing to do. People who are good at it, make it look so easy targets. Yeah, and he's one of those people, so it's yeah, if you're looking for a good laugh I, think Chris Fairbanks, Hall. He'll help you out with that. Also please check out our merged store where we have our black and white logo pen-. It's a really cool enamel pens, ten bucks, and all the proceeds are going to the black, emotional and mental health collective so. So? That's really exciting and we have some new march in there. We have a puzzle and some fun stuff to check out. It's on my favorite murder. Dot Com and the store. Yeah, we're very I'm very proud of that puzzle. There's a puzzle for everybody that's that's. That's still believes in the quarantine and the puzzles. Let's causal season. It is puzzled truly puzzles season. Hey Georgia yeah. As we look to make the most of our homes outdoor spaces right now, article is here to make your dream patio a reality. What with weather resistant dining sets who lounges sofas? Articles? 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Yeah I I feel like I started this one. Yeah, many a time. Yeah, I can't believe we haven't done this at l.. A. Alive La show yeah. It's like it's one of these stories and I'm sure you've always kind of heard about in the background. Everyone knows Chinatown is loosely based on The water wars that came before it and It's always spend like. A story that I didn't know that well, but I think being from California and Southern California. You hear little things about it. Yeah, but it's been forgotton kind of in history a little bit too because it happened right before the stock market crash. The Great Depression so like nobody cared Sorry say that would be an amazing book to a book of all the stories that got buried by Huger Stories Yeah didn't. We just talk about something recently that it was like, but then nine eleven happened, and so this story got Berry yes. Yes, it was a documentary are watching or something like that we were like. How could you not know about this? McMillan's I like. It was something like that where it was like it wasn't a You know wasn't a horrible story. That was more of a like. How how could this happen? And just got erased by nine ray, or like or like? The hearing was in late September, and so nobody gave a shit at that time. Yeah, yeah, this is like that so Let me quickly read my sources. I got some inflow from history dot com on hub dot com. There was a section from the book. The Mirage factory illusions. Imagination and the invention of Los Angeles, and that's why I now. That's by Gary Krist and then there's SCV history dot COM Smithsonian Mag kcet article by Hadley nears. What water empowered Dot Org? Some great information and photos from there I called down to the DWP. They gave me a little information. They. Let me come look at their microfiche. It was great. An article on. There's a website called. Failure magazine and I think it's just failures just yet. There's a Web. There's a page about the a book called Flood Pack. The deadliest man made disaster of Twentieth Century America, and the making of modern Los Angeles. fucking manned. That's by John Wilkinson. and then did you know there's a song by frank black from two thousand and one called Saint Francis Disaster. And there's US like unofficial music videos, a video from the disaster and photos from the disaster Jesus. Yeah okay, so saint. Francis. Dam Disaster is is known as the worst American Civil Engineering Disaster Of the twentieth century, and it's kind of compared to the triangle shirt factory fire in that it kind of led to this movement of safety legislation. Because so many people lost their lives so before we can get into the collapse of the actual dam. We kind of need to go over some history. And that is California's water wars, and that will give us some context, but the end of the eighteen hundreds Los Angeles was still a relatively small settlement, and it got its water from the La River via a system of reservoirs, and these open ditches made that were made there called Amazon has and. That had been used since the lowest public. Doris built them in seventeen eighty one. But by the early nineteen hundreds, there's a huge population boom in Los. Angeles, and over half a million residents are now living in La and the city's growing, so does the need for water, but it's we're in a desert. So this bunch of drought, city planners wanted Los Angeles become a major American metropolis like these people who had money in. An stake in the city growing. And, but that can only be achieved if there is water you know. Yeah so creed bright. Like you said and greed. Yes and greed greed a big part of it. Yes, I need to make that point grade water. Whitmore does one want. So the Dude Fred Eaton, he's the mayor now, and he used to be the superintendent of the Los Angeles Water Company and so he fucking knocks on the door of the new superintendent of the water, company and that in he's like. Let's build an aqueduct like that's how we get water, the city and that new. Superintendent is William Mulholland. Him Yeah. You have so mulholland drive. Everyone knows so let me do a quick sidebar and William Mojo and he's got this fancy story fucking life so William Mahone is he's born in Belfast Ie. And in eighteen, fifty five, he's born into a family of modest means. Any leaves home at fifteen with his brother, and they go to America and he ends up in L.. A. Around Eighteen seventy eight twenty three years old. He's got ten dollars in his pocket, so he gets a job in La, as on Harrow, which is digging, those wells in what is now compton and he uses his downtime while he's not working a fucking crazy job with manual labor, too, because he's really interested in engineering, so he start studying engineering, geology, hydrology, and mathematics. You know as you do weekend stuff, exactly casual stuff. It was like the eighteen fifty seven version of one hundred percent hotter. What. Do you think of this engineer on the street with their scarves? I'm Thursday night by. There's no water. Please just give me A. Wider. So he actually becomes a self taught engineer, which doesn't seem like it should be a thing. It should not be at their well. That's and some What's it called right there for shadowing? Thank you. So for the next twenty years Mojo rises through the ranks at the water company. He becomes the foreman, and then it comes to superintendent in Nineteen O two, when the city officially forms what becomes known as the Los Angeles Department of Water and power. What you and I pay every second month. And he's named the chief engineer, which is super impressive. However I feel like like maybe as a surgeon or certain jobs. You don't want self taught. You won't be one a a paper degree that says you learned all of it right? Yeah, and the people who already knew everything taught it to. Yes, not Utah, did you? That's right. You're like I got everything I got all of it. How do you know that oh? It's me Bill Mulholland high no every day. Okay I bet he was really tall, so everyone just listened to everything. Always with tall guys I think even as a young man. He looked like a grizzly old man and people believe him you know, Yup, so, he earns a good reputation when it's projects are built under budget, and ahead of schedule, which I also think is bad like time and use the money and build it right. Don't make it quick and cheap. He is he is? He is like a sellout engineer. Because usually engineers are like no, it has to be right in that means if we go over budget or over schedule eight, it still has to be right. He's like hey, pay money men. Are you happy then I'm happy pigs. And one of those projects that he got a good reputation for include friend of the podcast the Silver Lake Reservoir. In the nineteen oh six. Oh. I think it's the pot I think it is. A friend of the pilot. Is Silver Lake Reservoir? They are at our live show. That's right. So back to the water wars Mulholland is now tasked to transport water. They look for water where they can divert it from a certain part of the state and bring it to La, and they find that in the Lush Owens Valley, which is located on the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada. It's about two hundred miles away looks like it's right on the Nevada border. Basically over over no one goes ever exactly where you have to drive through to get to Vegas and it looks really hot deserty Yep so meanwhile, though the United States reclamation service, which was responsible for settling the. The Owens Valley which is like lush place where lots of things grow, and people are flocking thriving, they they had settled Owens valley in the late nineteenth century with farmers and ranchers, and they're like we're gonNA. Use the Owens Lake to build irrigation systems to help these farmers in the area. We're going to grow this area. We have plants. It's our. It's our water and we're making plans for exactly so there's this whole water war over who's going to get that Owens Valley water there. I mean that's a whole book in itself so I'm not gonNA. Do It justice. Read me the. Page wine. Unfortunately for the farmers and the ranchers and the people who live there. The dude eaten has extensive political contacts of course, including the president of the United States and hand Mahone aren above using dubious tactics like bribery and deception, so after these fucking long water wars, and by the end of nineteen o five, they're able to acquire enough land and water rights in Owens Valley to block the irrigation project and they are. Are GonNa build their aqueduct. Wow, when this canal project goes, public people fucking lose their shit, because everyone in La knew that like their livelihood in them, staying there and working and building families and more people coming to Los Angeles dependent on this water so finally there's a front page headline that Los Angeles finally has water. People celebrate property and real estate prices the day. It's announced double when a day well. People are just squirting hoses straight up into the air. Right use it all you weren't. Exactly and so in one thousand, nine, seven with a budget of twenty three million dollars, which I looked it up, and you can't even go that far back. You can only go to nineteen thirteen on this calculator I. didn't I didn't look for another one which I just realized that could have done. That would six hundred million dollars in nineteen thirteen. She's but don't worry. MOJO US at all. You know how ill. Yeah, that's right. He loves to come in under budgets right so construction begins on the aqueduct in Nineteen, seven around four thousand laborers work at top speed. They use new technologies like for example, a Caterpillar tractor the new thing well they set records for miles, tunneled and pipe cut. which I wrote, which slowdown guys get this right? NYRA. Also how hideously were they abusing those manual laborers that New Waco record that's in the desert, so they're working under the fuck and blaring son and the desert. There's no such thing as bottled water. Not, even dishonesty. Y-, everyone's. Favorite water, not even disowning. It tastes like plastic disowning. And it is really I mean when I started looking into this and looking at photos and you know reading about. It isn't really impressive feat. It's two hundred miles that they were able to take from this lake in. Owens Valley to the San Fernando Valley. In one thousand, nine hundred eighteen construction of the two hundred, two hundred twenty three mile aqueduct is finished the nineteen thirteen at the time of completion. It's the world's longest aqueduct and the largest single water project in the world. Wow, yeah, so it's super fucking impressive. It's a self tack kid from fucking Belfast, who made it happen? He becomes as big hero. While, we're and while we're talking about it. Dairy is not Belfast, although it's also in Northern Ireland and just call a dairy. Okay I. Got I got I. needed a pick me up the other night when I was watching TV alone and which I know, I said I don't do so I. started watching dairy girls again. Yeah, it's just meeting. So concerning the greatest so the city of Los Angeles is stoked. You know something like forty thousand people come to see the damn. Get turned on. The thing what am I doing right now? You're doing some bathtub exactly. Turner they turn on Yeah Faucet the Faucet. Pasta. I opened the big faucet. During the opening ceremony Mojo famously says to them. Is. Take it about the water. is taken it which is like, so he I think he got a really big head and became really cocky about all the things he could do, and almost like he's God like he's giving them this like essential Saying yeah, he made it happen. He made it happen he an. It's like a lot of people credit him with with Los Angeles, becoming what it was because it wouldn't have without the water, and he should be credited for how bad people have allergies here because it's the water that then made the non native plants get brought in, and there's all kinds of weird plant combinations here that don't make sense, and you could have no allergies or life and you move to La. You're screwed. Yeah I, have A. Damn Mulholland Mulholland. Next, Time Your Hay Hits Stephen. That's Mulholland talking through your nose. Order. He was a great nasal order. Another word, okay, he becomes as local hero. An Los Angeles is able to overcome its drought issues, and virtually overnight becomes a boomtown. The San Fernando Valley is transformed from a grain raising community dependent on the rainfall, essentially for water, it becomes an empire and quickly becomes one of the richest agricultural communities in the nation. Wow, so a lot of people make a fucking shit ton of money. Essentially 'cause they had. This is where they at least I know when I lived in Burbank Lake. It was all citrus groves. It was like tons and tons of orange and lemon grove an orange county then why it's called that. But meanwhile back in Owens Valley and by nineteen, twenty four, so much water has been diverted from the area that the actual Lake Owens Lake is drying up and the agriculture economy is fucked in the valley because they don't have access to the water anymore. Yeah, and a group of pissed off. Farmers Start to protest and one of the things they do that. They used dynamite and blow up parts of the aqueduct, not just sabotage, but so they can get the water like they blow up certain parts to get the water to start. Flowing to their areas yeah, and you know there's all these like. Underhanded things like they won't Los Angeles. County won't give the farmers and adequate payment for their land, so they don't want to sell, and they're threatened, and it's just like this it's it's really shady and underhanded, so there's all kinds of legal action going on, and there's. It's really that's that's what the water wore is and because of the water wars and the aqueduct controversy, and the fact that you know. He Mona realizes that his could be sabotaged really easily, and they'd be screwed, so he thinks you know what we need to do. Is Make these kind of these smaller. Storage systems closer to Los Angeles that if something happens to Owens Lake or the Owens, valley aqueduct will have you know these little pockets of water that can sustain us while we fix it so so in the early nineteen twenties he starts to build major reservoirs closer to la with concrete dams. The there's the one where rich people live above in Hollywood. The Hollywood hills Oh. Yeah, yeah! I went to rich person's party wants and saw that and it's gorgeous. It's just as beautiful reservoir the Hollywood reservoir with You can walk around it, and it's actually like being in nature. Right in the very middle of Hollywood. It's crazy. Right and you can see the. The Hollywood sign from there right? Yeah, yeah, it's Kinda right below there. Okay, and that's the one that when there was a drought here. What was that like six years ago or something? When it was really bad, and I would go up there to take my dogs to that dog park, which is now no longer dog parks idly, but I would come over that hill, and the reservoir would be going down down in my anxiety in. Hanoch was constantly going up based on the water level. Until a man at the dog park explained to me that that is drinking water, and it's actually not really used that way, so don't worry about that. Don't worry about the reservoirs. Thanks he's like excuse me. Miss I've been seeing your face every time you come here and you look sadder and sadder. You were wreaking. And you don't need to take a deep breath. Here's a bottle of Dasani. Don't worry. It's mean Dan Dasani here to comfort you about the reservoir. It's the season of plenty. Okay so he built that, and then he is like another one we need to build is in the San Francisco Canyon which is Forty Canyon. That's forty seven miles away from. La and he's going to aim it the Saint Francis. So it took that long to get to our dam. Only isn't why it's. Their construction begins in nineteen, twenty four, and in his haste, and with he has this kind of moment has confidence in his abilities. So much that he is just like plows through making this damn, he breaks ground without extensive consultation with geological experts. Here and you know points to a place, and they start building a dam. That's not true, but something like that. And essentially Mulholland, he also keeps raising the height of the dam as they're building it, so it keeps going up by ten feet of what the plans were, but they don't they don't widen the base of the dam to match that and so. It's super dangerous and at flex with the structural soundness, the Damn so when the dam is completed in one, thousand, nine, hundred six. It's able to hold twelve billion gallons of water from the aqueduct, so the water from the duck goes there. There's twelve billion gallons of water, and it's enough for two years worth of reservoir water. In case, something happens, and the main structure reached a height have to hundred and five feet of this concrete, these concrete walls, damning the slake, and it spans seven hundred feet, and you can look. There's so many photos which is fascinating before and after. The disaster and it is. It's huge spike. The precursor of the Hoover, Dam Oh, wow, so it's a big, fucking giant concrete structure and the hoover dam. I can assure you was built by college educated engineers. That's exactly right Karen I mean. This is a guest for sure, but I would bet my arm on it. Because what in the fuck are you doing? Building something that big right with no Halloween? But at the same time like the aqueduct never fell, none of the other structures fell. It was just aren't aqueducts, don't they? Just go flat along the ground. They're just the water in running at hose to like. Barriers Yeah. No, you're totally right I realize I'm being highly critical of Bill I'm not on his side area. Slee I'm not gonNA, argue for him. This is Hubris I'm seeing it and I know where this is humorous. So over the next two years, cracks and seepage appear in the dam, but inspection show that they're all with normal range for a damn the size of Saint Francis, so they're just sealed up and patched. On the morning of March Twelfth Nineteen Twenty, eight, the damn keeper named Tony Harnischfeger, he discovers a new leak during his morning inspection and this leak worries him because the leak has. Blood in it. There's a finger sticking out of the whole owe. No because. There's a ghost. There's a ghost in the bucking dam. There's a damn goes. No because the water is muddy, which means that the water is eroding the foundation of the dam and bringing up the muddy water, and so he calls out Mojo on Mojo and comes to the dam. He takes a look and he and his assistant were like no looks good to us all this fine, and they take off and go back to Los Angeles but Tony the damn keeper, and as well as the powerhouse workers who live in the nearby hydroelectric power plants nearby. Powerhouse workers who live there and the farmers who live in the small towns in the valley below not convinced like they can just see that something ain't right, and they can also see the mountain above is soaked in water, so workers start joking. See later if the damn, don't break, like becomes a joke. And one farmer, so where that he sleeps with his in his barn with the door open. So that same night, why not just get? You know what that's a great. Point I really wish they had. But at the same time. It's like they almost live in a rural area. You know it's it's. It's so far away from anything. especially with those little cars, they had an array. Sir, so on that same night married. The Mohammed was like all looks good. It's mine I'm going back home to eat or an expensive dinner. The concrete begins to shatter. No surviving human sees the Damn break at about eleven fifty eight PM. The Damn Keeper Tony. Who lives in a small cottage right below the dam with his six-year-old son? Qatar and his girlfriend. Leon Johnson are speculated as the first victims. So Lena's body is later found fully clothed and wedged between two blocks of concrete near the base of the dam. which suggests that she and Tony may have been inspecting structure right before it collapsed Oh my God, so later as water rushes from the dam, nearby power lines are swept away leaving the whole Canyon without power, and in total darkness, the residents of the San Francisco Canyon are awoken to shaking and rumbling and some mistake at first quake in California you know. However within moments, the Canyon is filled with twelve point six billion gallons of rushing water. And I've always pictured. When I heard the story in the past, I've always pictured like shantytowns. You know it's like the twenties and you think it's just like you know tents and stuff, but no these are. You could see the photos these communities of houses of home. Yes, yeah, this is not just kind of you. Know, pup tents and Shit, right? It's not yeah. It's not like workers cabins that are nearby exactly i. know these are real home town sir. Towns are actual towns with with With infrastructure and with the livelihoods, so at twelve, zero, three, a M, a wall of water, more than ten stories, high sweeps into the Community of seventy four people at the powerhouse number, two an LA DWP employee, Ray rising, who lives in that area with his wife, and three daughters, remembers being asleep in his wood framed house when he hears a roaring that he said sounds like a cyclone. The water is so high. They can't get out the front door. And the house just disintegrates around them and rake. It's tangled with an oak tree. He swims to the surface, and then he gets wrapped with electrical wires. He's able to grab the roof of another house that's floating by and jumps off He gets onto the roof and he jumps off the roof when it floats by the hillside, so he lands on the hillside. By himself. He standing there. He's got no clothes on. It's a freezing cold night there's. No light because all they lecture city went out. And the only other person on the hill with him. There is his neighbor Lillian Curtis Eyler and she is holding her three year son. What happened with Lillian? There's a few minutes before the Lillian woken up in bed and noticed a strange mist. And she and her husband instantly knew it was the damn I think it was a worry on everyone's mind. And he shoved her husband shoved their son into her arms pushed her through the window. and he's like I'm going back in. Save our daughters. But he in his daughters are swept away with the rest of powerhouse, the powerhouse number two community. And the the concrete powerhouse itself get swept away. Which just tells you how wrong you know this rushing water was and so the three. Players on this little hillside huddled together and wait for rescue Oh my God and The you C. Two hundred feet tall. Dam. Completely collapses. A hole punched in it. There's one structure in the middle that people end up calling the tombstone, but on its right and left these enormous concrete structures completely crumble, and those big pieces of concrete also start flowing with the rushing water as well Oh God. Yeah, so from there. The water continues to surge. It's rushing at a rate of eighteen miles an hour. And it's causing catastrophic damage to the towns of Kostanic Saugus fillmore Santa, Paula and saticoy. Wow, so you know when you're driving down the five to get the fuck Outta town and you drive past magic mountain and all that shit on race towns. Yeah, yeah, that's where it is What's that call when you drive down the five? Well I called IF I'm on my way up. That's the first leg of the journey I'm on my way home. It's the last leg of the journey, so it takes forty five minutes for the reservoir to empty completely of water. The idea ten stories of water is very upsetting to me. It's it's I. really don't like it. Like our big fear of mine, yeah, and rightfully so I mean there. It's horrifying ended, but that idea because it's like they didn't even have skyscrapers. That taller buildings that I L I mean I guess they didn't in downtown. La or whatever, but Emily Shire yet I don't think it's. It's just like a so monumental and horrifying, and you know beyond like it's just that. That idea of all the sudden something's happening that you could never imagine and in the middle of the night to wake up to that you know and not know whether it is or two were I feel like it's worse to know what it is coming your way. Yep Yeah I mean the chance of survival is tiny. Oh, also to see your neighbor naked would be. I'm just and I know. It's not as a big deal. Yeah, but it just be like. Did she just go? Hey, look, we just lived. Who Cares? Get over here and I guess. There wouldn't be an awkward moment if you both if you and your son and your neighbor are the only people in your town. That lived through something. You'd just be like deep. Yeah you'd have to be in deep Sharm Biaz. Horrifying it it it. It hurts because I think of so many people who woke up. And immediately their lives are over, you know there are a higher. How at the House disintegrating around you is such a crazy visual. His also it's water is so power. Yeah, it's scary, right? You have to think of it like that. We're not like no. You just swim to the surface. No and So much debris, it's carrying all the houses and all the cars and the concrete from the dam with it and wires and it it's just it's horrifying, and it takes forty five minutes for the reservoir to empty so this fucking flood is happening for forty five minute and twelve point four billion gallons of water, flood, the Canyon and the Santa Clara River Valley. Residents who were able to get out of their house in time. Grab onto whatever they can It said that the a woman. Some people see a woman on top of a water tank dressed in evening wear. A woman and her three children hold onto a feather mattress as it swept away in the flood for two miles. They hold onto it. A man named William Spring Swims Amaya with his infant around his neck, holding his infant, while his wife had climbed up an orange tree and just stayed there until she was rescued. A man in cliff Corwin of fillmore. He's trying out drive the flood in his car when it picks him up picks his car up, and he had a passenger with my guess, and the passenger was like said quote I won't be caught like a rat in a trap and jumps out of the car and his filled. But I'll let themselves stays inside the car. Until almost completely fills with water, and then he hangs under the hood, and he carried to safety. Thank God I know. I'm sorry that just reminds me of member of the soon Nami and I of the car that did that driving. This has to do at three point turn really fast, and just as staying on the edge in the Front of Oh Japanese soon Nami. Horrifying so five miles downstream in camp. A group of one hundred fifty workers for the Edison Company are asleep in their tent camp, so the nightwatchman. This guy named Ed Lock. He sees the flood coming. He tries to wake up as many people as he can in their tent and eighty four workers die. Of the one hundred and fifty workers, and the people who do survive they survive because they had zipped up their tents and they were able to float. Like what the fuck are the chances, oh? The kids also that such A. zipping up your tent is don't want this to be happening. Right deleted works earlier in the night or whatever Oh like you just never have it race I thought it was like a reaction of like unzipping no way later day. Yeah, wow, that's amazing and as self dies, and he's considered a one of the. Bigger heroes of the disaster. God, the first official alarm is sounded at one twenty a m via the Pacific. Long Distance Telephone Company so there's telephone operators. Louis Guy type in. She's in Santa. Paula and Resell Jones Saticoy I. Think the fact that they were in the. Flood, zone so they were. They were potential victims themselves, but they refused to leave their post and start calling residents in lower areas to warn them to get the fuck Outta, their house and clean to higher ground there later be nicknamed the hello girls for some reason. That just gave me chills lay now understood, what was happening tried to call everybody Holy Shit. Wake up, get the fuck, so they probably see run home and he lives because they call the people that were like. Further down. Oh, my God one of those operators, the woman Louise, she calls this. Dude Thornton, Edwards. He's a California Highway Patrol officer and he becomes known as the Paul Revere of Saint Francis of the Saint. Francis flood because he goes door to door. He's in his. He's on his motorcycle blaring. His Siren warns residents to get the fuck out, and then also deputy deputy sheriff, Eddie. hearn writes his motorcycle up the Santa Clara River valley toward the flood with his siren, blaring, making people wake up and get the fuck out He makes it as far as fillmore before he runs into the flood and gets swept away. Many residents are able to rush to safety in the hills because of these two and the women. Operators and there's a monument to the officers in San Santa Paula Cole. Is Wow meanwhile. Meanwhile, in the cozy I'm sure opulent home of William William Mulholland. The phone starts fucking ringing. In the middle of the night, his daughter answers and She brings her dad the phone. And when he goes to reach for it, he says quote. Please God. Don't let people be killed, please God don't let people be killed. Like, she must have been like the dam collapsed and he's immediately like you know. Yeah, knows what's knows what's happening. The flood damage is whole towns and farming communities for fifty four miles stretch before emptying into the Pacific Ocean. South Aventura WHOA fifty four miles. At Five thirty a M with a wave, still two miles wide and traveling at six miles an hour. It's carrying debris and it's also caring bodies with it. It's thought that at least five hundred people are killed. And that could be anywhere between five hundred thousand, because there's lots of people who were migrant workers and undocumented, so it's it's hard to exactly say and victims are recovered from the ocean as far south as the Mexican border and many are never found because they just got swept to see. The. The wave itself in the like the river it turned into was two miles. Y I. Mean that's like I can't even. I can't wrap my head around it the be school district in the area lost thirteen of its fifteen pupils, the Ruez family, a family of farmers in the Canyon that had been there since the mid eighteen hundreds. They lose six family members rose, Rosario and Enrica ruas and four of their children age eight to thirty. And many of those who were hit the hardest were Mexican American farm workers, and aside from the loss of life. There's also a huge devastation to the land and you know these are people's livelihoods. Over twelve hundred homes are destroyed. Orchards are ripped from the ground livestock. In the thousands and the Red Cross quickly sets up a headquarters near the dam site and men searched the money debris as high as twenty feet in some places for survivors, and there's actually video that you can see that people took of this. Silent video of them bringing bodies out of these cars from back then. And so they sort through the rubble, volunteers wade through all of it to find bodies, more bodies and survivors and makeshift morgues set up some in the fucking local dancehalls. And crowds form at the morgue as people look for their loved ones. and. They want to search through the night so actually universal city studios loan them giant spotlights to use. A ten year old girl is found underbrush still alive him. She had been carried ten miles from her home. Oh my God! Shall actually lived. It said that a baby thought to be dead starts crying at the morgue. She's still a wire. An amount of manage down stuck in the mud up to his neck, still alive. And a twelve year old girl is found by her neighbor in a tree and she's good, yeah. So news aerial photos of the collapsed damn spreads across the nation. People fucking lose their shit It's a relief. Fund is set up and telegrams and monetary donations role in from all over the country, and then so the investigation starts at least a dozen official inquiry panels by the Federal State, county and city government are immediately set up to investigate the collapse and eventually There's so much of course the collapses attributed to four factors unsuitability of the foundation, and so actually they find out that there had been an ancient Paleolithic landslide on the exact spot where the dam had been built, which there was no way to know that actually. And then. An uplift saying is called an inadequate design so ultimately a coroner's inquest determines who's responsible for the disaster, and during the inquest, William Mojo, and says and he okay, so he does seem genuinely devastated by. He must be what it's he. It's all his fault. He knows it and he takes responsibility. He says quote whether it's good or bad. Don't blame anyone else. You just fasten it on me if there was an. In human judgment I was the human I won't try to fasten it on anyone else. which was like? Yeah, you're to blame, but it's also like. I can't imagine someone these days taking that much responsibility for their obvious mistake, right? You know it's it's very laudable for sure. Yeah, so the enquist decides that Mulholland and then governmental organizations that oversaw the dam's construction at fault, but they clear home. Any charges that they do. They're basically like construction and operation of Great Nam should never be left to. To the judgment of one person, no matter how that person is like. You gotta get. A second opinion essentially. William Holden has been looked upon as los. Angeles. A savior for so long is now seen as a murderer. People fucking turn on him. People across the region even put up signs their windows that read kill Mulholland. Oh my Gosh! He's devastated. He retired from the Bureau of Water Works and supply in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight. His reputation is ruined. He retreats into a life of semi is. His granddaughter Katherine Says She. Remembers him sitting in silence at family gatherings just lost in his thought. He dies in Nineteen, thirty, five of a stroke at the age of seventy-nine. the victims are compensated for lost lives and land, and by nineteen thirty one. The tragedy is pretty much completely swept under the rug. And in fact, there's a book about California water. That doesn't even mention the disaster. Well yeah in later years, Mojo's reputation is restored and the Mojo in Damn. In the Hollywood hills, Mulholland Drive Mulholland highway and the William Mulholland memorial found in Los. Villas pretty colorful one. Yeah, are all named in his honor. There are still remains of the saint. Francis Damn that are like weathered broken chunks of gray concrete at the site. Where the dam was that you can see today. Wow! Isn't that creepy? on a positive note in response to disaster, the California, legislature creates a dam safety program, and soon has some of the strictest oversight laws in the country in one, thousand, nine, twenty nine. The California legislature also passes laws to regulate civil engineering smart ingrates. The State Board registration for civil engineers, and there is no more self taught engineers. Go like no, no, no yeah. The collapse of the Saint Francis Dam is considered to be one of the worst American Civil Engineering Disasters of the twentieth century, and remains the second greatest loss of life in California, his. Right behind the nineteen six San Francisco, earthquake and fire. The exact death toll remains unknown recent estimate safe. It's around two thousand, and since original counts didn't include the number of Mexican American. Migrant workers are transients remains of victims continued to be discovered in that whole fucking area every few years until the mid nineteen fifties. Continued, to find bodies, the remains of one victim is found deep underground near Newhall in Nineteen ninety-two. Oh, my God and other bodies believed to be victims of the disaster are found in the late nineteen seventies and nineteen ninety-four, and that is the story of the Saint Francis Dam disaster. Amazing. Turn out so long. There's just so much fucking information. Well, also yeah, you needed Kinda the back story, but. Wow. That's. Pick. The MAZING! Take coloring your hair at home to the next level with Madison Reed. He deserve gorgeous professional hair color delivered to your door, starting at just twenty two dollars for decades, women have had two options for coloring their hair either outdated at home, color or time and expense of a traditional salon. Many Madison Reed clients comment on her. 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You're welcome, America. So go listen to the real firsthand. I survived stories because there's so many. There's so many good ones so when I was looking. For this I was looking for one. I'd never heard of before that and that wouldn't count as an is survived story because there's there's a couple of them that are so unbelievable that they have only been on our survive. Yeah, they've been on like a couple. Other different kinds of shows yeah, this is one I had not heard of. It's the girl in the bunker in the survival story of Elizabeth show of. Have you heard of this one? Oh okay I'm I'M I. GET IT! Let's do it okay, so sources for this our state newspaper. That's in Columbia South Carolina. An DOT com the inside dateline blog on MSNBC DOT COM l.. A. Times Wick Pedia. Did I say that today? Dot Com and the lifetime movie the girl in the bunker yes. Starring Henry Thomas? Henry Thomas Elliott for me to. As, a kid adult he. It's a recent movie. Oh, he play! He plays the bad guy creep and he's really good at. It made me really sad how good he was at it! 'CAUSE I I'm. He was one of my first great love. Sure is Elliott for me. I was like why do I love so much? When he was dying, I was dying. Totally okay, so it's September. Six two, thousand, six and fourteen year old Elizabeth show has just gotten off the school bus and she's walking up her driveway and so her driveway. basically runs through. Through this wooded area. It's very rural area where she lives. It's outside the unincorporated community of logoff, which is the population is just over eighty three hundred. Wow, in south, Carolina, so she's about halfway up per driveway and she here's a man. Call out her name and she looks over, and there's a man in a sheriff's uniform standing alone in the woods. Might! Make. Any of any uniform alone in the woods. And he's he calls her by name Elizabeth and he waves her over, and so she's complies because it's. It's a person in uniform. She's a fourteen year old girl, and she asks what he wants. And he explains that he's with the Kershaw County Sheriff's department and that she's under arrest. and. She is totally confused and asks why and is really freaked out but he's already handcrafting her with her hands behind her back. He tells her that the Sheriff Department is found a bunch of marijuana plants at the house and that she's in a lot of trump show. She's really freaked out confused scared, but she also asked to see her little brother. WHO's already home? She he gets home before her and their home by themselves. After school, their mom works so the officer starts walking her through the woods and. And says that's why I'm. I'm taking him right now, and but they walk further and further away from the House and she starts to realize that something is really wrong off at one point they are walking along a riverbank, and he makes a point of keeping her off of the sand, so that her footprints aren't in the sand, and his are either, and she starts to realize there's something really wrong, so she finally gets the courage to ask him where they're going. And he stops and tells her you not a policeman. like fourteen. Is that that perfect age of of being naive and starting to have an understanding of the world yet and you're still you're still so minus thirteen and she is so young. She's like, but she is kind of you know. She's definitely getting more mature by the second but they're still their baby. They really are like they really are. So, at this point, he puts a caller device around her neck and tells her that it's a bomb and that if she tries to run or get away at any point, he'll detonate it and shall be dead. She says she won't and that. She'll comply when he asks her. If she's a virgin, she so scared, she can only nod So when Madeleine show calls from work to check on her kids like she usually does every day. Elizabeth little brother tells her that hasn't come home yet and Madeleine doesn't think much of it and says she's going to call back. She'll check back in a little while so when she calls back a couple of hours later, in Elizabeth's still home. She knows that something's really wrong. so she leaves work, she tells Bobby to walk down the driveway to see if for some reason Elizabeth is on there like hanging out with her friends, and because she has a friend who lives across the street when he does he, he sees Elizabeth's friend walking down her driveway two. She's looking for Elizabeth as well. 'cause. Madeleine called the friend to say. Do you know where she is? My made so basically? They started looking for her. So modeling gets home calls the police. She waits for over an hour for someone to show up in her house, and when no one shows up, she calls back and finds out only to find out that. That they had gotten the county wrong they had sent an officer to the another county so finally after several hours, officer shows up only to tell madeline that she's overreacting. He says that most teenagers away for a day or two. No parents ever think their kids. The type who run away Elizabeth's probably at a friend's house or off with her boyfriend somewhere and maintains trying to convince him note, this is not her at all. She everyday she comes home and takes care of her little brother makes him food like this is not her at all, and the guy says it's you know I see this all the time. Don't worry about it. He explains he can't put out an amber alert for her. Because it's too soon, he assures her. Will come back and he leaves. So we're back in the forest after walking from more than an hour. Elizabeth's kidnapper stops at the side of a hill, reaches down to the forest floor and pulls up a perfectly camouflaged door. It's the hatch to a bunker. and there's a manmade. Let like a homemade ladder made of branches that lead down eight feet down into total darkness, and he makes her walk down into it oh. My adviser gone. It's cold. It's it's pitch black as her eyes adjust, she sees. It's a fifteen foot long space that's dug into the forest floor, so it's the floors are dirt. The walls dirt It has a six. You know. It's a six foot ceiling. There's a well there's a bed. There's a stove with a chimney and and there's a battery operated television. The walls are lined with shelves are stocked with canned goods, guns, other weapons porn. She said She would later say that. It looked like something out of a nightmare. Now this man chains Elizabeth to the wall by her neck and sits her on a man-made bed that he that he obey Abed. He fashioned out of branches. Swimming floats and comforters, so it's really weird and Janki and creepy Elizabeth's looks over and season inflatable doll in the corner. And she starts to cry. But the man tells her. There's no point in crying that she needs to get used to it because this is how it's GonNa be for her now. He says that he's not going to hurt her and very soon after that he rapes her. So. This man's thirty six year old Vincent Fila and he's an unemployed construction worker, whose father died when he was a year old. So as mother remarries a man with a substance abuse problem, and so Vincent begins his binge drinking at age fourteen, and he'll go on to be treated for alcohol abuse ten different times, and this is the drinking problem that ends up getting him fired from his job as a construction worker, and will eventually leave him with alcohol induced brain damage. So he's got, he's got a bad drinking problem and just a year before. Elizabeth Chefs Kidnapping He is charged with sexual assault of a twelve year old girl, but when the authorities go to arrest him, he's nowhere to be found, so the authorities assume he'd the state, but it turned out. He was right under their noses the entire time. And their feet okay so. After a couple of days, the police begin a search with this show. Family keeps going back to them and saying you have to start looking for our daughter, so they put up. They distribute flyers with her picture on it, and then they start doing searches, and they start walking the forest And there is a point where they are sitting in the bunker and they can hear the searchers walking above them. But the it's so perfectly camouflaged that no one sees it or notices anything about the bunker at all. So after five days of captivity Elizabeth has built a bond with her. After said this girl, she's fourteen. She's really innocent. Really sheltered. She is so fucking smart like it's mind blowing. I don't know what she I don't know how she knew any of the stuff, but she knew to mid that she needed to make sure that this guy knew she was a person young, so she would ask him what his interests were, and she would pretend to be super into what he was into, and she talked to him all the time, and she basically slowly one his trust, and like establish bond with him while so. Like when they hear the searchers, he holds a gun to her head and tells her. If she screams, he'll kill her and when the Voices Fade, she tells Vinson that she likes him and that she wants to be down there with them, and she never would have screamed, so she's basically like establishing this kind of like the I like being here with you like you want to be here with you I. Want to be with you getting handled trust. Hurry I, yeah, exactly. She soon builds enough trust with him that he lets her leave the bunker so that she can go take a bath and like wash dishes and a nearby pond. Yeah, so when she's there, she pulls out. Strands of her own hair and leaves it around the side of the pond so that if they ever have dogs searching in that foreign, they'll be able to find her. She also one time when she goes to. The pond leaves her shoes behind. Just in case someone might see her or the Duh again if there's tracker dogs. SMART, it's genius. And then like when she's, he says. Where did your shoes go? She's like I I must have left them at the pond I can't find them like, and he believes everything. She says because she's so sweet and innocent and like, and and playing it so perfectly the most genius thing and Like of all the genius sings, she does though in this nightmare, situation is building enough trust so that when she asks him if she can play a game on his phone, he let's hope. Yes so she basically weights enough time and and you know basically builds the build the trust enough. And because she had gone to the pound and not run away. She done all these things and not done anything to break the trust. She was convincing him that she liked him and that they had this kind of a relationship. How long how long after she had been there that she asked for the phone day five. Wow, so or I believe day five or six so she starts playing games on his phone now he. He figures. Yes, she didn't run. He can trust her, and also there's they don't have phone service in the bunker. Right so it's not like He. She can't make a call, so it's safe. Yeah, so she'll uses phone play a game. Give it back and that's like a thing that that he starts getting used to her doing so on the eighth night. When he's asleep, she climbs up the makeshift ladder and hold the phone out the bunker door and and texts. Her Mother Holy Shit Yup. She writes it's so genius. She writes hi Mom I'm in a whole across from Charm Hill where the big trucks go in and out. There is a bomb. Call Police. Can you imagine being a mother and getting? Taxed especially after that amount of Taya where the police haven't helped you. Yeah, they've argued you. Then it turns out. Your child is missing then. That happens is like nothing. They're not finding anything. I think coming of any of the searches. There's no results of anything. And then suddenly she was actually on her way to a vigil that night they had been, they'd started holding vigils for her, and my was headed out of the House for a vigil, and she looked at her phone, and that taxed on her Chicago. Chicago I mean what you think. It's a hoax or like someone messing with her in the beginning well. No, she immediately was like this is lizzy. Family called her Lizzie and she knew her because that that's it's the. She knew she knew daughter. When when she showed the police, they called the police and showed the police the first officer that came to the House said. She might have like gone away with her friends. And now she's trying to establish a lie to come back and at that point she was like. Are you fucking kidding me what so, but then the sheriff shows up at an and also the little brother. This actually happened in the lifetime movie I'm not sure if this was happening, what happened in real life? But it was kind of a genius moment in the lifetime movie because the first cop that says she might trying. Trying to establish like an alibi is going to call back on the phone and the little brother goes yet is not a bad idea. Because what if she's what does she took the phone and that's going to get her car and like and the cops like. Oh, I think I'm the one that's the policeman here and share when the sheriff shows up, he's like we don't WanNa. Call 'cause that could put her in danger, and the little brother just looks the Copley. So they don't respond to the text, instead they run the cell phone number, and it comes up registered to a woman, and when they drive out to the address this woman's house. The sheriff recognizes the area. This is where they serve the warrant a year ago for the child rapists who had fled I, there's they're now starting to put it altogether. So, they end up searching the property while they continue to question the woman who lives in the House and it turns out that it's his girlfriend slash common-law wife, and that when they searched the property, they find what they think is a trash like trash hole and she ends up telling them. This is a bunker. He dug here and then they find There's like an abandoned car somewhere on their property, because it's all in this forest area, and she admits that she had been leaving food for him, she'd going then going and buying food for him, and leaving in in that abandoned car for him to come and pick up so now they know he's. Okay, so he'd been hiding out and she'd been aiding and abetting him. Exactly and so now they know he's within walking distance. Has He's hiding out somewhere else but near enough to come and get supply. How so so what they decide to do is they realized there that the theory is that he's a coward. He's not. He's GonNa run and this is not he's you know. He's a child molester rapist, and but he's not A. A serial killer, whatever so the chances are that if they leak this to the press that the mother is actually gotten a text, and that this girl might be somewhere alive and that they're going to go on a manhunt now he'll probably run, and so that's what happens. They leak the story to the local press meanwhile down in the bunker when the eleven o'clock news comes on Elizabeth. Elizabeth and Vincent are watching on their weird little TV and he sees the entire report of Elizabeth's mother got a text now. She that Sutton now they. The cops know that she's being held nearby. And now there's a huge manhunt on. Of course, Vincent Loses it. He's enraged. He's panicking hiring out and he's screaming at Elizabeth and she's like I would never do that to you, she is. It's so amazing. She convinces him that she didn't do it. And she basically says will. Couldn't it be the woman that's leaving food for you? How did I not that oh? He told her that because she is getting food. Yeah, okay like she knows everything. She's like his life now. And basically she convinces him. It's not her that she didn't do it. And so then he's. He basically goes well. Then what should I do? And she and she says you should run because they're gonNA. Come and catch you and they can't catch you down here. You should definitely run. So he does. He listens to the fourteen year old girl and he collects. Gamble, he could have just fucking killed her in anger right, but she's so smart. She's able to fuck. She's so smart and she later on on that, and it's a it's called inside dateline. It's this blog on MSNBC DOT COM and so she wrote a thing on there. That was really so. It was so young girl of her where she was like, but she basically said he was really stupid, so she realized after a while that it wasn't like. She didn't think he was gonna be violent like she thought all the things he was doing was kind of like out of desperation. She realized she could outsmart Yeah, and so she just knew basically she got him to do exactly what would get him caught so? He took all his weapons and the pipe bombs that were down there and some night vision goggles, and he told her I really love you and I really want to marry you and she was like yeah. I totally want to marry you to, and he's like okay. Well I'M GONNA run, but then I'm Gonna I'm GonNa find a way to come back to you? And she was like okay sounds great. You better go and he's like. Don't leave here until tomorrow morning, and also while she had been staying there with him the whole time. Time he was telling her how the whole thing was booby-trapped. The whole bunker was booby-trapped, my God and that there were bombs and different things every everywhere all around, so even if the police did come, you know he could make it blow up, so he leaves, and then she waits until the next morning, and then she comes out of the bunker now. Meanwhile, the morning of September sixteenth authorities had set up a line search and they were walking the woods, too 'cause. They knew that she was somewhere in the vicinity when they hear someone yelling help. They Find Elizabeth standing alone outside the bunker. And the officer got who got to her first, and she was like. Be careful. There could be bombs. It could be booby-trapped. Running toward her and he later was quoted as saying I received credit many times for saving her and I did not that child saved herself. Then since Fill Ya is found the same day nailing on the side of interstate twenty in Richland County, so he just basically went and gave himself up and got arrested while At his trial. Moments before his trial happens. Keep pleads guilty to kidnapping ten counts of first degree, criminal sexual assault, two counts of second degree, sexual assault possession of explosives. Armed robbery and impersonating a police officer, and he is sentence to four hundred and twenty one years in prison, and at his sentencing. The judge told Philly era this position requires IB, the conscience of the community, and the community is outraged by your axe. Many people have dick difficult paths, and they don't commit the heinous crimes you committed. You have preyed upon helpless victims with violence and savage manner. Good luck to you, sir, how? Then on that MSNBC, dateline, blog The Great Keith, Morrison writes this about his experience, interviewing both booth and Vincent for the to our dateline special episode. They interviewed him. They interviewed both they interviewed him from jail, and they interviewed her well. They did a whole thing about this whole case, and here's what Keith Morrison said. When Vinson snatched Elisabeth just fourteen years old, she had never dated a boy never once spent even a single night away from home without a family member, she was taken by a wily wolf of a man who had just spent the better part of a year, alluding the efforts of law enforcement. She endured. Terrible horrors faced what seemed to her certain death, and she prevailed the contrast Vincent to Elizabeth was quite remarkable where his story was self-serving claims, shifting back and forth to suit whatever version he was trying to sell Elizabeth was open, and brutally candid were his fearsome behavior wilted in the presence of a television crew. Elizabeth seemed to gain strength from telling the experience, and having come through it with her dignity and humanity fully intact. She smiled a smile to light up the room. Every once in a while a dark tale turns out well, and the worst human behavior is overcome by the best, which is why it was quite an honor to tell the story of Elizabeth Shouf. Home and that is the Harrowing Kidnapping Story of Elizabeth Shue. How Good team good Utah for torn eighteen years old. Oh! She so murder and Susan believable. Oh my God, hell, yes, girl! That was great great job. Thank you. I that's I needed that one and then. To find the Keith Morrison Code at the end is like. Those guys those dateline. Guys, are there legend? He followed Josh He's so funny onto it. Oh, yeah, oh! Yeah, he's my. He's my twitter friends under the PODCAST. Judgment Quits the greatest great job. I was the I think we all need that for sure. It's been a while speaking of. It's been a while you talk in her as Oh. Yeah, this is a underscore. Gilchrist was to drop my fucking array here for Y'all for years. My Dad and I been on separate size of the Colin. Kaepernick protest no matter what I said. He just always felt quote. It wasn't the right menu. I don't WanNa talk about it. I never gave up trying to help him to see but I figured he was pretty set in his ways this morning. I got a text from him. That said quote I. I was wrong. I was drew brees. I didn't get cap I do now. I cried and told him I was proud of him. He said I'm proud of you, so no matter how long it takes no matter how uphill the battle seems, we must continue to push for our black community pedal to the metal. Love you guys Hashtag. Black lives matter. I love that well. Mine is similar. The subject line is Birmingham says, fuck you and your confederate memorial. This is from Shannon P. Hey, they murder PELS, my fucking! Hooray is in my home town of Birmingham Alabama during their protests on Saturday local DJ funny main Johnson declared that it was the goal of himself, and the crowd gathered there to finally tear down the confederate memorial that is Ben an eyesore inland park too long. This memorial has been surrounded by plywood for years. Years Because last time folks tried to pull it down. That was the state solution for protecting it, but also hiding it kind of the perfect metaphor for American racism. Let's cover it up instead of dealing with it. It is needed to go for far too long. After a few hours of protesters pulling away plywood, the city's mayor. Randall would thin entered the crowd to. To speak with funny main. He said he didn't want anyone to get hurt, so he would like for for them to let him tear it down and promised it would be gone by Tuesday at noon. They agreed and the crowd dispersed. Trudeau would fins word. The memorial was removed Monday night. It's been the source of contention in the state for years and the state's. State's Attorney General's Steve Marshall said he would sue if Birmingham tore it down. What a Dick Would Finn said I don't fucking care paraphrasing and tore it down anyway. What a hero! Both he and funny main are I am so proud of these hometown heroes right now, hell! Yeah, that is I love that that's happening everywhere. Yeah, people people aren't messing around anymore so. It's so important for dig NESIC. Yeah, that's. Yeah. That's really good. Nice ones. Please send us your her raise You can just comment on our twitter or instagram or send them in via the website that Fan The Fan Colts. That was good Thanks for listening. Thanks for always being our rod friends. I hope everybody's doing good stay strong stay, make sure you log off every once in a while, and just LIDO SCO by a tree. If you possibly can please wear your masks, Please tell other people to wear their masses. But most of all stay sexy and don't get murdered goodbye Elvis. Cook? That was right on the money.

Los Angeles. United States California Vince Mulholland Mulholland twitter Saint Francis murder Gareth Oh Perry Mason Georgia Owens Lake engineer Chrissy Teigen Belfast Hollywood Chris Tulsa Tom Dinner DWP
Yellow Wallpaper in Venice: Story time poetry episode

The Savvy Creative

06:49 min | 8 months ago

Yellow Wallpaper in Venice: Story time poetry episode

"The savvy this Saudi heap three eight eight high creative minds and welcome to the savvy creative. Podcast I'm your host Cristina Castagna. That and today is April first. Twenty twenty and for me. This is my twentieth day of self `isolation. Now today I wanted to share with you. Some happy short love stories. But I feel that this piece I wrote now is more timely as isolation is starting to stir up mixed emotions. It's causing a lot of fear and erotic behavior and for some people. It's calming for some people it's multiplying now. It's a challenge to balance being alone and managing the and panic and still trying to assure loved ones that everything is still safe. We're all some of US have been affected. Some of us have not and throughout the month of April. I want to share with you. Different ways that you can cope with all this anxiety and hopefully get our lives back to normal because transitioning back to normal. We'll also be a process now. I found myself writing a home yesterday. Quite randomly and ironically because I was actually procrastinating on doing other forms of writing now since April is actually national poetry month. I thought I would put out this first poem that I've wrote in probably about twenty years and as I was writing this it was a way of me writing to myself much like the way we do in a journal and I was really just trying to stay calm and I was really just wanting a place to open up and talk about what I miss when I look at L. A. Through my window and the things I miss when I'm out and about in La. I encourage you to do the same. If you are missing your life and you want to stir hope not fear in what awaits US next and if you do feel inspired to write throughout this month of April. Please tag me in your posts. I'm happy to share it on my social and I wanNA see some of the best work that is going to come out of this mess. So here is the first poem for April that I want to share about what we're feeling right now. I'm writing to you from the city. I love real life and death. Cover the streets. Some streets gilded some gentrified others with tents on the corners watching them have slowly numbed my pain much like the needle scattered on the sidewalk. Numbs pain in the same way. The affluent streets can afford the American dream because they've learned to blend in with it. The gentrified ones are infused with tradition trend. The dangerous ones are the root of all culture teetering between the danger and the Glam on my blog. There was always a new adventure. I could seek. I miss the old buildings. I'd see walking through downtown or the ones that silently. Tell the story about the golden age of Hollywood. They weren't far from the sweatshops where my grandmother worked when she first came here sewing gallons the red carpet. I love hearing stories about the rise of stars that shine so bright because they spent years burning the midnight oil to keep their glow and now their homes light up the city from Mulholland drive. I missed the pass along the sand. I need to hear the waves again. Each crashing waves. Humbles me telling me not to swim against the current put to find the connection? That's perfect fit even for that brief moment. Finding the balance on a surfboard or that lasts countdown. Before the sun goes down over the ocean those moments when you know how lucky are to feel life in energy not visible to the human eye and tangible to open minds open hearts. I can't bear all those motivational posts. Anymore they are from hollow teachers. Let distance be my teacher how to understand love through the depths of conversations and the art of love letters put aside shopping and rationing food to help me appreciate the abundance. We live in let isolation make me a leader using ingenuity as a guide through the Mo mobs of panic as we hear skewed deaths whole numbers. We must dig deep to resurface facts and illuminate the truth let home be a place of warmth and comfort. Stop the art all around me from turning into yellow wallpaper and let discipline build strengthen freedom so that the words I write today sing long after my last breath is gone. Thank you for listening today. Creative minds go write poems stories essays but right something today and every day in the month of April. It doesn't have to be perfect. My stuff is far from perfect but it just has to be done and out there for the world. Now also remember that. We have one more month of lockdown. At least here in Los Los Angeles and probably in other parts of the US. We are on lockdown till April thirtieth. So we have one more month really make this time count. So you are walking out of quarantine and isolation with a smaller waistline balanced Chaka's and lots and lots of pages filled with amazing stories and words because remember you may be physically isolated right now but you don't have to feel trapped as long as your mind is free. You can survive this now. This is also the best time to do what I'm doing right now. Whether it's Solo Casting. Facebook LIVES INSTAGRAM. Live Zoom parties if you want some tips on getting prepared and learning how to do all these things with microphone techniques storytelling stuff like that then check out the guys. We had the new savvy creative academy by clicking the link in the description below. That's all for today creative minds. I hope you enjoyed this very short episode and I will see you on the next episode.

US Cristina Castagna Twenty twenty Facebook Chaka La Mulholland drive Los Los Angeles Hollywood L. A. twenty years
What to Become a Professional Presenter?

OC Talk Radio

54:10 min | Last week

What to Become a Professional Presenter?

"Thanks for joining us at the business growth cafe where each week. We select from a menu of topics for a focused discussion with an industry expert to provide insights that can impact your business's growth with your host angelo ponzi. I am angelo ponzi. Your host here at the business growth cafe and thank you for joining us. I'm here today to tell you. I'm addicted no not to drugs or alcohol but frankly to public speaking. You've heard me. I love it. I will go out of my way up. There was an opportunity to present to a group. I actually tried to manufacture them. Sometimes just i can out there and speak now. I wasn't always that way. If you listening to this show you heard about my journey of being a little on the shy side and frightened to death about getting in front of people and it really wasn't until i was playing in a band. I was a drummer. The band at the time and one of the singers was hearing me sing in the background. They said you got a good voice watching him up and saying that was like pulling teeth probably took a few months to actually get me out there but eventually they did. I think my first song which was probably teddy. Bear by elvis presley. I had my back to the practice stage. I was so concerned that i was going to mess up but that incident changed my life. I went from being fearful to being fearless when it came to getting out there and doing any kind of public speaking and eventually i had opportunities to speak thirteen. Fourteen fifteen sixteen times a year around the country especially during my days with the action sports industry. Because i was the guy with the data and everybody wanted. That davis in that was fantastic. So that was pre covid now here or in kovic. We're not quite post. Koga jet it's gets to be a little more difficult. I have been speaking the zoom to groups and it's certainly a different different way to do it but man did i just love it then i say i loved it man. I really love it. However there's a lot of challenges out there to being speaker finding the right opportunities creating a compelling presentation frankly that's relevant to your audience that people want to sit and listen to arizona nothing worse than giving a presentation especially on zoom in seeing everybody's head down doing something else right that's zoom etiquette by the way you listen to that please pay attention and ultimately of course of speakers. We all want to make some money. It's a ultimate reinforcement. Imagine there are people who do nothing but speak for a living and make a lot of money so covid or no kogo. It is one of my dream. And i bet you. It's one of yours as well so today if it is you come to the right place i guess. Today richard ball hoan founder and samantha. Managing director of the company missing link. The are both here today to start you down the path of becoming an authority and bringing your experience to the stage. So don't go away. We'll be right back after this message. Your strategic plans are essential to managing your business's growth spend the time to develop a cohesive roadmap to follow to ensure your entire team is moving in the right direction. These plans should take insights and the brand strategy where you've already completed to help you achieve your long term business in growth objectives as well as keep you competitive. These are actionable plans and should include the details of achieving your growth including tactical patients timelines budgets and. kpi's for success developing your plant as a team sport. Make sure you include the stakeholders of each year strategic departments in your organization because everybody in the company has impacted by the success or failure of your points. The following our six key questions to ask yourself. Do you have a clear understanding about what you're trying to achieve number two. What does your brand stand for in the eyes of your customers three. Why do your customers buy from you for what are your competitors and five. What is your approach to south. Where are your opportunities or revenue coming from and number six. How can you differentiate yourself from your visit. The pod group dot com to learn more. As i mentioned i'm joined by richard mulholland founder. And samantha leonice managing director of the company missing. Link the take us on a journey today. That i'm really particular excited about salmon. Richard welcome anki being absolutely so so other. There's three of us here today and out. So we'll try to communicate via hand signals An al kind of maybe call you allowed is. We're talking and i'll let you guys also decide who's gonna do the speaking but i'm excited to have you here and really for the put in the context of about what missing link is and what would you guys do. Why don't one of you take the lead and tell the audience a little bit about missing link in poison tation company that i started all of when he three years ago when i was twenty two and with the purpose of helping people be really less sucky when standing in front of other human beings. I think that human attention is wasted. All the time with bad presentations. And i wanted to go to war with that idea and try and make sure that when we get funded a group of people that we respect their attention and activate them accordingly while you just use the fantastic line. I don't remember seeing it on your website. So i can make you less sucky. I like that because we've all been there. Unfortunately i think i probably been one of those guys once before maybe twice maybe three times but more often the not of course in the audience in in you guys probably know way more than i do. There's nothing worse than sit through a presentation that just bloody agony that you're sitting there and trying to be attentive trying to be nice to the speaker but in the meantime you're all you're thinking about is when i go have lunch or whatever that submarine mode Every every audience member of the world is a highly trained black belt in submarine mud. It's the idea that you look at the you. Look at the presenter. Your your head is still there. You're perfectly Watching you even laugh and other people laugh but you have no idea what you're getting new repenting lunch or something else on. Our job is to is to sink the submarine like we don't want that. We wanna make people that are so attentive that day. They don't realize it the presentation finished and then like awhile actually paid attention through. It can't tell you how people must be saying dude. I actually pay attention to whole presentation. I said well thanks. That was the that was the band. But i appreciate it. Those great while. I mean again i think this. So what you're doing it and again having been on that side and and work with other people helping with their presentations bet but even for myself and again just creating the content that you think's going to be relevant and then figuring out a way to present it so we're going to get into that but but but the pandemic's i have some questions. I always like to ask so. Certainly you're a presentation company in working with lots of people and giving presentations yourself. Covid hits you have to pivot given all that's gone on with with your business. What keeps you up at night when you think about growing continuing to grow your business. Okay so much. The biggest thing is not taking everything is opportunity is given to us because as soon as you. If you think about your presentations job is to change. Human being's right to make people better because he spoke at. If you're a business leader you want to maybe give you audience. Let them feel that. they're safe. That vision that they have somewhere where they wanna go when we have to pivot our medium of delivery but we didn't have to have a purpose our purpose was to help lead lead not and through stages and what happened. Is that as soon as it will went online. It opened up the stages. The week could impact from iran south africa to anywhere on the planet and What keeps me awake at night. We've not done a big enough job off leveraging the opportunity that we've been given for if you're an appropriate entrepreneurs are driven by fixing a problem or filling a gap. That's what we do what this did. Is it create a meaningful problem and a really big gap that somebody has to fill. I not want it to be as and what keeps. Both seminar up at night is thinking about how we make sure. We don't miss that opportunity. Sam don't add something now. Yeah i think. One of the have to admit that i had in the last six months without global. The impact in south africa is that i've worked with rich on for most of my adult career for twenty years and the is at the top of entrepreneurs constantly looking full. The next thing that we need to we need to be involved in it makes sense to our business and it's frustrating sometimes as the co panel to always be changing routes. But this time. Which would say sam this chicken with him three days. Three to five days later and say okay. So i'm back that he'd be like no no no. We're not doing that anymore. And i'm like what would you say like three days ago. That was three days ago and now it doesn't feel that's necessary like we. You have to be watching an adept take time. It's not about standing stolen and waiting to see what the new normal looks like. That's not an option. So i think what if your kids just killed another one of your kids. I heard that in the background. This this is not on the weekend show. Everybody are about twenty training. Yeah and i have to say for the for the listener. So i'm in southern california. There in south. Africa am actually jealous. Because i'm over here drinking coffee and i can. I can see them. Even though you can't and sam over there drinking a glass of wine so i guess that's the time of the day And i love it. I love it. I have to say to i. I've watched some videos and your office is freaking cool. I've seen a lot of offices with bowling alleys and all sorts of other stuff. Your entire environment is just outrageous. I love the the whole concept. The bird's nest in the tree house in the slides and the firemen's i mean it's it. Looks like a freaking blast so web hats off all that man that is that is a great environment and certainly it's about the creativity and freedom to explore thinking. Maybe those are my words. That that's what i get out of all of that. So fantastic in in you listeners. Gotta go online to check this out. I think i saw that video on youtube. It'd be ended up going to say spoilers. Thank you so much for that. Because that was a really ocean project that rich and i worked on for a long and we basically turned around an empty shell in six weeks and turn that into what you saw on net emphasized. And but the spoiler alert is that thanks chuck global pandemic. We won a one hundred percent much business. Now we're gonna snippy birth nest star We've we've taken all that energy and put it in our work which has been a credible. Do you still talk about. Maybe two of the things so the first thing was much creative space. It was actually more of to prove customers in my mind. I realized that. I was trying to sell presentations to people who would be paying us. What if one presentation whether it be paying their pa or their assistant hold month's salary four so i realized they don't have a presentation problem they have a goodness being on stage in being boring is something. I don't wanna be problem so what we did is we wanted to set up an office. It was an antidote to boring because they were worried that they were going to be a hungry. Be so boring. The presentations are so boring. So we build. The office was about as because it doesn't matter how creative your spaces after one week. It's just your desk is just work rights. And and so that was. It was partially marketing partially attracting the right type of individuals come and working organization but one of the biggest limiting factors was two things that led to his using it so i was already our strategy to close it before. Covid struck two reasons for it. The one was that geographically anchored us. So we thought that. If you for you to get a proper missing nick experience you had to be forty five minutes from the office because we wanted to give you that company experience. We bought a stretch limousine. Pick you up. We drive you there. But that meant i was stuck dealing with somebody in your hands gary and i also live at a two hour flight away so that that was a problem. That was the first thing the second thing was that it was just an old people spoke about our office more than he spoke about what we did. So we generated so much. Pr for the environment. We worked in and people kept on calling his Organization but we see ourselves as consultancy retail sosas a smart business not just creativity for creativity sake so it got to the point where we started saying. Hey guys two interviews anymore. If you want to talk about our office that's not. That's not where the story's at so designing to what became a superpower early and got a lot and office before it was also pretty cool. Got a lot of press ended up holding us to an old way of thinking when we knew we had to let go of that superpower that thing that did so well in order to move forward to the next phase for business that you're not too great point i mean your your office tended over became your brand almost and So i commend you for that. I mean it's very difficult. I mean we all You know in our home environment for me personally in through a lot of my career actually in this office says where i've worked. I've always worked remotely a matter of fact when i was growing my agency originally that marketing agency. I used to have seven people. Come to my house in work in this room and in the next room with me because i always felt having offices before eventually became the know the clients were gonna come well. The clients never really came unless the usually we had clients. That would come on a friday early because they wanted to go home. Early right to y- yeah so from having that i mean i've had the high rises that that nobody ever came to just became obey. Expansive that but our to our office and our vine which was in high right it was designed by on the high end architectural firms. I mean the walls were slanted was as really interesting shapes but it became to your point not quite like yours. A focal point that people used to like to talk about but for us it was this or be sat. And that's what we did our work. So let's move off of that. Thank because i don't want this isn't about your office. I did have to mention that very cool. I love the debate vitamin congrats. So how many ask you both the same question. And i'm gonna go with you sam. What is the best business advice you've ever received done try and do everything hire people who are more than you do all of that wretched. Same thing same question. I'm not sure offhand. I may want to spend back to that light to give it some thoughts. I've had a lot of really really great advice. I've had a number of coaches that i've worked with throughout my career. That have all helped me different times. A pretty contextual. I would like to maybe mentioned one thing that was important but the lesson was almost the timing was years ago we lost one of our biggest clients was missing the car brand and my business coach was with me. The time is the old german guy and he got up out of my office. I was melinda hitting him. How unfair it was and he got out of got up in the middle of a station. Said i will be right back in the office and grow to bookshop. He brought the book of movement cheese and he drove back and he said i will not let us at until you read this book. And he threw the book at my table at any wednesday sets in reception. And i always think that my lesson was that the book itself was great in the right time but the one thing about advice advice has to be given exactly the perfect time. There's a five hundred. Other times where i've being given that book would have hated it but at that time it was the perfect antidote for me getting in my own way in my business and i realized that being a great coach is knowing the timing of went to deliver the right device to people at the right time and he just got it settled in and i again had never recommended that book to anybody until about a month after covid struck and i thought hey. This is the book to read again now. Your cheeses moved. That's interesting that you say that. Actually i read the book years ago. And i think it was late march early april. Somebody gave me that book again. 'cause again trying to figure out marketings being cut. What are we going to do. How can i continue to stay in front of people. And somebody said hey. Do you ever read this book so like yeah a long time ago so interesting that you bring that up we talk about getting people on stage getting them to do big presentations and things like that and so i look at someone who might even be an expert in their field in and really moving them to become an authority and i think that's part of the the idea of standing in and making presentations so when you're working with somebody in my next step i want to get into that a little more details. How do you work with people to that. Move them if they're already an expert to becoming an authority versus. You know tom. Dick harry that decides they want to become a public speaker and they have no idea what they're doing and there's a lot more work there. I mean this becoming an authority is is really interesting to me. Actually had a guy out london Just recently who his whole businesses around taking experts and turning them into authority figures. If you will out how do you work with somebody like that guy. So you touched on one half authority. I think there's two directions to come at authority at the one. Erection is expertise so if you are experts at the other is research and i think that both perfectly bible so what you have is you have some speakers who maybe high experts but low ability so there may be the world's leading speaker in their field but they are terrible at speaking with respect to j craig venter The man met the human genome. Seen him speak twice wants. Ted wants to pop tech absolutely incredible brain. Horrific editing The message across. But if you do want to have somebody speak to you. About mapping the human genome. That's who you're going to get because the authorities so high but then on the flip side you think about somebody like a mom. Confederal glad will has. High authority is a journalist but actually topics discusses are based on research not based on experience so his experience in the principals around the tipping point for example or outlines are low but his ability to research has high. So i don't think not being an expert necessarily preclude you from the stage provides to win to do the work and then of course you go to work on the other side which is ability to make sure that you can get across the store east of if you are low expertise. You can't get away with being lower than if you're very high expertise if you invented something or create something then you can do a degree to some degree. But then the flip side is it comes down to structuring. so i don't think ability is necessary. it's not about how well you're able to Speak a present. It's about how well you're able to structure a narrative. Because i've seen a ton of speakers who they look like they're not the greatest in the world and in fact one example i often use. My team can't stand him is elon. Musk musk looks like a terrible presenter. Except at the end of the presentation you want to stuff so if you wanna stuff then. He couldn't have been that bad and he. He isn't a typical good presenter. The structure of which. How'd you get an audience from where he picked them up to where he wanted to drop them off and if he can do that effectively. You don't need to be this big larger than life personality as long as you understand. The mechanisms required for for driving human attention. And i think he understands that. Just fine so. I don't think it has to start from expertise. I think that is great. If you're an expert too. I think a stage is a great way for you to become a figure but i'm not sure that that's the only departure point. I'm an expert at something. It could be that. I want to be seen as the world's expert in something that i'm not and if nobody else has put up there had to be the experts that could be you. Simon sinek is the world's leading experts on the word y. And nobody can tell me what he did for a living before he did that. Ted talk like he had no reason being there but he decided end up. That's great point grey point. There's a a gentleman. I won't use his name. That and i've had a lot of conversation with him. He he makes his living speaking and a lot of times. I'll talk to him and he'll say yeah. I'm researching a new topic. Somebody asked me if i could talk on it. He has no experience. Matter of fact he had no experience in the topic that made him. You know i won't say famous propelled him into the world of public speaking getting getting paid for and now that's all he does. He looks for topics. He receives pens entire days researching ideas. And then. if you find something that's relevant he'll go research create a presentation than start marketing it. So he's not an expert in it to your point but but he's researched it and so he has all the details that he needs to have though anyway. That's where it would have to be right. So he so. Many people hold themselves back from the stage because they they feel that they're not an expert enough in a category but hurting up and speaking in doing the research is actually often enough for what most people need from it. I think even experts would do well to start with research being the basis for your for your talk. And i love that for a long time looking at the skateboard guy behind. You and i was in the action sports industry for about thirteen years and and it all started. I i worked. I did research as a consultant for a retail chain called pacific somewhere. I don't know if you've ever heard of them and sew clothing stuff for teens and and behi behind the glass. We didn't focus. Groups was guys like bob. Mcknight from quicksilver bob hurley. They always say we wish there was more research in this industry. Well through about nine years i went. You know. maybe there's something to this. And i decided in created this company called border track which was a surf skate and snow. Snowboard research company and then became more of a consultancy. I've never skated served or snowboard in my entire life but i also sudden had all the information all the research to what. We're talking about this. So i started giving presentations at all of the major shows. All the sporting goods shows was brought around the country. Because i was now the authority figure in inaction sports and it's a it's a long journey kit trust me. They didn't accept me right away. Because i was a new york kid out in california but to your point i had that research if you will that turned me into that guy versus. I was the expert trying to flip it anyway. So there there's a there's a process may not you don't work with somebody and say okay. Let me see a presentation. great fiqh by right. So there's a there's a process that you guys go through and i love this this term. You gave it which is story to stage that. I love that that that is so descriptive. And it's about a nine step process. So let's let's talk about this. So how do you typically engage with somebody in in. How do you work them through this process and it also the time. i mean. this doesn't look like something that happens in in two weeks right. This takes a little bit of time. So let's delve into your story to stage saw. I'll take your founding point of which we decided to start it why that was because it's so much more than biting a talk if you can have the world's best talk which is like a beautiful fall leaf line in the forest floor. It doesn't matter pretty is nobody knows it exists is not going to be is going to be hurt and most speakers they get a couple of problems wrong one. They think their job is over one. Been the mike drops so when the audience applauds. That's not the end of your job. That's that you finished marketing components of your project at now you've got to convert their audience to your audience. I was frustrated. That most speakers weren't understanding this that they thought that i'm going to go out there. I'm going to get paid a fee. And i'm going to do my talk and then i'm going to be a paid speaker and i don't think being the speaker is not to take having a professional paid speaker for the last seventeen years and i understand that you could make really good money but actually i got six figures form for speaking. But i've got seven figures from. Its because when you get off that stage if you've done your job whether enough and that doesn't mean being over he sales you can absolutely convert their audience into your audience. So that was a departure point. The other thing is that most speakers don't understand what area of authority yes and they limit themselves to become a stone through speaker speaker whose influence as far as they can throw a stone because they'll hit somebody else talking about the same thing so you're a sports person who went to adversity. And you wanna talk about that. You wanna talk about one pro feet you want nor perseverance or a your marketer or you wanna talk about using edwards whatever you can hit you know that's not going to be a corner of the universe is going to have any influence so i wanted to create a process to help people i understand. What does this small corner of the world that you can own to me. A brand is simply an area of real estate in somebody else's brain and some where there's there's a blank plots of land available for your flag and most speakers are happy to prop themselves into overpopulated. Territory does add themselves to the mix. I believe that you should try and be out there and find the frontier in which you can own your space once you have that with. Have to work out what that looks like. And what that talk. Isn't we actually get our speakers to the sales material for their talk before they've made a single site then you go out and you send it and if nobody is it you tweak it and you said it and then when somebody visits which will help you through then and only then do we start worrying about how to make talk because at is a great jazz musician duke. Ellington only time. What i need is a deadline. You can spend with parkinson's law you'll spend if you've got six months to make a keynote. That's how long will take you to make but if somebody's paid you to show states next thursday within that's how long it takes. And so that's the job. Was we wanna get you booking. And then we actually build the content. Because you're keeping yourself enough to know that you have to do this. Once we get you onto the stage obviously want to help you with your technology and and how to use it your stage fast because it turns up stagecraft and especially now in presenting online and then finally we want to make sure that you amplify build your audience afterwards so we have nine steps to take you through getting to try and build an engine a your guest. His lot of board games behind me. Which is my passion and my favorites genre of games are engine. Builders games at that. You're actually a better machine and then eventually it takes over you've got this this profit generating and that's what i think. Public speaker should be doing belt that you building an engine. Something that just didn't really touch on there was how long the program isn't what it looks like the basically the price is you apply food for interview and the discovery phase pre the actual program. So it's really important for us to ensure that at the end of the debts adaptation on the line. We wanna make sure that everybody got street. Programming becomes like a success so we go to make sure that this affects this quarter of discovery. An interview process that happened beforehand. And then when she accepted to the program is a week serve on boarding. Get your frame of reference into the rot space and make sure that throughout lenses are on and then it's at the moment through student pilot phase. Such running identify. Ian three months programs are twelve. Twelve weeks with three cools a week so the cools on not mandatory at all and. It's not way actually the programs such that is with community sets and the the The sharing a lot of advantages and learnings. But that's where the questions so as you go through the senate best. If you've got shaking christians that come up you you open them up to a platform where rich and the team will address question. But also pose them to people within the cargo on the program with cast which is really powerful because people looking at it from different industries different walks of life different perspectives. Which is really cool. But for the most part the program happens a incredulously so you have access to a bunch of collateral end videos and then we work in workbooks in notion that gives a basic food playbook at the end of the program. Riches you to add that when we worked through. This was a big frustration for me. Is that a lot of even what we had done in the past out the week develop hawks for speaks became chose they pay as we work through them. Our team went to develop the content and made made material for them coached Sent them on their way. It having the deck wasn't effective enough. And i see a lot of these programs is something we originally considered doing where we work together for a week in the end of this week. Intensive you're gonna get a talking about to do it. I simply don't think that works. I don't think this is a weak little process. It's just so much discovery internally for you to figure out what corner of the world you wanna own. We're forcing people into three months. And they're getting uncomfortable with the clip. The were asking them to move at. That's three months. And i feel like a lot of people i could get it. Talk out of you in twenty four hours and beacon heavy ready to deliver tomorrow but it's not going to be your trademark talk. It's just going to be a good enough. And that's not with a lot of what i what i saw out there. What i what. The tap we were falling into. His business was Giving people at tool but we weren't it wasn't the right tool and we weren't teaching him how to use it property and so i would be wary of any of these one week. Walk out of there with a keynote in. You're going to be the roles nick speak. I'd i've never i've yet to see any of those people on any major stage. Nobody gets absence six weeks. And if you figure that out let me know the couple of things that are really interesting so it sounds like and correct me. If i'm wrong that you've pivoted a bit that that just because someone wants to use your services does mean they'll get to use your services that you're being more. I won't say the word selective but you're putting them through a screening process. Probably i would imagine. I do that when i talked to. A prospective client. I don't take everybody had loved to get their their their income but lot of times does not the right fit the way they think. I mean i've had people call me and say i don't believe in marketing. Convince me pass not interested right hip. And then i get. Why is it because we're going to have this conversation every day. No matter what i do you're not gonna think it's moving the needle. Whatever it is. I'm not. I don't wanna work with us. Just not a good set. So i would imagine you get some of that right. Hey i want time comes along. Mary comes along. I wanna be a speaker. Make me back and the kind of go through the motions. But maybe they're not the right fit for your program day name so i hold. Smu turned away obviously probably a third of the speakers who've approached us because i actually saved him like you're gonna give us your money and i'm not sure this is the time and this is the right program for you. There are some presenters. Were some people who've been right for the program but we're happy to make him something in her business. You know the the legacy business we can help you. Create a sales day for your. That's a problem. We do that all day long but my friend would man. I don't know if you've had on the show. But he he says you define your business by what you say no to. And i've always held that to be true. I missing link from. We started even though. I'm an entrepreneur myself. We had two zero entrepreneurs policy. We would not deal at. This is up until recently. Maybe four years ago i would not accept money from somebody who is paying their checkbook because are nightmare crappy clients they want to. They're actually spending than he wears. Everybody else be dealt with spending budget. And i would rather deal with somebody spending budget over somebody spending money all day long. This was one of the first times that not only are we dealing with. Where actually getting the person who pays the money is the person going through the program. They're on the hook and so we actually want people who care the one person so far. That's kind of didn't work out in the program and it's been a real big hit that one person who does the letter to apologize and this dude was basically to wealthy and the investment he made in as with seemed like a cool idea but it was never going to give the time to make it work. Here's like man it doesn't matter whereas everybody else wanna feel that this man is. You're making a gopher this an extension so part of our metrics business is dependent. We don't take commissions off speakers but part of our success metrics is business is depending on the dependent on the billions of people who go through a program so earth success by tearing the bonuses that we pads and gets to artie ms dependence on how well other unrelated human beings do and we have no control over that we can try to push them but we. We can't do it so we've got to make sure that the people we now are going to be likey at to succeed in the program because my goodness is dependent on doing the work. The let's let's talk a little bit about going from giving presentations. I do a lot of presentations but typically marketing for me right. I'm trying to show that. I have expertise and to your point the people in the audience. Hopefully there's one or two people at a say. I've gotta talk to this guy. I've got to engage with them and then there is that coveted payment in. I've been paid. I can't say that. I've been paid to do some of these about end. Their course there's the guy. I was talking about earlier. That does nothing but public speaking. And he's making out seven figures and that's all he does. All year round is make presentations. So how do you. How does someone decide or you help someone decide when they're worth being paid for and the other part of that question is do you help people and i couldn't i couldn't. I don't think you do that. You help identify in create opportunities for your clients as a speaker. I mean for the last few years. I haven't been involved missing guy. Fulltime leadership team and i had been speaker last year. I was in south africa at home with my family. Seven days in a row only twice in the yet being a fulltime speakers. Actually not that great. A job in fact is quite intellectually unfulfilling Because you're traveling around your same content. You you better search certain amount of keynote. She hasn't pretty in and it's not thinking actually missed running the business. I believe the the holy grail of speakers is the one in between nasa. in fact there's a hierarchy at the top of the hierarchy thrive created a talk. It's on a system and there are people all over the world that are credited by thinking and they want to talk to verne. Harnish has a system and you hired gazelles system. And you want to become an expert. Speaking of that you get paid to speak at that and and verne harnish will get paid. Because you'd that is amazing on the flip side from us. I want to as i said. Turn up be paid to speak in. A georgia fairmont Fly me halfway around. The world is not close. And i will come out there and i'll speak and then as a result of that i have something to offer to engage with the audience afterwards other than just another speaking and i think that's where we have to get now because avatar to that. Is you what you just described if you you're standing out there in your thought the drink thought leadership through your business and you're giving something that is compelling enough for an organization to hard your business because of something you said twenty five minutes. You've made them smart enough that they want to hire your business predict way bigger than your speaking fee within. Why would you charge for that. The only reason you're charging for your talks is because you've just not decided to. There's literally no more science and that does not that. You shouldn't just it. You're not charging so the next time somebody contacts says. Hey angela speak this mocking summits the two things you have to do. First of all when they try. Give you a topic to speak about you. Saying this is what i talk about. And the second thing is when they said you would wouldn't Look on these five thousand dollars. I'll have to come out there and that you know somebody says yes speaker then you realize it was that easy most people just say yes because somebody else asked them to say yes and because the client didn't offer a fee they just are too embarrassed to ask for everybody who asked me to speak of the conference. I say thanks so much every appreciate that. Kiss my feet. And then they are the pay. Certain amount depends. I will speak at events for free. Definitely if they're the right audience because in my mind is three ways for you to make one hundred k. Speaking one is to do you know twenty five k. Jobs and then you better make sure that you have a you know like really good acting engine and things like this that you could sell yourself. The other is to do five twenty k. Jobs and then you know you probably need a new york times bestseller tedtalk and the third way is to speak at the right audience for free and then you make it off business from there. So you've got to decide what you fit on one of those three things but we all should be paid for me. Get off stage in terms of i'm referring to we help you book stages that basically yossi. We don't book stages for speakers what we do have is we. We share it all and our opportunities so we obviously we. All the missing link has worked with every day pretty much. Every big culprits campanian interprises in south africa. We have a lot of access to the corporate market in terms of that kind of Speakers we also have a great relationship with all the stages regionally and richard boats richard a spokesman we both worked with change global before so we have nas opportunities to be able to link them. What's amazing about story to stage. Is that we we show them that. They need to build that authority Helped them with access to certain stages of on. How do you actually pitcher south. Certainly that's going to stand often. Be remarkable that you will if if somebody is creating an events and she's got five speakers in finally Chooses you every time. I like that approach because it really puts the speaker involved right. You're talking about the wealthy guy before he wrote a check in and did really want to put kind of the time into it. Right is a guy you know no big deal on that care about the money so i think that's part of it about being engaged as as the as the speaker well. I think that that is a cool thing about our program. And i think why people are having such a an incredible experience on this because we actually make you ensure that you are going to be based vision of self that you all you must authentic vision. So that when you stand up on that stage that you're going to have the impact and be that provoking speaker activate the audience in the way that you want to and in doing that building that visit us on the other side to not just standing up and having incredible open making sure that you are collecting that audience and engaging with them and seeing how you can check to them along the line lockridge says you. Have you make what set you stand in front of become not the person who paid for us audience. You're so you every time you get up on stage. They should be renewed. You want without the sales and one thing. I wanted to mention before we move on from this. I think it's important that people understand the myth of speaking agent. It gives you. The speaking agent is such a terrible full of security. You come home. And be put on a speaking agents books. And i'm on tons of speaking agents books but they're not their businesses not to find you gig their businesses to fill a slot but the easiest person they can fill so if they have you and one hundred one celebrity charges the same as you. They'll always put that person forward because they are easier sale and they're competing against the other speaking agents for that slot. So i worried that speak a bit of. I'm on an eight out. But i have a speaking agent. They're going to do all the work for me. I have never yet met the speaker unless unless they're one of the top celebrities mocking god wills agents or something like that where they believe like. Hey i've got speaking agent and they just brought me all this work a friend of mine. Who's a double three time. Ted speaker save Keeping getting so much from speaking agents and one day he employed a an assistant and he said well bottom. I get the gist. The traffic that comes from my office to go to my assistant. And then i'll just take the other work from the speaking agent and two in this case a penny because puns on panties. He didn't he realized that he was giving one hundred percent of the traffic to his speaking agents and they were disliking back to him. He ended up being the exact same amount just keeping those leads internally and he was getting no extra value from this agency so so i just think it's knowing the reality. Which is you are in control. You all your own marketer. If you are a speaker doesn't matter. How many agents you have urine control anyway. So never trust someone who says that they can change that. I want to go back to a couple of things that you said in your process and and i love that that you create the collateral in the marketing materials. If you will i before anything else. Normally it's created the reason i mean in my mind. I create the presentation that i've tried to figure out how to market it right. In this case it's like well let me create the materials i market and if i get the gig we'll do it. 'cause you made. You made a point to give me a thirty days before. I have to speak. I'll take me thirty days. Create the presentation. The one i described like two weeks ago. I ended up doing literally two days before the event and i had three weeks to do it so absolutely the other thing that i find it in. Your process is is about the audience and how to build the audience in in utilize the audience. Was there for future. Business future work. Whatever happens to be. Because so many times after i give you the rely presentations people come out. They congratulate you. Do all these things in you grab a bunch of business cards but the other not necessarily the relationship and trying to build those and depending on if you can get a hold of the list and i find that you know for me. It's like tada. Of course i understand that but you know it just reinforced. That is something that we constantly need to do when we do that. But but i did want to ask is. You're working with people certainly in getting them. Prep let's say for onstage but now on zoom might so how is that kind of changed your process and how you had to pivot to you know. I mean again for someone to alternately at. They're doing zoom meeting a lot of times depending on the nature of it for using slides for example. They usually just a little box on the screen versus if they're doing some kind of You know fo screen and just talking and not having any strong visuals. I mean as definitely a different game now. So how do you guys address that. So the first thing that you can decide to not make the case. I'm doing a presentation to speak for privacy and Video and video allows you to create very easy picture in picture slights so you can control. You can have a slight up next. You like a news reader. It can be full screen and what i particularly liked about. Phrase's approach is that it doesn't require green screen. It's don't try to do anything behind you. It's operating space in front of so it's actually as well. Hey i'm not going to have to out anything. So i'm in complete control of how i share my slides. If you can see my camera then you can see my slides. I don't have to share anything separately in his ways to work around that. Of course there are ways of sharing in zoom. Where in in teams. You'll always be either a big screen or full yours. Small we actually teach people how within zoom. You're actually a lot. You can play with to make sure your fifty percent of the image in your audience your slightest fifty percent to the image and in fact so to me. This is your big opportunity. The fact that presentations are happening on zoom. It has never been easier for you to get speaking gigs. because now nobody's taking the risk flying you happy around the world now you can be that person. Say hey this is what. I wanna do this. This is bad idea. And then i guess connects week thursday. Because they can't so it isn't upgrade. The other thing that. I think people are doing wrong is trying to get too fancy so there. I don't know if you've been to any of these webinars and things where they they've got these fools sweetie virtual studios and you've met this person who sang in there. You know all the way over there and that's not the stage was never a feature. The stage is always fixing a bug. The reason that i'm high up is so the people in the back roads can see me and now what's happened is everybody has a fundra seat. So we teach people how to engage creative. Look how to utilize this and it turns out if you can just use one or two small little tools better than the other person because the barrier to entry is so low. the quality is also so in the land of of two in three out of tens. If you're a four your winning and of course we wanted to speak to be higher than that but as cup of small little tips will get you so far ahead of everybody else. Just standing when you're speaking most is now presenting from their bums. I don't understand what happens. I saw it a stand up comedian. He made this joke at the beginning of his set. He said you know that's twenty five years. I've been a stand up. Comedian of six months of gonna sit down comedian. Why why are you sitting down bro standup. She'll your audience that you're engaging with them so there is certainly a couple of small little hacks tips in fact. That's one of the easiest things. I think for a lot of us for for myself. I definitely prefer presenting this way. In fact i want to start now controlling. i was lighting designer in my past career. I want to start making the when i changed. Slides lighting state changes. Now i'm not i'm not gonna crew so i can be stage crew as well as speaker like i've never been more excited. It's a great time to get into this or to be accessible hours ago. I was gonna comment standing up versus sitting down. Obviously i think all the presentations i've given sitting down and you know i'm a i'm an italian so you know my hands were waving tonight. I need to move. And i find a lot of times. Getting that energy sitting is it. I have to really dig deep to make that being really enthusiastic. When i'm presenting because i'm just sitting at it's not not quite the same lotta great content here. You've shared a lot of wonderful thanks. I have one last question for both of us. And i'm with you for sam. So what inspires you every day when you get out of bed. What inspires you like old inventory in this. Yeah i guess what inspires me. Is that every day seems to different time is almost stood still and how quickly things change and evolve in such a short period of time has also made me realize that. Tom is really like a. We need to be more Need to be comfortable. Should i say go rich. Saint for you that what inspires me. Maybe excites me. Up right now is the fact that i think that we look back. This people talk about this years. A crisis and pandemic and i see people on facebook wishing it was over. I think the future future. You is going to look at this and hold current you accountable to the how you behaved because future you you look back this realize this was the greatest accelerator your career. This was the most accelerated area of growth in your entire career. And if you look back if i future looks back at current me and says it all you did was make videos and quizzes on facebook of what kind of rockstar are you. You'll be deeply disappointed. I wanna make sure that the world is accelerating the business and other thinkers or accelerating with it. I don't want it to get away from me. And that i think is a tricky space. Because it's moving so fast that i wanna be onto the george pulling it rather than getting yet behind and the pack. Despite going to revenues zero in march the fact that last month was our best month in our companies. Twenty-three a history means that as of now we're managing to keep the pace. That i'm i'm very excited. We'll leave it at that so One of you want to tell the audience how they can reach you in connect with you and your website and all that good information if you go to need missing link dot com. You'll see they'll director cited. You will to see all the offerings we have and if you wanna get in touch with me i need you to get rich dot af. You'll be able to connect nick. I'm quite that seems to be my platform of choice but is linked to all my social profiles. There believe it or not folks. We made it through Quite a bit of the content today but right at the very end we lost connection. So i'm glad we made it through. And certainly a thank you to rich in samantha. And and you found out how to reach rich and also missing lincoln go. On to connect with samantha samantha. Dean leonsis you can find her on linked then and you can reach out right there or certainly through their website. I want to thank you again for sticking with me here at the cafe today. This has been a great conversation. I really enjoyed talking about presentations at at something. I'm very passionate about. And i strive to do as many as possible as i mentioned. And so again. If you're looking for representative and i have a wide variety of topics don't hesitate to reach out and let's have a conversation and your business needs a cmo or senior of marketing leadership. But you're not quite ready for a full time person yet. Read him seat senior level guidance. Connect with me to find out more about my fractional intimate consulting services can visit the punto group dot com to find a variety of resources there blogs videos e books and certainly connect with me on lincoln and lastly if you're a subscriber to the show i wanna thank you for being so and i'd like you to tell others that you know that could benefit from this show as well and encourage them to listen. They can benefit from the great content. Like we heard. Today you can visit the business growth cafe dot com or certainly find us on any podcast platform. You liked to listen to so please. Don't forget to join me next week. Here at the business growth cafe. Thank you for listening to today's discussion at the business. Growth cafe with your host angelo ponzi. Take a moment to subscribe to this podcast and visit our website at www dot business growth cafe dot com read angelo ponzis blogs at www dot the ponzi group dot com.

angelo ponzi growth cafe three days kovic richard ball hoan richard mulholland samantha leonice sam south africa forty five minutes two hour Dick harry Koga Musk musk bob hurley Snowboard research company Ted six weeks six months one hundred percent
Family Secrets Live: In Conversation with Liz Phair

Family Secrets

51:08 min | 6 months ago

Family Secrets Live: In Conversation with Liz Phair

"Family Secrets is sponsored by audible. One of my favorite things to do is listen to an audible book. It is such a great way to relax and pass the time as you're being transported from one place to another audibles the leading provider of audiobooks and spoken word entertainment in every genre imaginable. You can listen with the audible APP anytime anywhere. Get your first. Three listens free with a thirty day trial. That's one audiobook plus to audible originals for free visit, audible dot com slash Danny to get started family secrets production of iheartradio. A. Hi family, secret listeners, it's Danny. We're hard at work on fourth season family secrets, which will return in October. In the meantime I hope you're checking out my new daily podcast the way we live now. We're all pretty burnt out on the news and the way we live now is my attempt to bring us all together in a way. That feels comforting and helpful, but now whole other thing I'm excited to share with you. Another of the family secrets conversations that I recorded live this past winter. This one with rock legend lives fair. Listen I appeared together at the fine arts. Theater in Los Angeles to talk about creativity self expression, the burning need to tell the truth of what happened and of course secrets. I hope you'll love our conversation as much as I did. Hey everyone is so great to be here in La. At Writer's block with Liz Fair. It's. Really one of those moments of sort of like wait what happened? One, eight hundred Colorado Star. Star. So Listen I. Have a lot of really interesting intersections that I had no idea that we had until I read our stories. It's a book that I. Think is among many other things about identity. and. It plays with time because you think about time. And it strikes me even though I only really know us through your work and. A brief conversation and backstage it feels like you. Have a similar. Preoccupation, or obsession, with with time as I do, and so I guess I'm wondering if we could begin with. What makes a Rockstar want to write a memoir because this is not, this isn't like a memoir like higher ghostwriter and write a memoir, or you had other things to do, and it's a beautifully written really soulful, really powerful book. That I would urge you to read. I loved it then it feels like it was a long time in the pressure building to write it. That's what it felt like to me. That's interesting. Thank you those are very. Big compliments thank you The memories that I chose to share. Surprise a lot of people because it isn't about trashing a hotel room or meeting, famous people or no puking backstage about a little of that is there. was somebody somebody else puking. I was actually. I don't WanNa. Use The word inspired. I was catapulted into action. By. What was happening in our political climate? That may seem not intuitive to make that leap, but I found myself as I was watching what was happening to our country ever more drawn to what fundamentally mattered to me in life, what my baseline for decency goodness honesty! It pulled me into a place of having to plant a flag for what I believed in, and maybe fight in the only way I could, too. I was as I was telling you backstage? I also found myself judging a lot I, was not a judgy person until this happened and I found myself outraged and horrified by what I was seeing and that both. You know when something just crystallizes, and you just truly feel like. It's important to say what you think. Life is about and what matters what our baseline for how we should behave is but at the same time. What happened was I turned that back on myself and I thought. How would you be judged? You know what? People say if they were judging you, so a lot of my book is about personal stories that. You didn't ask for, and you don't need to know, but that would be sort of what if I were going to leave the planet, I would wanNA. Leave behind about everything that I had learned an experienced in life, and what I would say that mattered as you're speaking I'm thinking about There's a course that I teach once a year on the east coast, and and the the the title of it is the stories we carry. And these feel like the stories that you were carrying, which is I, guess why said that it feels like in a way. It was a long time. building up. Even though it wasn't something that you were necessarily ever thinking about turning into a book, it began early in the book. You write that you were carrying around toxic shards of souls I've casually shattered. And I found that so hauntingly beautiful because. We all do that whether or not, we're actually conscious that we're doing that or not. We carry around these shards. They live inside. Of US anyone here I can say this goes in Manila anyone here with Yoga practice. Right knows that you know when you. Enter the sphere of the body in a certain way, those stories, those shards, those toxic shards. Those people they exist. They never really go away and you brought them forth. In this book and named them There's You know early in the book. There's a girl in the bathroom that when you were in college. You and your friends just I mean she was. This girl was in terrible shape and you been drinking. She'd been released. She had been to, and she was. Out in. In trouble and it's. These these. Quote Unquote type of. Moments walking out of a bathroom and not doing anything to help like just not knowing what to do and then staying. With the the haunted nece and the shame, and the feeling of like should have done something and what happened to that girl? That girl then lives inside of you because of what you did or didn't do. She judges me I. Mean That was a circumstance in which there was a lot of people ignoring her and that pressure that you feel. To go along with whatever's happening was a freshman in college, and I was so nervous, everywhere I went that I had learned to put up a front of not looking nervous and looking like I knew what I was doing, so as I had numbed myself out and yet, this one casual encounter stayed with me my whole life and changed. How involved I become when I see that something needs to be done. So it also becomes a lesson. Right. Sort of metabolising that so of there's a very moving passage about this elderly dog. That was a neighbor of yours who? Was a neighbor of the woman who cut my hair way up on Mulholland drive and she said Oh. If you're thinking of adopting a dog, there's one that this famous comedian doesn't want anymore. and the dog was just alone. Like was left alone with basically someone coming into feed it right I mean. I can't speak to exactly what was going on. But yeah. It was for all intents and purposes. Abandoned Sweet Newfoundland that. I looked at my house couldn't accommodate it. There were two airs. It was too old, but like I went like three times, and just talk to it on the balcony, which sounds really sweet, but like the real crux came. When like a year later, and then I had asked everyone like. Where can Newfoundland's go? Does anyone want this and I had given it a fair shot, and then gone on tour and gone on with my life, and later on, someone had oh. I heard about some farm, new fees or something that could help the dog. And again I failed myself and I didn't follow up with and again when you said time. There so present to me. All the things that have happened to me are still so present, and it's how I write songs. It's all the unsaid on done. Forgiven things that just became part of me so time really. Didn't pass if anything. These past memories grew in importance. The longer time went on. I feel like with your book to. That's sense that. When the truth came out, it flattened time time just. Everything that you experience became one present moment. Well it's so interesting. I wonder whether it's like this in songwriting I know it's like this in. Prose, writing writing writing memoir, and also in writing literary fiction. Literature is I. Think really the only form that can play with time. With the greatest effectiveness. Even feel film I. Never Feel when I'm watching film, and that's being done I'm always aware that it's being done whereas in in when we read we can. Feel the way that memory moves we can. You know that flattening, you're describing or collapsing the collapsing of the present and the past. I mean when I. made the discovery for years ago. It's almost four years ago now that my dad hadn't been my biological father. Something I had never known. Actually I should say I had never sought. I think there's a phrase in inheritance which is the unthought known. A phrase that come back to again and again and again because. it's a psychoanalytic phrase. That that? Means, what we absolutely do, know what we know in our bones what we feel. Deep when we think about what a gut instinct is. It's that kind of knowledge, but it's too. To think, so, we just don't go there. I think I was living in that state, actually my whole entire life, but then to be in Midlife, and to make this discovery I had to really remember rethink. Re understand everything about what had come before. May I share what you said up in the dressing room. Was Andrea who asked you? What's your next project I'm not sure because I feel like I've been digging for this story my whole life. and. Think of how much you've done sort of looking for that. What was it unthought? Known known, but I think one of the intersections between us and a really interesting question for us to explore is. What makes an artist and artist? Right like there's a moment in your book where a friend of yours. So you're adopted. A friend of yours says to you. Do you think if you hadn't been adopted? You would have been an artist. and. I mean it's an impossible question to answer. It's like saying if I were a different. Person Really if. You Change One thing everything changes or you change. But, but there's something about you're being an observer. which was something that I was very aware of reading you the from the time you were small. You were always. Observing. And in order to observe one of the things I've often thought about is writers are outsiders. I. Don't think you can be an insider and write about. Anything from the inside. If you're at the I, if you're an insider because you don't have. You. Don't have any perspective on it. You don't have that anthropological view, and so you always seeing the world from that place of this slight remove the slight distance and. You know it's impossible to know exactly what created that what caused that? But what? What would you say to your friend? In in that regard or as anything about that makes perfect sense I think that a lot of the freedom that I feel is an artist to do what my mother would consider very outrageous and completely inappropriate things is because there's there's I. Have One foot out the door. Always have one foot in another state. That could be anything I could I could have come from any kind of people, and so that gives me a freedom to both search for who I am sort of like A. I guess permission to search for WHO I am, but also gives me that like you said that remove from being internal like I was definitely raised by a tight knit family, but there was one foot that was still outside of that looking back on it, and looking back on my place in it, and there's that. Insecurity which you went through so vividly, and it was just beautiful your description of that like who am I now? and that feeling like the floor has just dropped out from under you and I. Just had that in a slow grade way the whole time I was always here and I was committed and belonged to my family, but not totally. And I think that is the artist's item me. But that did stand outside myself did look for. The. Love it. I'm sorry. The unknown thought unthought known there's unsought known as what I'm always searching for myself. There's also this great this this great term that I came across when I was just madly researching and trying to understand you know whatever I possibly could about this new knowledge, and it was a term from adoption literature and its genealogical bewilderment. And I it's it's so poetic and beautiful and powerful. I, mean one of the things that's come up a lot for me. In the years since inheritance came out is right around the time that it came out or even before I would have mostly adoptive parents. Come up to me. Who hadn't read the book yet or maybe? If they had were reading it through a certain Lens and what they thought that I was saying or what they thought I was going to say. Was that nature? Matters exclusively and I remember the first time I had this conversation with. A writer standing by a pool at writers, conferences kind of pool where somebody always falls in every year at this writers conference in Austin Texas and he. He's Gay and he's a dad and he and his husband have. Three adopted kids, and he was was kind of a little bit confrontational on the subject of nurture and nature and I said to him. Do your kids know their adopted. And he said of course, and they always known. Yes, of course they've always known ever since they were were were sensual beings. It's okay, so their identities are formed around something that is true about themselves. What's true about themselves is that they know that they're adopted. They know that there is a reason for that genealogical bewilderment as they grow up, maybe not looking like they're family, because there isn't a biological connection or feeling a little bit, other or different, because there is otherness in difference and genealogical bewilderment, the sense of It's a wide open worlds this question of where I come from biologically. And the difference and this took me a while some deep thinking. Do, but the difference I mean if. Are formed by the stories that were told from the time. We're very small then that story, the adoption story is you're opted, and that's really it's complicated, but it's a different story from being. From the truth of identity being withheld. So what happened with me is that? My parents for reasons that. Made a lot of sense in place in time that they raised me We're never gonNA. Tell me I was never going to know this. They were going to go to the grave with this which they both did and I was never gonNA know, and no one would ever be the wiser and what we don't know doesn't hurt us right. So. My sense of identity as a child was based on something that was false, and so the the image I have for. It is almost like something being wrapped around. Like Husk, being wrapped around something that isn't solid on the inside because there was something that wasn't true and I think you know I mean I started this podcast? Family secrets because there is so much secrecy in in our society, our culture in so many different ways, and we're in this moment now, and you're part of that where it's coming out, and whether it's the me too movement, or it's the fact that DNA testing has made all of these kinds of secrets, absolutely impossible to keep anymore. This is what's happening. We'll be back in a moment with more family secrets. I confess I was nervous to be on stage with Liz Fair I mean Liz Fair. But in the weeks before our conversation, I listened to her narrate her outstanding memoir horror stories on audible, and I felt like I. have made a new friend. Liz's songwriting has always felt intimate and story like her memoir captures her unique ability to get us to look really look at life's detail in all its complexity, and all its beauty horror stories fantastic. Listen available on audible just as soon as you finish listening to this conversation. Get your first. Three listens free with a thirty day trial. That's one audiobook plus to audible originals for free. Tissot audible dot com slash Danny to get started. I think fighting. The shame of being human is something that I've crusaded on for a while the. There's so much in our society that. Is Stuck around this idea of let's. Let's not say it. I know that my parents didn't always tell me what was going on. And that always caused me a lot of cognitive dissonance. And the shame is so much more destructive than the truth, a lot of times because. Like you said you're rapping a husker. You're building scar tissue around a vacuum. So there's no way to resolve it. It's never going to heal. The. I mean just because it isn't spoken, doesn't mean it doesn't exist. In fact, it's not being spoken creates a kind of I mean I think of my parents and myself now and I'll never be able to have these conversations with them, but the air in our house was thick with this. And as a writer I- inheritances my tense book, all of my my novels were about family secrets. About the corrosive power of family secrets in one way or another If you would ask me to explain why this was my theme, I had this kind of. The thing that I that I have to say about theme, which is that it's just a fancy literary term for obsession. and. We and we don't choose what obsesses us and you know. Writers don't like to look under the hood too much about what's really going on. It's like you know that's where the magic happens on a mess with that, so I just kind of bopped along with family secrets being my theme, and then I started writing memoirs and I was a novelist. Why was writing memoirs? and. That's where I think the digging. You know that I was talking to Andrew upstairs I think that's where it began was just this sense of there's something there's something there and we are receiving feedback that there was an otherness about you. You were receiving feedback all the way along the line that hinted. Maybe, it's the way you wrote it, but it felt like I was I, was absolutely constantly receiving the feedback was you don't look Jewish. There's no way you're Jewish, you know. Shapiro your husband's name. Just a constantly I mean really every day and yet that's feedback, but if you're kind of entrenched in a desire to. In a need to not know you can ignore that feedback and can tort yourself around? Not Knowing what would happen to me when somebody would say to me as they did every day. Every day you don't look Jewish. I would say raise coach. Sure you know observant. Family went to achieve. Uh Spoke Fluent Hebrew to sinks two dishwashers. Recite my. Like my my Jewish credit. Like sort of basically getting people's faces about it like what's what's your problem? This is what Jewish looks like why can't you go there? I mean really a little bit like I mean it would. Founded. It offended me, but it was true. And what people were saying when they were looking at me and saying that was something that they saw as they had no skin in the game. And, so that's that's feedback I wonder and I. Don't remember if you touched on this in your book. What your mother was processing when these comments were happening, so let's go back. Is that too? Is A to no, not at all. Let's go back to the unthought known, because I think there's a way in which when we are told that something really is a secret and can never be revealed like airtight which I think my parents. Back in the. Early days of reproductive medicine there was a lot of euphemism there were there was an outright deceit away. So I believe that by the time my parents were. Bringing home a baby. they had. My mother more than my father had pretty much decided. That! It had never happened. You're going to build that house. Right on the foot of the denial. That's right. That's right. And that becomes. A kind of it's like a kernel of something that's true that somewhere lodged way deep deep deep deep in the psyche, but is not going to. It's not going to emerge with a clarity. It's going to leak all over everything. And that's how I I think it is like there was this like toxic leakage. That was always there. It's interesting because my mother. I always got the sense that. Over and over again. If you ever WanNa, find your biological parents, you know. Her brother was a lawyer or attorney, so she said you know we'll go through mark, but. There was could tell that that was not something. She really wanted per se to happen. There was the sense. Because ultimately we are parents children. It doesn't matter where we come from. I mean when I was little. I used to imagine the way I processed being adopted was. I would make up stories like I. Thought we lived in Cincinnati knows very young. And then we'd have these huge thunderstorms in my mind. I thought those were my parents coming to check up on me. So I'd like. I don't know why did that, but that's one of the things that I thought of and then recently. I have a God sister. My parents chose Godparents for me who? Had adopted their child from the same adoption agency so I sort of had to go that way to find out what my adoption agency was, and then when I I looked at Google that online, then it turned out to be established in eighteen eighteen, and it was originally called the new haven orphan asylum. And there! There's this campus with these big brick walls and everything and it just. It started this whole other identity now I'm like. GOTHIC tragic figure in my mind. But. That's how you can transmute. My identity can shift depending on what the details. And each new item. Is Really not, really relevant I'm still. My affectatious are my mother's my father's temper. It's all there. I am my parents child immutable. But that identity question are just so fascinating. I had freedom and you weren't given a choice until you discovered. That wasn't I. wanted to ask you about that like. Did. You feel that it was sort of. Betraying your parents to. Question it so much! Well, I would, I would begin by saying I found out accidentally right like I wasn't I wasn't going in search of I think that there's something here and I'm GonNa. Go find it I. Recreationally took the DNA test. Because my husband was taking one, so it began with sort of this and I could so easily as my whole life, never knowing. I had a couple of moments where I felt. That I was betraying my father. And one was when I met my biological father. I felt almost like. All met my father died when I was twenty three, and all my life. I have carried him with me. I feel his presence. You know an irony because for the for the people who were thinking that I was saying nature is all that matters. My mother was someone who I did not feel close to. And she is my biological parent. I checked. I made an elderly cousin. Actually go do a DNA test because I was so baffled, trying to piece it all together but she was and my father, who was not as it turns out. My biological parent is the person who is most formative of me who had in profound kind of soul connection with and I would feel his presence, and when I I found out that he hasn't been my biological father I briefly lost it. And, I think I lost it. because. Of course, it's coming from me and that chain had somehow been. Broke lost I lost. Yes, I lost him again. I was grieving him again, and I was wondering what he had known and all of that. So when I met my biological father, I had this feeling of you know we have magical thinking about the people who? have passed who we love and I think many of us do and my magical thinking was that my father could see what was going on in my life because. When he died, I was mess. You know it was complete total mess and he. That's his last. You know that would have been his last memory or knowledge of me. And then I grew up and I made something on myself and I had had this idea that he could see that. But, if he could see that, then he could also see everything else. You can't have magical thinking in one way so was like he could see that then he can also see. I'm marching into this restaurant in teaneck. Teaneck New Jersey and meeting the man who was the sperm donor like the secret, the thing that he never wanted anyone to ever know so there was that, and then the and the other piece I was upstairs signing books, and there's a picture of my dad and me the joyous beautiful father, daughter picture and The, young father in that picture if he could have talked about collapsing time right if he could have imagined a future where that picture would be on the cover of a best selling. Book and his his thing that he held as so private and secret would be in the world. I thought about this a lot. Because some people make these discoveries in their parents are still living. I thought a lot about what that would be. My parents were still living. I know one thing. There would be no book. I wouldn't have written this book with my Father Living. and my mother may be because I was attended to be more willing to throw her with us. I did I did because our our lives together were so But I WANNA I WANNA go I. WanNa before you. I. Just WanNa say something when you said that upstairs what I thought was before he even cracked her book. My first thought was how much he looked like your father in that picture. That's exactly what my read was. which is so funny, because that's just your joy, and your glee, and the connection that you have with them, so I just wanted to say and that's it though, and that's why. I now feel. I come from three people. Not? Many people can say that particular thing right and and. I wonder if that's true for you. As well you come from you come from four people. And I sometimes think you know even if I could find the my mother I, probably couldn't find my father right? I've made up so many stories about what their deal was almost like adoption porn. You come up with twenty first birthday. I came slinging downstairs waiting. To find out that. My Trust Fund that was supposed to be there just like start at breakfast and I stared at my mom for a while and she's like. What she did. This is such a Jerky. move so I said well. I just wondered. Twenty one I thought maybe there'd be something that you would wanna. Tell me. And she looked at me. She just sat back and she said if there were what would you do with it? And so like it prolonged I'm like it's just like a task. WAS So. So I want you to read a passage that particularly I thought it was really powerful from your book about what we're talking about here, so. I guess we're talking about my adoption I never know how much importance to give it. Is it a minor detail in my biography, or does it define me when I look at old family photographs today, really pertain to me. Are Those my ancestors or my playing at Nostalgia? However much, I wish to belong to any one person or group that urge is almost always counteracted by an awareness of being different is though there's a barrier around me a thin layer of ice on an eyelash that prevents full integration. I keep people at arm's length, and in their separate categories, even those with whom I have long term committed relationships. I remember when my father sent me the original copy of my birth certificate for the purpose of gathering passport paperwork, or because I lost my driver's license I want to add yet again. it arrived in a Manila envelope when I held the yellow document in my hands, and looked at the time and date punched out on an old school typewriter, a burst into tears. I was over. It was overwhelming to touch the last artifact that connected me to a mother. I never knew a young woman for whom whatever reason couldn't raise me. I saw vulnerable infant changing hands, and I wept for the agonizing decisions of everyone involved. For the snapshot of a fleeting moment of wholeness. Before I carried in my heart, this broken piece of glass, which I've been careful not to disturb lest it cut me I cried. Because I recognized a feeling, I must have once had, but could no longer summit no matter how quietly I sat or how happy I was. It makes for great art though I'll say that. We'll be back in moment. Family. Secrets is sponsored by, audible. Now, more than ever listening to the voices of others is important, and it can be tremendously good company during a time when the days. Are often challenging. I've always loved audible books, but these days I find myself with a greater need to experience the intimate connection. They bring to me. Whether you're into literary fiction, thrillers, biography, history or memoir audibles got you covered was an array of stories for whatever mood you're in. Get your first three listens free with a thirty day trial. That's one audiobook plus to audible originals for free to visit audible dot. com slash Danny to get started. I was thinking again of the collapsing of time as you read that. Everything about that was right there. In that yellow birth certificate tangibly. Yeah I saw her. I saw her for a brief moment. The real her, the young woman and I was a mother at that point. I should say so. It hit home very deeply. My family says that I held my son too closely when he was born, but I have this overwhelming need not to let him. That separation which I must have experienced because I was I guess two weeks old when I. They had me in the hospital. I guess for two weeks and for a newborn as as a mother. I can look back on that and think that's an unthinkable time you know, and so I just. Wherever, it could put him. I couldn't put him down. I I think early motherhood and motherhood. Parenthood perhaps in general. Makes you. Evaluate or Compare. But. You know that line about it makes for good art. I'm sure I had a happier life. I'm sure that this was like this was someone who? Wasn't ready to, and there would have been. I'm sure it was a selfless thing, but the sacrifice would still be extreme. It would still be incredibly hard to give up a child and she's out there somewhere. Knowing that I'm out there somewhere. And that's that's a tough thing. Oh! That's really interesting actually. Using That's one of the reasons I've never actually saw out my biological parent. One of them is just that I have enough to deal with the holidays can't. Handle Anymore! Really but. Just this this like. It could be something. She never told another purse. I was very aware of that reading your book. Thinking about that from that point of view, and that's just a sense I. had you know it's really? Probably even fifty fifty that she would want to have to. Own that it's interesting, too. Because as long as you don't search, or you know, have that desire, it remains a mystery. That are. Well, and as long as it remains a mystery. There's there's so much nuance and so much possibility. Even the trust fund. Deal with it if you had it. Goes seconds or like. You said something really. Beautiful when we were talking on the phone yesterday. About, you equated it to music. Do you remember what you said it was about? One note versus accord Oh. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's! It's there's what was it in the context? Remember it was in the context of knowledge if they pick. To to know. Anytime, there's an epiphany anytime. You get any kind of insight into. Whatever it is you're searching for and I'm a big. Of complexity I think that as As a species, we need to come to terms with things being complex I think we're really living in systems, overlapping and layering systems and I don't think we think like that. I think we still think in binary terms right, wrong, black, white, good bath, or these kind of oversimplifications of what's really going on and for me when you gain some insight on on your identity on the take, for example having empathy for my parents, and the adoption would have been for them, and how fragile that sense of what if she leaves us? What does she doesn't like US or whatever? We're doing the wrong thing or what is her nature but? Any kind of deeper insight it goes from being a fact to being a chord of knowledge. There's the low part of it. There's the middle part of it. There's the High Keenan yearning part of it. There's just a complex. Deeper, knowing which I'm a junkie for like that. That's what I'm in the game for in anything I do in my life is to have that. Expansion. Of a fact into a truth. There's something. To See if I can find it right at the very very very end of your book. You write. Horror Stories is music, not data. The haunting melodies. I hear over and over again in my head. And I I I loved that Just that language of music not data. Because what's data I mean that is just. Think of how often you live in data though we all do. We take. The difference between knowing what it would be like to be stranded at sea, and actually being stranded at sea like a real truthful understanding, and no matter how much you try to have the understanding you think of yourself as a deep thoughtful person, there's no substitute for actual knowing and I think your book is such a beautiful portrait of the journey from data today knowing and what was data can be false to. That's true. So I mean I spent my life creating narratives. To make sense of what. I thought I knew what I was trying to make sense of. My father was sad because my mother was angry because you know we were. The family system that we were. You know because and I would write about it. I mean when I go back and I look at my earlier work. It's all there. the those those. That struggle it was I was trying so hard to make sense of something that didn't make sense and the way that we do that. Is We tell stories? That's how we just human beings from the time that we were case. People scratching hieroglyphs on on on cave walls. That's what that's what we were doing and That was my attempt in one of the sort of stunning things to me in especially in the early months as I was trying to understand sort of put things back together again was that I was. Like all that wrong, you know and what I came to realize. It wasn't wrong. It just wasn't the whole truth. It was a piece of the truth. It was true that my parents were. Unhappily married. It was true that they were older. It was true that was their. Only that was true that they have conflicts in their. Religious beliefs you know with each other You know it was true that I was this very fair blonde child. That didn't look like you know she will. All these things were true, but they weren't the cord. They were data, points, and and I think. To go back to like if you know your friends question if if you haven't been adopted, would you have become an artist? Those are You know whatever those were. Those pieces are they are what create the obsession create you know the the searching the you know the artist as. You know there's something that I can't figure out that I can't get to and the only way that I can get to. It is by following the line of words or by. Writing the song that is, that's that's the way that you know, and that's why I love the idea of court. Isn't that how we know whatever we think of as God? Isn't that how we know love? Isn't that how we know? Like it isn't data it is. It's a cord, and we all have to write our way toward faith and belief in something that is intangible and. I love that. I love that. Yeah and it becomes the past it becomes. You know the way through a lifetime lifetime of of making work of making art. I've been thinking about one of the reasons why I have no idea what's next is because I don't ever want to imitate myself I don't ever want I want I mean I I'm a seeker and I'm I'm a searcher and I actually think I do think for myself. That these unanswered questions that I could not apprehend. Touch is what made me artist mean. I'm glad that I had the capacity. The ability the gift whatever you WANNA call it to be able to actually actualize it and do it, but that's searching, not I. Say to my students sometimes. You know if you went outside right now and you just you know. Did Man on the street interviews with people and you'll you sir, do you? Do you ponder your internal life all the time? Is this something that you think about you? Lie Awake at night and consider. Your. A lot of people say. I feel like is a woody. Allen movie that I'm describing, but a lot of people would say no. I just like those couple in the Woody Allen movie the I'm just shallow, and he's handsome and we're good whatever that? But it's not not everybody actually walks around with the need to express in that way. I can't argue with that. So so let's go back to I. Mean You said it was the political? Climate in that make sense to me. But why? Why a memoir wind up pour it into song well hilariously, my managers sitting right there, and he was part of the impetus because he was on tour, the smashing pumpkins and this is during the two thousand fifteen sixty. It must have been twenty sixteen. I guess I'm about to do your voice. Right in front of you. But prince adjusts passed away. It was the day prince died, and I was playing a show that night, and we were having a conversation about something else, but then it all became about prints, and we lost Bowie in that had affected me very profoundly and he goes. He's like blues, you know. You. Don't know how much time you've got. You know you could be gone tomorrow. You don't have no idea and like is this? Is this like? Are you making the work that you would wanna make if it's the last thing you ever did and? It stopped me because no I thought I. had like dozens of chances left and it just completely. Changed my outlook and I thought I had better be making the work. To the best of my ability that I would be okay leaving. What did I have to say? What did I? What did I learned in my? Almost fifty years at that point like what had I learn. What did I have to give back to my son to other young women and just people in general like did I have something to give to have something that? I, could you know make the world a better place than you found and I didn't have much, but I had own experience in my own. Own Insights and I had the ability to go from place where the public perceives me as higher. You know like Oh. Your life must be better and to be able to just open it up and be like Nope, see like exactly as pathetic as we all are. And I had the ability to do that and I had the ability. Thank God from songwriting to. Turn it into a sort of a small take those painful things like a grain of sand and annoy stor already use a very tired. Metaphor and make it into a beautiful jewel that people can read and say like Yeah I've felt that are there's one story about me going through a break up and going felt like such a raw nerve. It was such a bad break up. He'd had a baby with another woman buying back and I found out about it after the child was already born. and. He'd been asking me to marry him. He'd wanted. For us to become pregnant, and I was so devastated that going to trader, Joe's was a huge outing for me, and it took like all my and I felt like everyone was looking at felt like I had like a loser like across my face. And it was so hard pushing I can still feel pushing that cart. They're having overdressed. You know what I mean like. So I had the ability to give that to people and that's what I chose to do. That's what I felt like I wanted to do with the pain in my life was. Make it both funny. Make It okay at the end and just say like it's all of us. You also do something really with the those shards you know those those toxic shards of those memories of. The People that you felt that you had failed in one way or another of Honoring. Honoring them in a way. You know like when when you said. That your managers to you if you know if if if you have limited amount of time left. What what do you want to leave behind is almost like settling a debt. Of An existential debt feels like it's being settled here. that has nothing to do with whether these people would ever read these portraits. Go or you know I was I. was that person who I was that girl? It's it's. A kind of. A. Way of making something whole. Trying yeah trying to make something that can't quite be made whole, but it can be made. Beautiful is the way. For more podcast, iheartradio visit, the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Family secrets is brought to you by all. We live in a noisy, busy world and lately I have been really noticing that what I WANNA do is put on my headphones and I want to listen. Audible is the leading provider of audiobooks and spoken-word entertainment in every genre of people. You have at all times a library at your fingertips. You can listen with audible APP anytime anywhere. Get your first. Three listens free with a thirty day trial. That's one audiobook plus to audible originals for free visit, audible dot com slash Danny to get started.

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128: Altered States, Family Weddings, & Pandemic Speakeasies

Night Call

59:22 min | 2 months ago

128: Altered States, Family Weddings, & Pandemic Speakeasies

"Mobile APPS IT support cyber, and network security. These are in demand and rewarding career paths. You could pursue with the right education trust university with over fifty years of proven graduate success CPI University our hands on approach keeps you engaged helping make what you thought was complex fun and exciting when you think technology think e CPI university and you could earn your bachelor's in two point five years or less go to E. CPI dot Edu to get started. xfinity. Is More than just fast. It's Internet that gives you peace of mind security because if it's connected, it's protected. Yeah. Even your robot vacuum. Can Your Internet? Do that learn more at xfinity dot com slash X. Y.. It's eleven eleven pm in an isolation tank and you're listening tonight call. Hello and welcome tonight call a Colin show per are Dystopia in reality I am Lambert and with me is test Lynch and there is no emily to speak because she is driving back across the country which sounds fun. Yeah. Got Speed Emily. Only, what's up tasked? How're you doing I'm pretty good I'm pretty good that we've talked about this before, but there's no answer like pretty good. Really. Good. I, think is the only right answer I'm pretty happy that we can breathe the air again. That's the main thing. Yes that is the main thing. Yeah it's clearing up a bit but it's still it's still Kinda and I've been suspicious that the A Q I is not accurate. That's my conspiracy theory. because. There was a day recently where it was an age of eighty three, which is considered moderate but it was I was sneezing and. The air tasted like a grill and I was like man. I think we're right at the point where the moderate error feels like delicious fresh air because. At least it's not the very bad air. It's not the Chunky Chunky air. Air. I like the idea of the. Tasting Grill it had such a flavor to it. It was very and especially because one of the symptoms of Corona virus is a change in taste and smell. Oh Yeah it made me very paranoid but no, it was just the air. Yeah. It did. It did like Kinda tastes like a Western Bacon cheeseburger. Yeah. It had the mosquito. Yeah it was mosquito. My boyfriend was like Oh, are you burning fall candle and it was like no, it's just the actual fire air not a bonfire candle. The air is just burning itself. Should we take a night call to kick things off? Let's take a night call. Hey, I go. This one is a little bit of a Disney. So Awful I'm the oldest of four kids and my youngest brother basically is not gonNA came for his wedding this year in rural, Alabama, I feel kind of crazy. For you mean wondering go because there's a general generational McConnell and every chance to handle spread champs to further harm people. But the only reason actually 'cause I really loved him to say and main reason they haven't called it off is because my brother's feature father in law mother law with a bunch of deposits down on a bunch of News Alabama, they're trump voters the republican base is real. They are thinking like what we're doing is legal and everything doesn't say 'cause sars-like state regulation. Concerns, but then we're also going for like sign waivers to get into a venue and the weddings inside and It just seems like one of those things where I I'm going to use all agency on like I. Feel About Corona virus if I even go I'm really torn part of me wants to absolutely not go because sufficient we shouldn't support it and the other part of me is like if it's GonNa be my family because it's like silent white people that don't talk but. Aren't necessarily Chris we watched it like stand up for themselves that are just GonNa accept like now say stuff someone to be an advocate Olympic advocate for them, and then part of me wants to go just to like I'm trying to make it safer. It seems crazy to even think about this and I like a lot of people are facing descended choicer. So maybe it's yourself even ask but I'm just wondering any general advice that I can get it. I don't know maybe gone through this and They'll office demand I went and I got dumped out to anyone else who has weird family that's not can't bring stuff. Sorry we're on it and also. Next assault curio emigrate week. That was a really good call. Thank you for calling in. Also an interesting follow up to last week's call about going to Disneyworld. Yeah. Totally. I think a Lotta people especially as we head into the fall, there are some things that have been on calendars for a long time that now that we're like deep into cove, it seems like people are like, well, maybe we'll just go through with it because we have planned. Yeah and I can imagine I don't ever want. To downplay how much it would frustrate me and make me sad if I had been planning a wedding or there was another important event that had been sitting around for six months and I had no idea when I could do it I I think you can recognize that holding a wedding right now is probably a terrible idea but to understand the impulse to continue on with life I guess yeah I mean I think with weddings especially it's like people sick so much money so far in advance. That it I'm sure it's hard to say goodbye to that money if you can't get it back if you cancel the event. However, I'm extremely. I think you should cancel the event. That's my opinion. Well, the caller doesn't have the ability to cancel the event. No, totally. I mean I think people I think getting into this a little bit on twitter with people because I do think that. People shouldn't try to hold especially big family events safely because I just don't think it can be done. They should just postponent because. It's the idea of getting somebody's sick at the wedding seems so much worse than like it would make the wedding. Yeah. You don't want your wedding to be like the time when your entire family got infected with covert I. Think there has to be way to broach that subject and just say, okay. But what if we all went with the bus intentions? What if something bad did happen and then your wedding was it's like the wedding and main that a bunch of people died after I think many. Of them hadn't even attended the wedding. It's just that when they were infected out, you know the people who went to the wedding were infected. They went on to spread it to other family members but I also think a wedding that involves a family might be kind of the most dangerous of situations because you're going to have people who are older You're going to have people who are. In, closer contact to her hugging and stuff like that. So it just seems like an a uniquely dangerous situation but I do wonder about how to talk to family about this and I definitely think. Want to have more calls about how to talk to your family about quarantine and stuff like that on the show because it's something that we're all navigating to and it's really interesting to get that perspective. But I think. I don't think he should go to this wedding. Yeah I don't think you should go I know it's hard if you have relatives that are like very non-confrontational and just kind of. Berry this under underneath whatever other feelings they aren't talking about. By, I don't. I don't know that going and trying to make it safer I mean, I don't know what do you think tough? Well, my issue is that I feel strongly also that with weddings I you know weddings are really really emotional and tricky times for everyone involved. I have been in the position of not being able to go to weddings they wanted to go to for whatever reason and thought has been like a friendship ender in certain cases. But I also I was very upset when a good friend of mine couldn't go to my wedding and in retrospect I look back and think about how self-centered I was being that I got so furious like she was on bed rest she was pregnant. Wasn't even I was like that's this is horrible but it doesn't matter if there's a person who can't get your wedding on the day, you really don't care why do you think people get bridezilla brain worms I don't know I didn't even think I was that terrible of Bridezilla, although I wonder if I'd been putting it off because of a pandemic if go if I would be edged into Bridezilla territory because I would just feel like it was so unfair that like this was racking my day. On so awful. But it's. Like the one opportunity for a lot of people to get both sides of your family together. Especially, if maybe they don't get along which is not the case with me. But for a lot of people, I think it's a way for families to put aside differences and celebrate something and acknowledged the blending of a family. Maybe they won't see each other ever again and those were the best. Like, this one moment when you're all coming together as a family I think now too 'cause I was saying that I was starting to see people go to rich people weddings on social media and that it definitely seems like there's a certain financial level of people who are just going ahead with weddings because they think they can just throw so much money at it that it won't be a problem. One where people were getting co vid tests up the door. Like rapid rapid rapid tests, which somebody else's saying aren't necessarily accurate. So it's kind of like security theater where everybody gets approved to go into the wedding but then. You know it could be it could be a false negative I have an idea for our caller. Yeah. This is one of the times and I'm GONNA say I like radical honesty. But in this case I, think the best course of action is to lie and if you don't want your family to be angry at you or feel like you're. Some if you don't feel like you can take a stand and tell them that you don't think it's a good idea to have the wedding at all or that they shouldn't go. You have a cough. You could have a cough and then you wouldn't have to go I mean you could also try to gently execute some kind of. Advisory to them about not doing it. But I I understand that in certain circumstances that's not going to happen I. Think it's hard to it's like your brother you love them you want to go to their wedding it's not just like I don't feel like by you also are genuinely concerned about their safety, and if there's nothing you can do to get them to to postpone or or call off the wedding. I see also being torn about like going and being on site and trying to keep all the old people from going inside. Yeah. I don't think you can go I when you said that molly was I don't think our caller can go because I think that the if you think that you could somehow make it safer by going there what you're really going to do is Make the wedding like a statement against the wedding and I don't think that's GONNA fly. I mean I think it's such a sensitive topic for people because people do not want to call off these weddings and I think like a lot of things where it's like. We see that rich people are doing some things that regular people can't do. And it's like well, why can't regular people do that? Too there was. The pictures of the people who had a wedding. A few weeks ago where they had Ruth Bader Ginsburg as yeah the aficion and. Because it seemed super dangerous and a terrible idea because. Nobody was wearing a mask. It's like even even then it just was like. Not Worth it yeah and not to be a total Downer but on the other side of things I, I know people and I've also heard from people who have not been able to hold memorial services for their relatives who died and not being able to get together with people after the loss of loved. One is so awful to comprehend that I I think that's the context of wondering about. Having a wedding you know well I think it's hard 'cause it's like weddings. This joyful event nobody wants any negativity anywhere around it even with the thing of the Ruth Bader Ginsburg wedding going viral like some people were like can't you just let these people enjoy their wedding and it's like, no because of the circumstances like I don't know I wouldn't think it was a great idea anyway probably. But It just seemed like if you were going to hold a wedding during corona virus. And especially, if you were going to have a very vulnerable elderly person who the entire country was like depending on to stay alive. You should like never post. Any pictures anywhere. Yeah. I. Agree with that. That's what I keep getting struck by like people can't just do these things. They are posting about it and I think that helps normalize it in this fucked up way that makes other people be like, oh well, some people are having weddings. Why can't we have our wedding? Well, that's also been a trend all through quarantine of the only. Real kind of metric you have for for gauging how your own experience is matching other people's through social media, and you know when one person posts a picture of them hanging out with some friends you notice you notice it in a way that maybe you wouldn't if you weren't so cut off and just thinking like Oh i wonder where they are and wonder if it's safer where they are I wonder if they've all been tested I, wonder if they're in a pod and so you draw these conclusions that maybe you should not draw With your earlier point about rich people weddings, I actually think that this that in a way if you're not a rich person, but you've put down expensive deposits potentially when you still had a job that you may be now don't have. It's the same thing if not more pressure to somehow get it done I mean if you don't have a wedding and you give up that deposit than you probably aren't going to have a wedding ever or for a long time depending on how things go and that's That's really depressing. I mean it's not terrible, but it's it's a bummer. Yeah I. Mean I think we're acknowledging it's depressing and I think nobody wants to think about depressing things in the context of joyful event like a wedding but I think we just have to call. Call a moratorium on big family events for the foreseeable future because it's not worth it to get grandma thick. here's a question for our callers. If you WANNA call in a two, four, zero, four, six, I want to hear from people who have attended or been in zoom weddings because I've seen some that actually looks great and I, think it's a you know it definitely probably feels weird but maybe the safest way to adopt and still be able to like see your friends and celebrate. So if you've been to one of those, let us know. Yeah maybe just the couple could go to the venue. So the big at something out of their deposit. Just stream do a twitch show. Let's take a little break. Let's imagine a world where no one ever cuts corners. Potato chip bags are filled to the top for the car in front of you at the stoplight notices when it turns green, will a place like this exist where script pizzas are placed in the square boxes and wings come in jumbo sites. We're talking about Leo Pizza with an all new online ordering website for easy ordering Lido pizzas. Square because Ledo pizza never cuts corners, check it out at Lille. PIZZA DOT COM. If growing marketing and ECOMMERCE business as your focus, you need a platform that's focused on growth meet Clavijo. The ultimate ECOMMERCE, marketing platform for online brands of all kinds and sizes whether you're starting out or running a well known brand. You'll get everything you need to send memorable emails, text messages, and more clave IOS trusted by more than forty thousand brands like living proof, huck, Berry, and hint build customer relationships that will last a lifetime visit cleo dot com that's k. l. a. v. i. y.. O. DOT COM SLASH IHEART radio to get started with the free trial today. We have got another night call tests you WANNA. Take this night call. We'll. Both be taken the night cough. Nine call. Lovely. This week especially all the talk about social media which I feel like we all talk and thanks so much about and can never be done with. That I think about a lot with regards to social media is my like digital footprint. I'm a very archives minded person, and then I'm going to school for. The entertainment and I am very concerned with the idea that my twitter instagram on somewhere are basically the only record that I have on facebook. I guess the only records that I have of my teenage years and that I would love to deactivate. But then would I lose that record and all the embarrassing posts and photos and at all that go along with that that's something I. Think about a lot in sort of agonize over and even though I've mostly stopped using social media data day, they still don't want to get rid of it because I wanNA preserve that sort of archive of my life You know what you think about this and do you consider your social media media's to be you know a record of your life for just a place to post They buy. What do you think? Molly. Question we have only used to print out chats. Right? You have some Lake Oh yeah I still have them. Yeah. I. I think everything used to be a lot more feminine role when we first started on the Internet with stuff like AOL, it doesn't you know theoretically stay around. You can just sort of remember that you talk to a lot of people. On. Chat. But right now it is Kinda like facebook is like the the wall where your height was marked for a long time and then it became. You know a fascist instrument. So do you want the wall where you marked your height? To stand I, think this is such an interesting question especially coming from an archivist I think of myself as very lick emotionally tethered to my online selves of the past and I might tumbler at point I migrated duplicated it for a wordpress that's private so that I would have a backup and that was when there was a panic that tumbler was gonNA shut down in a race everything. But when I see people who are digitizing their photos or like digitizing all of. This stuff you know that they've had from like the seventies or eighties or whatever I always think about how I want to like UN, digitize all of that stuff and I think a lot about like printing out old blogs and like putting them in a binder or. Stuff like that that you can't really do with instagram or facebook things that are more visually oriented and I mean with Tumbler to there's lots of picture post that you couldn't really print out and get like the sense of them but I think that the impulse to do that has a lot to do with the fact that. I kind of our online solves almost like external hard drives where because you're you're doing it online, you're not really thinking about it because you know that what is going on is being preserved So it's in a way I don't retain memories like I would I think without that backup and then there's the fear that you'll just kind of forget who you were but that also that would be still exist on the Internet, but you couldn't access it kind of like a disembodied double is that to dystopia. I have tried to take a very detached attitude in recent years from all of the content that I've made over time. Because I feel like I. Don't have that much control over if something gets wiped. So I've tried to be like like tears in rain a little bit. I definitely like rip my own archives from websites to just try and keep them. But even then I'm like, Oh, it's just in a Google doc now, like I agree with tasked with the idea of TV digitizing things of having physical copies of photos and writing so that Ben you can another yourself from the digital version. Seems really appealing now, it also kind of seems like a fun quarantine project every time I say fun quarantine. Project I'm like not that I'm doing any fund. Projects but the idea of kind of forcing yourself to sit down and sift through and choose what's important even if that would mean looking at. You know fifteen years of facebook activity and distilling it down to two or three or five or six things that you can pull and maybe just like scrapbook it or something. Yeah I agree. 'cause it down to me for like what were the fives things I've ever written on the Internet that I would be proud of and want to continue existing, and then a lot of it is a federal and I felt it was a federal at the time. and that was kind of what I liked about. It was just like Oh you you let go of the balloon every day you can't just keep working on it forever and overworking it. You have to just like let it go. I try to have that attitude a little bit of like you just let it go. But it's also easier to have that attitude when your trusty friend has all your instant messages did in her closet. It's easier when your friend tests is the archivist. Those earlier years I it's weird. I keep those but they're they're almost all just kind of dense like nonsense what the real value is in having them other than the idea that if I really ever feel like I have no idea who I was that I could find out but I mean, it's it's a strange. It's definitely strange stuff to have but I kind of I like the idea of knowing that the full body of your work so to speak is not important but that like little glimpses of your past self could be yeah, I think rip some photos I mean I do think people should divest from facebook I really. Do you think that if you can get yourself off facebook think it's okay to just kind of like leave all your stuff there and go to it's harder with with things like twitter and Instagram I. Mean Instagram in particular because that's obviously just as bad as facebook you're not going get the same information, but it's owned by the same evil company and that's kind of part of the reason that I have trouble. With the idea of leaving facebook is that I'm like I think it should be all or nothing in a way But with Instagram, you certainly could make like they have you know ways to make books, mink, Lake photo albums out of all your pictures and stuff like that. But you wouldn't have the comments I don't know if those are important to you I don't think they're important to me maybe they are. But I mean it's also maybe these are excuses that I make just in order to like make my life easier and not do it is clearly the right thing to do I've definitely been wanting to just completely off lately. Yeah. Go back and forth because I'm like, oh I also need it to. Promote this show, and there's so many excuses and reasons in my mind like why hat just get off everything. But. I certainly have the like throw my phone and I in a river and never use it again fantasy constantly. I think also talking about the social dilemma. Last week or the week before I think, one of the things that we realized is that we all are very aware of the dangers of these things I think everyone who uses the Internet a lot and who uses social media. A lot is maybe not the target audience for the social dilemma because we're informed about why this is bad but it is kind of a mixture of a feeling like a professional responsibility to remain in. With people and also that little bit of like but I've been I've existed on this place for so long and if I leave then I'm gone you. Tears and rain tears in rain tears in rain. I endorse this too. Before we move onto states, which will be talking about in the second half. I don't have a night call about this, but a friend of mine got a very strange email that was apparently sent out. Randomly to people in La maybe from an old list of a party or nightclub or something, it is an email from a place called spanky. the spank he's is apparently a speakeasy where you taxed. Hello Suckers. Prohibition joke or something to three, one, three, three, one three and they send you a location time and a password and it is a party that goes from eleven pm until five am with mandatory masks social distancing enforced. They claim and no photos There is an emphasis on quote discretion, secrecy and safety. It is so bizarre to be doing this during quarantine and it's especially to send this out. Unprompted to people. I think yeah. You helped me to this and then sent me or read it threat of people who had received it who were trying to figure out how they got on this list. It seems like it comes from some other nightlife promoters people were like, Oh, I guess I went to a sketchy club one time probably that's why I'm on this list. But I'm not super surprised that people are throwing underground parties at this point in quarantine. I guess the first one was two months ago though at the only thing that you can really find about this at. This point when we're recording this episode is justice one reddit thread and the subject is Spanky speakeasy and so two months ago. People started receiving this and then I guess this is like maybe a relaunch or something but the address that's listed in the footer is like this curve on Mulholland totally empty of any building. Yeah. It's not a real address, but the whole pitch is like, oh, it's at a Manchester. It's like an after hours party at a fancy mansion in the hills and so they give this. Sounds like it could be because it's like a Mulholland drive address rate. Is Nowhere. But. It gives the the aura of like this will be somewhere around here. We just can't tell you exactly where until you sign up. The other weird thing about this is that I'm in the reddit thread which again, the only way I can try and figure out what's up with Spanky someone discovered that there was a livestream that was may be connected to this with test video where a guy is saying, can you hear me over and over and the Reddit user did a facial recognition match and the computers matched him with a guy from a Russian youtube channel. adding a layer. Of An extra layer of what the fuck to the spanky email but it's it's true local mystery. So if you've ever been to Spanky won't you please let us know your I mean I looked into it a little bit more because I got really curious when you said that and I was like who's throwing eyes wide shut parties right now not a good idea. But I'm sure there's an audience for that of people who WanNa go to after hours even now. but it seems like the people who threw it. Exists they exist they're like a real. Nightlife. Shingle and they had a website even when I went to their website, they were honoring dj or like saying Happy Birthday to a DJ who then my boyfriend said Oh. Yeah. That Dj. got. Got Me. Oh. So. I think maybe these people are not the best people throwing be covert party will. Also been a bunch of big parties on Mulholland like hype house type of things, and so there's some speculation as to whether these are you know influence parties or or what but I I just found like the pros of this email to be gross I mean it was like wannabe celebs it's really gross. It's like bring your drugs. Do do the sacks. it does I have been thinking a lot about. Dinner House M, which was like a brief actually refer me party venue in L. A. in the like mid off I guess I went through with molly a couple of times but it operated after hours and had a usually great deejays and had that feeling that it wasn't really supposed to be there but I've definitely been feeling. But I've also been feeling nostalgic for just going out to any literally any place yeah. I mean I. Think People are very cooped up and some people would probably just take the risk and go to a big party that they're paying for. Their promising you know social distancing and masks and whatever it seems impossible to. Deal with to me personally. But I'm sure that'll be happening more. It just seems crazy to meet to Liken Cova de Prohibition I. Know I mean that's kind of the the wildest reach here is that. Is Very, different actually. It is different. Yeah. Because the whole thing is like, oh, they don't want us to party and it's like, yeah yeah, we don't want us to party. Already. You die don't party Also I'm like the thrill that one might get in the before times from going to a super after our secret whatever like that kind of adrenaline rush of what am I doing? You could get that just from going inside a grocery store now well, yeah it sounds like the Disney world thing it's like it seems like something that might be fun in the moment and then you would have the world's worst existential hangover afterwards if like, oh no, my going to die because I went to an after hours. And you'd be right to freak out. Well, let's take a little break. When we come back, we will talk about altered. States. Hey Miles. It's Jack How's it going man good man you know just taking in that new car smell as much as I can help helps open my lungs a bit cooped I'm feeling cooped up man I gotta get gotTa. Get Out of the how you guys do. You don't see that's probably not cooped up you need to get see you vida crossover utility vehicle up. A so truth be told at the beginning of this I was driving around in a Mazda C x nine, the twenty, twenty they were like eight miles. We love what you're doing. Please try this car out and let us know what you think I'm driving in this thing it is the handling I gotta say is so smooth. You're already fans of your driving period they. knew out there on the roads and we gotta get this guy behind the wheel of the new six. It can do anything it. Intuitively, response to me as a driver. So like you know how you oversteer like if you're like going down straight away, maybe you start doing these adjustments with the steering wheel it's actively trying to make sure you're being as efficient as possible with your steering wheel the exterior design that is so sleek yet aggressive a pull up they say, oh my gosh this man is probably a one percent and they go. You know he's probably sensible and that's why I believe this car really was built for me why? Yes. I'm a black person who likes styling who likes efficiency who likes minimal Minimal flexing if you'd like to say but still enjoys a of elegance they truly design it like there's an art to how they design it. It's not just a science. No in cars is an art and it's for people like me I like to drive. No I'm not someone out here who needs to be doing three hundred miles an hour but I liked the handling of a good vehicle and I love a great bow sound system which these. Can come equipped with. So if you want more information on the Mazda C lineup including the first ever see thirty Goto Mazda, USA dot com slash Iheart, and don't forget to explore their strongest finance options. Guys come in all shapes and sizes. There is no normal for everyone, but there is a normal for you. If like thousands of other guys, you find that your normal isn't so normal anymore, it could be an addressable medical condition called Peronist disease or PD curve with a bump that bothers you isn't normal and should be checked out by urologists because you don't have to accept that as your new normal finding urologist and learn about PD. Dot Com slash normal. Hello. So we recently watched altered states. This was the first time I had seen altered states. In in my mind but I have been told that I watched it a long time ago and just let it fly away tears in the rain style. Molly you just watched it was not the first time. You've seen it. Yeah. I thought I had seen it, but it turns out I had not well it rules. This this movie is a nineteen eighty release directed by Ken Russell, which only happened after a shakeup the screen plan source novel by Patty Tchaikovsky and boy it does not sound like this movie was fun to make. At all no but it's fun to watch Super Fun to watch But for background on the problems with making it, I guess this was kind of came about as sort of a goof between Tchaykovsky meeting up with his best friend Bob Fosse, and also maybe herb Gardner at the Russian Tea Room and they wanted to make a movie with they. Wanted to pitch movie too Dino Diller Rentis and they were like Jecklin high like King. Kong. But he becomes a movie star and then Tchaykovsky went home and kind of came up with altered states Would you like to summarize the plot of this film molly? Sure. It was a novel I and it's about scientist who gets really into isolation tanks and Then combining isolation tanks with taking intense. Drugs. and. That's pretty much what it's about. It's an eighties guy pushing it to the limit. and. fucking pushes it to the limit. He does There was an director Arthur Penn was originally. Slated to direct this and he cast it and it's a great cast William hurt coming very close to Kevin Costner territory here and Blair Brown. Bob Balabagn. But I guess Arthur Penn got into a fight with Tchaikovsky and. And then Ken Russell was brought on after they offered it to like a million other directors and Tchaikovsky and Russell fought and so. Chefs, he is now credited as Sydney Errand because didn't want anything to do with it but this is China shop ski was eventually banned from the set because yeah just tell. Ken Russell, what he wanted and Ken Russell was like I'm trying to direct mate. The Dialogue Tchaykovsky wouldn't let anyone touch the dialogue and the dialogue is the funniest thing. Elliott. It's funny because it's based on a novel in the novels incredibly wordy and dialogue heavy and has all these monologues about like spirituality and drugs and God and finding yourself and Ken Russell was like Oh my God. There's so much talking in this book and Chaff Ski Doesn't want any of it cut. So he did a smart thing which was to have people kind of happing talking kind of altman style. Yeah, and it works really well because it's also said in this amazing Milia of scuzzy academics. Yeah, it's it's a it also has like a sorkin. Meets Sorkin or something, but it it really encapsulates. Born, in nineteen eighty when this came out. But I do feel like the dinner parties where they're playing the. And smoking a joint and all of these academics having these fast paced conversations and they're talking about psychoanalysis seemed very realistic to. And also like a dream world to me for some reason Oh, we'll also everyone's dressed fabulously. There's a lot of aquamarine turtlenecks and flowing nightgowns. Yeah. It just feels like you don't get to see the like scientists who are laid back that often anymore it's like when you see scientists in movies, they're always like Dr, we have to do this by it's like in poltergeist how the parents smoke pot it's just that like. Long seventies thing where it's like, Oh yeah. Everyone's like doing acid and having weird key parties. There are so many scenes where it's an emotional conversation but also intellect an intellectual conversation held between two completely naked people draped on love seats where it's just like I, had a party I stripped down I'm lying on a love seat now i WanNa talk about my work as an anthropologist, and also what's going on between US Babe? Yeah, the horny academia in horny scientists loved this movie. Are Fantastic. Especially, Bob Balabagn who's kind of the straight man just like Bob Balabagn floating around in this movie being like, Hey, maybe don't completely lose touch with your ego in order to become the goat had God man that six I'd go ahead man Bob Alabama, in this movie is the solution to the question we've been posing who does keys Ranieri Look, exactly like Oh. My God there you go. Wow. Short Guy Energy. You have the the bespectacled and beard, and also the kind of like lounging and judging you know totally although I feel like Bob Balabagn has too much sexual charisma for the not to be totally true I find Bob Balabagn just like magnetic I love him to be magnetic he is. And he's great in this they also have a funny relationship, William Hurt and Bob Ballybeen in this movie of like William, her really wants to be in the tank. Any wants to do the drugs, but he also like needs his crew. There both to monitor him also because in his mind and also maybe in Cheyenne Skis. Vision. Day Care so much about looking at what's up with his brain. Yeah, I mean I was little confused about what the purpose of these experiments was. It was just To Go as far into your brain as you possibly can. I looked into it more. Based on a real Guy Oh really. Yeah. It's Lilly. WHO INVENTED ISOLATION TANKS? And also was the guy that was famous for trying to talk to dolphins. Also, he inspired three movies and one of them is day of the Dolphin. Which we've also talked about on night call, but we should watch some time. I think he just on the on the cutting edge of Weird Science Did. He get addicted to his isolation tank. It seems like one does. Wow can you imagine? Would you do the isolation tank get into it? I feel like we've circled us and every time my answer is different having been kind of in an isolation tank. Via Corinthian I don't want more of that. Now the idea of doing hallucinogenic drugs and then going into an isolation tank is horrible I don't know how you feel about that. Isn't the womb an isolation tank man is you're going back to the womb. I. Yeah this movie also though the the purpose is not stated I guess William Hurts Character Dr Eddie Jessop doesn't realize what's going to happen when he takes this drug in the isolation tank. But what does happen spoiler alert is that he somehow mutates into an early form of man that he he saw on his initial trip which was in Mexico I. Think he was given a stew of mushrooms and roots and his own blood. And then he saw apelike creatures that were moving very gracefully, and then he what he became one of them but only in his mind then when he goes into the isolation tank and is taking a, I believe synthesized version of that drug. He grows hair and like froth at the mouth and wants to eat a deer and all of that kind of stuff. Yeah. This movie is just a feast for the eyes it is. Extremely Fun to watch. I don't know that it makes drugs look like something you want to do. But. In in exaggerating what about trip is lake? It definitely is like a fun thing to enjoy. They'd go to Mexico to get the experimental drug that will push him even further. It's mushrooms at some kind of magic mushroom, but it seems a lot more like. Just in terms of how it is done and how it affects people and they do it in a cave with everybody wearing tribal face paint. I just read a thing about this guy who's like the psychedelics concierge to the stars Zafy Zafy. It said, would you trip with someone who was the PSYCHEDELIC concierge to Lamar Odom and Michelle Rodriguez And the answer is I do not think I would like to with that. Happy. You wouldn't trip was happy. What's his deal? He's like a former something else and then he was like, I, think my true calling is to be your your trip buddy and take you. Take you to places where we can score the hallucinogen. People love it and I guess Lamar Odom was really transformed by the experience of tripping with Zap. I think when I saw the headline to it just said like Michelle and my brain filled in Obama and I was like, wow. I want to know about like trip in with Michelle Obama. surprised. But? Somebody. Told me because I was talking about this movie a lot after site and a friend was telling me about a CO worker. Who did I Oscar a lot of times they did it like five or six times and they said. Only the first two times. Great. Oh, no really they said you kind of like reach the thing you're gonNA reach shoes like in the first time I like got all the way to like unmake myself and the second time I like rebuilt myself up. And then the third fourth and fifth possibly six times I was just throwing up. It's like you can't treat your body or mind like a Lego set that you just disassemble and reassemble a million times I. Think it's interesting that like with any kind of drug there is there does seem to be a limit to the amount of it. You can do that. You'll get something out of it especially with psychedelic drugs and. Where you are. Maybe going to have some kind of erupt revolution or feel like you are. It does seem like it has kind of diminishing returns after a certain point. Yeah. I I'm interested in that I have never taken a large dose of Hallucinogens Oh, you haven't taken a large dose. I've never taken large dose of Hallucinogens have you taken any smaller doses us while my good friends? WHO has taken smaller doses of hallucinogens has really liked it but they did report that it builds up. So depending on which protocol you ju- if it builds up if you're taking multiple days in a row, there's the potential that you might find that one day you are taking apart your brain of Legos. A little more than you may have intended to but I think on this podcast were were non judgmental about people who take a loosener Jen's in general maybe. For you and I think that we're like, I think all your state a little saving all pro `ring your state under the right circumstances. The interesting thing though about altered states is that supposedly you would I mean he's so Eddie Joseph is very concerned with God and religion and like where he fits William hurt is on one in this movie insurance is amazing I kept thinking it was like a Prequel to the big chill. Well, that's why I was thinking. Of Kevin. Costner to you because I was like Kevin Costner and William hurt are just two sides of the same coin and then of course, in big show, we saw who prevailed. and. This was this was hurts first movie to and also Drew Barrymore is in this as berry more is one of the children who gets left behind by her father doing too many drugs which feels you know a little. Inter textual on the knows But if you're a person who's so obsessed with losing your ego like finding God within and the singularity and all of that kind of stuff, it just seems interesting. His Journey in this movie William Hurts character is to become is to go from a self-involved eighties guy who like is really just obsessed with his inner workings and obsessed with who he is and everyone else is just a bit player in his life to a thoroughly more self obsessed person well I like I like that he becomes like Honky a-list. Yeah there are some great shots of his arms bubbling Yoma God. Yeah. The practical effects, in this movie are unbelievable and I think it does a really good job of trying to make visual things that are not probably lake corporeal when you are tripping but. To try and replicate when it feels like trip balls using green screens and stuff. But this movie does a great job of Oh. Yeah. Creating an aesthetic. And apparently Tchaykovsky was really particular about those see and still like you know kind of fireball like the itunes visualizing scenes basic writing. There's there's some great shots of Blair Brown kind of sphinx-like like against a backdrop of the universe that's glittering If you've ever been serves a targeted ad from this one weird microdosing company they have it, it looks just ripped from altered states. But also interesting to me. I did not know that Patty Tchaikovsky was in psychoanalysis for a super long time starting in the fifty s to deal with like rage and violent behavior. And it does seem to be a movie about like a man who is very witty and intellectual not witty. I shouldn't say what he has no sense of humor but an intellectual and fast talking guy who's like really in control but he just longs to lose to go back to like a primal state where he rips at Dere open and eats its guts and it seems like a personal a personal project in many ways fray. Well, I mean I think if you seen network you can. Kinda catch catch that drift about chef ski but it is sort of lake. This. These people are also talkie the can't stop talking the can't stop thinking and all they really want is to like be forced to stop talking and thinking by something greater than themselves but look how much talking he doesn't the tank can you imagine being in an isolation tank and just like going the whole time? It's a very cocaine movie in that sense to where you're like he's not just doing the Iowa. But he's also just like high on like what wouldn't Alpha he is he's like tells his future wife Blair Brown. He's just like I'm not like husband material but like I'm GonNa Fuck your brains out and you'll never forget you know anything's going on about religion during and she's like us. Well that's when they're like being naked and sitting in bed just like, oh, well, you know. The the Holy Spirit comes to you when you're in the tank and can you fully get rid of the stinks that sits on your head I don't think I asked you the same question you asked me would you go in the deprivation tank I mean not right now But. I think. So yeah, my friend Mike who is a big altered states fan booked isolation tank in the valley. They are not super surprisingly mostly located in the San Fernando Valley at this point. He. Didn't like it as much as he thought he was going to because I. Think he said he was just like too conscious. The water kinda smells like chlorine and stuff and that. You start focusing on that because you can't focus on anything visual but. Friend of the PODCAST Mara Wilson sent a message to say that she's done isolation tanks and loved it really and was surprised to love it because she is very claustrophobic. She said, she lowered the door that can kind of keep the door propped open for as long as you want and that she was doing it like a little bit at a time leaving it like an inch open and and then finally she felt comfortable enough to shut it all the way and that she totally got into it. I don't remember. Did you do the James Tyrrell thing that they had lack was kind of traveling around where it was being shut in the light coffin? I didn't do the PA Yeah I didn't do the pod the light coffin. That seemed a little to me. They loved it. Oh, you did it. I did it I. Loved it. That's so altered states. Yeah. It really was and I was I was very concerned about it 'cause I to get claustrophobic and it felt like I had read a lot of things that implied that you could really not like it. If you didn't like it, you were not going to mildly dislike it. You were going to violently dislike it But yeah, I thought it was really fascinating I think to me being in water When you said the distracting chlorine smell was like, yes that's the issue We've talked also I think off pod maybe about an isolation tank that a sign no pooping in the tank. And I in this year you know. You get relaxed well, the thought of anyone pooping in the tank and then you being the next person in the tank. I. It doesn't matter how clean it like, no that stay on your wanted. But if you're William Hurt, you've got your own tank. Yeah and also I mean he he started off in a fairly fairly four star tank but then had to move down to the more motel six level tank the tank they had to kind of scrape the. Rust off of and it looks like a giant locker. It's like he gets addicted to the tank. Yeah. It's not the drug. It's like the being in isolation and and it's really I think he's also addicted to having two of his smart friends studying him yes to be studied I. Think you could really see it if you want to take it to Tchaikovsky as a Metaphor for writing for somebody who's just like being in their own brain all the time. Because that is what writing feels like to me. Sometimes I have to be completely in an isolation tank. Of. The soul to get anything done. Yeah, which is sometimes, it works well like in the middle of the night. I mean having also, this is another link to quarantine, but the idea of having a tiny space that's just for you and John or your work or just for your thoughts is extremely appealing. Water was thinking too because. In quarantine the idea of like an escape pod. I've been thinking about total recall a lot also especially when we were locked down with the fires and really couldn't go outside I was just like would i? Would I do the brain implant that lets me go on like a vacation to Greece right now where. I have no idea that it's not real. You know. Yep and then somebody was like, no, you wouldn't because Elon. Musk. Is the person offering it? That's true. I mean much like you wouldn't wanNA trip with Zappia. Necessarily you wouldn't want to total recall with you musk no set and setting I definitely was like I would wanna go on like a virtual vacation right now I wouldn't pick the one where I have to save the world and get the girl like he does and total recall I would pick the one that's like you know. Very Mundane. Just like eating a great shrimp Taco somewhere else. Well, that's like sand Juna, Pero? Raklli. Like just go on a beach vacation safely. But. It's an implant in your brain. Well, I watched we talked about this on the pod but I watch Sanjay Pero a couple of months ago after we'd been quarantined for a while and that actually sums up a lot of what we've been talking about in this episode in terms of like preserving your digital past as well as trying to like create a digital escape and and how those things are linked i. mean. It feels like over the past couple of months we've been kind of bumping up against the walls of the Internet and realizing the necessity of creating different ways to communicate because like obviously we're going to need to communicate. We're going to need to work remotely, but the structures that are in place to allow us to do so are all kind of corrupt you know? Yeah they're all really bad I mean I think. If anything what I really want is like an offline space. I think what we really want is for everybody to be in their isolation tanks and be able to combine brainwaves. I think that's the perfect solution is that what podcasting is I think? That reminds us something something we're doing right now. Full I think that does it for this week we are looking forward to having emily back next week. Thank you so much for listening to the PODCAST. If you're enjoying the show, won't you please leave us a review and subscribe on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast you can also follow us on social media. We are night call pod on twitter and I call podcast on instagram and facebook the bad places you can. Leave us a night, call two, zero, four, six night, and of course, we would always appreciate you supporting the podcast on Petri on we are Patriot dot com forward slash night call. We have a bunch of great reward tears we do Bonus PODCASTS, book club it's fun. Join US join us and leave us some night calls about your best trips, your worst trips, your feelings about isolation tanks, her anything else whether people should go to weddings. How spanky? If She Sees if Spanky is is really just a brain implant where you say you're going to go to an after hours and then when you get there, they put a chip in your brain. That's the conspiracy theory we will push. That's why it has no fixed address. So yeah, we'll see you next week for another night. You know how they say history repeats itself. We've allowed ourselves to be so divided. No one can disagree anymore without hating on the froze tapes podcast, we'll be sharing interviews from legendary TV host, David Frost, who sat down with some of the most influential people, the sixties and seventies a time of great upheaval in America a time that feels so much like today not elect Nixon. American. And I know something about the time of silence. It's funny. Isn't it that there aren't any women in the executive positions of this company I think it's really sort of involves the national purpose. Almost. The sole of the country when the president does it, that means that it is not illegal you won't find these tapes anywhere else join me. Wilfred Frost as we turn back the clock on the frost, tapes. Listen to the tapes starting on October six on the IHEART radio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

facebook twitter William Hurt Patty Tchaikovsky molly instagram Emily Ken Russell Kevin Costner Blair Brown Tchaykovsky cough Bob Balabagn Mulholland Alabama Ruth Bader Ginsburg Berry CPI University
California Water Wars - Los Angeles and the Future of Water | 6

American History Tellers

44:11 min | 9 months ago

California Water Wars - Los Angeles and the Future of Water | 6

"Maginness thirty four. You're a construction worker with the US Bureau of reclamation hired to work on the Parker Dam. Just one hundred and fifty miles south of the Grand Canyon. The dam site straddles the border of California and Arizona for the last week your crew. Who's been working on the Arizona side of the Colorado River attaching bridge footings? It's around two in the afternoon. Even though it's November hot sun isn't making your work any easier but suddenly the sound of your foreman's whistle cuts through the din. Hey what gives men around you? Stop what they're doing. Look up to see the foreman bullish man named Martin staying at the top of the bluff. Everyone stop which doing snorter stop says. Who SAYS THE GOVERNOR OF ARIZONA? Apparently you in the men climb the short distance to the top of the riverbank. Guess they thought calling in the National Guard would help convince us. You can't believe it. A high Mardi or a dozen army transport vehicles on around one hundred national guardsmen climbing out of them. Some of them are toting machine-guns. They're here to make sure we don't finish this bridge. This is insanity you've read in the newspapers about the back and forth between the two states over water rights. Arizona has been sour on the whole Colorado River project since the beginning and they probably should be California's set to receive the lion share of water from this dam and the larger boulder dam being constructed up river bringing in an army against their own fellow Americans. You and the rest of the men gather around. Mardi explains all's I know is I got a phone. Call the governor declared martial law until they get it sorted out. I guess he's mighty sore about where this water is going. How long are they GONNA stay? I don't know until someone makes a decision. The guardsmen fan out take their positions along the construction site. But as you watch they appear to be just as tired and confused as your crew. What do you think they're going to do if we keep going shoot US smart Alec and crew pipes up a Mardi Ju- budget for bulletproof vests men around chuckle. Mardi doesn't seem concern about the small army. That's cornered you on the edge of this bluff. He seems more exasperated than anything. I don't think these boys are going to start a civil war this afternoon. It's more. They're trying to make a point. You Fallon just take a long break for lunch. You shore lunch is still legal. Maybe we ought to check with the Arizona Governor. Yeah yeah all right. Anyways take a break pipe down. This is no laughing matter. The true disperses and heads towards the mess. You shake your head out here. In the desert water is a precious thing but is it worth the loss of American lives at the hands of American soldiers which is have to wait and see American history tellers sponsored by the audiobook edition of the Warsaw Protocol by New York Times bestselling author Steve Berry the latest installment of Berries Cotton Malone series one by one the seven precious relics of the Arma Christi. The weapons of Christ are disappearing from sanctuaries across the world from the tranquil canals of flanders to the elegant rooms of Royal Polish Castles. Too deep beneath the earth in an ancient salt mine malone is caught in the middle of a deadly war the outcome of which turns on a secret known as the Warsaw Protocol Audio File Magazine Calls Narrator Scott Brick masterful and he doesn't excellent job bringing in both the historical elements and the twist and turns of this must-listen audiobook. The audiobook edition also includes a special writers cut with fascinating behind the scenes commentary from the author. Get the audiobook of the war. Soft Protocol by Steve. Bearing now wherever audio books are sold from Andrea? I'm Lindsey Graham and this is American history tellers our history your story. Today we wrap up our series on the California water wars and the early nineteen hundreds Los Angeles was a city on the rise. The only thing stopping it from becoming a major metropolis was its water supply. The city had long dependent on its own river but when it became clear that it wasn't enough to quench. The city's ambitions to men embarked on a conquest to secure the city's future. Frederick Eaton and William Mulholland under their direction. The city would spend twenty three million dollars over the course of five years employ. Five thousand men all with the aim of piping water nearly two hundred miles from the eastern slopes of the Sierra Nevada down to Los Angeles but the plan was controversial and sew discord throughout the region. Today I talk to John Christianson an environmental historian at the University of California Los Angeles. We'll get inside the minds of the men behind the project and talk about the environmental effects. That can still be felt to this day. Here's our conversation John Christianson. Welcome to American history tellers. Thank you you've been known to call the Los Angeles aqueduct project. L. As original sin. Why is that well the aqueduct that brings water from the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada? Two hundred and forty some miles. North of the city was both the city's original sin and a signal accomplishment. Amazing feat of engineering that made the city as we know it possible a bit it was also that original sin of taking water from another place another ecosystem another community and bringing it to the taking it really And bringing it to the city as William Mulholland chief engineer of the Los Angeles Department of Water and power said in nineteen thirteen. When the aqueduct was first opened in water tumbled out of the aqueduct into the San Fernando Valley where Los Angeles would soon be rapidly expanding as he said there it is take it and it is really that kind of Arrogance and Hubris to that the Los Angeles aqueduct. In what is sometimes called the Owens Valley water grab has come to symbolize not just for Los Angeles but really for all of California and all of the all of the American West well. Let's talk about Willie Mulholland. He was certainly essential character in the story. And let's talk about how he and Frederick Eaton got the rights to the water in the Owens River valley to begin with historian. Marc reisner has said that they stole it fair and Square. What were the methods this pair used? Well I think it is a good way to put it. That they stole it fair and square The you know the in the popular imagination you know. The the ideas that Los Angeles Crab that water took. It stole it. You know but they went up there. And they bought the water and land from farmers and ranchers in the Owens Valley and historians have shown that you know that they paid fair market value to willing sellers So you know in the West When you when you own a piece of land and the Water. That is used to irrigate it you know. Both of those are property rights And they can either go together. If you're irrigating a farmer or ranch or they can be separated in the water can be sold off to some other use and Mulholland and eaten went up there. And they bought up farms and ranches. They didn't tell people what they were buying them for And you know that in a way you know make sense because if they had let out Let it be known that they were. You know buying all kinds of properties in the area. The the price is probably would have gone up and they were trying to get those properties for the the best price they could. You know the fair market value at the time and you know other historians looking back have seen really in many ways that the people who sold their water to their land and water and the water was separate from the land and brought down to Los Angeles that they were probably better off in the long run than people who stayed in the farming farming and ranching business but the way that it was dying the secrecy with which it has done you know really Angered people in the valley and fueled resentment That continues to this day. What do you think is that the root of that resentment is it? Just that they're valley changed or is it that the city swindled them or if they feel that they did by not being as honest and upfront as they could have been. I think it's all of those things and it's also You know the the Valley Owens Valley is today and has been for the last century since the aqueduct was built and then opened in nineteen thirteen Has Been Essentially a colony of Los Angeles Colony of the Los Angeles Department of Water and power. The city owns most of the land up in the valley owns most of the water rights leases some of them back now to ranchers and farmers. And you know Lisa's properties back to businesses in the Owens Valley. But it's hard to really do anything without getting you know some kind of permission or contract from Los Angeles. Which is you know the big bad city more than two hundred miles away you know so I think it's also that they lost control of their own destiny. Most people know this story through the nineteen seventy four film Chinatown. Does that film to a justice to the dynamics of the time or is it too. Much Hollywood drama. Well it's interesting that you phrase the question that way because I think it does both really There is almost nothing about the film that is historically accurate and yet it captures the truth of the story the moral heart of the story and and I think that's why know I. I also call it a Los Angeles as original sin and the and the movie really captures That's in that corruption in a way that is true. Even though it's not at all accurate I in terms of the events that had describes the Times that those take place the characters you know all of which are very loosely based on the historical story but not at all accurate. But if you when I talk to people and I say you know that I study water in the American West or in California or in Los Angeles almost invariably people say oh. You Mean Chinatown. So that story has actually become our imagination of the history. And and you know and it's really crucial in a way that that we deal with it and I think that has also captured that moral outrage that people have when You know thinking about it. A city reaching out into the distant countryside And taking its water even though that has happened you know all around the American West and really made the Metropolitan West as we know it today. Possible I'm curious. How did you come to specialize in studying the water in the West? Water is essential to life in the in the West And you know that's true both ecologically and environmentally but also of course socially economically politically the the American West. As we know it today would not be possible without these incredible feats of engineering that have created what we call sometimes a hybrid landscape that has both engineered and natural and so two to understand the American West today. You really need to understand that history. I'm still I'm still curious In your professional career. Was there a moment when you realized that water was the lever for this and this would capture? Your imagination was her a specific moments than you can recall. Well so that's a it's a. It's a good question and you're making me think back. I mean. Let me tell you you know what I brought me to. The Owens Valley was early in my career when I was a journalist and I lived in in the great basin which is that area between the Sierra Nevada and the rocky mountains I lived in northern Nevada and You know on the eastern side of the Sierra Valley much like Owens Valley But farther north from there and at that time in the late eighties and early nineties. Las Vegas had filed water claims on underground water hundreds of miles north of the city and that it would tap that water and bring it to the city and remember the Owens Valley was the battle cry of the opponents of what came to be called the Las Vegas water. Grab and so. I travel down to the Owens Valley to try to understand that his tree and the and the concerns of residents there and why that anger continue to today. And why you know. Remember the Owens Valley could be a battle cry for these kinds of confrontations around the American West. You've just described another confrontation That is obviously very similar in the one. That led you to the Owens Valley. These confrontations though are whether complex their nuanced without them without the water. Las Vegas Los Angeles wouldn't be cities that they are. There's clearly some advantage to having a city grow. There's clearly some disadvantage to having the water taken out of the valley. It makes me think about Mulholland himself. Who saw Yosemite National Park in wanted them to too damn their water to stop the Goddamn waste? Of course Yosemite is a national treasure and was then to is this just ruthless utilitarianism. Who was Mulholland in this moment well William Mohammed was a Irish immigrant ditch digger? You know who tended the ditches that brought water into the city town at the time of of Los Angeles from the Los Angeles River and he worked his way up to be the superintendent and then the chief engineer of the the water company and then the city agency which became the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. And he had an you know an engineer's vision of Engineering the landscape to make the city work. Make it possible. And you know that s. The city grew became more demanding and more grandiose And as the city was doubling every decade growing rapidly in the early twentieth century he and and colleagues believe that the city needed a new source of water. If it was going to continue to grow at couldn't just depend on the water that falls as rain and the Los Angeles Basin and comes down the Los Angeles River which is very unreliable and flashy river like many in in in the West so when they found when Wins Valley two hundred miles to the north at the base of the Sierra Nevada. You know which has this. Great Snow Pack then melts in the spring. And all this water coming down the river and ending up in you know in a in a lake in the desert called Owens Lake. I think they had that same vision right that that water was being wasted as it flowed into the desert and that that water could provide what a great growing city needed and it also had the added benefit of being up hill from Los Angeles. So that the whole system could be fed by gravity and and and still is and at the time you when he said an interesting kind of enigmatic thing that you know that I think exemplifies you know this thinking he said if we don't get the water will never need it so. The city needed that water in order to grow. It didn't need it right away. And if it never did get that water wouldn't be able to grow and that is really kind of the. The essence of the drive of water seekers says a great historian of Watering California called Californians seeking watering able to in order to enable growth. And it's not just Los Angeles at the same time. San Francisco was damning the Hetch Hetchy valley which was right next door to Yosemite Valley a valley that John Muir called. You know just as as gorgeous incredible is Yosemite Valley That valley was hetch. Hetchy was dammed and is a reservoir. That still serves San Francisco and and this happened really all around the American West and these great waterworks are what made the the cities and and and Agriculture of California. The West Possible American. History tellers is sponsored by Scots. Think about our most iconic early American buildings Mount Vernon Monticello the White House strong beautiful stately soaring columns wide verandas noble domes. Each is expertly proportion to project grace and authority and each framed an immaculate verdant lawn. Nothing about your own lawn. If immaculate and verdant aren't quite the adjectives you'd use. It's time to get some help. Scotts TURF builder thicker. Lawn has everything you need to turn your lawn into the thick green paradise that you deserve Scotts turf builder thicker. Lawn is a three in one solution consisting of seeds to fill in gaps soil improve refer enhance root development and fertilizer to feed new grass and thick and and green. 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You are changing values over time In the last twenty thirty forty years fifty years now really since the first Earth Day We've seen a change in values where the people voters are increasingly put value on the environment on other non human species and ecosystems on the rights of native American peoples that were ignored in you know in trampled and the development of the American West. And you know we've increasingly seen court cases decided laws passed ballot measures passed recognize the importance of those values that recognize it changes in the ways that we operate these kids engineered and natural systems. That are now our water systems and rivers of American West and you know That great historian I was talking about earlier. Who called California water seekers went on to call a you know a collection of water seekers and he talked about this kind of incremental change Norris Hundley junior was his name and he talked about how often you know two steps forward one step back but we have seen really tremendous change in those values over time And and and I think it's important to recognize you know if we think historically that we're in we are living in history. Were living in a period of change and we can be agents in that change and recognize the ways that we want to. Val You other things you know. Other people other communities My own view. Is that this history that this original sin if you will as well you know that connects us to the Owens Valley when I opened my faucet and get a drink of water. I'm drinking water. That comes from Owens Valley. But I'm also drinking water that mixed with it that comes from the Colorado River system and mixed in there too is water from the delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin River and Northern California. And that's an incredible history of of Engineering and human achievement. Made a great city like Los Angeles possible that I love and value You know being here in the energy of of of the city and people being together and creating things but it also gives us an enormous responsibility to those places as well to those ecosystems and communities and I think we are increasingly recognizing that responsibility. We have a long way to go still. Let's return to Mulholland. Because it occurs to me that his career and the public's view of him changed as well in in his lifetime. Of course the Owens Valley conflicts weren't weren't the only problem for the aqueduct. There was the Saint Francis Dam collapse. I why did that dam collapse? Well there's still quite a bit of debate possible about why that dam collapsed in one thousand nine hundred twenty eight on killing. As many as four hundred thirty one people you know when it failed catastrophically sending a huge flood downstream that dam had been built as a as a another source of water for Los Angeles as a as a backup source for for droughts after the Los Angeles. Aqueduct was completed the investigation at the time and historical investigations. That have taken place afterwards. Really Point to that. It was that it was not The site itself and the geology was not adequately understood. So that there were as water seeping into the rocks around the dam that held the dam and that those You know appear to have softened and then you know enable leakage around the dam undermining dams plug if you will in that Canyon that the foundation of the dam itself was not adequate and also that it had been really overseen by only one man William Mulholland and that there should have been more oversight more checks and balances on the design and building Of the Damn. It's easy enough to just go to Google and And see the historical record and photographs of of the impact of this dam collapsed and it's kind of catastrophic is the word but it also certainly affected mulholland himself. How so I would really ended mollins career. You know here was a man who had everything invested in his image and his accomplishments as a great engineer and and he was ashamed You know this Dam and reservoir that he had advocated for that he had you know gotten approval to build that he had overseen had failed catastrophically and killed more than four hundred people in the greatest disaster since the the San Francisco earthquake and it was really a man made disaster and he was the man responsible after the the incident. What changed in California water policy in the aqueducts history and Maybe Los Angeles is view towards water. You know on on on the one hand there were things that change. There were You Know Damn Regulations Damn Safety Regulations. That were passed. In the aftermath of the Saint Francis Dam collapse there. They're Weena was increasing attention to dam safety and citing in building. And and all of that but on the other hand you know not that much changed There were fears at the time that the collapse might derail the building of the Hoover Dam on Colorado River which also was being approved and then build immediately in the years after and that supplied water and still supplies water and electric power to Arizona. California and Nevada. That dam was built there lake. Mead Reservoir is an important water supply for the southwestern United States that was built in the nineteen thirties and that brought water to southern California in Los Angeles and in the years after that a huge state water project was built to bring in in canals to bring water from northern California as I said the Delta the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to to southern California and so that great building of hydraulic society that dependent on on increasingly large dams and reservoirs and aqueducts canal. Projects continued really into through the nineteen sixties and into the nineteen seventies. And it wasn't really until the late nineteen seventies and early eighties that we really began to see a shift away from a building new huge water projects and we have not seen that many sense. American history tellers is sponsored by Babas. I turned forty six this week. Definitely middle aged which is disconcerting. And also why? I'm trying to stay fit. One thing I've discovered is that working out is hard. It's always hard even after weeks of conditioning. It's still pretty hard bomb. His socks can't change that but they can't make it more comfortable and take every bit of comfort I can. Bombs has new performance socks designed from everything from running to hiking cycling and more they're made with a lightweight poly cotton blend which keeps your feet. Cool dry and comfortable never sweaty. Each sock is also built with a special foot. Hugging Arch support system. 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It became a behemoth of Culture in the United States and globally probably solely due to its access to water. But what happened in the Owens Valley and in the hundred years at Los Angeles was growing to this status will in many ways you could say and people do and it seems so that the Owens Valley was kind of frozen in time If you go there today it is still a very wide open. Incredibly beautiful landscape There it's you know dotted with small towns and it has not really changed that much in a hundred years and you know there are some folks who say you know. That's really thanks. To the fact that Los Angeles took all the water if Los Angeles hadn't taken the water and also bought up all the property. The private property that was necessary to control that water valley would probably be a lot more developed and covered with you know suburban tracks and second homes and sprawl and so in some ways this history preserved the natural landscape of Owens Valley at the same time it took the water. Now it's also you know it's also caused a lot of problems The de watering of the Owens River You know the the Then the lack of water that flowed into the desert lake called Owens Lake that then dried up and his now one of the worst Sources of some of the worst air quality dust storms in in the United States and That those problems in turn you know have You know forced Los Angeles through court cases that have been one by environmental groups. And by folks in the Owens Valley. You know to keep water in Mona. Lake to ensure that there's enough in stream flow in the Owens river for fish and other species to dedicate more water to Covering the Owens Dry Lake to keep down those toxic dust storms and so Los Angeles is now also investing millions of millions of dollars in remediation an of the damage that that that has caused. And you know there's still a lot of you know animosity and anger and be between Owens Valley and Los Angeles. But there's a there are there are also ongoing negotiations. Los Angeles clearly needed the water to grow to the state. It is but that was a long time ago. We are in twenty twenty today. What is the state of water in Los Angeles right now? Well the State of water in Los Angeles. Right now is pretty good depending on how you look look at it Of course is a great debate in Los Angeles about the future of our water supply particularly with the threat of climate change. All of California and Los Angeles in particular is very very dependent on snowfall in the Sierra Nevada. That is really are great reservoir and our whole system of dams and reservoirs and canals and aqueducts says Ben Bill to capture that Snow Melt when it runs often the spring. Hold it in reservoirs and then deliver it over the dry summer and fall months to farms and cities and we know from Climate Change Science. And you know we see some signs of it already that There is an increasing likelihood. That snowpack will lessen and that it will run off more quickly and sooner and now that's going to cause huge challenges for the system that was built for one climate regime. But we're going to have to figure out how to operate in another climate regime so the water that we get from Owens Valley and from northern California and even from the Colorado River is going to be increasingly precarious and there are a lot of folks here in Los Angeles advocating that we need to figure out how to be more self sufficient to capture more of the rain that falls here store it in the underground and the groundwater and then use that water for drinking water and for irrigation And we need to conserve more and you know so. There's were were investing a lot in that. Now there are. There are some folks who imagined that and would like to see that we would become self sufficient that we would no longer need water from the Owens valley or the Colorado River or northern California. I don't think that that's likely I think folks would like to see that happen. Because it could kind of absolve us of that original sin But I as I said I think that That we have a historical responsibility to those places and that's important and that's going to continue those places also give us the kind of portfolio of different sources of water on that are not always You know a threatened equally by the same forces we may have you know. We may have a less of a water supply from one in one year than the other and so we have. We have options including this options of conserving water and storing more groundwater and so we're beginning to over the last twenty thirty years have really built a kind of portfolio system that spreads are risks. And that means that we can survive the kinds of droughts that we've over the last ten years where most of those years we've actually been in a drought and we've done pretty well and managing through it. WE'VE You know life is not stop. The city is not stopped. You know we've seen more people shifting to kind of desert you know drought tolerant landscaping in their yards During the height of the drought we saw city the city of Los Angeles and cities across the state reduced their consumption by twenty percent. And we've also seen that over time as California's experiences these droughts that are normal part of our Mediterranean climate that each time that we conserve more during a drought a lot of that conservation sticks so even as California. I'm sorry even as Los Angeles has grown over the last twenty years. Our water consumption has actually decreased. And that's a good sign for being able to manage into the future and times that are going to be a increasingly precarious for our water supplies. You mentioned that There many opportunities in the future In terms of technology or policy engineering. That might absolve Los Angeles of their original sin. But I'm I'm interested in returning to the balance of the ends and the means and the balance between growth and conservation. How can we look to the history of Los Angeles and its water decisions as a guide for future conversations over these issues of growth conservation ends means and the Morality? That guides us that. That's a big Tough question and and I think it's one that we're going to have to continue to grapple with and ask ourselves you know as we move into the future you know as Norris Hundley junior the great historian of water in California. Uh Sad were making two steps forward one step back off and as we make these incremental changes even as we see the importance of really significant changes in our values. And I I think that Los An- The history of Los Angeles and its relationship to the Owens Valley and the La. Aqueduct can be read as a tale of coming to terms with those rec- moral responsibilities vow and and changes in values and increasingly Respecting the importance of ecosystems and communities where our water comes from of the history and heritage and rights of native American communities that live there still And we've not gone nearly far enough in Los Angeles yet and recognizing and coming to terms with Those responsibilities and and so you know I think it is going to be continue to be important for many many years for us to to continue to ask that question Those questions about where our water comes from. What is our responsibility to those places and communities and it's not just the Owens valley it's also the Colorado River watershed and The the the river systems northern California John Christianson. Thank you very much for joining me today. You're welcome had spent a great pleasure. That was my conversation with John. Christianson and environmental historian at the University of California Los Angeles next on American. History tellers in two weeks. We'll be starting a new series about the tumultuous years of the early republic and the seventeen eighty s the dust had barely settled on the revolution and a series of rebellion centered on class and racial conflicts threatened to endanger the American experiment but first next week and update on our series about the also race massacre. Archaeologists Tulsa have uncovered evidence of a possible mass grave where victims of the massacre might be buried and now the city of Tulsa will excavate. The site will catch up on these and other efforts until so from wondering. This is American. History tellers. I hope you enjoyed this episode. If you did I've to other podcasts you might be interested. American scandal American elections wicked game search for them and subscribe on Apple. Podcasts spotify Google podcast. Or wherever you're listening right now if you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe the cover art of this podcast. You'll find the episode notes including some details. You may have missed. You'll also find some offers from our sponsors by supporting them. You help us offer this show to you for free. We'd also like to learn a little bit about you. These complete a short survey at wondering dot com slash survey. That's one dot com slash survey. We'd love to learn what you're listening to what you like. And what topics might tackle Max. You can also find us and me on twitter and facebook. Follow the show at AH tellers. And I'm at Lindsey Graham and thank you for more information on the Saint Francis Damn Mulholland aqueduct. We recommend flood path by Jon. Wilkin American history. Tellers hosted edited and produced by me. Lindsey Graham for airship sound design by. Derek Barron's this episode produced by Austin Cross. The water war series was written by George docker edited by Dorothy Marina. Our executive producers are Jenny Lower Beckmann and Marshal Louis created by Hernando. Pez for wondering.

Los Angeles Owens Valley California Los Angeles Department of Wate Colorado River American West the Times Los Angeles Department of Wate Aqueduct Sierra Nevada University of California Los A Los Angeles aqueduct project ARIZONA San Francisco Yosemite Valley That valley Willie Mulholland William Mulholland Los Angeles River Los Angeles Crab Valley Owens Valley
What we are thankful for at this time

Artwork from C.P.

46:10 min | 4 months ago

What we are thankful for at this time

"Welcome to the artwork of CP everyone today down. The Illinois are going to be talking about what we are thankful for. Yeah, the pandemic she kept me in my house. For six months as today. And it's been interesting generally. I ever told you guys I realized in the middle of Google international airport that I was coming home to no job. So I quickly scrambled and decided to become a full-time content creator slash. I more focusing on Mondo one of them today slash doing multi-level marketing on the side, which will get into. Astra by math class like switch give you guys update on that. It's going to well to find out why it's going well. So yeah, but all know my my house is one of this is the same blinks purple is that my house is stable and my a friend of mine actually off the beaches are now fighting fighting with mental call system do too. Well, I guess it is due to CP it's a lot of kids are doing a pandemic which Danielle and I will get into IP and Healthcare next week, but I am now fighting the medical system due to their lack of town and I let's just put it this way. I basically got well not I didn't get in a fight with my doctor. I was nice about it. But basically I said doing a pen demek. I expect you guys to at least respond to find homes. And that's why I because they point blank asked me they said well, why you why you leaving I said because you did not respond by calls. I said you gave me a z-pack, you know, I have a lack of movement. God gave me a z-pack and sent me on my Merry way. And then when my step mom tries to call she had to hang up the phone because it took them so they minutes respond to us and thinking well if push comes to shrubs and I get in the sticky situation with my health. I don't need to be relying on medical system long to get back to me. I need to make actions quick and I need to make now. The reason why I bring this up is because for the past five months. I have a been extremely lucky and it's extremely blessed that I haven't gotten. Severely sick severely Said Knock on Wood and I haven't really gotten off severely said I'm glad I have a band instead of calling him for five months. but me getting severely sick is not good. Not good. We getting anything is not good due to my boss. We can lungs due to cerebral palsy and Danielle not giving Danielle getting anything is not good do too. Well. We can log in due to cerebral palsy. So yes we both week once. Now it's getting to the point where and I've always been like this even before the pandemic to. I've always eaten ever sent you put in the funds me because people notice too and I told a dear friend of mine. There's a month to just does a laughing at me because I one of the lessons I want for my mom way back. When when I was young too. She goes, you know, I am I am not going on a chef you eat what you put in front of what I put in front of you and Thursday. It's so funny because I had another well, she's more of a point of now than I thought but I had attempt Aid come in here for two weeks two weeks to get a dog weeks said to be and when I When I think I'll never forget it. I I think there's only because right now while he wasn't there and and so how it works is by step. Mom has a full-time job and she often leads come in from 8 to 6. But on this particular day, this Aid was here. Because I know mine went on vacation and we all knew this was government and the health aide. The 8th actually just swing back to my abuse situation which again and thankful for Life. Set up the way it said. The 8th actually saw what was going on. Before we did because and I just applied to do say and I think this applies the temp a didn't say there's a month. But anyway, the aide said something to me that I will never forget em, and so was it was at my that's given table in my living room will have been watch that will be my table into them. I can't feed myself any more and I go won't out of the goodness of my mouse. I save you the two seconds flat and this aide. Goes to me I have never been thanked from Hill in my life. And now this a house had help this debate had challenges which I want to get. I will not get into I will not get into bed. Why why she had relatives and and see yeah she had challenges and she But I want beam is that. most people Glen you say thank you for a meal or thank you for anything. Most people say you're welcome and move on. They don't say I never been Thanks for me on my life. And thanks for making me land my life. And so when my point beam Is when you go to the grocery store and you I have a I have a friend who now dead now used to be now how I know this is to just used to be a oxygen off consultant and I use it as an option and consultant and I was well when I was little and so now he does you work for permanent form in Colorado. And so the next time you guys go to the grocery store I want you to say the first line worked with the front line workers at the grocery store month. You don't have to say thank you. I'll do the best, but you can always say, thank you. for assessing because Basically, but now I think before any human that wants to help me any human that once this is me I'm thankful for it could be the it could be my sugar. It could be my pilot. Julius it could be by 8 and the humans that want home with me. I'm thankful for and basically being trapped in my home for 5 months. That's a little scary song. Has really opened my eyes to what I do have as to go back to what I don't have money and I really really really want to get back in about get you guys. I have sort of a Google me and I admitted this like a little do I have solid watching YouTube videos of airplanes off and now I am in the Facebook group dial I belong to paint and so we've got a problem because this is a longest stint. I have spent at home. And all my life because my mother and I not so much my dad my dad made me promises and then wow keep let's just put it that way and but my mom and I did a heck of a lot of traveling. and I apologized for the topic that that but My mom and I did a heck of a lot of traveling and I don't know how she did with and she taught me how to travel. She actually taught me how to travel and now I woke up in Mill right last night. because I I realized I posted on June 23rd. A picture that was going to change my life forever. And the reason why I posted that and was why it popped up on my name again is because it was five weeks. It's been five weeks. Well Wonder than that long as I said, I posted a picture of my beautiful on Facebook to make it loud and clear that this month was my abuser so I could show you go check out my Facebook. Sorry, you'll see the woman that abuse me home also see my step sister my aunt and my sepsis my my mom my aunt home. actually most about sitting beside the woman that abuse lie, and if you look at this woman faced you can tell she is. You can just see it in the facial features. And I that's one of the reasons why I gave mine in July because I gave wind which I'm so thankful that I gave a quiet in July because I asked that because that individual I won't never again. Drake and will never again drink because alcohol will get you can get nasty on there call and on faith thankful that my abuse even though it was filled and I'll never forget it. My abuse situation was set up the way it was because if my let's just put it this way home. Y. Hi, they really keep cheerleaders would spread out. Would spread out on every fourth this house including ten feet away from me. I would have had my arms broken. I would have literally had my arms broken because if you look at this, look at this woman who will be a snake she and she used to used to be. the Fairly skinny alcohol made FF alcohol made her fat and alcohol definitely changed her faithful features because she's only ten years younger than my mommy. So and my mommy then she turned fifteen fifty eight and then she got so this person Is now in her fifties she was in her forties when my mommy died and mom and her son was only ten when my mommy died and now he's in his twenties, but and I'm in my son he's dead. But this person Man of facial features has changed since beginning of vinyl and I am very very thankful that it wasn't as bad even though it was emotional appeals thankful. God to those private leaders who including my mom my step sister and my a distraction. Who got the clutch? Speak on my behalf. And I fairly fairly very thankful. that we have now gotten to the point where I don't have to speak to buy abuser life. As I get a phone call and he'll be out all tweet. Like she created the call from the cops would be like next what all the I won't be sad. I won't be I won't be client on the phone. Like I did when my grandmother died. I won't be upset. I will be like what next good job and I have a funny family than August and phone call in the next couple of weeks. because I have a funny family that I got a phone call. In the next couple of weeks that will change my life. And I don't know whether it's going to be about my abuser or I don't know whether it's going to be. About something else but as long as I have my wits about me. I value very thankful that I can fill eat. I value very thankful that I still have a roof over my head and I am very thankful that I do work as a professional speaker and very thankful for the cash that I do have and yeah dead. So my point being is the next time you go to the grocery store. Thank the essential workers who's dealing with food in the food aisle, because we don't know. We don't know. If we go to bed at night, and we don't know what's going through us and in middle of right, we don't work going. See the next morning and I am feeling very thankful. to Danielle for sticking with me She could have given up on me easily. She could have given up on me sleep and I am very very thankful. I am to my cousin's family who also unlike my biological family. They haven't given up on me all the time. They haven't given up on me. Although we've had our struggles trust me, but they haven't given up on me and Noah have my aunt one eight have to give up on me because she did what she did and but my aides will become and have become friends and will state my friends until the day I can't do it anymore. And because I found I value value thankful that I'm getting my journalism degree and I only have 49 Credit Go Skippy, you could be hippy Skippy because the other girls laughing because I am what that good Elizabeth to be overdone, whatever. I want that over and done with and you guys know it and it's like God Billy Billy and as a five-week class really but it's all going to be wizard in the end. And as I said, I may I may take a couple months off. Just to let my brain relax and get my head out of a textbook or I may just call my school. Now I transfer into my Master's Degree light off the bat. I mean because as I said a high-power has called me he called me into doing was mm. And then now he's saying go into special ed because you can practically teach those buttons now as much as I know about Special Ed, I would be honored and happy to help the kids have special ed Mulholland. And so Danielle, do you want to say anything else? Do you want to say you please? At this time, I'm thankful for my health the friends and family I have where I live work and how I am a part of the challenge just been play project. Which by the way you guys the and we're sorry about that the challenge cast and play project has a month and a little delayed a little delayed due to cold didn't do to everything else and so long. Yeah, and for those of you that are dealing with lost due to covet For those of you that don't deal with with lost due to cold or any lost just remember. the good times you had with that person and o b i August is always. A discount was for me. August is always a difficult months for me and God. But I don't be strong and just like my mama taught me and it's it's going to be in safe mode. It's going to be interesting. I never thought I would leave ten years of my mom being gone home let alone. Let alone husband my dad. Being will he is now so ten years ten years you guys they passed away. He doesn't suck and I I knew that I I knew that within the 10 months and that I was going to be a different place, but I I thought at this point I would have two parents. With they'll disabilities. but I didn't realize that I was going to be off and and I didn't realize that I Would have the the biological family backing me up and yes if the biological family his office. I am not expecting you guys too, especially my abuser to turn around and walk and come back and buy life. You guys abandoned me into something then you guys abandoned me as soon as I got in the cap off on Friday, August 13th you guys available on Friday, August 13th, 2018. As soon as I stepped back into this house, you guys are banned me. So yeah, and again as soon as I stepped back into the house on May 8th, he's 2019 my family tend to rely on myself or my step sister or my mom or my eight month. So oh and and they haven't checked on any of my AIDS or any of my chosen family to ask how we can help with our own. Oh they came out here. walks the Set It Off Had my aide. But by eight come in at the end yelled at all my business who was on a Full Tilt as in my Neil yelled at all of all of us. All four of us and then in earshot as my aide. Go my abusers witness goes to my step-mom you pay wins age too much and wage. It's like okay, you guys have not come out here to help me in any sense of the word of God and then you say that and when you when your mother has a full-time God in when the buzzer has a full-time job. most people get AIDS to help the child or they do what they can to. Are they do what they can to make things work? And that's what I asked my Dad decided to do way back when And believe it or not. I have had nope since I was well as I know all my life, but help out who came in and helped me I had help. Bye Mom God help for us when I was fourteen even know even though she was my primary caregiver jobs and but I've had help because the reason why and I'll never forget this. I asked her what I said. Why why do we need help to goes? Well, if you want me to concentrate on to you I need help with that was the simple fact and I am very lucky and blessed. To be teaching my help day in and day out about available palsy and I am very blessed month. Although some days. I have not called on the day, but I am a very blessed month do have. Halsey and continue the work that I'm doing And that's how I'll leave it at that and then they'll do you want to say anything else, I knew that I do that. I was just keeping I do that. I was just giving you the moment, right? Yep. And Danielle and I are thankful to you guys that you guys actually follow us and let's get that. Let's not forget that the Earth level rating. She's like black build ahead, which is that off. go to look at some of the video that we have people who actually care that they follow us and actually want to make sure that we still say they said yes, we are even though and somebody looked down Aspen, Colorado and am so happy August everyone and I want you guys to let them you know, and I know Danielle and I know when you especially the teachers and the ad men's Of Schools go back to school. Thank you very much. And I said go back. I don't mean go good. Good. I am I mean go back because those of you who are going back. I applaud you for going back. I spoke to change admin this morning. She's she's she's about going back, but she said it's going to be interesting. I have spoken to teachers in Florida teachers in the Florida teachers in thousands, of course teachers and go model. And so as I said publicly I just figure them out the education space doesn't mean I knew leaving my teachers or my admins, especially my special ed students alone in this fight because as someone pointed out to me yesterday Douglas cook who is a teacher in, Texas? He said it's like going into a war zone without gun. So if you and as I said above those of you that listen to us when and we may do a bonus episode this episode on ask into and so But those of you that listen to Thoughts with CP the education episode. If you need to call me on your way into school. Or if you need to put on a podcast or inspirational music to pump yourself up as your yes as you probably Mouse not which I believe most often both state mental maths was now I know I know Florida and Colorado do and I know that in the example list does the end the dust and so I as you plug back in the school, you're going to need all the resources you can get and I will be right there with you guys. I may not be loudmouth educator that I once was but I will be right there with you guys and I will cause I just supplied every single teacher out there because you guys are going into the war zone and I am going through episode on They'll let Isaac done. I episode on my experience in education. I may be asked to know his schedule you guys next week. We're doing what can help in education and then the on that following week. We're doing health care and CT because I I said this goes for anyone with grades just into this relationship and to ask several palsy. So next week, we're doing what you can do. Do help yourself in education and even outside when you get home at night because the policy fist they still had to do less than late and they still have the party drifts. So and they asked to deal with comments. I I can't I can't imagine so I'm going to do that next week with my partner. Well my podcasting but I almost told you my pain and crying although we have done many crimes together over the years but nothing doesn't divide them about it. And so I'm going to do that with my podcasting on and then I'm going to we'll talk about health care and she and how we keep ourselves healthy, and then I guess we'll We'll come up with something that is. Unique this year because we're glad 10,000 downloads you guys the was God knows how I did that. I don't know how long how we did that? I don't know and what forty thousand downloads and were the amazing the voices of teacher wage teachers is at 100,000 loads. I that's one of my smaller shows that I did George O'Malley is a side project but the two main ones on the c p and then asked when course home. So I want by the beginning of 2021. I want to see more is that wrong with them? Asked when because I graduate in April of 2021. And by the time I hit the pavement in the same field, I want to know that my work will be looked at and if I have to and people my podcast on my with my life, and so I want to know that my work for the disabled is still standing and so off the end of 2020. I would like twenty thousand downloads and I would like 20,000 episodes by the black one one actually. It's not 20,000. It's going to be two thousand episodes what 1000 episodes dog? Asked when now so I would like to achieve the 2004 so drunk and I would like to achieve a heck of a lot download then I have now and so just keep sharing and just keep doing what you're doing and supportive of people with disabilities. And so we'll see you guys next week for the educational except Gaza and God. Yeah, here we go battlefield of Education you guys by you guys

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