18 Burst results for "Ms Magazine"

"ms magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Now we get the kids in school at an early age, We can exaggerate. The kids had to think we should break up the family kids that look at the state as the family as the school is the officials as their family that is the parents teaching them. And so those are the two primary reasons for going to that point was a noble thing. You know when I saw their intentions behind it, where they were coming from when they created it, the thought of it I saw I saw the evil behind. That was a noble venture. Sharon did you know that Gloria Steinem and one of her home books now, admits CIA funded Ms magazine. No, I had no idea about that. I never heard that we're gonna shake a friend in this magazine environment. Ms Magazine with state and go of taxing women breaking up. No kidding. I never heard that. Well, they tell me. I mean, I mean, I know it, but not because I know that he was involved in it. She glorious I was proud of. It wouldn't help me help women. No kids, So they funded. Yeah, Of course. It's divided Congress right there you have. Ah, brief snippet of it. I never thought I would like that either. When the women's lib thing came about, I was there. I remember Germaine Greer, Abs on all of it. I remember all of it from so deep into it. Everybody's girlfriend was deep in, but the bottom line is what he just laid out. It's perfect sun on I was stammering to the beginning of the new World Order right there. Rockefeller result. Socialist international. That doesn't mean that you should take back anything that wouldn't have rightfully so, but that's all laid out in the Constitution. The new World Order to lay it out for you. You're on the edge. As a homeowner. Sometimes you're so busy. You don't notice the little things that need attending.

Ms magazine Gloria Steinem Germaine Greer Sharon Rockefeller CIA Congress
#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

Latino Rebels Radio

09:04 min | 1 year ago

#DignidadLiteraria Was Never About Just One Book

"Roberto Lovato welcome back to Latino rebels radio we Brian. How are you a Actually I think this is my first. I did it program once I remember. Yeah I had you on before yes I did. I've had you on before. Okay you're right you're right. I'm just so tired. What puts the pause button on the bus? who leads to an Latino rebels campaign? You know. We're good we're good. We are so good. I'm so happy to have you back. Listen for those people. That don't know what they need. That lead that idea is can. Can you just begin to break it down for people that may be have not been following. What's gone on in the literary world mostly New York World of the last last couple of weeks so tell us about? What is it about that idea that is that you guys are doing well? I'm a I'm a student of social movements. Yes and I try to be a practitioner every so often and so I think I can. We can legitimately say that we have a social movement because we have a victory in the victory came about after McMillan flat iron. Her books decided to publish along with people. In Hollywood and Oprah Winfrey to push the book called American dirt as what Sanders he's narrows caused not just the great great American novel. But the great novel of lasts America's right to that effect so would all that promotion that you gave the book that resembled a marvel comics launch. You know the way they do. These multi-platform launches with multimillion dollar budgets. On made it a big deal and so when Miriam Gerbo my colleague and Dini that Talia terrarium defacto kind of leader of US spiritual leader in this. This is an and other leader of us in his She wrote a scathing essay that was rejected by MS magazine and so she decided in her own unique way with their own unique unique voice to call out the novel for what it was which was a cartoon of of of a Latino experience trying to be so to us as a great work of Literature on power with gotta see a Marcus and Gabriela Mistral. Row after Lanyo I mean I just. I still have a hard time trying to put put the name. Janine comments next to that. Yeah so that really moves that when I saw Mary. I'm just say I I was moved in a lot of us. Were moved to action and it moved. W Bose as well who is on top of this and together. We came to form the united idea which talk about is about Nothing less than the insertion of the Latino voice in the national conversation of the United States right now. We're focused on you know in the inclusion of our voices in US literature as expressed in the number of books the number of writers the number of editors the number the people in the media ecology the number of right. You know critics all of which if you look at the numbers are are pathetically low abysmally hello and so So yeah we're about as our name says about our dignity and we have measures of dignity for corporations like Macmillan or flatiron books as well as for critics as well as our own people. What constitutes dignity and so for example? I've been using the the frame very consciously of the decline in Florida the Folkloric Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. ooh What does that mean it means is basically that the as constructed in US literature you get a book contract two degrees you dance. Mambo Salsa a Ranchera 's dress recipe over and and you start you know dancing wight gays right on event. Here in New York is called Tom is about Latinos in the white gays. And the way the whitegate shapes us through the publishing industry so some that have chosen to kind kinda throw on their colorful clothing and act in ways that are safely an expectedly Latino done. That's what I mean by the decline and fall of the Folkloric Co Industrial Complex of Latino Literature. So the question for us. You're in New York this week. You guys had a press conference anyone that wants to follow the American dirt issue We talked to medium good about two weeks ago. My colleague Maria Hinojosa Doodo media did a did a one hour. MPR Latino USA that everyone needs to listen to I actually wrote about the white gays for NBC News So you mentioned the white Gazeau what what happened. You said this is a victory. So what exactly happened this week for you to say that this was a victory. Well let me describe describe the campaign because one of my roles was very much involved in the design and implementation of the strategy that got us to you meet with one of the titans of US Global Publishing McMillan and it's an imprint flatiron. The publisher let me show American dirt so to get there. You have the explosion of energy around American people criticize the content and the writer and all. Aw Ridiculous and actually really racist marketing of it. When you have for example the now infamous? Barb wire centerpieces at a lobster ops to dinner to celebrate American Dirt Bran Janine comments from an organizing perspective. Did her part to be the gift that they kept on giving from an organizing perspective but that that that energy kind was focused on the book and on her and some of US realize well in we need to kind of pivot this and so our first pivot was to start questioning one of the Thai another Titan in US Latino US publishing and Literature Oprah Winfrey Honor Book Club which has spread definitive role in pumping this book up to be something of Steinbeck Ian of an epic. I mean. It's almost like they've been trying to make it to be homer's Iliad of our time for for Latinos when it was written by this woman who has friends who paint their fingernails with with barbed wire and stuff. So you know we always sort of realize we don't need to focus on her any more her book and she herself has done the damage and they're going to go do their thing but what came out of this explosion was the realization of the crisis in. US is publishing especially as it Threat as it relates to Latinos in the United States who have fewer than one hundred and fifty books about what is published by US per year when you have thousands of books published every year so so then we started many of his questioning Oprah Winfrey in her in her promotion of this. She didn't seem to listen to the beginning. And then little by little. We started catching her attention. was that of other. People like Salma Hayek who admitted publicly that a picture that she took and south that she put online with her promoting. The book was actually Fake News. Because she didn't even read the book right. That's right so you have this explosion of energy now. Starting to focus going on oprah going to oprah only to bring more attention and momentum to it because we had by this time we had already sent a letter to McMillan and flatiron books saying that. We wanted to meet with him to discuss how we were going to try to remedy this matter and take the conversation in a more productive a place for all of us right so they responded immediately they wanted to be with us and we agreed into an are meeting was last Monday. And after some back and forth An- Anna realization. That we weren't going anywhere and that we have a mass ask very incredible amount of power in our community. That's there for us to to to work with. They agreed along along with us to a plan that includes a very measurable into you know indicators of the numbers of employees is not just a flat iron but throughout the the Macmillan ecosystem marketers editors and other people involved in the decision fusion making process. That brings you literature in the United States. So this is this is a major victory in that

United States Oprah Winfrey New York Folkloric Co Industrial Comple Mcmillan Roberto Lovato MPR Maria Hinojosa Brian Janine Ms Magazine Macmillan Salma Hayek America Folkloric Industrial Complex Miriam Gerbo Mary Ranchera Hollywood
"ms magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to Latino USA I'm Medina hosa I was on thanksgiving break and went to whether Hannah to go visit my family and while I was there I read American dirt this is medium goodbye she's a check on a writer who was asked by ms magazine to review the book American dirt bike ginning Cummins and found it to be an incredibly insulting endeavor to have to read asus novel well I was visiting my family and my he call the novel tells the story of Lee Dechy Connell she's a middle class bookstore owner in Acapulco Mexico EDS entire family is gunned down during a king St yet I'm after her husband a journalist publishes an article about the head of a local cartel a man that Edea was flirting with so needy and her son Luca escaped the massacre and in fear of the cartel they find themselves taking a dangerous trek north to the United States I wrote my review sent it to me as and then I received an email it says something to the effect that several editors spoke to one another and decided that though my review was and I recall specifically where the word spectacular that it was far too negative and after that it was stated that if I could think of something redeeming to say I would be paid and the review would be published and I responded that I don't have anything nice to say about that book so I'm not changing a word that I wrote today we're gonna dedicate our entire show to the outcry over American church the book that set the internet on fire we're going to go back to the end of twenty nineteen that's when news rooms across the country like ours received copies of American the cover is white with a pattern of.

Hannah writer ms magazine Lee Dechy Connell Edea Luca United States asus Acapulco Mexico EDS
"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I was on thanksgiving break and went to whether Hana to go visit my family and while I was there I read American dirt this is medium goodbye she's a check on a writer who was asked by ms magazine to review the book American dirt bike ginning Cummins and found it to be an incredibly insulting and ever to have to read a racist novel well I was visiting my family and my he call the novel tells the story of Louis the XV Connell she's a middle class bookstore owner in Acapulco Mexico EDS entire family is gunned down during a king St yet I'm after her husband a journalist publishes an article about the head of a local cartel a man that Edea was flirting with so needy and her son Luca escaped the massacre and in fear of the cartel they find themselves taking a dangerous trek north to the United States I wrote my review sent it to men as and then I received an email it says something to the effect that several editors spoke to one another and decided that though my review was and I recall specifically where the where it's spectacular that it was far too negative and after that it was stated that if I could think of something redeeming to say I would be paid and the review would be published and I responded that I don't have anything nice to say about that book so I'm not changing a word that I wrote today we're gonna dedicate our entire show to the outcry over American church the book that set the internet on fire we're gonna go back to the end of twenty nineteen that's when news rooms across the country like ours received copies of American the cover is white with a pattern of bluebirds which is reminiscent of traditional Mexican elevator trials but the birds are surrounded by barbed wire and in the middle of the cover there's a blur by writer don Winslow.

Hana writer ms magazine Louis Connell Edea Luca United States don Winslow Acapulco Mexico EDS
"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I was growing up by the time we started ms magazine and we were all grown up she had lost all of her magical powers the end of the nineteen fifties were a hard time for all women in the coding for wonder on she had become kind of like a car hop so we put her on the cover of ms magazine in her original self and we ran her golden age strips inside and asked our readers to lobby to bring Wonder Woman back with all her powers intact and so many people road and carried on and lobbied and so on that the comic book company that owned Wonder Woman finally make her her own self again as you began to see her and I remember getting a call from one of the chief executive looking after Wonder Woman and he said okay okay they she's got all her magical powers back she can fly she of the magic lasso that makes people tell the truth she has a African American Amazon sister named Nubia now will you leave me alone the women it was your influence that ultimately brought around the nineteen seventies Lynda Carter Wonder Woman TV show well not exactly a TV show but she did indeed at least have her powers back I'm just gonna leave that it's your fault in my twelve year old self thanks you your your twelve year old self is very smart yeah no that's not what it was one of the things we found out in your book your new book is a book of quotes yours and others but perhaps one of the most amazing things I found out in your book is you did not say the thing that you are most famous for saying you may not have a woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle yeah I heard that and I repeated it and then it was wrongly attributed to me and finally I discovered that it was a woman in Australia who had said it yeah it when she was a student she had written on the wall of the ladies room and it's got on T. shirts and went around the world wait a minute when it started it by being written on the wall in the year the university of Sydney yeah that's how that's how we did viral in the seventies get I I need that married later in life did anybody throw that back in your face I guess you needed a bicycle there's something like that no by that time that marriage laws were equal secondly we were in love David Dale and I and we wanted to be together and so we were on our way anyway to Oklahoma to the Cherokee National reunion and Wilma Mankiller whose chief of the Cherokee Nation a dear friend and she offered us a Cherokee ceremony so who could resist that I couldn't although I'm just going to say if my wife it said to me I've got a great idea for our marriage is going to be overseen by a woman named.

"ms magazine" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

09:28 min | 2 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"On your side. I'm Doug Stephan on the DJ V program. Jay's for Jennifer as in horn v is for Victoria as Kenyon and see even though not displayed is with miss, Shannon. Ms right in restaurants to use miss anymore is not Mr. MRs, MS right. Is it appropriate ever to use mis- mis-? Right. When did care that works. Yeah. I would general in general. The it started in the seventies with MS magazine and glorious army that I'm forty years buying the times. Jennifer say here fifty years behind the times. Really? So Jennifer is here we've all put on our oxygen masks and now you can help everybody. Jennifer. You know, they say shower. Me. And now, he's thank you, really. All right. Let's talk about the boy scouts. This is a crazy story more than twelve thousand boy scouts have been sexually abused by seventy eight hundred leaders volunteers. This is according to an expert working with the boy scouts, and this is what is reflected in court documents, according to several news organizations boy scouts of America said in a statement quote. We sincerely apologize to anyone who is harmed during their time in scouting. And quote lawyers ads on the internet are seeking clients now to file sexual abuse lawsuits against the boy scouts the states have been moving to adjust Justice statute of limitation lists of the victims of long ago, sexual abuse consumer damages these sexual abuse settlements have already strained the boy scouts finances to the point where the organization is now looking into chapter eleven bankruptcy. A boy scout bankruptcy would be bigger and scale than any other sects of us bankruptcy. According to an attorney who's representing more than three hundred victims in New York state. These claims are they're trying to get them to obviously, go beyond the statute of limitations. So that they can be dealt with. But the fact that this is part of the such a prevalent part of what seems to be such a good organization the boy scouts people that make it through to eagle scouts. I think all of us know, what that takes has respect for it. But the fact that this is another place where older men in power can pray on younger men. It's it just pretty. On disgusting. Yeah. Voodoo you trust anymore. That's the question. We were talking about this a little bit earlier going into a hotel room or something with your boss. Have somebody, you know. But you don't know him that. Well, why would you do that? But why is it that it brings up pressed issues? Why shouldn't you be able to trust somebody and his or her intentions, but yet with is it the news media that really blows these things up or is it really that bad when you can't be a student with a teacher, or you can't be a nurse with the doctor where you can't be a secretary with the boss. So you can't be whatever it is. You can't be a boy scout with a leader. You can't be. It's just it's absurd. But yet it is a part of life is it that bad. We think it's really that bad or do you think the news media exaggerates some of these claims look at these numbers of the boy scout says it'll? Pretty significant number there. More people that get out of the boy scouts probably have nice things to say about it. Then the people that don't but at the same time. I think it's a good reminder because we didn't really talk about sex or gender when we talked about the Catholic church abuse scandal. Although most of the people who were victimized were boys not in every case. But in some case, it seems though that when we talk about sexual harassment or sexual abuse. We typically focus on women, and I think it's really important that we don't forget that. There are a little boys and men that get caught up in all of this. And it's a good reminder when we hear a horrible story like this to make sure that we're checking in with our male children as well as our female children because I think it's our inclination probably as parents to go we need to protect our daughters. But also think about our sons and all this because a lot of sick people who wanna use their power to get what they want or what they desire, and I say this. I don't know the rights been depend on this. As I'm thinking about it. I'm kinda editing my thoughts, but I I think it's worth a minute or two of our time. When we think about the what sort of thinking about what I just said in a manner of speaking the the business about who can you be with an who can you trust a new family trust? And we go into this whole business. The news media so focused on the most obsessed with this business with Trump in his tweeting. And what does that really mean about him and kind of crazy yadda yadda? So there's this from the top on down. This question about people in the mental health. Tom a Britney Spears, and what was going on with her? And it brings me back around to something. I think we've talked about this week last week last month last year. The whole mental health stability of our society. Or maybe even the world has the world gone. Crazy are there so many people that are so maladjusted missing jested, whatever that that normal doesn't even seem normal any. Well, how do you find normalcy? Where do you find normally think about the people in your life that you think are normal who do you think are most of the people in your life, Victoria, CARA generated, the most people normal, and what your definition of normal? Well, right. Yeah. Any such thing. I think everybody's got something and it. Yeah. I used to think is a kid. And this is what was really sad is as a kid. I'd look at my family, and my family looked a lot different than everybody else's family that I grew up with because of a divorce and separation and lots of stuff going on. And I always thought cash it'll be so nice to be normal. But whatever. I think you realize normal normals a moving target most of the. Yep. Normal is something that's really it's like who's your next door. Neighbor. Do you even know is it normal funen? Oh when I was a kid growing up. I we didn't it wasn't weren't a lot of people around because I was out in the country. But I knew who my neighbors were my folks knew who the people in the neighborhood were we have weekly potluck suppers at the old meeting house. You know that kind of stuff that's really gone or most people don't even know who the hell their neighbors are right? Do you know most of the people in your building, Victoria? Who'd you say anybody going on right happy about that? I don't want to. I don't want to know. And I know that's New Yorker in me. I don't wanna know the my neighbor is know New Yorkers just kind of want to live and let live and we don't really want to get involved. So I think Jennifer in your neighborhood, how many of the people there you've been in that neighborhood, your grandparents owned the house for you did. So how many of those people around here? Do you know? Well, most of the people that were here, my grandparents are here now gone. But there are two people that I know in my neighborhood. Yeah. Carrot, you know, people in your building. How many people you know in your building? Considering their hundreds of them not a ton. I've run my neighbors. And so I know them when they come home. But I I don't know. I think for me apartment living is much different. I think it's much harder to recognize because I don't see them when they come home. I might hear a door closed, but I don't have a window to look outside and see who's there next to my parents house. I know both of the neighbors that live there do I know all the personal details about them. No. But I know their name, and I know their jobs and stuff like that. But I don't know. I think it's much harder in an apartment complex about. It's a really different world. We live in master, Jack. That's for sure forty million people move in America every year that average American moves eleven times in their life. That's really pretty amazing. You can't get to know anybody really very well under that circumstance. It's more here in our country. They plays house except the no bat there's still some areas in the Middle East and Africa where they're actually not. Matic. There have any homes think about we all think about in terms of normalcy. We think about having a home as being normal. Well, in many, maybe even most parts of the world. Yeah. That's the case. Most people have a home, but in some parts of Middle East parts of sub Saharan Africa. Don't have homes. They just keep moving around. It's really it's it's hard to conceptualize because it's so different living a life that way most those people you if you're able to talk to him. They tell you. They're happy. So what does it take to be happy something else? Maybe go around. This is the talk tree and its finest here. Yeah. Right. Yeah. What is what makes you happy about that at sixteen after the.

Jennifer MS magazine Middle East America Doug Stephan Mr. MRs Catholic church us Victoria Kenyon Shannon harassment Jay New York attorney
"ms magazine" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"So before the internet when it was just Zien ze and MS magazine in these things in the the brave people who came forward and started telling stories about sexual abuse sexual abuse was not something that was talked about. And they came out, and they told their stories and not that sexual says been a radical and not even close, but we talk about it. Now, we sort of a culture understand that. It's bad news flash. But that was because people told their stories, and they started talking so nine and a half or ten years ago, there weren't people telling stories about grief about how hard it is to be her sometimes and people telling stories telling stories telling stories finding each other making community that has started to make change happen. We see that in sort of some some more progressive education or some of the books that are coming out these days opening these conversations with kids about how do we talk about foundries? How do we talk about boundaries and consent for your physical body? And then how do we talk about communication skills? How do we talk about how you handle bully on the playground? Or if you're the bully like all of that stuff is starting to happen. So I don't I don't think we're far off from having education in the classroom. But how to have difficult conversations? I don't think we're there yet. Because I don't think the grownups are willing to have difficult conversations. But the the. The ease with which we tell in here stories these days the media through which we we have to share until stories to tell the truth about the things that are painful and hard in this culture and around the world. I honestly gosh. I can't even believe that cynical me is gonna say this. I feel hopeful that something like that. Will happen. I do too. I do too. I just don't know how long it will be until it's widespread enough that we don't have the climate that we have in our culture right now, that's gonna take some serious undoing and that's gonna take people being willing to be uncomfortable. And that's hard, right? So. Here's here's a good example of this. So most of my followers on social media have experienced out of order de so child death, and and baby loss and suicide natural disasters and all of these things and every once in a while post something about pet loss. And without fail. One or two people will chime in and say, how dare you write about pet lost my baby died. I early you kidding might. They will go off. Now. First of all, they haven't been in my community, very long to know that that's not how we treat each other. However, you know, I I have a practice. I'm not always very good at it. But to listen for the message beneath somebody else's words, and what I hear in. That is somebody who feels like there's not enough listening. There's not enough compassion in the world to go around. So how dare you talk about pets when nobody wants to talk about my baby. So I'll come into the comment section, and I'll say something along the lines of it's really hard isn't it to to give airtime to someone else's loss? When you feel like yours is invisible. And nobody wants to talk about it. We also find this when a celebrity has a loss in their lives and suddenly everybody, or you know, David Bowie dies, and everybody's like outpourings of grief and support in all of this and the. You know, the grieving people in your community are like you're never met the guy, and you met my sister, and you've never so much as offered your condolences. Like, there's a there's a distant compassion dissonance there. Right. And so the thing here is that we functionally compassion in. This culture is a finite resource. We don't share it very freely, right? We have this sort of competition about who gets to have airtime in their pain who's paying worse, and we do that because compassion is a scarce resources when resources are scarce. What do we do? We fight over them. How dare you talk about pet loss when you won't talk about my sister. Well, if we want a culture where compassion is a abundant vast resource than we have to sharp start being extravagant with sharing..

MS magazine David Bowie ten years
"ms magazine" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

04:56 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Lust film is yours and sisterhood. It features all kinds of people from across America today, addressing the camera to read aloud and share personal responses to letters written in the nineteen seventies to the editor of MS magazine. The country's first mainstream feminist magazine Kenyans film is going south. It's a second in the series that's entirely reliant on the editing process as it's fully constructed out of YouTube clips at first seemingly completely random and eventually shaping the trajectory of several characters to explore the meaning of truth in the internet era, both filmmakers share their processes and how they make the zillions of decisions that go into an edit on their own. So if you're considering whether or not to edit your own work for, if you just want to know how the mine of editor works, definitely give up a soda. Listen. So for context, do you always at your own work? Do always edit my own work, and for me in very attached to the idea of editing own work and it, yeah, it feels to me like so much of the thinking and decisions happen for me in the editing room. That's really where the film is made for me. But also for me, there's a huge and I come from kind of an experimental film background. So for me so much of the process of figuring out what the materials emerged to be happens through really like playing and experimenting and touching things in that room and moving things around myself. To me, it feels really central to filmmaking to actually be the one who's in the not just in editing room but doing that ending. Okay. So going to see. Of always being interesting my films even into like twenty years ago while shooting my own film ended it myself. Most of the writing happened on the table. Now that us like found footage, it's better the all I do. It thing. Off another in. An idea to start with it starts with the cut and the other one's fall after. So for me, all the creative thinking, concepts exertion, the arising beside like to explore subjects, drew it research. Everything happens in on India, getting room, and I'm so glad. Now. Like when I started it was with Steinbeck with film and cut stoops now it's like I can do barely everything with my laptop, everything with the laptop. So it's part of my life. I had to redo. Nurture like I take care of my. And it's really process something takes a year or two to finalise some. So it's so way of being with the material occupying film somehow to despite our over it of editing. That's interesting point you make to that back in the day. We were editing with St. Maksim actual film and that not only that has changed, but where you're finding your material, especially you Dominic is totally changed. Its, we'll talk about how the industry. The thing is that while I was making more traditional. I mean, like she'll Ming ended it seeing and working with them when they moved to computer. It wasn't internet yet. So. Couple years later, my first PC then the this called internet did my suit. Mating room. So it became some sort of a distraction. You know, I would have to fight looking at my emails while eating chatting with my girlfriend like this. Watch born. All kinds of distraction. So decide to use it as source material instead of a distraction. So that's how I started to serve the women. It. Clips. Wow. So you leaned into the distraction of the drug. It is wanted to add a thing about researched because you mentioned also the stadium where the research and conceptualization happens in editing and thought. I think there's a big spectrum, I think even documentary of how much people imagine they know their project before they begin. And I think the world of grant making and funding and pitching really encourages you to pretend you know what you're making before. You know what you're making it, but I also, I don't know what I making and till I'm editing it. And for me, that's so important. And when I started film, it's not because there's a statement I wanna make or thing they want to do, but it's because I have a bunch of questions that feel like there may be interconnected or could be interconnected. And for me, it's really a curiosity that motivates me to explorer and spend time with stuff and sit with stuff and let the foam emerged from whatever that stuff is..

editor YouTube MS magazine America India Steinbeck Dominic twenty years
"ms magazine" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Know, there's there's it's kind of like the New York Times asking for help for people to identify what's influencing voters when they are the ones that influence voters. It's so it's so baffling because it's so in your face that we can't get out of the weeds to view it from the big picture here. And. I I don't know how else to put it. It's completely baffling to me. So. Yeah. And that women's movement, by the way. Gloria steinem. I wanted to to end with us. But I didn't have time for into the break. Gloria Steinem was a button sold product of the CIA. And she admits it she's on tape saying. Yeah, the worked for them, and they were all behind my messages, imagine that they were. So progressive shockingly so liberal and they loved what I had to say. And I worked for them for years, and guess what they owned MS magazine for ten years, and nobody knew it. Yeah. I'd love for some more stuff on that to come out from the CIA involvement in in projecting her in the public eye. Why do you think she got so fought popular and famous go back to all of her stupid quotes about women and men, and and think about the stuff that she said that was a product of manipulation by the CIA that was a product of putting her out there? So that we would start feeling manipulated people. Don't go back into the sixties and go gee was every woman oppressed in just vocalized it at the same time in America. How did that spontaneously occur? It didn't they were manipulated into it. They were manipulated into their oppression. They they wanted to seriously. I don't think people realize to the extent we are manipulated or manipulated in this where manipulated in this whole FBI investigation because we're.

Gloria steinem CIA New York Times FBI MS magazine America ten years
"ms magazine" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on Oprah's SuperSoul Conversations

"So I have to say as a group of women because everything that we'd seen in the press and in movies with about motorcyclists as you know, treating women as possessions being dangerous in in various ways. So I was sitting in the in the little dining room of the motel where we were and the full of motorcyclists, and I was trying to be cool and also an open mind and open. Right, right, right. And one of the motorcycle wives she came over and she said, she just want to tell you, I really enjoy MS magazine. Yes, right. I couldn't believe it. And then she said, isn't that woman with you? Isn't that Alice Walker? I really like her poetry. I mean, you know, it just teaches you so much about stereotypes. Yes. Then she also said, now, look out the window and you see that purple motorcycle out there in the parking lot. So that's mine. Now she had her own motorcycle. She used to ride on the back of her husband's it had MS on the license plate. Oh, she said you should see my grandkids when grandma drives up purple motorcycle. It was. It was just wonderful. And so my conclusion is that we all have a purple motorcycle inside and what that story shows is that we all make prejudgments about people in our lives. I was telling you that when I read that story reminded me of the time of running on a road in Indiana and being approached by this pickup truck. And it the pickup truck. We had a confederate flag in the back. So naturally, I was laid no in I'm out here by myself. And why did I come by myself? And you know, what am I going to do? The guy pulls over and he slowing down to tell me that he loves watching the Oprah show with his wife. It's just one of those pickup truck moments. One of those purple motorcycle moments. The pursuit of change is taken Gloria to virtually every corner of the earth..

Alice Walker MS magazine MS Oprah Indiana Gloria
"ms magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Then it moves right into a chapter on fair pay that the ms magazine actually just did an excerpt of yesterday so people wanna read it you can find it on ms magazine right now and that shows how we're seeing the impact of gender justice racial justice economic justice being entertained on the actual paychecks of women we can see for example that women of color experience extreme wage hits while women are still in its variances wages overall of all races women of color experiencing extreme relations on top of that and moms and moms of color are also experiencing extreme wage hits you can really look at the theory of change in the theory of why we need to be united together and the practice and the impact of what happens when we're not which is different impacts on different groups of people around one core issue and then we move into really looking at wealth inequality what's going on in our economy where there's job growth and why that hitting women the hardest women are twothirds of minimum wage workers and that's the area of the highest expected job growth in our economy and someone we don't have workplace protections winning haven't addressed wealth inequality we really impact women and families the most and so there's a whole chapter on that it's very exciting i think they're all exciting us we also look at the glass ceiling that's another chapter and i love that chapter his i actually wrote it before the rise of the metoo movement which of course was started over a decade ago but really the recent rise of the metoo movement and icebound when i was doing research that the harassment that women are experiencing the daily regular harassment and sexual assault that women are experiencing is part of what's making the glass ceiling bulletproof so examined both those and then i will tell you the whole book richard i love to tell you the whole we'll pause the conversation but about how only ten percent of women in our country are even getting into a room with a glass ceiling in the first place says only ten percent of women are making seventy thousand dollars or more a year and so really the rest of the.

ms magazine harassment assault ten percent seventy thousand dollars
"ms magazine" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"So machel saw geezer god you this year you're going to be twenty it's you know this is the thing if you're alive right now you are this time the age what say hey number i know but it's it's you know you must have had that one day you know what i've lived a life of my own term name done my own thing so you know what ms magazine or what ms what cosmopolitan has to say about me i don't give a me neither but it's it's it's a moment and as a milestone get there you got their slow and easy baby you got their eat well you got the best way you know how as a survivor you gotta tell somebody man telling you know you you throw me out the house where you belong god i wonder what list tour is doing right now don't say that michelle don't say i love to love liz torah about the singing liz yes actor yes not the actor i love to this is the sheet up she was the queen house he was in nineteen ninety yeah this taurus but anyway we talked with that before in the song the guy says baby house was what did i do join me on the streets and she goes i knew merge where you belong i got on the street so i wanna talk really quickly about something that i i knew it but it wasn't really obvious until recently and i don't know where i saw him but i saw michael douglas and i was like i said michael douglas he said yeah said oh my god he looks great that face is so snatched but you knew that i knew the old one the first facelift you know this i don't know which face if you saw but he's never been shy about in fact after he had his second one he appeared at restaurants and stuff with bandages on like i told you just philbin did at the gym he didn't care he's just talking to me at bandages all up down by his ear you'll get your get your roof redone don't you pass higher up on your car don't you and i have never been one to shy away from what we i will be honest people other people will like if you're a star and you have had enhancement.

ms magazine liz michael douglas philbin michelle one day
"ms magazine" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"Two people on campus and he was going to be he had gone to prison and was gonna be getting out would have access to campus and when i get my uh with the story and i felt like i had to do something and i started doing all of this research about uh rape on college campuses and how poorly bear typically handled and about rape in general what a huge issue it is unwise and at the time ms magazine had released a study about rape on college campuses that was groundbreaking and i felt like i had to do something and as i started to write the story also people came forward out of the woodwork so i had i had employers other students who came forward telling me about their experiences and i have a real activism background and so i felt like i had to do something i felt like i couldn't just stand by and not do anything taco and being ahead of your time to the hague kill you know i figured that i would either become come on an attorney or a therapist and um i did a semester in la was going to go on the east coast and i volunteered for what was then called the los angeles commission on a salt against women as a rape and domestic violence councillor uh there now called peace over violence and i started doing the training it with sixty hours of super intensive training about base accouncing skills about trauma about rape domestic violence the cycle of violence stalkers you know all kinds of stuff that had to do with violence predominantly against women but other people as well and um as soon as they started doing it i felt like i had so my calling and i felt like i need to do this by this is this is what i'm supposed to do and so i applied to grad school and um and became a therapist guy that is such a great story because so many people you know how this moments in their life were there in spain.

rape ms magazine attorney la spain los angeles commission sixty hours
"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of the dating process not questions are now being questioned and crisis a sense of privilege being lost lost empire another cultural shift was a foot another evolution in the women's movement 24yearold rebecca walker was also at that table two years earlier she'd written an article in ms magazine called becoming the third wave which gave rise to the term and movement known as third way feminism i asked her how much the debate had changed since she was at that roundtable in some ways i don't think it's changed that much you know when you hear neil me talking about the importance of really interrogating the ways in which boys are raised to think that they are entitled to transgressed boundaries that women are surging and and i think we we were all we've all been talking about the the need to revision masculinity and to have these conversations with men for men to have them themselves you know really trying to understand what it means to be a human being with that wisconsin with empathy with a kind of sophisticated nuanced understanding of of sex and sexuality and being engaged with another human being in a way if it's not coercive that's not damaging that's not punitive that's not unhealthy um women's empowerment and women sexual pleasure are synonymous and that part of what we need to be doing is claiming are sexual agency and i think that's something that's coming up right now in needs more nuanced discussions certainly this discussion about disease and sorry situation how can we make sure that women are acting with a sense of clarity and purpose and understanding of of how to set appropriate boundaries of what sexual pleasure fuel sake and how to get it of the importance of having communication in conversation about intimacy that's what we were talking about then and that's what we're talking about now host ashley banfield said.

rebecca walker ms magazine wisconsin ashley banfield neil two years
"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Allah rongj i i wasn't being i love i love eating psycho love fasting apparently well guys extreme i enjoy forcing i false 102 days a week because of an an article i read an in a science ms magazine that's that says it keeps you shop into that today and as i get older i'm approaching 50 in january i feel like i've got to do more and more to keep my style of where to go so i do false one or two days a week and then it means that you can eat even more on christmas diets yeah so i fostered yesterday and i will be eating a lot to mind you're going to have duck on christmas day in them the turkey comes later is that right no but on on boxing day will be to nelly pablo no which i think is a chilean dish which we every single boxing day which is a turkey onions tomatoes peanut butter cumin and plain chocolate all mixed together on rice it's absolutely delicious and sound great our got it's good fbi post to appeal when you just list the hour it's good chocolate peanut butter and tacky what more could you are more at ju like turkey roberts on christmas day and boxing day and then the day after and the day after that why pool mother was a martyr to turkey on unkown christmas day so leather rubber just sort of papua rhode was memorable christmas mayor was on the night of christmas eve and christmas in timor suara justice with as the touch askes had gone and we had a huge sturgeon which is traditional abba we went church and then we went to the family several trade i've known at no you eight sturgeon i thought you lay buried got the igf 1 out of it narrative away no in the in in the balkans big fish aden christmas in custody gay is very much part of the same and it was really froehlich because the was such a feeling of.

science ms magazine fbi christmas day rhode nelly pablo papua 102 days two days
"ms magazine" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"But the big thing to me is that white privilege is not a thing i can change but you know what is maybe if i try we all do incarceration rates housing rules the terms of bail and i know the term is going to change all these all these phrases change all the time fifteen years ago white privilege was routinely called white skin privileged than the skin part dropped away one reason why sociological frames bubble up and take hold is that changing the language of a problem is a lot easier than changing a problem also it seems to me that a lot of these in vogue ways of looking at the world are born in academia where 80 audiences less eager to push back and be you know the social sciences exist in part to offer new labels for the world you don't get tenure for saying yeah that guy who's already here his ideas are good lift let's keep doing that now of all the sociological frames that i mentioned as me not being a subscriber to i think white privilege might be the best with now look at rape culture there is too much rape there are compelling statistics that rape is under reported by victims under charged by prosecutors uh we've discussed that on our show also men can be pigs and they are more powerful than women and a lot of them have the wrong message about just about everything having to do with sex but rape culture to know what that means that that i haven't looked into it it just seems to mean everything every accusation proved rape culture every denial proves rape culture every prosecution and nonprosecution both shoulders rape culture in 1985 ms magazine did a story called date rape the story of an epidemic and those who deny it it was a strong corrective it was on the cutting edge trying to end rape this this facet of rape to try to change our thinking about rape it was what you might call 1985 quite progressive.

rape ms magazine fifteen years
"ms magazine" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"But the big thing to me is that white privilege is not a thing i can change but you know what is maybe if i try we all do incarceration rates housing rules the terms of bail and i know the term is going to change all these all these phrases change all the time fifteen years ago white privilege was routinely called white skin privileged than the skin part dropped away one reason why sociological frames bubble up and take hold is that changing the language of a problem is a lot easier than changing a problem also it seems to me that a lot of these in vogue ways of looking at the world are born in academia where 80 audiences less eager to push back and be you know the social sciences exist in part to offer new labels for the world you don't get tenure for saying yeah that guy who's already here his ideas are good lift let's keep doing that now of all the sociological frames that i mentioned as me not being a subscriber to i think white privilege might be the best with now look at rape culture there is too much rape there are compelling statistics that rape is under reported by victims under charged by prosecutors uh we've discussed that on our show also men can be pigs and they are more powerful than women and a lot of them have the wrong message about just about everything having to do with sex but rape culture to know what that means that that i haven't looked into it it just seems to mean everything every accusation proved rape culture every denial proves rape culture every prosecution and nonprosecution both show there's rape culture in 1985 ms magazine did a story called date rape the story of an epidemic and those who deny it it was a strong corrective it was on the cutting edge trying to end rape this this facet of rape to try to change our thinking about rape it was what you might call 1985 quite progressive.

rape ms magazine fifteen years
"ms magazine" Discussed on Strong Opinions Loosely Held

Strong Opinions Loosely Held

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"ms magazine" Discussed on Strong Opinions Loosely Held

"Celebrity feminism it's it's tricky because again it's a really valuable way in especially for people who might not be exposed to feminism through their schools are their friendships or their parents or whatever but it's tricky because feminism it's it's not a brand and it's not a static movement it's a way of thinking away of advocating a set of ethics an most of these affects and most of the political goals are not necessarily the ones that celebrities are excited about celebrities 10 to gravitate toward the the easiest am the sort of most already accepted issues of feminism whether we're talking about you know body image or you know equal pay for equal work or reproductive rights and that's great but honestly those are always the issues that have gotten the most airtime within feminist movements because those are the ones most relevant to sort of middle class white educated women so there was already know real lack of of pr for those issues my question is you know what can celebrities do about the ways in which feminism still has so much work to do on you know a policy level in ways that just aren't sexy you know that don't look good on a tshirt that don't look good on a magazine cover uh what about those issues and what can celebrities really do for them you talk about this evolution in your book it went from a label that was shunned to one that's now embraced can you talk a little bit about the steps in that evolution like how he got from man hater to beyond say it didn't actually go from you know a rejection to an embrace there was an initial embrace during the second wave through ms magazine when ms made a really conscious effort to reach out to celebrities to get them on board with a very specific goal which was passing the equal rights amendment and so if you look at issues of ms in the early too late seventies their celebrities on the cover they're the same celebrities were on the covers mit of ms.

ms magazine