6 Burst results for "Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer"

"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:47 min | Last month

"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"She was jail. She never stopped coming. She never stopped advocating. She never stopped fighting. Fannie Lou Hamer. Born on October 6 1917 in Montgomery Cap County, Mississippi. She died on March 14 1977. And end Enola. Uh um, Amount Bay and Mississippi. Look, we got Tonto. Um Uh, ended for today. But she speaks to the best of time. And because of modern technology, we could hear Fannie Lou Hamer speak in our own voice. And so we bring you The voice of courage, a profile in courage a Fannie Lou Hamer at the Democratic Convention 1964 camera onto the credentials committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. And I live in 6 to 6 East Lafayette Street. Rule Bill, Mississippi. I'm South counted the home off Senator James O. Eastland and Senator Stennis. That was the 31st of all this in 1962. That 18 of us traveled 26 miles. The county courthouse in Indianola to try to register to become first class citizens. We would let him in the knowledge with by policemen. Highway patrolman. And they only allowed to other thin. Take the literacy test at the time. After we had Making this test and started by Trouville. We will Harold up by the The police and the state highway patrolman. And carried back in the Nolan. While the bus driver was charged that day was driving a bus the wrong color. After we pay the fine among us. We continued on to route deal. And Robin. Just Dani cared me for miles in the rule area where I had worked as a time people and sharecropper for 18 years. Was met there by my Children. Told me the plantation owner was angry because I had gone down. Try to register. After they told him My husband came And said the plantation owner was raising Cain because I had tried to register. Before he quit talking the plantation on a chain. Instead. Fana Luke, do you know that? Perhaps tell you what I said. And I said Yes, sir. He said. Well, I mean that that if you don't go down and withdraw your registration You will have to leave. Then if you go down and with gold You still might have to go because we're not ready for that in Mississippi. And I'd address him and told him that I didn't try to register for you. I tried to register for myself. Had to leave that same night. All of this is on account of we want to register. Become first class citizens. And if the Freedom Democratic Party is not seated now I question America. Is this America? The land.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Luke Senator Stennis Senator James O. Eastland Montgomery Cap County Freedom Democratic Party Amount Bay Indianola America Cain Dani Nolan Harold Trouville Robin
"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:20 min | 7 months ago

"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"CS. We continue with Johns Hopkins Historian Martha S. Jones author. Now Vanguard. How black women broke barriers, won the vote and insisted on equality for all and I pulled a 2.5 minute clip from the 1960 for Democratic Convention. Of Fannie Lou Hamer, who you write about a civil rights activist, obviously, including a voting rights activist centrally, and she also ran in the Democratic primary for Congress that year for listeners who don't know that and even in the context of today's shocking times. The story, she tells here is truly extreme by today sensibilities. This's from an era when conventions had much more suspense about how things would turn out. There was no suspense that year about Lyndon Johnson being the nominee. That was a foregone conclusion. But in this clip Fannie Lou Hamer is addressing the credentials Committee of the Democratic Convention. Looking for recognition of delegates from what they call the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which was different from the pro segregation Democrats who led Mississippi at that time. This is the 1st 2.5 minutes of her presentation. Mr Chairman. And to the credentials committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. And I live in 6 to 6 East Lafayette Street. Rule Ville, Mississippi. Sunflower County, the home ofthe Senator James and send it in It was the 31st of all this. The 1962. That 18 of us travelled 26 miles. To the county courthouse in Indianola. Inside registers to become first class. We was met in in the knowledge. That policeman Away patrolman, and they only allowed two of us. Take the little test at a time. Have we had Macon this test and started back to Trouville. We were held up by the police and the state highway patrolman and carried back in the Nola. Where the bus probable charged that they were driving above the wrong color. After we paid the fine among us. We continued on the roof veil. And Robin. Just funny. Carry me for miles in the rule area. Why had worked as a pan people and sharecropper for 18 years? I was met by my Children. Told me the plantation owner was angry because I had gone down, tried to read. After they told me my husband changed. And said the plantation owner was raising came to call if I had tried to register And before he quit talkin, the plantation all the pain. And said fan allude to, you know, perhaps tell you what I fail. And I said yes. He said. Well, I mean, that said, if you don't go down and withdraw your registration You will have to leave. And then if you go down and with growth You feel night has to go because we are not ready for that in this And I'd address him and told him that I didn't try to register for you. I tried to register for my I have to meet that same night. Fannie Lou Hamer. Not the 1964 Democratic Convention, and her statement goes on for another six minutes. And if you think what you heard there was bad, her story gets much worse, including being arrested and being savagely beaten by multiple people. You can find the whole thing online later if you want to hear the whole thing, But Martha Jones, where would you say that Democratic convention fits into the big sweep of history in your book? And of course, that Fannie Lou Hamer presentation. Penny. Lou Hamer makes plain as she speaks on behalf of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party that delegates from the state of Mississippi who have been seated at that convention. Without the ascent without the vote without the consultation of black Mississippians are not legitimate delegate. That American democracy will no longer Tolerate the notion that voting rights are realized when black Americans like Hammer and thousands upon thousands of others continue to be kept for the poles in the state like Mississippi, as we heard Intimidation, violence along with literacy test. Betty Lou Hamer Stakes, a claim on national television so unsettling that Lyndon Johnson will step to the podium. And preempt her live on television in an attempt to suppress her remarks. But of course before the evening is over. The network will in fact, be her remarks, and we have them now to help us appreciate how vexed struggled Fannie Lou Hamer. And the many other heroines of the civil rights movement how vexed their circumstances were Lyndon Johnson stepped in to interrupt the remarks that we were just listening to He did. He came on live television because, hey, Murray was calling into question the very legitimacy of that convention that was going to, of course, then nominate Lyndon Johnson as their candidate Hammer, said. Delegates who are here. That haven't been elected by all people, right by all Americans Buy all Mississippians are not true delegates and should not be seated and she looks tohave the black Mississippi Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegation seated in their place. And what happened. She doesn't succeed on DH. We know that, of course, that Hammer will spend an extraordinary amount of time in the back room. She will be implored by party activists, including years like Martin King to step down into compromise. Perhaps you can hear it in Fannie Lou Hamer voice She had not come to the Democratic convention to compromise and she will go home without her delegation having been see, but she will have gone home after making this remarkable record that we hear the D legitimation of a National party convention. And her struggle, of course for voting rights will continue back in Mississippi, where there is a tremendous amount of work to do on the ground. So an example there in 1964 of continuing to try to get the right to vote in realtor terms for black women, as well as black men that long after the 19th amendment was ratified in 1920. Yes. And so here we are almost 45 years after 1920 Black American women like Hammer are doing the work that had been Guarded by black women way back in August of 1920 what they're seeking his federal legislation that will give teeth to the 15th amendment that had been ratified in 18 70, the 19th amendment that had been ratified in 1920, but that was still That were still thwarted by state level Jim Crow laws along with violence. This is the work of the voting rights movement that begins in 1920 takes us all the way to the Voting Rights Act, signed by Lyndon Johnson in 1965. We have a few minutes left with Johns Hopkins historian Martha Jones, author now Vanguard how black women broke barriers, won the vote and insisted on equality for all And I want to spend our last few minutes, bringing it up to the present centre Comma Harris. Has achieved a lot of firsts. She was elected as the first African American and first woman to service California's attorney general, As you know, is most of our listeners now the first African American to rip Represent California in the United States Senate in the first South Asian American senator in history. And yet when she's asked about her first she often responds with a quote from her mom. You may be the first to do many things, but make sure you're not the last. What do you make of that response?.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Democratic Convention Lyndon Johnson Mississippi Mississippi Freedom Democratic Betty Lou Hamer Stakes Martha S. Jones Hammer Mississippi Mississippi Vanguard Freedom Democratic Party Johns Hopkins Indianola Sunflower County Nola Mr Chairman
"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on WSB-AM

"We've got a ways to go and the songs give us the words to get there there is music to move us on our past and sometimes sometimes you just have to see some of you may be familiar with her but Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist forty four year old sharecropper when she picked up her activism she was a mother and she was a mighty singer of the song of the a sense there's a book by Charles marsh is a professor at the university of Virginia it's called god's long summer and then it he records the words in the story of Mrs Hamer there's a night nineteen sixty three when she was arrested and jailed in the Winona jail she was beaten terribly and that night there was no music as she heard the jailers plotting her death for speaking up but the next morning something happened fourteen on that time Mrs Hamer said when you aren't in a brick cell locked up and haven't done anything to anybody but you are still locked up there well sometimes words just begin to come to you and you begin to sing and she's saying that the song that morning a song that told of the Bible of Paul and Silas when they broke out of jail to the mighty earthquake she sang a song saying sinking brings out the soul not one known us as Charles marsh sinking brought out the soul of the black struggle for freedom for Mrs Hamer didn't not seeing alone sitting in their cells down the hall Jim Johnson and now powder you Vester Simpson and Lawrence guy the joined her in song church broke out empowering them to stay on the gospel train until it reaches the kingdom in sorrow in hope and uncertainty in faith we've seen the a sense not because life is ever moving upward but the cause on this journey god in Christ Jesus walks to someone twenty one is a song of the community also just like Mrs Hamer didn't sing alone the other saying with her I wasn't the only one belting out those church songs on the long hikes there's more than one voice in psalm one twenty one there is the initial questioner who sets his eyes to the hills and wonders where does my help come from and then that question begins to answer his own query my help comes from the lord he says but then another voice appears it's after that second verse the pronoun switch so now it's not me and Maya and hi now it's you now it's your listen to it and see if you can.

Charles marsh professor Mrs Hamer Paul Jim Johnson Vester Simpson Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer university of Virginia Winona Silas
"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Retropod

"History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pot a show about the past rediscovered. She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special thanks to Deneen Brown who reported this story for The Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history visit Washington Post. Dot Com slash retro pod.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Mississippi Mike Rosen Freedom Democratic Party Mississippi Delta Jamie L whitten Freedom Party Congress Martin Luther King Stop Dr Martin Luther Author King J US Time magazine Deneen Brown
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 1 year ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump
"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"mrs fannie lou hamer" Discussed on Retropod

"History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in a Mississippi jail for name was Fannie, Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her. Why she was about to make an appeal before the credentials panel at the democratic national convention, the potential implications were profound Hamer represented the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge. The seats of the current all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of. The party's rules because they had systematically excluded black citizens. According to time magazine Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the southern Democrats whose votes he needed for re election. He wanted her silenced. But Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther King junior, and she would not go unheard. Henry was born in one thousand nine seventeen in the Mississippi. Delta the share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the winter Hamer tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton. When she was six years old. Hamer started her civil rights work in one thousand nine sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what should have been a minor surgery. She tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed a literacy test which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated. Questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation that day, she was fired from her job, but she wasn't defeated Hamer became a student nonviolent coordinating committee community organizer and helped found the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party as a candidate from the party. She ran for congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent, Jamie l Whitten at that year's democratic national convention Hamer made her. Way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement, including Martin Luther King junior spoke. But all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes. Mr chairman. And two they could dentist committee. My name is MRs Fannie, Lou Hamer, she called for mandatory delegation, integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. The thirty first of all the the night food. That eighteen of all travel put the six miles who the county courthouse in in the null to register to become first class Hamer described being arrested in beaten in a Mississippi jail after a white waitress at a rest, stop refused. Her service. That's how she got the blood clot. This is the own account of we will to register the become first class. If the freedom democratic fun if not feed enough. Question amount. After her testimony Hamer and other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson, a wildly tough politician had held a news conference. So that national television networks could he cover her testimony live? She was livid, but Johnson's efforts to silence her didn't work that night in a hot Atlantic City hotel room Hamer in the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news less than a year later, congress passed the Voting Rights Act, and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago Hamer became the first African American to be seated as a delegate she received a standing ovation. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to deneen Brown who reported the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Lou Hamer Democratic Party Mississippi Lyndon B Johnson Mike Rosen Martin Luther King congress Freedom Party Washington Post Washington deneen Brown Delta Henry Atlantic City chairman president