18 Burst results for "Mrs Astor"

"mrs astor" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:33 min | Last month

"mrs astor" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Into the dinner party and I'm Rick, the travel writer. Can you introduce me to a couple of these parks in a way that I better understand their personality and want to get to know them better. I think I'd first introduced you to Cesar Chavez because he changed everything for me that national park you know, we hear that our national parks are best idea. It was Caesar Travis National Monument That said, it's an evolving idea. That you know here we have in 1916 Stephen Matter. The head of the National Park Service who looked at his donors. Um Mrs Astor. Coming to Yosemite. Would she be comfortable campaigning? No, she would not. They build the Wani Hotel. Fast forward to 2012. We have a black president who was a community organizer. Who chose to honor another community organizer, Cesar Chavez. Okay, and evolving idea over there. There's Grand Teton, Can you introduce me to Grand Teton? I understand that's where you've had so many childhood memories. Grand Teton National Park. This is my mother Park. This is the park that after September 11th when I was in Washington, D C and felt that there was no solid ground beneath my feet. I went back to Grand Teton and put my hand on the flanks of her mountain and went up to amphitheater like and re baptized myself in safety. Whoa! I want to drink with Grand Teton. But wait a minute over. There's Big Bend National Park I've heard is really interesting after dark. I made a pact with big.

Cesar Chavez 2012 Rick National Park Service Big Bend National Park Washington, D C September 11th Yosemite 1916 Astor Grand Teton National Park Stephen Matter Grand Teton Wani Hotel first Caesar Travis National Monumen Teton Grand
"mrs astor" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:59 min | Last month

"mrs astor" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Feral spirit of the wild west like a modern day. Edward abbey on fat tires. Chris joins us a little later in the hour today on travel. With rick steves. And flannery burke explains what arizona and new mexico represent to the nation and to each other as a one of a kind region. We often call the great southwest. Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests so they came to the party then i thought all right. Who's the guests that you just don't want to have their. It's a family member. You know their complicated difficult but you have to have them. That was glacier national park for me. I just thought. I really don't wanna get into climate change that glaciers are met you know melting and and the history with the black feet nation but glacier national park sat at the table and then there were the bad boys and girls. The ones who i knew would keep the conversation interesting and honest that would-be gettysburg issues of slavery that would be alcatraz issues of incarceration that would be gulf island national seashore bp oil spill. And then there's always the surprise guest. Who changed everything. And that would be cesar chavez national monument so that was my dinner table. My dinner party. Can i come to dinner party please. i. I'm just. I just walked into the dinner party. And i'm i'm rick. The travel writer. Can you introduce me to a couple of these parks. In a way that. I'll i'll better understand their personality and want to get to know them better. I think i introduce you to cesar chavez because he changed everything for me that national park you know. We hear that our national parks are best idea. It was cesar chavez national monument that said. It's evolving idea that you know here. We have in nineteen sixteen. Stephen mather the head of the national park service. Who looks at his donors Mrs astor coming to yosemite. Would she be comfortable camping. No she would. Not they build the awani hotel fast forward to twenty twelve. We have a black president who was a community organizer who chose to honor another community. Organizer cesar chavez. Okay evolving idea over there. There's grand teton. can you introduce me to grand teton. I understand that's where you've had so many childhood memories. Grand teton national park. This is my mother. Park this park that after september eleventh when i was in washington. Dc and felt that there was no solid ground beneath my feet. I went back to grantee thanh and put my hand on the flanks of her mountain and went up to amphitheater lake and rebaptized myself in safety wall. I wanna drink with grantee ton but wait a minute over. There is big bend national park. Clifford is really interesting. After dork. I made a pact with big band. Let me introduce you that. Should i ever disappear. That's where i'll be and you're right. It is a nocturnal park. Where the sounds of pechory of have alina under moonlight. Sound like the tiptoeing of patent leather hooves on sandstone. I wanna be there at midnight but but wait a minute. I remember last time. I was with you. You told me canyon. Lands was the most beautiful place on earth and also. The most vulnerable introduced me. Canyon lands if you believe. The earth is flat come to canyon lands to the needles overlook. Can you'll see the curvature of the earth it is an erosion landscape that reminds us. How young we really are. Who would you introduce me to to really connect with with native american culture. Come with me to effigy mounds on the banks of the mississippi river. And let's walk into this glenn where there's a two hundred fifteen foot wingspan of a mound in the shape of a peregrine falcon. And while we're watching this mound and swear that the wings move a red headed woodpecker drops down to right where the heart would be. And if you go a little bit further. There is a mound in the shape of a bear facing the direction of the mississippi river. Prayers held bones buried protected. Terry tempest williams has invited us to a most unusual get together in which we get acquainted with diverse collection of national parks. She describes her experiences at each of them in her. latest book. Called the hour of land. Personal topography of america's national parks. It's now out in paperback terry and her husband live close to arches national park in utah. Terry's website is. Coyote clam dot com. You know what's odd to me. Is our national park. System was born in wartime. And there's a battlefield. That's actually a national park. Can you introduce me to gettysburg. Gettysburg is the guest. I leased now. And i keep going to visit..

cesar chavez Terry tempest williams Chris joins flannery burke Lands national park teddy roosevelt national park glacier national park arctic national park Edward abbey rick steves gulf island national seashore grand teton national park Stephen mather big bend national park Mrs astor awani hotel new mexico Terry grantee thanh arizona
"mrs astor" Discussed on The Family Vacationer

The Family Vacationer

03:49 min | Last month

"mrs astor" Discussed on The Family Vacationer

"Season backs when my special times the whole town see i said town rob the whole city. Beautiful white light. We have an illuminated boat parade on the harbor. Watch the parade of votes yet. A little chilly out there but on great and yet we have the engines. Museums are all decorated. It's just really spectacular here at christmas time. They have a huge month on celebration of activities for every every age. This amazing now. Okay so i did want to ask you about the history here. I am a history history. Buff i love it at and You know you've been mentioning some of these mansions. Can you talk a little bit about specific the specific popular mansions and maybe some other historical landmarks. That are around definitely. Oh definitely well the mansions. I always like to talk about the colonial era. I because that was of course here before the mansions and newport colonial town as you mentioned or rob you know you just feel that here. The cobblestone streets in the little wooden buildings in are surrounding and the gas slit light lamps but You know the colonial era segues into of course the gilded age and why did they come here well. They came here from new york city because it was very hot and they wanted to get away from the city. Go to a place where it was cool in the summer and because of the wind off the water around two o'clock every day have great wonderful threes flows through newport and that's why they built scranton engines here The vanderbilt's the orlic. You know the bruins. They all try to outdo. The astor's mrs astor was hers. Yes it'll turn mansion and they all followed in summer on the water side in some around the landside but they have beautiful gardens and with them they brought these beautiful mansions with beautiful manicured lawns. And these trees abe from all over the world so we have this great Are of trees in each one of these places you know. It's a celebration of each of these distinct families coming here and building these and you know it's wonderful to be able to share them with the public honor thanks to the newport reservation society of newport county It's it was their dream to open these homes and provide Just a peek inside a world. That many of us aren't familiar base rich and famous as somebody said once and they've taken painstaking efforts to preserve these. These are not inexpensive homes to preserve but they work very hard to do that in to educate people on the importance of it. So we're very blessed to have those here along with our historic mansion of museums as well so summertime in newport. And that's that's when. I was around late summer early fall and you mentioned offline that summer kind of sells itself in the area. But can you talk about you. Know you guys have four hundred miles of coastline. Can you talk a little bit about the beaches. The beaches are great here. you don't get the pristine beaches anywhere in kidney. Well anywhere in new england like youtube year. And you know there's so much to see and do when you come to the beach. of course. i just like to sit in the sand. You know shop in the water and just you know the beach is important of the ocean is also very important because we have a huge marine industry.

newport mrs astor newport reservation society of rob vanderbilt bruins new york city new england youtube
"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Josephine. Oh everybody have you been waiting. Monteilh not very long comments or georgia. Venus at my uncle's how do you do so your little josephine. Imagine not on star da da moon. What the difference all comes under the same heading josephine. I heard you money fans on my nephews program. Imagine a child like you. Nine years old leaving an orchestra we're living in a wonderful age doesn't leave the orchestra she sings doesn't make any difference. She very good look at norma standing over there by himself like a regular stranger. Well i'm waiting if we're going in let's go with. We're not all right. Okay do you come on. come on wien. Isn't that funny looking statue. Quarter josephine the doorman uncle uncle take off your hat. I can't with john now style of josephine. he strength. my how business is muscled. He on his arm straw. Here's a thing. You must mention armstrong. Here this is bonny. Ross his hometown. What did you overhear town. Tom landon looking for honesty and disease to be looking right at me to keep looking at your long enough. I'll bet atlanta. We'll go out to george. Who is this guy over here now. Is that a nice way to talk about a great statue all right. You didn't watch your language in here uncle plea all of a sudden. There's a law against the man obese. Socrates the great greek philosopher socrates. I salute you. Were the greatest of all the greeks and you will always be remembered for. And there's plato. Sure everybody knows plato. The first blue plato. Lunch with thirty five. All right all right look at comic. It's no it isn't broken. Child sets that. Have been milo the goddess of love. She was the most experiment of womanhood. The world avenue. Why is he that any arm. I'll tell you why. Joe the ball when she was a little girl like you used to buy the thing so let that be a lesson. Please keep quiet represent uncle. Let's see down here on the sign. Rodin's thinker uncle. Will you please watch your language and for announced correctly for goodness sake. The person can't talk around you anymore. You certainly changed since you've been reading books. All of the sudden it became regular. Mrs astor's horse. I told you not to bring him in here. What can i do. It's my mother's brother our own flesh and blood. No what's that all the jobs post over there. But i didn't hear anything. Stop that that a horse with a man's head. You'll find that in greek mythology. It's cold central supposed to be a race half man and half horse willing in the mountains obsessively which we had that race today. Half man and half got tips around georgia's that's the way to talking. And i can go all right all right uncle george it. He's a pitcher. I saw a few times already. And i could never figure it out. What are you referring to this. One here with the grill on the back porch and the in the type thing into guitar uncle who happens to be a painting of romeo and juliet and it's not a backboard that the balcony. Why is she the only one in the balcony because this radio and nobody goes into balcony anymore. What does romeo and juliet represent. Romeo and juliet. My child is one of the world's greatest love story it's a story to households. The montagues calculates. They were bitter enemies so the parents are juliette. Promised to marry someone else then. She and romeo took poisoning died together. Never to be father. would you believe it. I know a case like that right here in chicago. A friend of mine. Who has the grocery stores in love with the girl but the girl's passed composing limps. That shows you how life. That's like romeo and juliet uncle. No they got different. Nobody still must be a very sad. One i always remember the epilogue blooming piece this morning with it brings the funding for our will not go ahead and go have more talk of these bad things. Some be pardoned and some punish. Ed never was there. A story of more world and juliet and romeo after only working at honey phase and.

josephine Monteilh Tom landon Josephine wien georgia Mrs astor norma romeo juliet armstrong george Ross Rodin plato atlanta john Joe Romeo juliette
"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Josephine. Oh everybody have you been waiting. Monteilh not very long comments or georgia. Venus at my uncle's how do you do so your little josephine. Imagine not on star da da moon. What the difference all comes under the same heading josephine. I heard you money fans on my nephews program. Imagine a child like you. Nine years old leaving an orchestra we're living in a wonderful age doesn't leave the orchestra she sings doesn't make any difference. She very good look at norma standing over there by himself like a regular stranger. Well i'm waiting if we're going in let's go with. We're not all right. Okay do you come on. come on wien. Isn't that funny looking statue. Quarter josephine the doorman uncle uncle take off your hat. I can't with john now style of josephine. he strength. my how business is muscled. He on his arm straw. Here's a thing. You must mention armstrong. Here this is bonny. Ross his hometown. What did you overhear town. Tom landon looking for honesty and disease to be looking right at me to keep looking at your long enough. I'll bet atlanta. We'll go out to george. Who is this guy over here now. Is that a nice way to talk about a great statue all right. You didn't watch your language in here uncle plea all of a sudden. There's a law against the man obese. Socrates the great greek philosopher socrates. I salute you. Were the greatest of all the greeks and you will always be remembered for. And there's plato. Sure everybody knows plato. The first blue plato. Lunch with thirty five. All right all right look at comic. It's no it isn't broken. Child sets that. Have been milo the goddess of love. She was the most experiment of womanhood. The world avenue. Why is he that any arm. I'll tell you why. Joe the ball when she was a little girl like you used to buy the thing so let that be a lesson. Please keep quiet represent uncle. Let's see down here on the sign. Rodin's thinker uncle. Will you please watch your language and for announced correctly for goodness sake. The person can't talk around you anymore. You certainly changed since you've been reading books. All of the sudden it became regular. Mrs astor's horse. I told you not to bring him in here. What can i do. It's my mother's brother our own flesh and blood. No what's that all the jobs post over there. But i didn't hear anything. Stop that that a horse with a man's head. You'll find that in greek mythology. It's cold central supposed to be a race half man and half horse willing in the mountains obsessively which we had that race today. Half man and half got tips around georgia's that's the way to talking. And i can go all right all right uncle george it. He's a pitcher. I saw a few times already. And i could never figure it out. What are you referring to this. One here with the grill on the back porch and the in the type thing into guitar uncle who happens to be a painting of romeo and juliet and it's not a backboard that the balcony. Why is she the only one in the balcony because this radio and nobody goes into balcony anymore. What does romeo and juliet represent. Romeo and juliet. My child is one of the world's greatest love story it's a story to households. The montagues calculates. They were bitter enemies so the parents are juliette. Promised to marry someone else then. She and romeo took poisoning died together. Never to be father. would you believe it. I know a case like that right here in chicago. A friend of mine. Who has the grocery stores in love with the girl but the girl's passed composing limps. That shows you how life. That's like romeo and juliet uncle. No they got different. Nobody still must be a very sad. One i always remember the epilogue blooming piece this morning with it brings the funding for our will not go ahead and go have more talk of these bad things. Some be pardoned and some punish. Ed never was there. A story of more world and juliet and romeo after only working at honey phase and.

josephine Monteilh Tom landon Josephine wien georgia Mrs astor norma romeo juliet armstrong george Ross Rodin plato atlanta john Joe Romeo juliette
"mrs astor" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

08:11 min | 10 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Like many explorers. Henry hudson tried and failed to discover the northeast passage the principal problem being that it didn't exist. At least he did manage to map out most of the eastern seaboard during his sixteen. O nine expedition. He found himself in the territory of the llano people who cautiously decided to trade for and supplies with these trespassing white men rather than attack them to celebrate. That hudson threw a party. That is still being referenced to this day. And i guarantee you have heard of it. My name's moxy and this is your brain on facts. We've made it through our first co vid christmas new year's corridor. I say i. Because i am still seeing a lot of unmasked faces and bear noses at the grocery store. Most of us are missing going to parties these days. If you're not missing them because you are a textbook actual introvert carry on with your activities if you're not missing them because you're still going to parties. I'd like to have a few four letter words with you outside after the show. So i thought today we might live vicariously through some of the most remarkable parties suarez shindigs salons and dues thrown. We all want to keep up with the joneses a freeze. We get from a comic strip that started in nineteen thirteen for mr and mrs bradley hyphen. Martin of turn of the last century manhattan. Nothing could be more important. When climbing the social ladder one rung at a time became too frustrating. For the new money couple. They decided to go for broke even if that meant literally they would throw the social event of the season. Nay the year they worried about get bogged down with little details like the fact that everyone not in the upper crust was dealing with a serious economic recession. The best kind of party as everyone knows is a fancy dress party costume party to those of us colonials. Guests were instructed to come dressed as a famous history figure from the previous three centuries. You'd be hard pressed to be the only person dressed as your favourite queen or general as the guest list was a whopping eight hundred names long. And that was just the beginning. The bradley martin's social secretary because of course they had one of those drafted florid descriptions of the coming festivities to print in the newspaper. For example five mirrors on the north side of the ballroom richly. But not heavily garlanded in a curtain effect by mov orchids and the feathery plymouth divine. The profusion of mauve or kids will stream carelessly to the floor like the untied bonnet strings of this. His prose succeeded in drawing a lot of attention across all social strata from other socialites. Dying for an invite to the clergy and even the newspapers themselves who took a rather dim view of the proposed extravagance. I'll link to one of these social secretaries write ups in the show notes website. And you can judge for yourself. The bradley martin's responded to this criticism by pointing out that their ball would quote stimulate trade by creating demand for seamstresses hairdressers florists and the like which is getting irritatingly. Close to trickle down economics. The short notice for the guests. They pointed out would mean no one would have time to order their costume from paris so local tailors would get the work instead. They're rebuttal only served to bring more attention to the party planning. And there's no such thing as bad publicity. The party would be held at the newly completed. Waldorf astoria on fifth avenue where the empire state building stands today. The hotel staff were instructed to do whatever they had to do to make. The hotel look like versailles. During the reign of louis the fifteenth cost. Be damned in addition to the six thousand. Orchids flowers were brought in from hothouses as far away as south carolina and alabama did. I mention this party was happening. In february heaps of roses were thrown against the walls and allowed to rest on the floor to later be crushed under the feet of the fancy people. There were enough flowers to hide the orchestra. Not a quartet or a chamber ensemble and orchestra that played throughout the night. A company of one hundred waiters which serve guests. Caviar stuffed oysters turtle suckling pig and flog raw and pour out a staggering four thousand bottles of moet shandong pain in the five hours of ridiculous excess. The evening of the party finally arrived february tenth. Eighteen ninety seven regular folks gathered outside to watch. The guests arrive at eleven. Pm eager to see the costumes. The papers had reported the guests plan to wear mrs bradley martin dressed as mary. Queen of scots in a gallon with a twenty foot train and over two million dollars in modern figures worth of diamonds. Not to be outdone. The famous mrs astor managed to wear twice as many diamonds. There were fifty marie-antoinette's ten lady pompa doors and three catherine the greats. One london magazine estimated. That the ball's female revelers used more than five hundred pounds of rouge two and a half flour barrels worth of powder and enough powder puffs to make a pile ten feet high and six feet wide. I haven't checked the math. But i'd like to believe it's correct. In addition to the lookie loos outside there was also an obvious police presence. Some two hundred strong with worried about champagne. Drunk swells getting into fisticuffs. No they had a very real concern that a riot might break out. Figures vary but the bradley martin's spent between two hundred and four hundred thousand dollars the equivalent of between four and nine million dollars today on this party or between five and ten thousand dollars per guest. The us had been in a serious recession for twenty years. At that point unemployment was high. Those who were working made an average of four hundred dollars a year seven dollars and change her week. You could feed clothe and house a family with five children for about a dollar twenty five a day back then while the little people's struggled to do even that the millionaires enjoyed a party. That would have paid a day's wage for a quarter million people. The bradley martin's spent enough money to provide for nearly nine hundred families for a year on a party that lasted five hours with a fleet of four hundred carriages to take the guests home at the end when the total bill for the party got out. It got the attention of another city department. The new york city tax authority. They doubled the bradley martin's tax assessment as well as raising the taxes of many of the guests almost all of whom were millionaires. The power couple apparently felt the city was being ungrateful for all their generous economic stimuli. They packed up and moved into permanent. Tax exile in the uk.

bradley martin mrs bradley Henry hudson Waldorf astoria suarez hudson mrs bradley martin manhattan mrs astor pompa Martin One london magazine lookie loos paris south carolina
"mrs astor" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

04:13 min | 10 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Present from Merry Christmas ladies shouldn't treated by Maybe they're just guys everything. That's good, baby, surely treating marriage baby? Student. You proper, you know? Guys, I wish you a merry Christmas labor here. Thank you Do their fucking job. You A man already Putting the squeeze on the Grinch came with a package is she's off fast. We're your holiday Hit station, New Jersey One a 1.5. The kiss. Sand. Mrs Astor. Did not me. Downstairs. That I will do it. Mom. Hello. You know why? Yes. And gloves. So let me see me. Take of me. Where's your Well, good. Just brought your mama, she said. Putting on the holiday pounds on the holiday hits on New Jersey one a 1.5 Do not use it. Oh, It's a small eyes..

"mrs astor" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

04:03 min | 11 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Inside says that made them broke. Ali hating, engaging. It's down by now, Don't you think of the changes the entire Christmas donkey a la la la la la la la la la la la la la la Children singing clap their hands and she starts to dance. Talk Italian to the man he even understands. Come on, isn't embarrassed. They went under the girl that comes to town and bring Zotto chariot Hey, singing the change. It's down the donkey King of the change in your Christmas stocking La la la la la Okay. Company Morning, A dollar. You can tell you trying to tell you Kay X W 80, New Jersey one a 1.5 Garden state's home of holiday hits on the air, You're smart speaker and NJ one a. 15 dot com. Jersey. Why No. One point Some kisses, sand need, Mrs Astor. Did not great. Downstairs. Have a wish. She said that I was still in my medical bag, Mom. Hello, Sandy. No. Why? Some mommy kissing Santa Claus. Leave, Mr Joe. Let's see maybe another take of me. You sure about that doctor and bad fast asleep. Leave his beard. Level food at him. Mama San New Jersey, one of one boy New Jersey chime time. It's 502. Now. Here comes New Jersey Fast traffic. Good.

"mrs astor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They imported glass from France and Belgium. Those those shipments came into the wars. They owned the wards, the Roosevelts, her direct line descendants. Franklin Roosevelt. We need to remember quickly here. Her her future husband was an operator. Roosevelt up the Hudson, her her family. Her uncle Theodore Roosevelt, Uncle Ted. The 26, president of United States was also a born and bred New Yorker and her father was a born and bred New Yorker and her grandfather, the first Theodore Roosevelt Sr. Cared a great deal about the city and was one of the first you know great advocates for the poor for the marginalized for the for the for the mentally distressed and the mentally ill, and he was on the board of the of the New Museum of Natural History and They were absolutely part of the fabric of the city and the city. It's important to remember that she was born into and the city of her childhood is that city that is so such a complex and contrasting History as what it was just then becoming, which was the nations and the world's capital of wealth. And the nation's capital of immigration, which gave Eleanor her very first. The contrast between those things you could walk a block in the city and go from diarist poverty. You two fantastic wealth in the city of her childhood, and it gave her her first vision of the United States is a liberal, pluralist democracy. All of the Hertz early experiences of the city, even including riding the fifth, The Fifth Avenue You know, coach as a, which is a horse drawn a vehicle as a child, seeing a man appear before her and put his hand out and asked desperately. For any anything that she could give. It gave her her first look at an understanding of what was needed. It was the world also, by the way that was not regulated. It was a world where disease was rampant. It was the world where We're all the things that became part of the liberal and Democratic Party and the of the new deal even eventually were then being answered by the Democratic machine By Tammany Hall. You came if you showed up in Manhattan as an immigrant, Tammany Hall would come to you and start bringing you ice and asking you what you needed. The government wasn't there for you. The government was corrupt institution but New York and it's constant composting and, you know, constant divisions between wealth and poverty. Really were her great laboratory. I guess it did. Makayla. The name of this book is Eleanor. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, who was born in 18 84. At 29 East 38th Street. You walked us through the Roosevelt side of the family. But the other side of the family was a prominent family as well. The Livingston halls What do we need to know about them to understand her? Well, The thing you need to know to understand, Elinor is that this was an old the halls were an old Knickerbocker, New York family. They are from old New York, just as the New New York of Vanderbilt of Morgan of the Railroads of the Industrial Revolution of was taking hold. Big, big bill. Big big castles going up in Fifth Avenue, where a single person Had become so wealthiest. Oh, suddenly live like a king on Fifth Avenue. They were of the old New York to Edith Wharton, New York, the downtown Gramercy Park, New York, and they were being marginalized. And they were not finding a new place in this new big world, a Vanderbilt wealth and 400 people filling up Mrs Astor's ballroom. They were just barely making it And as they fell into various states of alcoholism and co dependency, and Eleanor became as a teenager as an orphan. The sort of responsible child adult among these very child like adults who didn't you know they had just enough money to get themselves into trouble, but no longer quite enough to get themselves out. She was constantly bailing her aunts and uncles who would get into scrapes of all kinds out of jail. They she sat by them in court. She became a go to a doting God, parent to their her niece is in the hall family. She became the Eleanor Roosevelt. We think of much later in life. As a humanitarian and as a national Tribune of the poor. And the marginal is the first lady. She learned a lot of what it meant to constantly take care off. People who were Um, arrested people who were emotionally and physically and literally arrested people who were depending on her, and she really found that she had to depend on something within herself. She learned actually, that she had strength within herself. That she could depend on and it was finding that through each of your uncles and aunts, crashes and delusions and denials, I think this facing of disaster Each time head on. Instead of hiding out in fears that she felt very strongly she discovered she gained strength and control from keeping her nerve. And it was magical. The transformation actually when she when she really became the woman, she was going to be on. She looked at the halls and said, You know, I am a lot like you. But I have this other strength. And I think was Roosevelt strength, looking looking at Hall style and grace, But it was the combination for her both that gave her the image of herself. I think there's somebody who was going to do something you know in the world. Initially as a as a young woman. She was not particularly confident her parents had a great deal to do with that. You write in your book, Her father embraced her as a miracle from heaven. Though Elliot and Anna her parents had been hoping for a male heir, a precious boy junior to put an end to the Roosevelt clans. Plague is one biographer. Returned the family's recent sending of girls. Relationship she had with her parents was quite different. Her mother, who was thought to be one of those beautiful women in New York City, was really rather cruel to her, called her granny at a young age. How would you describe her mother's parenting style and its impact on young Eleanor? Cold. I see. Um uh, also very needy. And this in a narcissistic way that Eleanor be a reflection of herself And you know, barring that, at least a very fine reflection of the family in its in its graces and elegance is Elinor had a kind of a sweet faces a child. She actually was. It was commented upon in newspapers and magazines at the time that she was a very adorable, attractive child. She's not some, you know, got to figure out of an Edward Gorey cartoon standing in the corner, but that's how her mother cast her. You know, she would say that when her mother Criticized her openly and called her granny in this very contemptuous, demeaning way that she wanted to sink into the floor for shame And shame was really the ruling emotion. Humiliation was the ruling emotion that she felt From her mother. And one thing that should be said about her mother. Not to excuse or good to explain. Which is her mother wasn't just some, You know, society lady who you know, was terribly determined to have Eleanor be something. What she was with herself afraid in which he was afraid of was falling down in class becoming marginalized, so that all the sort of badges of status that she needed to wear She very much wanted Eleanor to wear, too, And she very much net something to her that Elinor would be a sort of youthful Blythe carefree figure instead of what she Saw her as which was sort of downcast and stern and an old and granny light and she wanted nothing to do with boldness and sternness and someone sitting in the parlor with a long face. Eleanor Roosevelt would say of her father. Most of all, I wanted to be loved by my father, and he was certainly Elliott Roosevelt was certainly affectionate to his daughter. He also had severe Addiction issues with alcohol laudanum. What impact did this have on Eleanor? And where do we see it later in her life. Essentially, she and her father had a wonderful co dependent relationship. I mean, they understood each other and yet and he depended on her. And she depended on him and that was all very positive and rewarding until it wasn't until addiction impacted on her as In pretty simple way, which is that she became his rescuer. She became his caretaker. She became his his wife more than his wife in the sense that she took care of her father. And when he finally plunged into the really dark and of his disintegration She could only do so much as a Z young as a child. She was She was nine she choose eight. She was nine. She was 10. These are the years when when this was going on, so she could only She could on Lee barely function in these roles that I'm describing, but and he was his his addiction. It's not a point of people and you get this from the book is that their addiction was ferocious. It was based on A A lifelong in the Roosevelt family. That is to say, the Theodore Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt Banning and Corinne Roosevelt. These are the Children of Theodore Sr and many residents they were they were taught. Self medication. They were taking mercury based medications as kids. They were losing their cognitive abilities because their southern mother thought that Callum L and blue pill.

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt New York City Theodore Roosevelt Sr Theodore Roosevelt Franklin Roosevelt Elliott Roosevelt Roosevelts Roosevelt family Elinor United States Roosevelt clans Tammany Hall New Museum of Natural History Corinne Roosevelt Uncle Ted president Manhattan France
"mrs astor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And they were not finding a new place in this new big world of Vanderbilt wealth and 400 people filling up Mrs Astor's ballroom. They were just barely making it And as they fell into various states of alcoholism and co dependency, and Eleanor became as a teenager as an orphan. The sort of responsible child adult among these very child like adults who didn't you know they had just enough money to get themselves into trouble, but no longer quite enough to get themselves out. She was constantly bailing her aunts and uncles who would get into scrapes of all kinds out of jail. They she sat by the new court. She became a goat. A doting God, parent to their her niece is in the hall family. She became the Eleanor Roosevelt. We think of much later in life. As a humanitarian and as a national Tribune of the poor. And the marginal is the first lady. She learned a lot of what it meant to constantly take care off. People who were Um, arrested people who were emotionally and physically and literally arrested people who were depending on her, and she really found that she had to depend on something within herself. She learned actually, that she had strength within herself. That she could depend on and it was finding that through each of your uncles and aunts, crashes and delusions and denials, I think this facing of disaster Each time head on. Instead of hiding out in fears that she felt very strongly she discovered she gained strength and control from keeping her nerve. And it was magical. The transformation actually when she when she really became the woman. She was going to be on. She looked at the halls and said, You know, I am a lot like you, but I have this other strength. And I think was Roosevelt strength, looking looking at Hall style and grace. It was the combination for her both that gave her the image of herself. I think there's somebody who was going to do something you know in the world. Initially as a as a young woman. She was not particularly confident her parents had a great deal to do with that. You write in your book, Her father embraced her as a miracle from heaven. Though Elliot and Anna her parents had been hoping for a male heir, a precious boy junior to put an end to the Roosevelt clans. Plague is one biographer. Returned the family's recent sending of girls. Relationship she had with her parents was quite different. Her mother, who was thought to be one of those beautiful women in New York City, was really rather cruel to her, called her granny at a young age. How would you describe her mother's parenting style and its impact on young Eleanor? Cold, icy. Um, uh, also very needy. And this in a narcissistic way that Eleanor be a reflection of herself And you know, barring that, at least a very fine reflection of the family in its in its graces and elegance is Elinor had a kind of a sweet faces a child. She actually was. It was commented upon in newspapers and magazines at the time that she was a very adorable, attractive child. She's not some, you know, got to figure out of an Edward Gorey cartoon standing in the corner, but that's how her mother cast her. You know, she would say that when her mother Criticized her openly and called her granny in this very contentious, demeaning way that she wanted to sink into the floor for shame And shame was really the ruling emotion. Humiliation was the ruling emotion that she felt From her mother. And one thing that should be said about her mother. Not to excuse or but to explain, which is her mother wasn't just some, You know, society lady who you know, was terribly determined to have Eleanor be something. What she was with herself afraid in which he was afraid of was falling down in class becoming marginalized, so that all the sort of badges of status that she needed to wear She very much wanted Eleanor to wear, too. And she very much meant something to her that Elinor would be a sort of youthful, Blyde carefree figure instead of what she Saw her as which was sort of downcast and stern and an old and granny light and she wanted nothing to do with boldness and sternness and someone sitting in the parlor with a long face. Eleanor Roosevelt would say of her father. Most of all, I wanted to be loved by my father, and he was certainly Elliott Roosevelt was certainly affectionate to his daughter. He also had severe Addiction issues with alcohol laudanum. What impact did this have on Eleanor? And where do we see it later in in her life. Essentially, she and her father had a wonderful co dependent relationship. I mean, they understood each other and yet and he depended on her. And she depended on him and that was all very positive and rewarding until it wasn't until addiction impacted on her as In pretty simple way, which is that she became his rescuer. She became his caretaker. She became his his wife more than his wife in the sense that she took care of her father. And when he finally plunged into the really dark and of his disintegration She could only do so much as a as a young as a child. She was. She was nine she choose eight. She was nine. She was 10. These are the years when when this was going on, so she could only She could on Lee barely function in these roles that I'm describing, but and he was his his addiction. It's one appointed people and you get this from the book. His addiction was ferocious. It was based on A A lifelong in the Roosevelt family. That is to say, the Theodore Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt Banning and Corinne Roosevelt. These are the Children of Theodore Sr and needy residents. They were they were taught. Self medication. They were taking mercury based medications as kids. They were losing their cognitive abilities because their southern mother thought that Callum L and blue pill and other mercury medications work here, All's for all kinds of things taking self medicate. Cation is a starting point. You then add alcohol and alcoholism in the sort of sporting young, younger set, Gentlemen, sportsmen world of Elliot and Anna Roosevelt in their early marriage and all the drinking that was going on. And then you add all that to finally an injury that really got the better of him during the society circus so called a kind of a big party under a tent where he did stunts with other young men on horses, But he fell, he broke his leg had to be reset. As he tried to recover from this drastic break of his femur. He got addicted to Loughton, which was a tincture of opium on highly addictive. And as you mixed laudanum with alcohol as you mix laudanum with almost everything and began its its effects were the effects of opium that the downward spiral Is its own dark nightmare that Eleanor wasn't fully aware of, until until later until she was 15. And the truth was told to her by a sadistic on, but what she did see, and was aware of was in the thinking he was in control. All the stress and dread intention. It brought to her household and brought to the family. This was due. This was doom and dread. Elliott Roosevelt was going down and he did die by falling out of a window. Eleanor became an orphan. And she was sent to school in England to the Allens would school up Until this point, her education had been a little bit scattershot, and she meets a woman who really changes her life. The headmistress there You write about her arriving Was in the gate, The lower branch of the lofty cedar of Lebanon pointed up to the drive to the school portico. There, a regal woman with a head of snow white hair came buzzing down the steps to welcome Eleanor. When their eyes met..

Eleanor Roosevelt Elliott Roosevelt Roosevelt Roosevelt family Roosevelt clans Elinor Theodore Roosevelt Elliot Vanderbilt Mrs Astor Anna Roosevelt Edward Gorey Corinne Roosevelt New York City Um Lebanon Addiction opium Plague Theodore Sr
"mrs astor" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You get depending on that overtime, That often is fun. No, I'm uptown Auburn. I was fortunate in my early publishing career to work for Alfred A cannot Jr Otherwise known as packing off, and Pat would do the same thing with Kant chronology. He kept a chronology of everything on Daz, his sort of administrative person. Every letter he wrote, went into a folder that was not chronological. And he had years and years and years of chronological photos. All these letters he ever wrote to all these famous people, so and he would put back through them. He'd say, Please give me 1990. You know, police didn't really little person gets a file to and and that becomes its own. It has its own sub files. And and that's why the people it's very, very important to keep them. They, each of them separate and and very clear. Well, 11. One thing I delighted and horrified in doing and reading your book was trying to keep all the gilded age families in order. I mean, the You know the Roosevelt you talk about the Roosevelts, their marriage of FDR and Eleanor being the sort of the merging of the Oyster Bay Long Island Roosevelts and the Hyde Park Roosevelts who come from the quotes. Still feudal end quote Hudson Valley. That the families up on the Hudson Valley were, you know, a remarkable collection of landed Gentry on Dat Anna Hall. Eleanor's mother was, she was emerging of living things low lows and halls. They hung out in simply New York with the deploy, stirs and other high society swords. I mean, it's an endless, It's an amazing collection. Of name of New York. In many ways, I think of Eleanor Roosevelt. Your book is sort of a portrait of New York. Of course that goes down to Washington. But you know, it's a New York She's a New York girl. Uh and she moves among New York and then as much as she tries to get away from that gilded age, she's stuck in brownstone society, Um Edith Workings land and and then the Vanderbilts sort of keep haunting them. Um, well, her mother in law said the Vanderbilts might divorce and so might the asked doctors, but the Della knows do not You know that FDR went and got a library. It was a quoting Astor's five library that he shipped home from Europe so that these names and histories come back into their lives and sort of haunt them. Barbara Tokat is in charge of literary programs at the New England Historic Genealogical Society, um, very much the ones in charge. At that point, David McCullough's his book, Eleanor, Of course, Mrs Astor's Ballroom and the Ass. Is in general where the old slightly older version of great wealth that what struck me about New York and I'm so glad you saw the portrait of it isn't part of the city. And there was so much that was left on the cutting room floor and helpfully. So I think, And thank you, Ellie Parker again, who helped me cut out a lot of that early New York But it was a city the city she was born into. Was a city very much like the word we're in. Now in that it was a city absolute polarized between unimaginable wealth. An unimaginable poverty on as each new wave of immigrants. Immigrants arrived at Castle Garden and came into the city. The world Elinor was going to finally transcend was also the world. She was going to be, in some ways, very committed to reshaping and saving So many of the things that That were reforms that out Smith first and then Eleanor herself and Franklin Roosevelt. In the reforms of the new deal were reforms that helped save people who were thick in that city who didn't have representation. You got off the boat, and the guys from Tammany Hall came over and started bringing you ice and started bring you bring you services. So that you would do their bidding politically, you would you would. You would vote the way they told you to vote because they brought you ice for your little icebox. Or they brought you something. Eleanor and Franklin, where the where the government began came toe ultimately represent the government that replaced that corrupt machine city of bosses and people coming and giving a special favors to give everybody equal measure in the In the American in the American, uh, dream but also is essentially the prosperity that was created with all that wealth..

Eleanor Roosevelt New York Mrs Astor Hudson Valley Daz Oyster Bay Long Island Rooseve Hyde Park Roosevelts Pat New England Historic Genealogi Auburn FDR Um Edith Workings Vanderbilts Alfred Franklin Roosevelt Tammany Hall Kant David McCullough Dat Anna Hall
"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Great Greek philosopher Socrates I salute, you were the greatest of all Greeks, and you will always be remembered. And there's Plato. Sure everybody knows Plato. The first blue plano lunch was ninety five all right all right. Look at. Comic it's. No it isn't broken. Child Sex with that have been at Milo the goddess of love. The most perfect specimen of womanhood that world avenue in. Why is he that any art I'll tell you why joe the ball? When she was a little girl like you used to buy the thing, so let that be a lesson. Please keep quiet. Represent uncle. Let's see down here on the sign. Rodin's thinker. Uncle. Would you please watch your language? Pronounced those words correctly for goodness sake. The person can't talk around you anymore. You certainly changed since you've been reading books. All of the sudden if it came regular Mrs Astor's haunts. I, told you not to bring him in here. Can I do to my mother's brother, our own flesh and blood. Joe The full. Yes, see that post over there. But I didn't hear anything. Stop that. That a horse with a man's head. You find that in Greek mythology. It's cold. Central supposed to be a race half man and half horse rolling in the mountains obsessively. Had that race today half man and half gotta tips around. Georgia's. That's the way to talking and I can go all right all right. George Yeah. He's a pitcher. I saw a few times already, and I could never figure it out. What are you referring to this one here with the grill on the back porch and the fill in type thing into guitar. Uncle that happens to be a painting of Romeo and Juliet, and it's not a part that the balcony. She, the only one in the balcony because this radio nobody goes into balcony anymore. What is Romeo and Juliet represent, Romeo and Juliet my child with one of the world's greatest love. Story to households the MONTAGUES capulet. They were enemies, so the parents of Juliet's made a promise to marry someone else. Then she and Romeo to poison died together never to be. would. You believe it I. Know a case like that. Right here in Chicago. A friend of mine who has grocery stores in love with the girl, but the girl's passed. I can call the lamps. That shows you how life goes. That's like Romeo and Juliet Ankle. No, they got different. Young Hughley. It must be a beautiful. Very sad one, I always remember the epilogue blooming piece this morning with it brings the tongue. Sour will not show his head. Go head to have more talk of these bad things. Some be pardoned, and some punish edits never. was there a story of Malwa Juliet and Romeo? Only Oh, and Julia well honey phase. Look. Oh. Your. Own. ooh! report. uh-huh! Who? Pain Norma. Have you enjoyed yourself? Well This is all you're going to show me. After three months and see it is backed up against Sally then restrooms who've without windows on every? Honey I. Really got a surprise.

Romeo Malwa Juliet Juliet Ankle Mrs Astor George Yeah MONTAGUES capulet plano Joe The Julia Rodin Georgia Sally Chicago
"mrs astor" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Center the time right now is seven seventeen. taking a hardline against impeachment and I gotta tell you it is S.. okay quickly. I know I'm not interested in what they're saying out loud. I don't believe them when they say I think you said in private I one believe Tony cats ninety three W. I. B. C. good morning. a closed door meeting Nancy blows he doesn't want to hear anything about impeachment it's a growing rift between her and house judiciary chairman Jerrold Nadler. and she's saying things like you can weakness thank you selling these closed door groups closer meetings of members of Congress you complete this. stop it with the impeachment nonsense they're not stopping it with the impeachment nonsense what are we talking about. of course they're going down this road. it makes no difference to them how absolutely awful horrific. their interview with Corey Lewandowski was everyone's going to focus on core learned as he saying I have no obligation to be honest with the media will Corey Lewandowski have to deal with that. let's talk about the fact that they brought him in the former campaign manager for Donald Trump to move down the line about whether or not they're going to do impeachment. and they got it wrong a great great piece by Byron York in the Washington examiner. where it every turn. the Democrats want to remind you of the Nixon impeachment. tell you for example you told Cory learned owski did the Democrat from New York John that there. that you are a I'm struck doing the work of this committee you see if you don't answer the question the way we want them answered your instructing the work of the committee as if somehow that's a crime. any says in I will remind you that article three of the impeachment against president Nixon was based on obstruction of Congress. as Byron York points out beautifully. the difference between Nixon and trump is that Nixon's impeachment began with an underlying crime. is that the reelection committee broke into the DNC committee headquarters and was looking for information. regarding Donald Trump in Russia the underlying crime you could say let's call the DNC hack the hack of the emails that was the Russians in Russia without any involvement of the trump campaign as explained in the Muller report. the Nixon impeachment at least have a basis. I know this nonsense doesn't. it's really a great great piece. because no matter what you think about trump if this is about history people if the Democrats are going to try to make this connection and as we discussed before they're gonna mention Nixon every seven seconds. Mensing makes them the Republican every seven seconds is very helpful. but they don't care about the actual crime the only care about the charge funny we said that before too. the crime is inconsequential they only care about the charge. this is obvious it is always been obvious it continues to be. they are if flailing on this left and right and they don't care and Nancy was he thinks she can stop them I don't buy in. I think she wants it to I don't think. I am not convinced that they can even Lianna Fleming steak house as well and it's gonna be incredible it was an hour and a half two hours nine hours of drinking and and laughter myself and hammer Nigel checks on the writers of my subjects on the right home or not I think we're going in chronological order here and then or all gonna get back on the stage we got special guests joining in and you and Bourbon. all all happening and yes I will have a popcorn moments arms I at least right now scheduled how about popcorn moments for a night with W. IBC you're going to enjoy it this is a three for. right here. we've discussed how when it comes to Iran. and it comes to the attack on the Saudi oil field. you have multiple people blaming the United States you see Iran had to do this because it's the U. S. got out of the joint comprehensive plan of action are known as the Iran nuclear deal because we've got too many sanctions it's always the U. S. is false center Tim came from Virginia going down this line of thinking when I hear coordinated response for the president and vice president saying we're locked and loaded I worry that they're going to take military action and there is absolutely no reason for the U. S. to go to war or engage in military action to protect Saudi oil zero let the Saudis defend themselves I actually have no disagreement about the idea let's savage defend themselves the Saudis have to be able to defend themselves and that would have been enough but it's Tim Kaine this is a guy who ran with Hillary Clinton for president Hey it's never enough we sell them weapons we give them advice that's one thing but to be engaged in military action another war in the Middle East war to protect Saudi oil and were based what I believe is on some you know fundamental mistruths that the administration is is promoting what Mrs Astor there they're going around saying the attack was unprovoked the U. S. is provoking arrived we were in a diplomatic deal with them allow them to sell their oil we pulled out of the deal the US pulled out and we've we punish their oil economy and so around and a dent Ron's not a good actor you don't have to like this but we are provoking around every day with of sanctions and with military action are we provoking them to use still tankers as well we provided promoted. working them into sponsoring terrorism dear lord it's such an ugly ridiculous stretch and then there is represented Hana Maron who's got a plan to give a job just to anyone and by giving everybody jobs by Justin inventing jobs it'll pay for itself this is an idea that has a along the legacy was proposed by African rolls of felt it was supported by Martin Luther king junior it's going to allow its a pilot project that pilot program that is going to allow fifteen communities with and this country to create this program and I think ultimately when these jobs are created and people are pleased in these jobs it will pay for itself. well that's Jamie. that's Streamy what is the job doesn't matter is it necessary doesn't matter we just create jobs that pay for themselves I'll. that's not you create a job because you have a need to fill also was very clear government can't create jobs government can only create work only the private sector can create jobs I'll go over another time then the president. talking about what's going on in Israel the special election not sure how this is all going to shake out and reminding everybody that the special relationship is not just with Benjamin Netanyahu. people usually should know before the president. everybody was going to be very close and we'll see what.

president Nixon Donald Trump Nancy Corey Lewandowski Byron York Russia Lianna Fleming DNC Congress New York chairman Tony Washington Mensing Jerrold Nadler. Cory Congress. Muller owski
"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:24 min | 3 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Today's world famous happening. Franken euthusiasm brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves got that. Right. One of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans. Very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? Four civil terrorism. Thank you. Welcome. It is so nice to have you with us right here on talk radio. It is Frankie Boyer and really not. My mother would use many expressions with MRs Astor in them and everyone listening, and I'm sure younger people alike. Who is MRs Astor, and we are going to talk about who misses Astor wise and joining us is Cecelia tissue. And she's a professor of English and American studies at Vanderbilt University the author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what's what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was. Frankie boy, they have good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs disaster. Took a while. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society. And all America, followed her lead. It was about how you can duck yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many utensils at the table. What was the fish fork? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new, and if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you. Yes. Yes. So boy, Mark Twain would have fealty field day today Whitney. Would indeed he would indeed. And in fact, Mark Twain, and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, perhaps along a corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car there was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to core have have photographs and some drawings illustrate there is peacock alley. And there were both there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one book the hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you'll know this and Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside scribbling away, the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. That walled off the walled off. I was actually I last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards everything just. Chapel. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So elaborate so incredibly in fact, today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astra book what would MRs Astor do? I, of course, went to Newport toward those mansions again. I'd seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip. I had to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you'd better be there. If you were in the social elite. Otherwise, your social status was at great risk. So everybody who matter who was in. What was called the four hundred the four hundred where did that where did that number come from? Where did it? Yeah. Well, yeah. Mrs Astor's, kind of coach she had a life coach. That's what we would call this man today. His name was ward McAllister, and he coached her on everything that she needed to do to maintain her preeminence social status, he was at her ear, and he was asked by the reporters. How many people might go to MRs Astor's ball? Her annual ball was on the last Monday evening every January right up through the eighteen ninety s and into the os of the twentieth century. How many people he said four hundred and otherwise the other people ought not to be there or even think about being there. So the the social elite waited in early December with trembling fingers for the postman to deliver their Malian trae. And I had to look at that. Where did you get your mail? Now, relating of the of the house was still in her boudoir and her maid would bring her silver tray with the mail and with trembling fingers. She opened the invitation to MRs Astor's bull, and she would be with her with her escort, a husband or an eligible bachelor. She would be in that four hundred for the next year when the trembling would start all over again, how long did this gilded age last Cecilia? You know, Frankie it really lasted. And there there are debates about this as there always are about historical periods. But it was World War One that most people agree brought an end to this era now. So we're talking about nineteen fourteen. And if we ask when did it all start we have to dial back to the eighteen seventies? The civil war has ended reconstruction in the south, and and Vanderbilt Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt who's who's university where I teach named he donated a million dollars to get Vanderbilt University going so that the railroads his shipping business could crank. We have the eighteen seventies and on until World War One. And these were about fifty these were the most influential in richest people Thomas Edison names, we still know today JP Morgan Edith, Wharton Vanderbilt's, right? Andrew carnegie. Rockefeller rockefeller. Yeah. And they all Randolph Hearst Joseph Pulitzer, you've got them. Now. They are the Mario names. And it's interesting those names have familiarity, but maybe MRs faster does not. So when when I put together my book, okay? Who was she? Why would she important? What could we learn from her and shouldn't any anybody picking up this book, and it's called a browsing book, meaning you can open it up, anywhere, and and remake. Yes. Manta tribute to my publisher. And I'm yes with a ribbon bookmark there. So these were these were years, let's remember the the US south was trying to pull itself together. Yeah. Knitting to look back at I'm grateful that we are beyond those times. But it's important to remember those times into also for anyone that wondered what was that expression? Why why was MRs Astor.

MRs Astor Waldorf Astoria Hotel Astor wise Frankie Boyer MRs Astra America Vanderbilt University Randolph Hearst Joseph Pulitze Newport New York Franken euthusiasm Frankie boy Mark Twain US ward McAllister Frankie Rhode Island Rockefeller rockefeller professor of English Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt
"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:12 min | 3 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what's what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was. Cranky. They had good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs. Took a while. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society. And all America, followed her lead. It was about how you conduct yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many you pencils at the table. What was the fish for? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new, and if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you. Yes. Yes. So boy Mark Twain would have the field field day today Whitney. He would he would indeed an fat Mark Twain and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, perhaps along a corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car there was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to have have photographs and some drawings and illustrate there is peacock alley. And there were both there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one booked a hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you know, this and Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside crippling away the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. You know that Waldorf the walled off. I was actually I last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards that everything just. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So in elaborate, so incredibly inside today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so-called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astor book, what would MRs Astor do? Of course, went to Newport toward those mansions again seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip. I had to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you better be there. If you were in the social elite.

MRs Astor Frankie boyer Waldorf Astoria Hotel Vanderbilt University William Randolph Hearst America New York Mark Twain Joseph Pulitzer US Newport ward McAllister professor of English Rhode Island Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt Rockefeller rockefeller publisher London Thomas Edison
"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:12 min | 3 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It's a show about living in today's world. I think something is happening brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves got that. Right. One of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans. Very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? Frankie boyer. Welcome. It is nice to have you with this right here on talk radio. It is Frankie Boyer. Growing up. My mother would use many expressions with MRs Astor in them. And. A professor of English and American studies at Vanderbilt University the author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what's what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was. Cranky. They had good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs. Took a while. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society. And all America, followed her lead. It was about how you conduct yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many you pencils at the table. What was the fish for? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new, and if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you. Yes. Yes. So boy Mark Twain would have the field field day today Whitney. He would he would indeed an fat Mark Twain and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, perhaps along a corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car there was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to have have photographs and some drawings and illustrate there is peacock alley. And there were both there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one booked a hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you know, this and Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside crippling away the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. You know that Waldorf the walled off. I was actually I last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards that everything just. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So in elaborate, so incredibly inside today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so-called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astor book, what would MRs Astor do? Of course, went to Newport toward those mansions again seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip. I had to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you better be there. If you were in the social elite. Otherwise, your social status was at great risk. So everybody who matter who was in. What was called the four hundred four hundred where did that where did that number come from? Where did it? Yeah. Well, MRs Astor's kind of coach she had a life coach. That's what we would call this man today. His name was ward McAllister, and he coached her on everything that she needed to do to maintain her preeminence social status, he was at her ear, and he was asked by the reporters. How many people might go to MRs Astor's ball? Her annual ball was on the last Monday evening every January right up through the nineties and into the os of the twentieth century. How many people he said four hundred. And otherwise the other people. Not to be there or even think about being there. So the the social elite waited in early December with trembling fingers for the postman to deliver their mail. Trai? And I had to look at that. Where did you get your mail? Now. The lady of the house was still in her boudoir and her maid would bring her a silver tray with the mail and with trembling fingers. She opened the invitation to MRs Astor's bull, and she would be with her with her escort, a husband or an eligible bachelor. She would be in that four hundred for the next year when the trembling would start all over again. How long did this gilded age last Cecilia? You know, Frankie it really lasted. And there there are debates about this as there always are about historical periods. But it was World War One that most people agree brought an end to this era now. So we're talking about nineteen fourteen. And if we ask win did it all start we have to dial back to the eighteen seventies. The civil war has ended reconstruction in the south, and and Vanderbilt Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt who's who's university where I teach is named. He donated a million dollars to get Vanderbilt University going so that the railroads his shipping business could crank up. We have the eighteen seventies and on until World War One. And these were about fifty these were the most influential in richest people Thomas Edison names, we still know today JP Morgan Edith, Wharton Vanderbilt's Andrew Carnegie. Rockefeller rockefeller. Yeah. And they all in Randolph Hearst Joseph Pulitzer. You've got them there. They are the Mario names. And it's interesting those names have millions that maybe MRs Astor does not. So when when I put together my book, I tried okay? Who was she? Why would she important? What could we learn from her and shouldn't any anybody picking up this book, and it's called a browsing book, meaning you can open it up, anywhere, and and remake. Yes. Thank you. Tribute to my publisher. And I'm yes with a ribbon bookmark there. So these were these were years, let's remember the the US south was trying to pull itself together. Yeah. Knitting to look back. But I'm grateful that we are beyond those times. But it's important to remember those times into also for anyone that wondered what was that expression? Why why was MRs Astor always being mentioned? Now, you know now, you know, what would.

MRs Astor Frankie boyer Waldorf Astoria Hotel Vanderbilt University William Randolph Hearst America New York Mark Twain Joseph Pulitzer US Newport ward McAllister professor of English Rhode Island Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt Rockefeller rockefeller publisher London Thomas Edison
This is the essential guide to manners

The Frankie Boyer Show

04:51 min | 3 years ago

This is the essential guide to manners

"The author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what's what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was. Cranky. They had good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs. Took a while. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society. And all America, followed her lead. It was about how you conduct yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many you pencils at the table. What was the fish for? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new, and if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you. Yes. Yes. So boy Mark Twain would have the field field day today Whitney. He would he would indeed an fat Mark Twain and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, perhaps along a corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car there was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to have have photographs and some drawings and illustrate there is peacock alley. And there were both there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one booked a hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you know, this and Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside crippling away the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. You know that Waldorf the walled off. I was actually I last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards that everything just. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So in elaborate, so incredibly inside today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so-called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astor book, what would MRs Astor do? Of course, went to Newport toward those mansions again seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip. I had to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you better be there. If you were in the social elite.

Mrs Astor Waldorf Astoria Hotel America New York Mark Twain Newport Whitney Rhode Island William Randolph Hearst Palm Court London Pulitzer Six Weeks
"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:26 min | 3 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"It's so show about living in today's world famous happening. Franken brings. Brings an amazing eclectic mix to the airwaves got that. Right. One of the reasons she's earned legions of loyal fans is very simple. When you listen to the Frankie Boyer show. You just never know. What's going to happen? Frankie boyer. Welcome. It is so nice to have you with us right here on talk radio. Is Frankie Boyer and growing up. My mother would use many expressions with MRs Astor in them and everyone listening, and I'm sure younger people are like who is MRs Astor, and we are going to talk about. Who misses Astor wise and joining us is Cecelia tissue. And she's a professor of English and American studies at Vanderbilt University the author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was Frankie they had good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs. It took awhile. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society and all America, followed her lead. It was about how you conduct yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many utensils at the table. What was the fish fork? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new. And if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you it's so fascinating. Yes. Yes. So. Boy, Mark Twain would have fealty field day today Whitney. He he would indeed. And in fact, Mark Twain, and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel perhaps along of corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to have have photographs and some throwing straight. There is peacock alley. And there were ball there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one book a hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you know, this. And Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside rippling away, the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. That walled off the walled off. I was actually at last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards everything just. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So elaborate so incredibly in fact, today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astor book, what would MRs Astor do? Of course, went to Newport toward does mansions. Again. I've seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip ahead to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you better be there. If you were in the social elite. Otherwise, your social status was at great risk. So everybody who matter who was in. What was called the four hundred the four hundred where did that where did that number come from? Where did it? Well. Yeah. Mrs esters kind of coach she had a life coach. That's what we would call this man today. His name was ward McAllister, and he coached her on everything that she needed to do to maintain her preeminence social status, he was at her ear, and he was asked by the reporters. How many people might go to MRs Astor's ball? Her annual ball was on the last Monday evening every January right up through the eighteen ninety s and into the os of the twentieth century. How many people he said four hundred. And otherwise, the other people ought not to be there or even think about being there. So the the social elite waited in early December with trembling fingers for the postman to deliver their Malian trae. And I had to look at that. Where did you get your mail? Now, the lady of the of the house was still in her boudoir and her maid would bring her a silver tray with the mail and with trembling fingers. She opened the invitation to MRs Astor's ball, and she would be with her escort a husband or an eligible bachelor. She would be in that four hundred for the next year when the trembling would start all over again. How long did this gilded age last Cecilia? You know, Frankie it really lasted. And there there are debates about this as there always are about historical periods. But it was World War One that most people agree brought an end to this era now. So we're talking about nineteen fourteen. And if we ask when did it all start we have to dial back to the eighteen seventies? The civil war has ended reconstruction in the south and the and Vanderbilt Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt who's who's university where I teach is named. He donated a million dollars to get Vanderbilt University going so that the railroads his shipping business could crank up. We have the eighteen seventies and on until World War One. And these were about fifty these were the most influential in richest people Thomas Edison names, we still know today JP Morgan Edith, Wharton Vanderbilt's, right? Andrew carnegie. Rockefeller rockefeller. Yeah. And they all Ean Randolph. Hearst Joseph Pulitzer got them there. They are the Mario names. And it's interesting. Those names have million that maybe MRs Astor does not. So when when I put together my book, I thought, okay? Who was she? Why would she important? What could we learn from her and shouldn't any anybody picking up this book, and it's called a browsing book, meaning you can open it up, anywhere, and and remake. Yes. Amanda tribute to my publisher. And I'm yes with a ribbon bookmark there. So these were these were years. Let's remember the the US south was trying to pull itself together. Meeting to look back. But I'm grateful that we are beyond those times. But it's important to remember those times into also for anyone that wondered what was that expression? Why why was MRs Astor always.

MRs Astor Frankie boyer Astor wise Mrs esters Waldorf Astoria Hotel America Vanderbilt University Hearst Joseph Pulitzer New York Franken Mark Twain US Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt Newport Ean Randolph ward McAllister professor of English Rhode Island Cecelia tissue