18 Burst results for "Mrs Astor"

"mrs astor" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:33 min | Last week

"mrs astor" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Into the dinner party and I'm Rick, the travel writer. Can you introduce me to a couple of these parks in a way that I better understand their personality and want to get to know them better. I think I'd first introduced you to Cesar Chavez because he changed everything for me that national park you know, we hear that our national parks are best idea. It was Caesar Travis National Monument That said, it's an evolving idea. That you know here we have in 1916 Stephen Matter. The head of the National Park Service who looked at his donors. Um Mrs Astor. Coming to Yosemite. Would she be comfortable campaigning? No, she would not. They build the Wani Hotel. Fast forward to 2012. We have a black president who was a community organizer. Who chose to honor another community organizer, Cesar Chavez. Okay, and evolving idea over there. There's Grand Teton, Can you introduce me to Grand Teton? I understand that's where you've had so many childhood memories. Grand Teton National Park. This is my mother Park. This is the park that after September 11th when I was in Washington, D C and felt that there was no solid ground beneath my feet. I went back to Grand Teton and put my hand on the flanks of her mountain and went up to amphitheater like and re baptized myself in safety. Whoa! I want to drink with Grand Teton. But wait a minute over. There's Big Bend National Park I've heard is really interesting after dark. I made a pact with big.

Cesar Chavez 2012 Rick National Park Service Big Bend National Park Washington, D C September 11th Yosemite 1916 Astor Grand Teton National Park Stephen Matter Grand Teton Wani Hotel first Caesar Travis National Monumen Teton Grand
"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:38 min | 2 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Josephine. Oh everybody have you been waiting. Monteilh not very long comments or georgia. Venus at my uncle's how do you do so your little josephine. Imagine not on star da da moon. What the difference all comes under the same heading josephine. I heard you money fans on my nephews program. Imagine a child like you. Nine years old leaving an orchestra we're living in a wonderful age doesn't leave the orchestra she sings doesn't make any difference. She very good look at norma standing over there by himself like a regular stranger. Well i'm waiting if we're going in let's go with. We're not all right. Okay do you come on. come on wien. Isn't that funny looking statue. Quarter josephine the doorman uncle uncle take off your hat. I can't with john now style of josephine. he strength. my how business is muscled. He on his arm straw. Here's a thing. You must mention armstrong. Here this is bonny. Ross his hometown. What did you overhear town. Tom landon looking for honesty and disease to be looking right at me to keep looking at your long enough. I'll bet atlanta. We'll go out to george. Who is this guy over here now. Is that a nice way to talk about a great statue all right. You didn't watch your language in here uncle plea all of a sudden. There's a law against the man obese. Socrates the great greek philosopher socrates. I salute you. Were the greatest of all the greeks and you will always be remembered for. And there's plato. Sure everybody knows plato. The first blue plato. Lunch with thirty five. All right all right look at comic. It's no it isn't broken. Child sets that. Have been milo the goddess of love. She was the most experiment of womanhood. The world avenue. Why is he that any arm. I'll tell you why. Joe the ball when she was a little girl like you used to buy the thing so let that be a lesson. Please keep quiet represent uncle. Let's see down here on the sign. Rodin's thinker uncle. Will you please watch your language and for announced correctly for goodness sake. The person can't talk around you anymore. You certainly changed since you've been reading books. All of the sudden it became regular. Mrs astor's horse. I told you not to bring him in here. What can i do. It's my mother's brother our own flesh and blood. No what's that all the jobs post over there. But i didn't hear anything. Stop that that a horse with a man's head. You'll find that in greek mythology. It's cold central supposed to be a race half man and half horse willing in the mountains obsessively which we had that race today. Half man and half got tips around georgia's that's the way to talking. And i can go all right all right uncle george it. He's a pitcher. I saw a few times already. And i could never figure it out. What are you referring to this. One here with the grill on the back porch and the in the type thing into guitar uncle who happens to be a painting of romeo and juliet and it's not a backboard that the balcony. Why is she the only one in the balcony because this radio and nobody goes into balcony anymore. What does romeo and juliet represent. Romeo and juliet. My child is one of the world's greatest love story it's a story to households. The montagues calculates. They were bitter enemies so the parents are juliette. Promised to marry someone else then. She and romeo took poisoning died together. Never to be father. would you believe it. I know a case like that right here in chicago. A friend of mine. Who has the grocery stores in love with the girl but the girl's passed composing limps. That shows you how life. That's like romeo and juliet uncle. No they got different. Nobody still must be a very sad. One i always remember the epilogue blooming piece this morning with it brings the funding for our will not go ahead and go have more talk of these bad things. Some be pardoned and some punish. Ed never was there. A story of more world and juliet and romeo after only working at honey phase and.

josephine Monteilh Tom landon Josephine wien georgia Mrs astor norma romeo juliet armstrong george Ross Rodin plato atlanta john Joe Romeo juliette
"mrs astor" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:03 min | 7 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Peter. Lance, of course, is well known to coast to coast listeners. He's an old friend of the show. I like to think the medicine old friend of mine I love his work. I am one of his biggest fans. Five time Emmy. Award winner as an investigative reporter, working as a screenwriter and then also as a novelist and continues to research. Some of the most original work that we can never talk about on coast to coast in this new book is No different homicide at Rough point. How are you doing tonight, Peter? Vienna so happy to be launching what amounts to the cyber book tour with you on this on this occasion because you have the perfect skill set. It's almost like a try. Expect of skills. A your journalism professor you've written your doctoral dissertation on True crime trend is an Episcopal deacon deacon in the Episcopal Church. You have a sense of morality that is perfect for judging a story with more moral ambiguity in five seasons of breaking bad I love that line. I love that line. I love that line in the book. I thought that was great and listen. I want to say what's interesting about you mentioned the work I did on this in my thesis, but I was interviewing and rule and I was like the last person to get to interview the queen of true crime. And she told me something that just really stayed with me. Not just that All good. True crime has to stay victim focus, and you do that through the whole book. On D I don't like true crime that fetishize is the murderer. And or the murderer, where they get heavily into the blood and the all the other stuff, But the other thing that she wrote, she said, This was her first step every time that she wrote a book. Was that she felt like it was the obligation of the true crime researcher to actually go to the place where the crime had taken place to get to know the people, And she said this so eloquently to eat the local food. To get to know what makes something someplace special. And what's interesting is that step toward knowing the geography? The lay of the land that the blood seeped into is really a step home for you because you grew up in the very same town where this murder took place. Yes, but interestingly I actually returned to Newport for my first of two long research trips there on the 52nd anniversary of Eduardo's murder, and I wanted to be there in At five o'clock in the afternoon at rough point the scene of the crime and I wanted to smell the air and feel what it felt like It didn't get dark till 6:30 p.m.. So it's still quite light out when it happened, and I just wanted to breathe it, you know so more than having grown up there as the new Porter, a local kid. I literally went there intending to be there to try and, you know, just get a sense of what must have happened. This man, what was going through his mind her mind on the job? Well, so let's start, though, with the usual suspects, and in this case, Newport like in any good true crime piece, has to be seen as one of the major characters. In this story that that Newport has it has distinct characteristics. It is its own kind of place and because of its origins. It plays into Doris Duke's hands later as she gets away with murder, But talk about the history of Newport before I go any further, Newport, Rhode Island, you you go into beautiful detail. I think people need to have some context about it on how it got started and why it ends up being this playground for the rich and famous. Great. Well, as you know, in the beginning of the book for that very reason. I have a map of Newport or Southern Acquit Nick Island T O set the record here, this little state, the small state in the Union, Rhode Island, this kind of new shapes state largely obey now against the Bay. And south of Providence, the capital, Newport, three Island runs north South and the really the bottom of a quick Nick Island. Probably don't more than maybe five or 10 Square Miles in is really where this incredible history of America has taken place. The experiment in liberty and all of it. You know Tragedy in grace, right? So you have pre revolutionary times I have a chapter in the book on the old Stone tower. This mysterious tower that the I now believe is was built around 15 80 to 25 years before the Jamestown, Virginia settlement by the British And then you have Revolutionary times in Newport, Newport for 3.5 years was occupied by the British George Washington went to church there. Trinity Church is the oldest Episcopal House of worship. I believe in the new world. On. That's factor is very importantly, into the book with respect the doors who was a parishioner there on then, eventually Newport starting in the mid 18, hundreds became the playground of what would later become known as the New York 404 100, wealthiest people in the New York social Directory, who are said to be the number of swells who could fit into the ballroom of Mrs Astor at the time, and they were known as the Knickerbocker Asi. That's greater, many of them, you know, descendants of old Dutch family. So anyway, they started coming to Newport, along with sub post civil war. With post with Southern plantation owners that that had somehow gotten had their money intact. After the war, and Newport became this playground where these they would it was like exercising one ups Manship, where one multi multi millionaire, the equivalent billionaires would build one summer cottage. Then the next one would build a bigger summer cottage. That's what they call these things. The Breakers the most famous is the House of the Commodore. Or the grandson of the Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. There are six different cottages in Newport related to the Vanderbilts, and in fact, rough point was originally built for a Vanderbilt on Lee to be purchased by James Buchanan, Duke Towards his father. So that way when we say cottages, let's just say one of them is 30,000 Square feet, right? I mean, some of those houses are essentially Uh, malls. I mean, in terms of their scope in their size. Absolutely. Yeah, There's no I don't know, except for in North Carolina, which is also the Vanderbilt the state. I think it's the largest home of its kind in America, but that was built by by one of the Vanderbilts by one of the architects of many of the Newport quote cottages. And you know, it's just It's very hard for people to comprehend the scope and size of these places. So anyway, in Newport, you have the robber barons the You know the Vanderbilts, the Belmonts, etcetera. They asked us and they would come every summer. In fact, they had a riverboat if you will, almost like it's called the old Fall River line. And the mothers and the Children would spend the whole summer in Newport in the father's making money on Wall Street would get on these boats at after work on Friday, they'd overnight they get to Newport, and then they step on the boat Sunday night and B it Wall Street in the morning, and they all had their state rooms. So that was kind of a culture of Newport for decades and decades. Then it became the home of the America's Cup races, the jazz and folk festivals the night Dylan went electric I happen to be in the audience is a local kit. And then were you really?.

James Buchanan North Carolina Eduardo Newport Peter five seasons Doris Duke 3.5 years Friday Dylan 30,000 Square feet Sunday night first New York Lance 6:30 p.m America Fall River tonight Wall Street
"mrs astor" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:13 min | 7 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Peter. Lance, of course, is well known to coast to coast listeners. He's an old friend of the show. I like to think the medicine old friend of mine I love his work. I am one of his biggest fans. Five time Emmy. Award winner as an investigative reporter, working as a screenwriter and then also as a novelist and continues to research. Some of the most original work that we can never talk about on coast to coast in this new book is No different homicide at Rough point. How are you doing tonight, Peter? Vienna so happy to be launching what amounts to the cyber book tour with you on this on this occasion because you have the perfect skill set. It's almost like a try. Expect of skills. A your journalism professor you've written your doctoral dissertation on True crime trend is an Episcopal deacon deacon in the Episcopal Church. You have a sense of morality. That is perfect for judging a story with more moral ambiguity in five seasons of breaking bad I love that line. I love that line. I love that line in the book. I thought that was great. And listen, I want to say what's interesting about you mentioned the work I did on this in my thesis, but Was interviewing and rule and I was like the last person to get to interview the queen of true crime. And she told me something that just really stayed with me. Not just that All good. True crime has to stay victim focus, and you do that through the whole book. On D I don't like true crime that fetishize is the murderer. And or the murderer, where they get heavily into the blood and the all the other stuff, But the other thing that she wrote, she said, This was her first step every time that she wrote a book. Was that she felt like it was the obligation of the true crime researcher to actually go to the place where the crime it taken place to get to know the people, And she said this so eloquently to eat the local food. To get to know what makes something someplace special. And what's interesting is that step toward knowing the geography? The lay of the land that the blood had seeped into is really a step home for you because you grew up in the very same town where this murder took place. Yes, but interestingly I actually returned to Newport for my first of two long research trips there on the 52nd anniversary of Eduardo's murder, and I wanted to be there in At five o'clock in the afternoon at rough point the scene of the crime and I wanted to smell the air and feel what it felt like It didn't get dark till 6:30 p.m.. So it's still quite light out when it happened, and I just wanted to breathe it, you know so more than having grown up there as the new Porter, a local kid. I literally went there intending to be there to try and, you know, just get a sense of what must have happened. This man, what was going through his mind her mind at the top. Well, so let's start, though, with the usual suspects, and in this case, Newport like in any good true crime piece has to be seen as one of the major characters in this story that that Newport Has it has distinct characteristics. It is its own kind of place and because of its origins, it plays into Doris Duke's hands later as she gets away with murder, But talk about the history of Newport before I go any further, Newport, Rhode Island, you go into beautiful detail. I think people need to have some context about it on how it got started and why it ends up being this playground for the rich in for Famous. Great. Well, as you know, in the beginning of the book for that very reason. I have a map of Newport or Southern Acquit Nick Island T O set the record here. This little state, the small state in the union, Rhode Island, This kind of U Shaped state largely obey now against it Day and south of Providence, the capital, Newport, The island runs north south, and they're really the bottom of equipment. The island probably don't more than maybe five or And square Miles in is really where this incredible history of America has taken place. The experiment in liberty and all of its, you know, tragedy in grace, right? So you have Pre revolutionary Times I have a chapter in the book on the old Stone tower. This mysterious tower that I now believe is was built around 15 80 to 25 years before the Jamestown, Virginia settlement by the British And then you have Revolutionary times in Newport, Newport for 3.5 years was occupied by the British and George Washington went to church there. Trinity Church is the oldest Episcopal House of worship. I believe in the new world. On. That's factors, very importantly, into the book with respective doors, who was a parishioner there on then, eventually Newport starting in the mid 18, hundreds became the playground of what would later become known as the New York 404 100, wealthiest people in the New York social Directory, who are said to be the number of swells who could fit into the ballroom of Mrs Astor at the time, and they were known as the Knickerbocker Asi. That's great, many of them, you know, descendants of old Dutch family. So anyway, they started coming to Newport, along with sub post civil war. With post with Southern plantation owners that that had somehow gotten had their money intact. But after the war, and Newport became this playground, where these they would it was like exercising one ups Manship, where one multi multi millionaire, the equivalent billionaires would build one summer cottage. Then the next one would build a bigger summer cottage. That's what they call these things. The Breakers the most famous Is the house of the Commodore or the grandson of the Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt. There are six different cottages in Newport related to the Vanderbilts, and in fact, rough point was originally built for a Vanderbilt on Lee to be purchased by James Buchanan, Duke Horse's father, so that we wear what we say Cottages. Let's just say one of them is 30,000 Square feet, right? I mean, some of those houses are essentially Malls. I mean, in terms of their scope in their size. Absolutely. Yeah, There's no I don't know, except for in North Carolina, which is also the Vanderbilt the state. I think it's the largest home of its kind in America, but right that was built by by one of the Vanderbilts 51 of the architects of many of the Newport quote cottages and, you know, it's just It's very hard for people that Comprehend the scope and size of these places. So anyway, in Newport, you have the robber barons. You know, the the Vanderbilts, the Belmonts, etcetera, the Astors and they would come every summer. In fact, they had a riverboat if you will, almost like it's called the old Fall River line. And the mothers and the Children would spend the whole summer in Newport and the father's making money on Wall Street would get on these boats at after work on Friday, they'd overnight they get to Newport. Then they step on the boat Sunday night and B it Wall Street in the morning, and they all have their state rooms. So that was kind of a culture of Newport for decades and decades. Then it became the home of the America's Cup races, the jazz and folk festivals the night Dylan went electric I happen to be in the audience is a local git. And then were you really? That's Oh, yeah, I was there. The 91 Electric I can give you chapter and verse on that later in the show. I love that allow actually gonna ask you about that, because I mean, that is the famous.

James Buchanan North Carolina Newport Eduardo five seasons George Washington Doris Duke Peter Dylan Friday 3.5 years 6:30 p.m 30,000 Square feet Sunday night first New York Lance Wall Street America Cornelius Vanderbilt
"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

01:30 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Us a call. Eight seven seven nine two nine six seven three or tell us about the other boogeyman in your life. Send those emails to words. Wayward radio dot. Org support for way with words. Come some tom bin bags backpacks and plot face masks designed and made in seattle portable culture since one thousand nine hundred seventy two. Tom ben. that's t. o. M. b. i. h. in dot.

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

02:52 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"And she tries to explain in a reasonable way the patterns that she sees and i think she's done an excellent of showing. That isn't just one offs. But there's a a real physical thing happening in the mouth the something about these words and the order in which the sounds occur that is forcing us down a similar path when we speak and this happens a lot in english actually every language goes through this so the other that i want to note here is. I am not surprised that you've heard this on the national stage from a lot of national news media. Because i have seen evidence that some people believed that foreword is the only correct pronunciation of that word and they teach it to their staff. And i've i've heard of this. And i think it's a mistake but i think they're modeling and on a british pronunciation first of all they're monitoring on old east coast white male patients in the late eighteen ninety s and they're also thinking of the word toward which some people believe should only be pronounced his toured so they're teaching people to say it that way. Which for right or wrong. I think i think it's incorrect but Lots of people are doing it. And i've got a soup spoon. I can't stop the tide you know. I've a friend from new york. He says there's no aren forward and if there it's optional like neither are is in forward but it's always always since she's got some speeches and other art people by the way who pronounced forward to rhyme with ford f o r d and as a matter of fact there are people who say the word forehead and the word forward they rhyme. They sound like homophones ford. That's very interesting so any one thing. I want know before we go. Alex is. I counted nine different pronunciations. That are possible in the united states of the word forward Real depending where you are. What your background is whether or not you have. Our fullness are rotisserie. That is you come from dialect culture where the rs not pronounce certain circumstances and and other things. We've got a track record for being kind of an ambiguous word. All the oldest words have these these chew conflicting characteristics but the one is the oldest words tend to be very stable but the thing is if they had multiple forms back in the day they may still have multiple stable forms. Now i believe forward is one of those super interesting. Language is interesting. We should show about that anyway. Hope you come away a little reassured. Alex do appreciate a grant martha all right. Call us again some time with your observations right. All right take care. I want to share the name of that paper one more time. I think it's going to be two walkie for most of the audience but the lists are good. The list of words that undergo this dissimulation. It's called our dissimulation..

new york Alex nine late eighteen ninety s two ford f o r d british of people martha english one more time united states one east coast
"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Lot of care and a lot of safety. A lot of precaution. So yeah tapper light. It's like saying drive safely when someone leaves the house. Take care take care. Take it easy. high-grade is still used today..

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"You see somebody who's trying to make themselves look attractive by messing with their hair putting on makeup sort of straightening up. You might say their preening you trying to look especially printing printing your preening Preening of course refers to the action of birds. You know and and arranging their feathers. What i didn't realize until recently is that there's another wonderful word aloe preening can that awol yes awol. Oh preening that would be. That's what birds due to each other. You prince somebody else like that as a metaphor for you know you. Brush the lint off of lapel or something like that turned the right way is straight aloe printing Eight seven seven nine hundred nine nine six seven three. Hello you have a.

Eight seven seven nine hundred
"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:35 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"North dakota high john. Welcome to the show. Hello john what can we do for you. So i have a word search question. I am enrolled in an online program for veterans who have gotten out of the military Or returned from a deployment and that program works with processing emotions. Things like that one of the things that talked about was that we're always feeling emotions or feelings feelings. Were working on trying to identify those and that emotion. I can't seem to identify is what i'm calling middle emotion and so i basically put all of our motions on a time line from one to ten one being you know clinical depression Something like that ten being. You know complete euphoria. But i can't figure out what number five would be. If you are dead center in the middle what would be the word for number five and I actually have. There's a peer mentor program on that Program and i chatted with somebody on there and we tried to come up with some words and and one of the words he came up with was insouciant which i really liked But i had to look it up. Because i wasn't familiar with it and The definition was free from worry or anxiety. And i was like yeah. That's still doesn't seem quite right. And so after i did that for kinda searched around for that for a little while. I figured i'd give you guys a call and kind of figure out and see if you guys had any ideas i agree. That insouciant isn't really the right word to me. It's a little more about carefree. And even when you should have care and cici's only neutral word that he came up with was also apathy. I was like typically apathy as associated more with the depression side of it. So that's a little bit more down towards that one side so it was at the tough. Were to come up with and you don't wanna use the word like normal because that everyone's normal is different right correct. What's wrong with neutral. Neutral is actually not a bad word. I not a word. I typically would associate with an emotion but but that could work. The other one. I was thinking of was the word zen z. E. n. year. It was 'cause i the way i.

john North dakota one high john one side ten five
"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:02 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"I'm calling from madison alabama islandia. Welcome to the show. Hello lydia what can we do for you at this question about to us. They sounded really similar. But there's doubt a little differently. It's immigrate with an e and one m in immigrate with is to. I could see how these could be confusing. Did you look them up. Or just you just thought of us in thought you'd go straight to the experts. Thought if you guys oh. We're so glad you did me too. And the difference between these two words. Lydia has to do with your point of view. They're two different words. And basically you emigrate when you leave a place. That's with the e at the beginning. Emigrate has to do with leaving and immigrate has to do with entering a place. So you're traveling in each case but in one case you're going out of place and with the other word you're coming in to a place and the way to remember. That is the i at. The beginning of immigrant has to do with somebody going in and the e. in emigrate has to do with exiting or leaving. Yeah and there's a. There's something kind of permanent about this. It's not just immigration from the house today to go to work right you immigrate from country when you are going to make a permanent move immigrate to the country when you're gonna make a permanent move. Yeah yeah i think so. Too and another difference between the two. Is that immigrate. Going in has two m's and emigrate just has one when you're going out so when you get to the place you get a new m. k. Make sense yeah okay. Good if you need further clarification pops in email and we'll send you a little note on it all right past. Listen to our show a lot. Yeah great well. You've helped a lot of other people. Understand these words to lydia. So we're really glad you called. Thank you thank you bye-bye bislett take care bye-bye you know. Sometimes kids asked the best questions and we'd love to hear from more of us so give a call eight seven seven nine two nine nine six seven three or send us your questions in email. That address is words. Wayward radio dot. Org.

lydia Lydia two words today one case each case two different words two radio dot. Org madison alabama islandia Wayward one three eight seven seven nine two nine nine
"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

05:30 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"I'm not throwing. i'm tossing. Eight seven seven nine nine nine six seven three. We love talking about words. Their kids say that maybe aren't quite right in your whole family. Adopts that worden we had an example of that from rebecca who sent us a tweet that said a friend recently mentioned that her could not say pentecost but instead said polka dots now all the kids say it and they make a point to wear polka dots to church on pentecost sunday The door will not sunday right preparing for polka dots. Seven seven nine two nine nine six seven three. Hello you have a way with words. Hello hi who's this. This is eve zanu calling from fairbanks alaska welcome. Even what can we do for you. When i was growing up we would spend the night and our grandmother's house. Sometimes and on a hot summer days she might tell us to go into the back bedroom and raise the window down and we just thought that was the funniest thing and would giggle. But i i never understood why she said raised the window down and i think about it as i got older and i thought well i wonder if it has anything to do with the type of window and that's as far as i got okay So when she said raised the window down she meant. Open it to let some air. Open the window okay. And where was grandmother's house. It was in san jose california area but she was from texas. Okay okay good and you have..

texas eve zanu san jose california rebecca sunday Seven seven nine two nine nine six s Eight seven seven fairbanks alaska three nine nine six seven nine
"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

04:28 min | 8 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on A Way with Words: language, linguistics, and callers from all over

"Where are you in. Beloit wisconsin town names to say beloit. That's the sound of a faucet dripping in the other room. yeah. I always heard a quarter and a toilet lloyd. Well what's going on every. Oh well i am..

Beloit wisconsin
"mrs astor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:02 min | 11 months ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They imported glass from France and Belgium. Those those shipments came into the wars. They owned the wards, the Roosevelts, her direct line descendants. Franklin Roosevelt. We need to remember quickly here. Her her future husband was an operator. Roosevelt up the Hudson, her her family. Her uncle Theodore Roosevelt, Uncle Ted. The 26, president of United States was also a born and bred New Yorker and her father was a born and bred New Yorker and her grandfather, the first Theodore Roosevelt Sr. Cared a great deal about the city and was one of the first you know great advocates for the poor for the marginalized for the for the for the mentally distressed and the mentally ill, and he was on the board of the of the New Museum of Natural History and They were absolutely part of the fabric of the city and the city. It's important to remember that she was born into and the city of her childhood is that city that is so such a complex and contrasting History as what it was just then becoming, which was the nations and the world's capital of wealth. And the nation's capital of immigration, which gave Eleanor her very first. The contrast between those things you could walk a block in the city and go from diarist poverty. You two fantastic wealth in the city of her childhood, and it gave her her first vision of the United States is a liberal, pluralist democracy. All of the Hertz early experiences of the city, even including riding the fifth, The Fifth Avenue You know, coach as a, which is a horse drawn a vehicle as a child, seeing a man appear before her and put his hand out and asked desperately. For any anything that she could give. It gave her her first look at an understanding of what was needed. It was the world also, by the way that was not regulated. It was a world where disease was rampant. It was the world where We're all the things that became part of the liberal and Democratic Party and the of the new deal even eventually were then being answered by the Democratic machine By Tammany Hall. You came if you showed up in Manhattan as an immigrant, Tammany Hall would come to you and start bringing you ice and asking you what you needed. The government wasn't there for you. The government was corrupt institution but New York and it's constant composting and, you know, constant divisions between wealth and poverty. Really were her great laboratory. I guess it did. Makayla. The name of this book is Eleanor. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, who was born in 18 84. At 29 East 38th Street. You walked us through the Roosevelt side of the family. But the other side of the family was a prominent family as well. The Livingston halls What do we need to know about them to understand her? Well, The thing you need to know to understand, Elinor is that this was an old the halls were an old Knickerbocker, New York family. They are from old New York, just as the New New York of Vanderbilt of Morgan of the Railroads of the Industrial Revolution of was taking hold. Big, big bill. Big big castles going up in Fifth Avenue, where a single person Had become so wealthiest. Oh, suddenly live like a king on Fifth Avenue. They were of the old New York to Edith Wharton, New York, the downtown Gramercy Park, New York, and they were being marginalized. And they were not finding a new place in this new big world, a Vanderbilt wealth and 400 people filling up Mrs Astor's ballroom. They were just barely making it And as they fell into various states of alcoholism and co dependency, and Eleanor became as a teenager as an orphan. The sort of responsible child adult among these very child like adults who didn't you know they had just enough money to get themselves into trouble, but no longer quite enough to get themselves out. She was constantly bailing her aunts and uncles who would get into scrapes of all kinds out of jail. They she sat by them in court. She became a go to a doting God, parent to their her niece is in the hall family. She became the Eleanor Roosevelt. We think of much later in life. As a humanitarian and as a national Tribune of the poor. And the marginal is the first lady. She learned a lot of what it meant to constantly take care off. People who were Um, arrested people who were emotionally and physically and literally arrested people who were depending on her, and she really found that she had to depend on something within herself. She learned actually, that she had strength within herself. That she could depend on and it was finding that through each of your uncles and aunts, crashes and delusions and denials, I think this facing of disaster Each time head on. Instead of hiding out in fears that she felt very strongly she discovered she gained strength and control from keeping her nerve. And it was magical. The transformation actually when she when she really became the woman, she was going to be on. She looked at the halls and said, You know, I am a lot like you. But I have this other strength. And I think was Roosevelt strength, looking looking at Hall style and grace, But it was the combination for her both that gave her the image of herself. I think there's somebody who was going to do something you know in the world. Initially as a as a young woman. She was not particularly confident her parents had a great deal to do with that. You write in your book, Her father embraced her as a miracle from heaven. Though Elliot and Anna her parents had been hoping for a male heir, a precious boy junior to put an end to the Roosevelt clans. Plague is one biographer. Returned the family's recent sending of girls. Relationship she had with her parents was quite different. Her mother, who was thought to be one of those beautiful women in New York City, was really rather cruel to her, called her granny at a young age. How would you describe her mother's parenting style and its impact on young Eleanor? Cold. I see. Um uh, also very needy. And this in a narcissistic way that Eleanor be a reflection of herself And you know, barring that, at least a very fine reflection of the family in its in its graces and elegance is Elinor had a kind of a sweet faces a child. She actually was. It was commented upon in newspapers and magazines at the time that she was a very adorable, attractive child. She's not some, you know, got to figure out of an Edward Gorey cartoon standing in the corner, but that's how her mother cast her. You know, she would say that when her mother Criticized her openly and called her granny in this very contemptuous, demeaning way that she wanted to sink into the floor for shame And shame was really the ruling emotion. Humiliation was the ruling emotion that she felt From her mother. And one thing that should be said about her mother. Not to excuse or good to explain. Which is her mother wasn't just some, You know, society lady who you know, was terribly determined to have Eleanor be something. What she was with herself afraid in which he was afraid of was falling down in class becoming marginalized, so that all the sort of badges of status that she needed to wear She very much wanted Eleanor to wear, too, And she very much net something to her that Elinor would be a sort of youthful Blythe carefree figure instead of what she Saw her as which was sort of downcast and stern and an old and granny light and she wanted nothing to do with boldness and sternness and someone sitting in the parlor with a long face. Eleanor Roosevelt would say of her father. Most of all, I wanted to be loved by my father, and he was certainly Elliott Roosevelt was certainly affectionate to his daughter. He also had severe Addiction issues with alcohol laudanum. What impact did this have on Eleanor? And where do we see it later in her life. Essentially, she and her father had a wonderful co dependent relationship. I mean, they understood each other and yet and he depended on her. And she depended on him and that was all very positive and rewarding until it wasn't until addiction impacted on her as In pretty simple way, which is that she became his rescuer. She became his caretaker. She became his his wife more than his wife in the sense that she took care of her father. And when he finally plunged into the really dark and of his disintegration She could only do so much as a Z young as a child. She was She was nine she choose eight. She was nine. She was 10. These are the years when when this was going on, so she could only She could on Lee barely function in these roles that I'm describing, but and he was his his addiction. It's not a point of people and you get this from the book is that their addiction was ferocious. It was based on A A lifelong in the Roosevelt family. That is to say, the Theodore Roosevelt, Elliott Roosevelt Banning and Corinne Roosevelt. These are the Children of Theodore Sr and many residents they were they were taught. Self medication. They were taking mercury based medications as kids. They were losing their cognitive abilities because their southern mother thought that Callum L and blue pill.

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt New York City Theodore Roosevelt Sr Theodore Roosevelt Franklin Roosevelt Elliott Roosevelt Roosevelts Roosevelt family Elinor United States Roosevelt clans Tammany Hall New Museum of Natural History Corinne Roosevelt Uncle Ted president Manhattan France
"mrs astor" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Funnels and the pieces kept sinking reports would later speculate that it took some six minutes for the bow section travelling at approximately thirty miles an hour to reach the ocean bottom. The stern momentarily settled back in the water before rising again eventually becoming vertical. What crazy sight to see It stayed in that position for a few minutes before beginning its final plunge water pressure allegedly caused the stern, which still had air inside to implode as it sank. The stern is that back or aft most part of the shipper opposite. Bow. To twenty. AM. April Fifteenth, nineteen twelve the stern disappeared completely into the ocean. The titanic was gone just two hours and forty minutes earlier. All was well everyone enjoy themselves everyone except of course, the imaginary fourth class passengers a mini had already been eaten by cigarettes. But seriously, all those happy pastures were ready to enjoy two more days on the boat due to arrive in New York the morning of the seventeenth, and then all went to Shit. So quick now hundreds of people floating in the freezing water the cold would soon claim most of them although there were still room and most of the life boats crewmen were fearful that the votes will be swamped causing them to sink despite this fear several lifeboats did return to. Rescue swimming people and a few people were pulled to safety but most will still die from the cold over the next several hours. Numerous ships try in vain to contact titanic the US would put the death toll at one, thousand, five, hundred, seventeen passengers and crew the British at one, thousand, five, hundred, and three. No one knows the real figure because official council most passengers are only done when a ship reaches its destination to account for stowaways and passenger movement ports. So no one knows exactly how many people were aboard the titanic when it when it went down. So maybe there weren't any four pastors, but there could have been stowaways overall what Kinda pastures tended to die and who survived. Titanic researcher jet, a chuck an ESI crunched numbers breaking down the demographics and he found that ninety seven point twenty, two percent of the and forty four female first class passengers were rescued. While only thirty, two, point, five, seven percent of their one, hundred, seventy, five male counterparts were saved ultimately he found that male second class passengers fared the worst. in terms of survival, only fourteen out of one, hundred, sixty eight made it out of life the total survival rate for women actually seventy four percent, the male survival rate just barely twenty percent clearly, there is an important lesson to be learned here. Male meets sex that is fuck chivalry. Am I right or am I right? If what if you're boats sinking remember three things dudes one you are odds are stronger than most of the women around you to only the strong survive three every man for himself doing to do sweep the leg mercy is for the week. Three thirty am That was a credit quote. If you're wondering at three thirty, the last part of the whole thing that'd be super weird. At three thirty am the Carpathia one of the Cunard? Liners. Cunard Line's liners. So awkward talking about these ships this whole episode of hated it where it's like it's like the White Star line in the ship liner, the White Star Line's liner. Anyway three thirty am the CARPATI. What are the Cunard? Line's liners with the first ship to arrive in the area firing signal rockets. ship, it only be around other six years. The CARPATHIA was sunk on July seventeenth nineteen eighteen after being torpedoed three times by German submarine. Somebody's thinking boats and the decade before the roaring twenties. At four ten am number two is the first lifeboat to reach the CARPATHIA. Safely aboard the Carpathia is may wrote a message to be sent. The White Star Line's offices deeply regret. Advise you titanic sank this morning fifteenth after collision iceberg resulting serious loss life further particulars later, he mentioned that message how frustrating to get messages like that in the days before phone calls and emails when it could be hours sometimes days before you're able to get more info. At eight thirty A. M THE CALIFORNIAN PART OF BRITAIN'S LEYLAND LINE IF I didn't mention that earlier, which at approximately five thirty am learned. The titanic sinking finally arrived is search the area for several hours but did not find any additional survivors. At eight fifty am the Carpathia carrying seven hundred and five titanic survivors headed towards New York City, where it would arrive to massive crowds on April eighteenth. On April sixteenth newspapers around the World Race to publish a headline about disaster, they were in such a hurry to get to their articles out the numerous newspapers ended up giving families. Loved ones false hope about the sinking the World reported zero fatalities. The Daily Mail declared no lives lost and the Belfast Telegraph claimed no danger of loss of life as poor families what an emotional roller coaster for them. American newspapers able to take advantage of the time difference. Headlines that were more accurate. The New York Times for example ran the Headline Titanic sinks four hours after hitting iceberg eight, hundred, sixty, six, rescued by Carpathia probably twelve fifty parish is may safe Mrs Astor maybe noted names missing. On April Eighteenth, the Car Passi adopted pure fifty four in New York. City before a crowd of forty thousand people who gathered despite heavy rain and good news that fake heralded that I said fake died earlier had actually faked lived I fake light he faked made it into one of the fake lifeboats. And he fake announced the survivors entrance to New York tortured Perpetrator Ladies Gentlemen of new. York City I present to you Sir Cosmo Duff Gordon my former employer man responsible for the deaths of several of your loved ones. He paid the crew to keep poor women and children off of the lifeboat. Don't let him deny it sounds like murder to me w Reginald Chopin's passenger mouth I will drown you yet. So cosmo by the way would live until nineteen thirty, one dine in London at the age of sixty eight. Public suspicion that Duff Gordon had acted selfishly tainted him for the remainder of his life. A letter written by Sir Cosmo was found in two thousand twelve and he wrote at one point there seems to be a feeling of resentment against any Englishman being saved the whole pleasure of having been saved as quite sport by the venomous attacks that made it I in the papers are they made it I in the papers? Right now, we're GONNA continue to timeline diving into long often hilarious process of trying to recover the titanic. This weird information I did not expect the several serious obstacles to the recovery of the titanic the I was where was it? No one knew exactly where the titanic was and knowing roughly where something is not knowing roughly where something is not ideal for search. The next fairly difficult hurdle jump was how the hell did we get this gigantic hunk of steel off the bottom of the ocean floor if we do find it It weighed over fifty, two thousand tonnes when it was not full of water despite these two gigantic obstacles less than two years after it sunk. And bring it back to the surface in nineteen fourteen Charles Smith, US architect of some renown based primarily in Kansas City who also lived in Denver Colorado proposed to attach electro magnets to a submarine to pull the wreck from the bottom on January thirty four for January thirty, first nineteen, fourteen, the New York Tribune ran the headline to raise titanic by huge magnet. Denver architect plans to float the liner and fit her for Ocean Service. The article read to raise the titanic recovered the bodies from its hold and again fit the ship for a scheme which Charles Smith a Denver architect hoped to carry out this year. His game is I to locate the ship he that intends to lower a submarine carrying seven persons by means of a steel cable. The submarine is to be operated by `electricity furnished through cables from the above as the submarine. is lower powerful electric magnets will be attached to its prow light. Steep cables are to be attached to the magnets the other end of which will be wound around steam winches on scouse on the surface. When the titanic is found, the submarine will push the magnets against.

New York City CARPATHIA US Denver Cunard Line Sir Cosmo Duff Gordon Charles Smith Carpathia New York Tribune Belfast Telegraph Sir Cosmo researcher official Duff Gordon Ocean Service murder BRITAIN Colorado London Kansas City
"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Great Greek philosopher Socrates I salute, you were the greatest of all Greeks, and you will always be remembered. And there's Plato. Sure everybody knows Plato. The first blue plano lunch was ninety five all right all right. Look at. Comic it's. No it isn't broken. Child Sex with that have been at Milo the goddess of love. The most perfect specimen of womanhood that world avenue in. Why is he that any art I'll tell you why joe the ball? When she was a little girl like you used to buy the thing, so let that be a lesson. Please keep quiet. Represent uncle. Let's see down here on the sign. Rodin's thinker. Uncle. Would you please watch your language? Pronounced those words correctly for goodness sake. The person can't talk around you anymore. You certainly changed since you've been reading books. All of the sudden if it came regular Mrs Astor's haunts. I, told you not to bring him in here. Can I do to my mother's brother, our own flesh and blood. Joe The full. Yes, see that post over there. But I didn't hear anything. Stop that. That a horse with a man's head. You find that in Greek mythology. It's cold. Central supposed to be a race half man and half horse rolling in the mountains obsessively. Had that race today half man and half gotta tips around. Georgia's. That's the way to talking and I can go all right all right. George Yeah. He's a pitcher. I saw a few times already, and I could never figure it out. What are you referring to this one here with the grill on the back porch and the fill in type thing into guitar. Uncle that happens to be a painting of Romeo and Juliet, and it's not a part that the balcony. She, the only one in the balcony because this radio nobody goes into balcony anymore. What is Romeo and Juliet represent, Romeo and Juliet my child with one of the world's greatest love. Story to households the MONTAGUES capulet. They were enemies, so the parents of Juliet's made a promise to marry someone else. Then she and Romeo to poison died together never to be. would. You believe it I. Know a case like that. Right here in Chicago. A friend of mine who has grocery stores in love with the girl, but the girl's passed. I can call the lamps. That shows you how life goes. That's like Romeo and Juliet Ankle. No, they got different. Young Hughley. It must be a beautiful. Very sad one, I always remember the epilogue blooming piece this morning with it brings the tongue. Sour will not show his head. Go head to have more talk of these bad things. Some be pardoned, and some punish edits never. was there a story of Malwa Juliet and Romeo? Only Oh, and Julia well honey phase. Look. Oh. Your. Own. ooh! report. uh-huh! Who? Pain Norma. Have you enjoyed yourself? Well This is all you're going to show me. After three months and see it is backed up against Sally then restrooms who've without windows on every? Honey I. Really got a surprise.

Romeo Malwa Juliet Juliet Ankle Mrs Astor George Yeah MONTAGUES capulet plano Joe The Julia Rodin Georgia Sally Chicago
"mrs astor" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:01 min | 2 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Center the time right now is seven seventeen. taking a hardline against impeachment and I gotta tell you it is S.. okay quickly. I know I'm not interested in what they're saying out loud. I don't believe them when they say I think you said in private I one believe Tony cats ninety three W. I. B. C. good morning. a closed door meeting Nancy blows he doesn't want to hear anything about impeachment it's a growing rift between her and house judiciary chairman Jerrold Nadler. and she's saying things like you can weakness thank you selling these closed door groups closer meetings of members of Congress you complete this. stop it with the impeachment nonsense they're not stopping it with the impeachment nonsense what are we talking about. of course they're going down this road. it makes no difference to them how absolutely awful horrific. their interview with Corey Lewandowski was everyone's going to focus on core learned as he saying I have no obligation to be honest with the media will Corey Lewandowski have to deal with that. let's talk about the fact that they brought him in the former campaign manager for Donald Trump to move down the line about whether or not they're going to do impeachment. and they got it wrong a great great piece by Byron York in the Washington examiner. where it every turn. the Democrats want to remind you of the Nixon impeachment. tell you for example you told Cory learned owski did the Democrat from New York John that there. that you are a I'm struck doing the work of this committee you see if you don't answer the question the way we want them answered your instructing the work of the committee as if somehow that's a crime. any says in I will remind you that article three of the impeachment against president Nixon was based on obstruction of Congress. as Byron York points out beautifully. the difference between Nixon and trump is that Nixon's impeachment began with an underlying crime. is that the reelection committee broke into the DNC committee headquarters and was looking for information. regarding Donald Trump in Russia the underlying crime you could say let's call the DNC hack the hack of the emails that was the Russians in Russia without any involvement of the trump campaign as explained in the Muller report. the Nixon impeachment at least have a basis. I know this nonsense doesn't. it's really a great great piece. because no matter what you think about trump if this is about history people if the Democrats are going to try to make this connection and as we discussed before they're gonna mention Nixon every seven seconds. Mensing makes them the Republican every seven seconds is very helpful. but they don't care about the actual crime the only care about the charge funny we said that before too. the crime is inconsequential they only care about the charge. this is obvious it is always been obvious it continues to be. they are if flailing on this left and right and they don't care and Nancy was he thinks she can stop them I don't buy in. I think she wants it to I don't think. I am not convinced that they can even Lianna Fleming steak house as well and it's gonna be incredible it was an hour and a half two hours nine hours of drinking and and laughter myself and hammer Nigel checks on the writers of my subjects on the right home or not I think we're going in chronological order here and then or all gonna get back on the stage we got special guests joining in and you and Bourbon. all all happening and yes I will have a popcorn moments arms I at least right now scheduled how about popcorn moments for a night with W. IBC you're going to enjoy it this is a three for. right here. we've discussed how when it comes to Iran. and it comes to the attack on the Saudi oil field. you have multiple people blaming the United States you see Iran had to do this because it's the U. S. got out of the joint comprehensive plan of action are known as the Iran nuclear deal because we've got too many sanctions it's always the U. S. is false center Tim came from Virginia going down this line of thinking when I hear coordinated response for the president and vice president saying we're locked and loaded I worry that they're going to take military action and there is absolutely no reason for the U. S. to go to war or engage in military action to protect Saudi oil zero let the Saudis defend themselves I actually have no disagreement about the idea let's savage defend themselves the Saudis have to be able to defend themselves and that would have been enough but it's Tim Kaine this is a guy who ran with Hillary Clinton for president Hey it's never enough we sell them weapons we give them advice that's one thing but to be engaged in military action another war in the Middle East war to protect Saudi oil and were based what I believe is on some you know fundamental mistruths that the administration is is promoting what Mrs Astor there they're going around saying the attack was unprovoked the U. S. is provoking arrived we were in a diplomatic deal with them allow them to sell their oil we pulled out of the deal the US pulled out and we've we punish their oil economy and so around and a dent Ron's not a good actor you don't have to like this but we are provoking around every day with of sanctions and with military action are we provoking them to use still tankers as well we provided promoted. working them into sponsoring terrorism dear lord it's such an ugly ridiculous stretch and then there is represented Hana Maron who's got a plan to give a job just to anyone and by giving everybody jobs by Justin inventing jobs it'll pay for itself this is an idea that has a along the legacy was proposed by African rolls of felt it was supported by Martin Luther king junior it's going to allow its a pilot project that pilot program that is going to allow fifteen communities with and this country to create this program and I think ultimately when these jobs are created and people are pleased in these jobs it will pay for itself. well that's Jamie. that's Streamy what is the job doesn't matter is it necessary doesn't matter we just create jobs that pay for themselves I'll. that's not you create a job because you have a need to fill also was very clear government can't create jobs government can only create work only the private sector can create jobs I'll go over another time then the president. talking about what's going on in Israel the special election not sure how this is all going to shake out and reminding everybody that the special relationship is not just with Benjamin Netanyahu. people usually should know before the president. everybody was going to be very close and we'll see what.

president Nixon Donald Trump Nancy Corey Lewandowski Byron York Russia Lianna Fleming DNC Congress New York chairman Tony Washington Mensing Jerrold Nadler. Cory Congress. Muller owski
"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

10:12 min | 2 years ago

"mrs astor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"The author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what's what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was. Cranky. They had good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs. Took a while. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society. And all America, followed her lead. It was about how you conduct yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many you pencils at the table. What was the fish for? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new, and if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you. Yes. Yes. So boy Mark Twain would have the field field day today Whitney. He would he would indeed an fat Mark Twain and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, perhaps along a corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car there was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to have have photographs and some drawings and illustrate there is peacock alley. And there were both there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one booked a hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you know, this and Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside crippling away the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. You know that Waldorf the walled off. I was actually I last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards that everything just. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So in elaborate, so incredibly inside today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so-called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astor book, what would MRs Astor do? Of course, went to Newport toward those mansions again seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip. I had to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you better be there. If you were in the social elite.

MRs Astor Frankie boyer Waldorf Astoria Hotel Vanderbilt University William Randolph Hearst America New York Mark Twain Joseph Pulitzer US Newport ward McAllister professor of English Rhode Island Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt Rockefeller rockefeller publisher London Thomas Edison
This is the essential guide to manners

The Frankie Boyer Show

04:51 min | 2 years ago

This is the essential guide to manners

"The author of several books including a exposes in excess. And we're so thrilled you're with us today. Your new book is out, and it is called. What would MRs Astor do? And it is such a pleasure. So let's talk about MRs Astor, and who she was. And what's what are we missing today as as as most people listening to this may not know, MRs Astor was. Cranky. They had good to talk to you. And I to heard from my mother who do you think you are MRs. Took a while. And we could say she was the Queen of New York society. And all America, followed her lead. It was about how you conduct yourself. How you behave at the best your manners. Your speaking voice. How you should be with other people how you should be at a ball or on the street or at a restaurant. And let's remember that was a time of many many you pencils at the table. What was the fish for? What was the cheese knife? Mrs Astor new, and if you wanted to be a respectable person in America in the late eighteen hundreds you better know too. And she was the one to set the pace and teach you. Yes. Yes. So boy Mark Twain would have the field field day today Whitney. He would he would indeed an fat Mark Twain and MRs Astor, perhaps we're at the same place in the palm court in the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, perhaps along a corridor. That connected the Waldorf Anthea story at two hotels, and that car there was called peacock alley. It was a version of what today we would think of as the red carpet. So in in my book, I needed to have have photographs and some drawings and illustrate there is peacock alley. And there were both there. Fancy ball, dress balls. There was there was not necessarily enough room in one's private mansion ballroom. So one booked a hotel such as the Waldorf Astoria. The guest list was exclusive crowd stood out on the sidewalk to see who came in. What did the ladies wear? What were their gills? And of course, the reporters, the news media social media of the day was the press, you know, this and Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst competing with their New York newspapers and their reporters were outside crippling away the next day, all New York and all America knew who had attended. And what they wore. And how elegant they were what a day that was. Yeah. You know that Waldorf the walled off. I was actually I last year when I was in London. My friend booked the rooms at the Waldorf, and oh my gosh. It was just like going back in time. So elegant the courtyards that everything just. Yes. Different level, totally different level the decor. So in elaborate, so incredibly inside today, maybe some of your audience have visited Newport, Rhode Island, others might that's where the so-called cottages, which are really the mansions off, MRs Astor's era. That's where those those palatial summer homes are and they've been preserved and they are open to the public. So researching my MRs Astor book, what would MRs Astor do? Of course, went to Newport toward those mansions again seen them, you know, years past, but this was very different. This was a work trip. I had to get it. Right. Talk about those mansions talk about MRs Astor in Newport, six weeks in the summertime, and you better be there. If you were in the social elite.

Mrs Astor Waldorf Astoria Hotel America New York Mark Twain Newport Whitney Rhode Island William Randolph Hearst Palm Court London Pulitzer Six Weeks