22 Burst results for "Mr. Shelley"

The Year Without a Summer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

06:24 min | Last week

The Year Without a Summer

"The heat of summer is well and truly here in the Northern Hemisphere, the hot humid days just won't let up and living in new. York City I continue to be frustrated that central air conditioning is not as ubiquitous in homes and businesses, as it is in most parts of the southern United States where I grew up. Then, of course, it's always been substantially hotter in those southern states, although with climate change, the northeast is heating up more and more, but that does make me think sometimes. How the heck did people survive before? Joining especially in those very hot climates, farmers ALMANAC A few insights nothing to mind blowing people would take day trips to swing holes or up. To cooler weather, they kept windows and doors shut at midday to keep out hot air and delayed cooking or baking. Until the evening they ate refreshing. Cool treats and was available in homes, blue fans across blocks of ice, the biggest factor most likely however was it simply wasn't as hot as it is now at least in terms of extremes, quoting farmers, Almanac, the extra ordinarily hot summers that are commonplace today were virtually unheard of fifty to one hundred years ago in fact, seven of the top ten coolest, US summers on record occurred nineteen, hundred and nineteen fifty and quotes. There was one year however over two centuries ago now that it was a lot cooler. Eighteen Sixteen Aka the year without a summer quoting farmers. ALMANAC referred to by many names, including the poverty year and eighteen hundred and froze to death, the year eighteen sixteen was literally a year without a summer across much of the northern hemisphere throughout not only North America, but also northern Europe and parts of Asia in exceptionally cold summer, featuring killing frosts in July in August crippled food production crop failures in food shortages were. Were so widespread that rioting and looting became common in the United Kingdom and France on this side of the Atlantic. Many residents of New England and the Canadian Maritimes froze to death, starved, or suffered from severe malnutrition, as storms, bringing foot, or more of snow, hit hard during May and June. Many others from the region pulled up stakes and move to western New York in the Mid West where the cold was less severe. In fact, the year without a summer is now believed to have been one major catalyst in the westward expansion of the United States and quotes Nicole may have been less severe in the southern and Western us, but it was still highly unusual on July fourth eighteen sixteen. It was forty six degrees Fahrenheit in Savannah Georgia. For the record this year on July fourth and Savannah, it was ninety degrees. So. Why did this happen? It was due to one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history Indonesia's Tamboura. The volcano erupted on April Fifth Eighteen fifteen, continuing to up for a week and killing nearly all of the twelve thousand residents of Tim, Bora as well as almost all plants in animal life on the island, quoting the Paris review, countless tons of volcanic. Volcanic ash circulated in the upper atmosphere for years after the events blocked out sunlight and lowering average surface temperatures globally in parts, of North, America Europe temperatures dropped by more than eighteen degrees. Fahrenheit there was snow in New England July and dark rain clouds swept over Europe throughout the summer months in Hungary reports of Brown snowfall, tainted by volcanic ash and quotes. Understandably many thought the world was ending that the sun was dying. It's really fascinating. Though is some of the cultural ripples that this massive event caused. You may be familiar with the story of how Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was inspired to write Frankenstein as part of a spooky storytelling challenge when she percy shelley and Lord Byron and friends were holed up in a villa in Geneva. One stormy summer turns out. It was this dark, thunderous apocalyptic. Apocalyptic summer of eighteen sixteen. The crew had gone to Geneva, both to ride out the unusually rainy summer, but also to escape their various dramas in England, being stuck indoors for so much of their trip Lord. Byron challenged them all to write ghost stories to entertain one. Another Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein which would set the stage for all of science fiction to come? Also among the Geneva Villa guests was Lord Byron's personal physician Dr John Polidori. Who wrote short story for the challenge called the vampire, and this story is often credited with the birth of the Modern Vampire Romance. But those genre defining publications aren't the only cultural institutions to come out of the summer last year of Eighteen, sixteen among the mini shortages across Europe was a crucial shortage of oats which led to the starvation and deaths of countless humans and livestock, including at least ten thousand horses, not counting how many were also slaughtered to save money or become dinner German? Baron Carl Dreyer's and inventor in student of mathematics started trying to design a man powered form of transportation, while historians agree that he was inspired by the weather based os shortage. He also saw a need for an alternative to horses as crucial for war. Quoting the Paris review his first designs for human powered transportation involved complex conveyor belt, driven four wheeled vehicles, but raises breakthrough came when he turned his thoughts to balance drawing on his experiences, skating on ice ponds drains, put his faith in the power momentum and front wheel, steering to keep a two wheel vehicle rate. This idea became his love, machine or running machine and quotes, and this running machine would become the modern day bicycle. All of this makes me think about how many things will change or be invented from this moment that we're living through. And of course there's a lot of things we're already seen, and we're likely to continue to see some big cultural shift, but like who, out there is writing the next genre defining novel that people will still be reading two centuries later. Who's inventing something that will be innovated on for decades before becoming a ubiquitous ordinary mode of transportation. Maybe won't be those types of things specifically, but there are surely ideas happening and things being created that we won't realize the impact of for decades

Europe United States Lord Byron Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Paris Review Geneva New England Frankenstein Savannah Savannah Georgia Baron Carl Dreyer New York Geneva Villa Mid West Indonesia North America Atlantic United Kingdom
Chicago Weather: Freeze Warning Ahead

Ben Shapiro

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Chicago Weather: Freeze Warning Ahead

"Forecast freeze warnings up tonight we're down to thirty two degrees and knocking on the door of record cold for Chicago our record low at o'hare's twenty seven from nineteen eighty three early tomorrow morning forty one degrees this afternoon thirty two tonight with a freeze warning in effect sunshine Saturday fifty six and then what weather for mom's day Sunday showers high fifty two from the weather channel meteorologist Scott Lori Moore WLS AM eight ninety with another update thirty Mary Shelley out there right now just forty one at the lake forty three at midway forty one officially

Chicago O'hare Mary Shelley Scott Lori Moore
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 6 months ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

08:38 min | 9 months ago

Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

"We thought we would talk. Hello Classic movie monsters or I guess. A derivative thereof You know all the films like Frankenstein Dracula creature the Black Lagoon and salon boy. Oh boy so yeah so we are. Actually we each picked one classic creature. We're going to be sharing history in details about that creature in the story about the story about them so should we. Should we drinks. Yeah okay so I'm going to actually hand the mic over to Tracy and you because I she has forty drinks that she's going to be sure they're all so I'm focusing on vampires and at total wine there was actually quite a bit to choose from uh-huh depending on how elaborate you WanNa get with the topic. There was even like walking dead wine assume that seemed like sheeting. That seemed like that would be better for his. Obviously yeah it's because it's actually from the TV exactly. So I can't have rick on the cover and be thinking of Bram Stoker works for me with that said that I brought three drinks because being hungover and being two o'clock in me not having lunch it just seems weird like crack. Open a bottle of wine right now but I do have Francis Coppola diamond red plans talk a little bit about Coppola going on. Because you can't really talk about Dracula directly without talking about Coppola and then I also because I don't like I said if I'm going to open that I also brought four. They use my teeth to pull the bag out. I have a lovely temper neo. Oh I love to drag on. And we'll talk a little bit about what dragons dragons relates reverse dragged him the vampire at least in literature but like I said that's a bit heavy so honestly what I think I'm going to start with. Breath is a nice blood. Orange Margarita and S- To serve it in as they said I just live seven houses down I brought on my own Hamilton Sippy Cup when I say Hola pouring that that's awesome chewing that All amazing choices see. That doesn't take a random rationalization cody did you notice that mixture. You have doesn't actually have to kill it in it. Oh I I forgot I also brought my own patrol. Never leave home without it. So the monster I chose today is Where wolves so what? I'm drinking today. Is a Lithuanian heritage. Beer called where wolf it's literally called Werewolf and it has a quite a high alcohol content. So that's so funny because just right before for the show Tracy and I were talking about how we like picking drinks. That aren't just the name. They require narrative. Chris here's where we'll there's nothing with that sound so bitchy all right so Chris is still looking to see what kind of beer is is it. Strong connect have a taste. Today makes one of us. Oh that is delicious is really good. That's dangerous Oh my God. I'm just GonNa Covet this break a command. It's a Belgian dark El okay. I'M GONNA try that too. Yeah so for my drink. I'm actually Old England. I'm actually doing Frankenstein. And so and that was that was what I was GONNA do. I was I went into English. Oh I hear terrible and like you know what. I just can't drink this after my night. I'm going to get something good. Mary Shelley found something actually liked Mary. Shelley well well I whenever you look at all these old stories. I what I think of it is. They all kind of intertwined sometimes in ways and they're just kind of these wild crazy stories stories. So I've found a blackberry merlot called twisted Vine Ohio. Yeah good expected to get a couple. I rolls maybe like really all right so with that I will get into history I didn't want to do anything like Hollywood movie. Poor history because that would have been very long and excessive in instead I thought I would give a weird overview on the history of monsters the word monster itself derives from the Latin word monstrum meaning to demonstrate or monarch meaning to warn There's also the Latin word monstrum which Just means abnormal or supernatural but can also mean wonder or miracle generally speaking monsters are physical whether real or imagined representation of those things society as Dean leaned unknown or unnatural and most mostly those things that we fear and cannot explain physically. Speaking a monster may have some unusual characteristics. In fact one time things such as two-headed cavs or babies born with abnormalities were considered monsters so basically anything that was outside of what society claimed as quote. Normal aw was seen as monstrous of course as we know in addition to the physical characteristics. Munster's we'll do some terrible things or act out on the way beyond the standing of society being set that any one of us in this room could be considered a monster me with my blue hair and you both being super tall me with my gay so monsters there's all of you There are a ton of tons of monsters that go back in history. There were monsters that were found in cave paintings represented by animal human hybrids which unlikely cliches in real life hence monsters or at least at the conclusion that historians drew in Greek and Roman mythology monsters were perceived as a form of displeasure from the gods examples being cyclops Gorgon. Medusa Centaurs Sirens and so on. It seems that in religion like Judaism Christianity and Islam. They avoided talking about monsters aside from stories related to Satan and the power of evil in Hinduism monsters. A lot more prevalent. you see gods depicted with extra limbs or as an animal human hybrid and in native American culture. You have creatures such as the Wendy Go. Skin walkers and even sasquatch after the renaissance period with science becoming a new a fairly new thing. It really tried to attempt to explain what exactly monsters were to no avail in the gothic period we were graced. With two of the most infamous monsters Frankenstein and Dracula as well as some of the creepiest fairy tales by the brothers Grimm in psychology. Carl Jung tried to explain monsters as any central part of development might in that they were seen as the quote otherness within ourselves. I kind of discussed with this with you. Cody Day in that how I was talking how we need to balance the light with dark so I think that's the same thing it's arguing and our gang. We all have a fascination with monsters. This podcast is an example. Cody are armchair. Chair crypto zoologists. That even if these creatures don't exist it's that innate curiosity of the possibility of their existence as society changes the faces of monsters changing. We'll continue you to do so when before we used to be freed of things like trolls and elves. Today's where we fear things such as candyman or to say that once monsters collection of our society and then all the terrible things in it as well as an escape from those terrible things monsters are ever evolving and as long as we have fears and terrible things going on in our world they will. Oh not go away in my opinion. That's escapism at its best interest inc.. I have like a believer skeptic question but I guess I wanNA save it maybe. For debunk okay. But I'm afraid that I'm going to. I'm going to forget it. I'm going to ask now for both of Y'all are there any monsters or creatures that either of you actually believe in. Yes yes. That's probably what got me. Hooked on your podcast in the first place you were immediately talking about things that I have seen with my own eyes so I can only to Chris as a believer in many of the things. He's seen. Yeah I'm sitting there at work. Listen to going. Oh my God I saw that too says yes shadow people. I can't talk about that right now. Is Definitely I've had encounters encounters with shadow people. But as far as what we're talking about today. The closest is a boyfriend who thought he was a vampire. Oh Shit are you talking about that in your story. No I wasn't going to because it's complicated and messy advocates network. Deep Ball Game L.. Dated someone who thought he was a vampire sidelining. I think he was just really sexually confused. Needed to explore some things and that arena. He had seen the horror many

Cody Day Francis Coppola Chris Mary Shelley Tracy Black Lagoon Cavs Bram Stoker Carl Jung Rick Hollywood Old England Wendy Go Munster Dean Grimm Vine Ohio
The History of Women in Science Fiction

Breaking the Glass Slipper: Women in science fiction, fantasy, and horror

05:21 min | 1 year ago

The History of Women in Science Fiction

"Science fiction has often been represented as a boys club but you have in particular studied and written extensively about history of women running science fiction if women have always been present in his own room why do people don't know about this why do we just think about the men who have written science fiction right i mean i think we we do think about women in the shocker but only like at certain periods of time right like everyone willing to admit that mary shelley is is one of the founders of the genre certainly one of the i think the first authored a write a commercially successful science fiction story and then you know you get fast forward to the nineteen seventies add a the revival of feminism an all of a sudden you at authors like her glennon joanna raw in margaret atwood and then people are like oh wow women right science fiction fiction and of course just this past year n k jemison right became the first author of of any gender race to win three she goes in award so now we see women in the john ross but there's a huge gap between like eighteen eighteen as they nineteen seventy they add i don't really understand where all the women were so i started looking around at turns out sure enough there they were there we've always had women in the sean raw on from the very beginning women constituted about fifteen percent of all science fiction producer third an we know that by the time they started doing reader's poll in the nineteen forties and fifties that women counted for at least forty percent of the readership as well an today i'm not sure where we are in readership but i know that the numbers of women science fiction have doubled so worried about thirty thirty five percent now but i think the reason that we forget that there were so many women in between shelly an a the revival of feminism in that the the growth of science fiction is because women were sometimes writing we were looking at the kinds of fiction they were writing and then we also can't find it because it didn't always get anthology eyes right it's it's really hard the early science fiction community were all magazine science fiction and add those magazines often got thrown away or they didn't laugh they weren't preserved so if you don't have access to a university with a huge science fiction collection like i do it's really hard to find these women and then you know it's exacerbated by the fact that even even if you have anthologies a lot of early anthologies were written by people who didn't necessarily include women in those anthologies for one reason or another yeah i mean it's it's interesting because obviously you have the the men who were writing in this pulp magazines same guy that didn't disappear people still about that and it's like it's just frustrating but then i mean i don't know if there's anything in it but things like james chip tree you know perhaps people don't necessarily know that that this is a pseudonym right right i i think james kept tree right that was probably a pretty well now one interesting thing i've found is that most women did not you nailed it and then most women went by willie decidedly feminine name an and usually their own name although sometimes they would also take other names like willis lorraine which is a lovely name she was born mary mod done you could see why she switched her name but really what i found is most women did not match courageous men an austin women pictures were printed printed in the magazine in the very early magazines author had catches of themselves with their draw with their with their stories so an even if somehow you missed that'd be editor were quick to correct a reader who missed took female writers from el writer but what did happen and that one very early in the shot like in the twenties and thirties right so white after universal suffrage and the first wave of feminism and i think a lot of people were really sort of on board with thinking about how the future my female as well is mel an but then in the late thirties and forties you the backlash against feminism in that time when the first science fiction anthologies are being put together and those were put together by a younger group of men who really did you find participated in that that minutes backlash rhetoric right john campbell who wore that no woman could write science fiction even though he'd been publishing in magazines women did you know he had it that's how to the male got her start in her career he told her no woman could write a story and she said yeah i bet i can write a story you'll like it so much you'll you'll back me from warren and that's exactly what happened actually but as anthology forgetting put together women we know they're anecdote on an app that that women have told that they were cut out of the magazine so luckily i've known her with one of the pioneering science fiction authors she gold lingers back and a was really popular with people's you're looking big creating space opera often she had been invited to be to include a story in one of the first big client fiction anthologies andover supposed to be a party for everyone who's gonna be on thala g and she was sick and she couldn't go so she sent her husband an editor said oh you must be likely stone he said no no that's my white i'm just here for her as a place called her and they're like oh that's very interesting and then within two weeks you had a letter saying yeah we decided to drop their story from anthology i'd really hard not to put to ensure together on that

Thirty Thirty Five Percent Fifteen Percent Forty Percent Two Weeks
"mary shelley" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

16:27 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM. Let's go to the wildcard line Monique is in Sunland, California. Good morning Monique. Hi, richard. Thanks for having me on my pleasure. I want to tell you about a new Frankenstein movie that just came out, but since you're talking about near death experiences. I just wanted to pop in there that when my father was passing away. It was about a week until he crossed over. And I had asked him if he had seen my grandfather who had passed a couple years prior and was history teacher, and he was very detailed. He said. If I recall correctly, he said, yes, I saw them on a Tuesday at two thirty five PM. So that's pretty precise with that. That's pretty precise. Absolutely. So I I really feel that when someone's going into the different realm that they can see their loved ones. But anyway, back to this theater. I mean, this this film, it's called the tales of Frankenstein, and, you know, nice Halloween show and the premier is going to north Hollywood. At regency Bali clauses. Six theater on Wednesday. October twenty four th at seven PM, and I have a nice role in there. So I'm really excited about it. And I wanted to tell the coast fans about it. And you're welcome to calm, and George and all the other co host and what role do you play? I have a voice over I John and her name is Ma and I am the girlfriend of Frankenstein. Who's wow. Is is saved and transplant it now. Answer me, this is it Frankenstein, or Frankenstein. Whichever you prefer whatever. Well, I prefer the gene wilder Franken. Teen. Right now is this is this more sort of faithful to the Mary Shelley book this version. Yes, it is actually her anniversary of the two hundred anniversary of Frankenstein is this year. Are you? I knew I know she wrote in eighteen eighteen so that you're right. It would make it two hundred years, but I didn't know. I mean is it coming up on the actual months? The actual day is this is the release of the movie coinciding with the actual month or day. Well, the release came out actually on DVD are on October the sixteenth. I'm not sure of the actual day. I just know that this year two thousand eighteen is her hundredth anniversary of rating that pretty remarkable that wasn't just a movie about a monster. There was so many layers to that book and think that Mary wrote that two hundred years, you're right. That's wow. She was very talented will thank you. And congratulations on your your your role in Frankenstein. Let's say hi to. Let's see Curtis is in Primm Nevada Curtis. Good morning. Welcome to coast to coast morning. Good morning. Thank you for taking my call. My pleasure. Yeah. I was gonna talk you about a near death experience. I had last year when I had cancer that I got to speak to my grandfather. And he gave me a message. It's all about brothers that I had no idea about my whole life. Really? Now, you had so you had kidney cancer at you at some point. Will you will you dead for clinically dead for a few moments or what happened? Well, I believe. Yes. I was I crossed over to the other side. I had surgery ten o'clock in the morning on September eleventh last year two thousand seventeen and they had complications with the Vinci robot machine that they were doing the surgery with and I guess you had to change some tools or whatnot had to give me more medicine to keep you sleep Walker. Well, September twelve at three AM in the morning is man I finally woke up to my mother's. Voice calling my name and. The most beautiful surreal, peaceful place. I've ever been in my life. The most everybody says the brightest light white light did not hurt. My eyes whatsoever. And my grandfather standard their flannel shirt on sleeves rolled up jeans smoking a cigarette. What are you doing here? And I'm looking around trying to figure out what's going on. And I just don't I don't I don't know. I I don't know what's going on. It's not your time to be here. Why are you here? And I remember telling him again, I don't I don't know. You need to go back. Your time is not done on earth, your bombed. These you. Here's other people didn't need you. Please. Tell your mother did it was not her fault. I was not coming back. And I was just please tell your mother was not her fault. I was not coming back. And I love all you. And I woke up to my mother calling my name and just last month. My mom told me that she went to the. Chapel there at cedar Sinai Beverly Hills right after surgery and. Praying praying in it. Came over her told her that she had to get up there to the rim immediately force her way. And they're they're top to me and told all the nurses is. She needs to talk to me. Maybe I'll come back. If if I hear her voice so argued with them for probably twenty thirty minutes. They finally let her and to the rim, and I woke up immediately to my mother's voice calling my name. Dan, did you deliver that message from your grandfather? Yes, I did immediately. And that is like what the crazy thing is that my doctor versus anesthesiologists, my mom. My father my girlfriend at times were all there. And I said I just woke up like somebody snap their fingers eyes wide open. And I told my mom mom. I just talked to grandpa. I remember the look on her face. I what I just talked to grandpa. What you did? What did he say? I told her immediately broke down in tears everybody in the room is looking around. I will is part. Here's my mom's. No. No, my dad's been gone for over twenty three years. So then my doctors John versus everybody's jaw just dropped it about the floor. And I remember the look on everybody's face waking up out of a dead sleep like that. And I completely remember it all and since that day, my life is changed one hundred. For the better. What did what did your grandfather mean? An what happened, you know? I don't under-. I don't know. What he did? He went, okay. When he was sick in the hospital. He had like a triple or quadruple bypass surgery and. He was the doctors were telling my mom her brother and her sister that it's time that he's probably not coming back. He's in a coma that there's really not that they could do is heart is done guys. They just consider pulling the plug. Well, my brother was the one that took care of everything in the family. So it was her decision. Whether to let him live on life support or let him go. Well, she made that decision. Let me go. Brothers sisters have been mad at her entire life over that. He wasn't skills democrat. He was not gone, but. But he told me everything for her. And you didn't know this about what had transpired with your mom and your your grandfather. No, I had no idea. I'm forty one years old. I was probably seventeen eighteen then. And I I don't know. I don't remember any of that was never told to me. I was in the hospital. I remember being in the hospital, but I don't I was never told anything about that. Marco great. Great story Curtis. Yeah. Yes. So. I wish I would all over again and asking more questions. Awesome. Awesome experience. And well, here's hoping here's hoping you don't get the chance for a very long time Curtis. Thank you. Thank you so much. Appreciate it. All right again on the wildcard line TJ is in Minnesota. Hello TJ. Good morning. Good morning. I've got I'm curious a lot of callers on a lot of shows have been talking about all the drop and pour me. And I do have a near death experience as well that we can go into and that's created a lot of issues for my myself. But I I struggled to understand what happened to humanity. I mean. The war and everything I mean, we're a human race. And that's going to be just the way it is. What is it gonna take to fix that? And I have become a sensitive after a suicide attempt in two thousand. And so I understand there's another side. So we can take the conversation in a number of directions, and I'm I'm just curious on. Yeah. Let's let's talk about your near death TJ. I made a mistake in two thousand I lost my family. I'm a war veteran. Disabled war veteran. And. When that happened. I walk myself up from the outside. This kind of be gentle that way, I walk myself from the outside. And now I experience. A lot of things that most people can't see or hear. And so it's bec- complicated. Really? So you have developed you believe psychic abilities as a result of your near death experience. I wouldn't call them psychic believe, I would rather lean towards being a sensitive. Okay. Yes. And what sort of things are you sensitive to? I can tell when somebody's around. I can I can hear their voices. I can see I've got videos of them to prove that I'm not inaccurate. I have pictures of them to prove not inaccurate and recordings. I'm a big fan of coast to coast. And and I've I've gotten a lot of the products that coast to coast has. Well, thank you for supporting our sponsors. Absolutely. And and I did it just to prove. I wasn't crazy because I thought it was going crazy. I'll bet. Yes. Yeah. It's tough to deal with like like. There's TV shows, you know, that that Long Island medium, and and other TV shows. And so I started doing that. And it it really isn't something. I don't think most people want to do you're talking about communication with the dead. Yeah. It's not something that you want to do on a regular basis. It doesn't stop would be my Cup of tea. No. So you can't shut. You can't turn it off. I don't know how to turn it on turn it off. Right. Either way. I know they are these spirits are they trying are they do they want something from you. Do they want you to do? They want your help. Communication with other people. And when that happens it scares the heck out of. Do you see full on apparitions or do you just feel their presence? All all of the above. And it scares the heck out of everybody else around me. And it's real it's a real deal. I'm just not sure how to affect that. Like everybody else does. A tough situation. I'll bet I can't imagine. So you're just walking around. Let's say you're in the grocery store, and all of a sudden someone who is passed on will approach you in the freezer. I'll and say here here, I am I want you to I want you to contact my wife or my daughter or. It's ironic. He put it that way. Because one of the five or six times that it's happened. It was in a grocery store with exactly that this. Yes that is that is weird. And and when you see them if you see a full on apparition. I'm thinking of of the six percents, total total total human form, and you see them as as they. So do you see them if they had a violent death? Do you see them? You know with with their mortal wound, and that sort of thing or. Have. I have. And I know that they went through a struggle without question. Yes. So I got an answer that question. Yes. Yeah. That would be pretty hard to that would be pretty hard to take. Well, have you had it all started after I tried to kill myself? And I I you know, I mean for radio, I appreciate that. Oh, yeah. Getting the help that you need TJ to deal with whatever it is. Yeah. Through the struggle. But I am I am I'm in counselling. And and it's not a matter of me being crazy. It's it's a real deal. I've I've been able to plump information that the people that it scares are just blown away and making regional round the corner. And she told me exactly what I'm talking about. And I've never been in the house. So it's I'm one hundred percent accurate. I just don't know how to turn it on or off either way. What would you rather do turn it off permanently or be able to control it? I don't know. That's a really good question. I it's it's so intriguing that had like to know more. But at the same time. I'd like to turn off. It's it's a fifty fifty. Well, tice. I wish you all the best good luck. And I hope you'll continue to to get the help that you need not only for. What's going on in terms of? Your psychic ability, or whatever you wanna call it. But also the other issues that you're dealing with. And we thank you for your service. And we wish you God speed. Thank you, t j. Let's see I think we don't have time for another call. We will do we'll get to some more calls when we come back Bill in Williamsburg and Carlos in Hawaii and Mary in snowflake,.

Frankenstein TJ Curtis John Monique Mary Shelley kidney cancer Sunland wilder Franken California richard George Hollywood Sinai Beverly Hills Walker Dan Primm Nevada Long Island Marco
"mary shelley" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"This is the two hundred diverse array of Mary Shelley's, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and just weeks before Halloween what better time to celebrate than with a new movie about the Frankenstein monster, you know, brain transplants and villagers with torches and castles and mad scientists it's kind of a retro legendary horror, film, producer and writer. Don Donglu tells Canucks in an exclusive interview is new tales of Frankenstein. It's a throwback to class core films as an anthology, and a film that families can enjoy arm movie, but not in the sense of a modern horror where you know, you're kind of take your kids or you kind of repulsed by the gore. This is kind of an old fashioned monster movie who's written for the Flintstones, the RT's transformers GI Joe and host of horror films says it was the movie he wanted to make the ratings board. It would probably gonna compete g thirteen or something. It's not the kind of movie you you'll be barest. If you take your wife for the kids to sell releases next week Bob rail, Kanok said seventy just reading it is that time of year. It turns out to be a. Pretty tough way to earn three hundred bucks. But six people say it was worth it because they had to spend thirty hours lying inside. Open coffins part of a pre Halloween challenge. Put on by the six flags magic mountain during that time, they not only had to deal with the weirdness of being in a coffin. But also drenching rain scary lightning in the sky as this weekend storm passed over after doing all of that one of the participants just grabbed his money and drove right home, but the five others while they stuck around is he they wanted to ride the roller coasters. Why not? Coming up in five minutes at the bottom of the hour. Or search continues for a gunman who opened fire at Glendale restaurant and banquet hall when have more on that right now, it's seven twenty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the Fahd's. This report brought to you.

Mary Shelley Don Donglu Glendale restaurant six flags Bob rail producer writer Kanok five minutes thirty hours ten minutes
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"I want to give these people. A metal argue that the reason super intelligent AI is potentially dangerous is because it is being programmed to be masculine est. An imperialist using Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and the caney in psychoanalysis. That's their feminist AI paper. They argued that a fat body is legitimately built body as a foundation for introducing a category for fat body building into the sport of professional bodybuilding. It went into a journal called fat studies. That so good they, they found something called feminist glaciology. Okay. This is a real thing barely. So they copied the idea and then they wrote a feminist astronomy paper arguing that feminist and queer. Astrology should be considered part of the science of astronomy, which will brand as intrinsically sexist and researchers loved it. Then they wrote a paper about trans people in the workplace says, ma- menus, male preserves to enact dying macho. Masculinity just masculinity discourses. In a way society at large won't accept they published a paper best summarized as quote. A gender scholar goes to hooters to try to figure out why it exists. It's so it's so great def- Amelia rising common experiences pretending to be mystified by them, and then looking for social constructions to explain them. Sure. Oh, man, I can't even read this one on the air. Wow, it's it'd be so..

Mary Shelley
"mary shelley" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"And so you all that knowledge and that wisdom inside his loss. In fact, a lot of things in human culture rashly created, intrigue states. So for example, Mary Shelley came up with Frankenstein inner dream yesterday the song yesterday Paul McCartney came up with a dream the periodic table came to a chemist in his dream right Elias, how created the the sewing machine in his dream? Like what are we dreaming about late at night that were just forgetting about. So remember your dreams and just having the intent to remember your dreams was the whole process. People listen to it. But what I would say. Is just have the intent of deciding I wanna remember my dreams and that'll help. And then there's journaling, you know things. The second thing I would say is, once you got a bed to make your bed, you're like, Jim, what is was that through my brain, right? Well, first of all, clean environments, important for clean the for clarity. Brain it is, although they say, you gotta let your sweat evaporate off the bed. Otherwise you're creating dust, mite reproductive territory. That's a totally different conversation. Maybe maybe make your bed after you do something else and let it air. Let it let that that's an important distinction. Nobody wants. Nobody wants to have dust mites. So you have making your bed is is important because number one clean environments, you know this when you clean your laptop or or your office, whatever you have clarity of thought ride your external world's reflection controlled. But the other reason is at a high level at a meta level, how you do anything is how you do every day and your training yourself, right? And so how you do anything, you're training yourself to be excellent. First thing in the morning and you're starting your day, you know this also, there's a science to momentum either. Positive or negative, like people could spiral down. You start getting that jelly Donut. You start. Now we're now searches binge-watching this. It just goes down, you know, down down, but also success has momentum. Also, you could build success breeds success. So why not make your bed? How long does it take a minute, two minutes and you start with excellence and you could build on that. You start with a win. And the other reason why when you come back and night, you come back to your bed. You come back to success racing, fanatical, full circle. A third thing you can do for singing the nights connected us mites a first. The third thing you can do to jump start. Your brain is brush your teeth and you're like, Jim, that's so obvious. Well, I have well a little. I spent a lot of years not jump starting my brain. If you know what I'm saying that would say, I little twist on it. I would encourage people based on the research is to challenge yourself to brush your teeth.

Jim Mary Shelley Paul McCartney Elias Frankenstein two minutes
"mary shelley" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"While back we did a show about frankenstein was on the anniversary of mary shelley's book if you remember that show am i asked you what is the biggest frankenstein of our lifetime or what will be the biggest frankenstein our lifetime well if you're sean parker one of the founders of facebook you here it's facebook you hear that social media is a monster that certainly is not tame to me it's like guys you figure it out this is a programming mechanism that we had no idea or maybe we did in the back of our minds we let we let it go anyway we did it anyway a former vice president of user growth at facebook chenoweth power taya had this to say when he was speaking at a stanford graduate school of business this is very telling as well listen to this i want to bring us back to the point that you're making about exploiting consumer behavior consumer internet business and you said that this is a time for soul searching and social media businesses and you were part of building the largest one what soulsearching are you doing right now on that i feel tremendous guilt i think we i think we all knew in the back of our minds even though we feigned this whole line of like they're probably aren't any really bad unintended consequences i think in the back deep deep recesses of our minds we we kind of knew something bad could happen but i think the way we defined it was not like this it literally is a point now where i think we have created tools that are ripping apart the social fabric of how society works that is truly where we are and i would encourage all of you as the future leaders of the world to really internalize how important this is if you feed the beast that beast will destroy you if you push back on it we have a chance to control it rain it and it is a point in time where people need to heartbreak from some of these tools and the things that you rely on the short term dopamine driven feedback loops that we have created our destroying how society works no civil discourse no cooperation misinformation mr truth.

mary shelley sean parker facebook vice president dopamine stanford
"mary shelley" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WLOB

"Nineteen fifty one and it was radio adaptations of works by famous writers like edgar allan poe mary shelley scott fitzgerald william faulkner john steinbeck ray bradbury and many others the scripts were by george leifer and ernest kunoy and others and it was directed by andrew c love the cast members included parley baer jeff corey howard culver john danger paul frees virginia gregg and many others we have an episode now for you called i am not a stranger it's from may eleventh nineteen fifty one here's part one of nbc short story nbc presents short story tonight i am not a stranger by james st some of the finest short stories of the decade and certainly the most engaging have turned up in the pages of what are known in the trade as the slick magazines tonight as nbc presents short story we turn to a southern romance which appeared first in the pages of the saturday evening post and was included in an excellent anthology of post stories the story i am not a stranger by james street here now i am not a stranger by james street the rain have begun a gentle southern rain since leaving richmond virginia all towns begun to look alike a square a confederate monument post office cafe but this last time was different that was a sign on the outskirts town of list please drive carefully we love our children as i approached the town square i pulled over to the curb girl was sitting on a bench unrest spreading live oak she had no rela and the rain was blowing against a spray she glanced up and smiled so we were old friends she tilted back her head and laughed hey what do you do up in new york.

john steinbeck ray bradbury george leifer gregg nbc james street richmond new york edgar allan poe mary shelley scott fitzgerald william faulkner ernest kunoy andrew c parley baer jeff corey virginia
"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

"The downward trend include more prescriptions being for a shorter duration a nearly eight percent decrease in new patient starting on opioid prescriptions and far fewer high dose prescriptions i'm mike hampton frankenstein author mary shelley is a genius according to national geographic tv the network announced thursday that the nineteenth century writer will be the next subject of the genius franchise a mini series on a particular historical figure the first series featuring albert einstein premiered last year the second profiling artist pablo picasso starts next week shelly was a prolific writer in the early eighteen hundreds with frankenstein in particular still alive as a piece of literature the shelley series will air in two thousand nineteen most likely in the spring the same creative team of brian grazer and ron howard's imagine entertainment will make it a new associated press poll finds americans are concerned about the possibility of deteriorating relations with russia china and north korea ap correspondent ben thomas reports a majority of those surveyed fifty six percent expect us relations with russia will worsen over the next year while just less than half forty eight percent see things souring with china and despite signs of diplomatic progress with north korean leader kim jong un on nuclear weapons nearly half see the same thing coming with north korea one respondent seventy year old john parker fort lauderdale florida says president trump has opened up a whole bucket of worms with too many countries all at once he adds it's almost like he's trying to get us into trouble ben thomas washington i'm all about low prices but dammit cheap way of course i had this weird best value superpower.

ben thomas washington president ben thomas imagine entertainment albert einstein mike hampton trump john parker fort lauderdale fl north korea mary shelley kim jong un russia china ron howard brian grazer frankenstein shelly pablo picasso
"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

"Radio television digital news association estimates the local tv news employment at twenty seven thousand one hundred journalists this year the american society of news editors has stopped keeping count of newspaper employment but one estimate puts it at twenty five thousand or slightly below it was only back in two thousand that newspaper employment more than doubled that of tv news operations the rtd na said in a report thursday that people who can do multimedia jobs are in demand at tv stations the black pat on should expensive farm equipment from an nba hall of famer to tractors were stolen from scottie pippen's farm in arkansas according to the arkansas democrat gazette pippen's family is offering a twenty five hundred dollar reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction pippen owns the livestock farm with his brother the six time nba champion who now lives in florida is a native of hamburg arkansas frankenstein author mary shelley is a genius according to national geographic tv the network announced thursday that the nineteenth century writer will be the next subject of the genius franchise a mini series on a particular historical figure the first series featuring albert einstein premiered last year the second profiling artist pablo picasso starts next week shelly was a prolific writer in the early eighteen hundreds with frankenstein in particular still alive as a piece of literature the shelley series will air in two thousand nineteen most likely in the spring the same creative team of brian grazer ron howard's imagine entertainment will make it this is fire fighter raphael poor yet reminding you that every day portion.

scottie pippen arkansas florida mary shelley writer pablo picasso shelly frankenstein brian grazer ron howard nba albert einstein imagine entertainment twenty five hundred dollar
"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

"Will donate a minimum of one million dollars in two thousand eighteen to the firehouse subs public safety foundation by donating point one three percent of every purchase meeting is still apparently on between president trump and north korean president kim jong hoon but his ap washington correspondent saga megani reports trump says he'll be ready to pull the plug if he doesn't think it'll amount tomorrow the president already sent his cia cheap to meet with kim jong noon the most highlevel us contact with the regime in nearly two decades he says he will meet with kim in the coming weeks and do everything possible to make that a success but if he doesn't think it will be he won't go if the meeting when i'm there is not fruitful i will respectfully leave the meeting at a news conference with japan's prime minister the president says the us is also working hard to free three americans detained in north korea though he did not directly say whether free them is a precondition to meeting kim saga megani washington frankenstein author mary shelley is a genius according to national geographic tv the network announced thursday that the nineteenth century writer will be the next subject of the genius franchise a mini series on a particular historical figure the first series featuring albert einstein premiered last year the second profiling artist pablo picasso starts next week shelly was a prolific writer in the early eighteen hundreds with frankenstein in particular still alive as a piece of literature the shelley series will air in two thousand nineteen most likely in the spring the same creative team of brian grazer ron howard's imagine entertainment will make it sign racism has led to charges against world cup host russia fever made the decision tuesday less than two months before the tournament begins racists challenge for aimed at black french plays during france's three one friendly win over russia in some petersburg last month fee facet disciplinary proceedings have been opened against the russian football union russia's deputy prime minister who's overseeing worldcom preparations told state news agencies on tuesday that russia was cracking down on racist fans and the f you said it's cooperating with the fee for investigation russia was previously charged with racist behavior by its fans at the last two european championships on both occasions the rfu paid a fine it's the third ray system case this.

frankenstein worldcom russian football union imagine entertainment albert einstein kim jong rfu petersburg russia france brian grazer ron howard firehouse subs shelly pablo picasso writer mary shelley north korea prime minister
"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

"By state law chinese ecommerce giant alibaba has agreed to step up investments in thailand the founder of the shopping giant met with highlands prime minister on thursday and signed an agreement to help set up a smart digital hub to facilitate trade between thailand china laos myanmar cambodia and vietnam reports of the hub would also serve as a research and development center for alibaba it's reportedly set to be completed next year the government said alibaba also plans to help train tie entrepreneurs and small businesses and ecommerce and to set up an online tourism platform the national guard california's preparing to deploy to the us mexican border ap's shirley smith reports the state's governor says they've worked out a deal reached an agreement with the federal government that the state's national guard troops will deploy to the border to focus on fighting transnational gangs as well as drug and gun smugglers but governor jerry brown says the guard cannot handle custody duties build border barriers or have anything to do with immigration enforcement some troops may be deployed this month they're expected to stay until at least september the thirtieth and they'll be assigned to all parts of the state not just the border meanwhile homeland security says the final details are still being worked out i'm shirley smith frankenstein author mary shelley is a genius according to national geographic tv the network announced thursday that the nineteenth century writer will be the next subject of the genius franchise a mini series on a particular historical figure the first series featuring albert einstein premiered last year the second profiling artist pablo picasso starts next week shelly was a prolific writer in the early eighteen hundreds with frankenstein in particular still alive as a piece of literature the shelley series will air in two thousand nineteen most likely in the spring the.

pablo picasso albert einstein jerry brown vietnam myanmar thailand frankenstein shelly alibaba writer mary shelley shirley smith us california cambodia prime minister founder
"mary shelley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And am 820 npr news and the new york conversation today science friday wonders what scientists can learn from mary shelley's frankenstein the saiful i book club gathers to talk ethics monsters and modern frankenstein's and that's today at two on 939 fm we're talking to diana henry and we're talking about british food what makes something british and all the influences that go into today's british food so diana we've been we were just talking about full english breakfast for you're talking about as an arnold bennett on life but i wanna talk about you wrote a whole article on porridge i'm we're just going to stick with breakfast for awhile and you had whole arctic article on porridge and you wrote about something you at you call the par aged renaissance in britain can you talk about that well it had very much faster than because if you have steel caught or pin had oatmeal it takes quite a long time to cook i'm we have the quick short as well the rule does that you can do in about ten minutes but people basically were or having coal cereal stat and nobody wanted you really stand for for even ten minutes stirring in the morning i'm dan i don't really know what happened i think partly because of the nordic thing people were going over there i'm having parties which is a bigger thing basically and in denmark and um of this country moving companies in it is here and then coming back and starting to make it not just with oats but to make it also with ryan spelt and barley and this coincided with worrying about carbohydrates these were slow these carbohydrate so people can call me i mean it's sold goes with the teenage anything a little bit but at the same time i think it was more broadly to do with health and everybody was more concerned about it and then people to do different things with it and it just suddenly seemed very delicious i mean there's a um a girl in london he has a place called 26 grains and i was there at the weekend you couldn't you couldn't get a table in space that meets the parties cafe background that's all she does that's an easing in the afternoon but pretty much porridge and she's done some very interesting things with it i mean when i think i'd you've interesting points i mean i.

mary shelley arnold bennett britain denmark london new york diana henry ryan ten minutes 26 grains
"mary shelley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is science friday i am i replayed show when i say frankenstein massive thirst for stock may be a certain palefaced both nick giant from movies are cartoons loosely based on a book by 18yearold mary shelley published two hundred years ago today if you're reading along with these sifi book club this winter he might also be thinking about how lonely that monster seems but does frankenstein also bring to your mind modern creations perhaps artificial intelligence gene editing technology algorithms that might be coming monsters in their own right fight facebook yeah facebook it may seem like a stretch but if you're looking at wellintended creation and one of them facebook that seems to have some monstrous unintended consequence his my next guest say look no further than silicon valley in companies like facebook there's the facebook fiasco with fake news and foreign propaganda or maybe those more harmless but ridicule worthy startups like the now defunct juicero remember when a four hundred dollar juicer with no better than squeezing with your own hands that's what we're going to be talking about this hour my guests are aaron griffeth a senior writer at wired she's written extensively about startup culture but also says the techies are quickly becoming the wall street bankers of this decade welcome erin i thanks for having me and embrago associate professor of philosophy and religion at the university of north texas in canton texas he wrote a piece for the conversation listing silicon valley as one of the many modern frankenstein's welcome it's great to be here thanks let me start with you ain't frankenstein victor frankenstein creates of being live turns into a monster is silicon valley at a fair comparison will i think that's a good question um we have to think about not just with the moral of frankenstein is but whether this story which it in two hundred years ago can still speak to us not just across the industrial age but now the postindustrial in digital age and i i guess i'd like to start by suggesting the book may be antiquated in some sense for a couple of reasons so may be the answer is no we can't learn something for frankenstein about uh silicon valley one.

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"mary shelley" Discussed on Brains On!

Brains On!

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on Brains On!

"This is a curio from the brains on where we're serious about being curious brains on is supported in part by a grant from the national science foundation this is brains on i'm molly bloom and i'm here to transport you to a dark and stormy night in eighteen sixteen now eighteen sixteen is known as the year without a summer all over the world the weather was cold and dreary crops and grow well in some rivers flooded there were ice storms in july in new england it was not a normal summer people weren't aware at the time but it is now believed that a massive a volcano in indonesia was responsible for this strangely cool and stormy time a volcano called monk tamboura erupted the year before and it sent a massive cloud of dust into the atmosphere so big in fact that it had an impact on the whole world's climate and it was during this year without a summer at an 18yearold named mary shelley was staying at a house in switzerland she was there with some friends many of the riders they were on a beautiful lake but the weather force them to stay inside as is the appropriate activity for a cold night they were reading a book of go stories allowed around a fire inspired one of mary's friend suggested they each try to write their own go story and out of mary's imagination frankenstein was born mary shelley's novel frankenstein was published two hundred years ago in eighteen 18 in it a university student named victor frankenstein assembles different dead body parts into a single body and is able to bring this body back to life victor frankenstein abandons his creation forcing the creature to try to find his way in a world that is afraid of him there's a lot that happens in this story but the source of inspiration for this important moment came from science.

molly bloom indonesia mary shelley switzerland victor frankenstein two hundred years
"mary shelley" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KKAT

"I call it a pyrrhic victory because it's a month of frankenstein antibodies tonight with frankenstein knows set of with the creation monster that was created keno the ending of mary shelley's story a monster come back to destroy you come alive and attack us nancy very nice she has been an interesting here of course it is a very interesting year across the board for everybody in the world of politics put a very interesting year most that's because of the drama in the chaos that's been hanging out there that is very little do a lot of the other stuff but you can give him dis across the board apps in some areas season in some areas this president but if there is an a there when it comes to the economy it's a victory if he wants to run in four years because we still vote with our pocketbook and if the world is sitting fat fatter and happier we're not going to break something that's going in a direction that's right hell i'd love yogurt if i if this is just me if i may him four years from now i look up and i've seen the economy grow tremendously record unemployment still we got more people back in the workforce the we we've cut down some of that deficit we fix some of these trading pros maybe i've got another person appointed to the supreme court you look back and you say to yourself my work is done here i'm gonna go out on top i'm drop in the microphone i'm going to sandy colfax and give i'm going to get out before i get pushed that's what i would do bull sake 'cause they're still not giving up this ghost when it comes to you know russia but you can say all you want nancy but remember they're just like the republicans with obama they're not going to as far as their concern their lesser they're they're they're going to look lesser to the people if this is a success because we've set it up to be that way and they're gonna be like why did we think of tax cuts because that's not a we are because we have all of the.

frankenstein mary shelley president russia nancy obama sandy colfax four years
"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on AP News

"Modified bill was the bit of monday calling for up to three years in prison for breaking the law a baby named frankenstein was born on halloween in winterpark florida oscar gary frankenstein's birthday was four days after the due date but the family says there super excited that oscar waited parents kyle and jessica frankenstein say baby oscar weighed in at six pounds nine ounces and as twenty inches long the baby's grandmother jennifer frankenstein tells w k m mg oscar is her first grandchild and the frankenstein families first baby born on halloween although she does have a thirteen year old daughter who shares the same birthday as frankenstein author mary shelley a head of president trump's announcement of his choice for a new fed chair the federal reserve is leaving its benchmark interest rate unchanged for now ap correspondent jennifer king reports fed policymakers have decided to leave their benchmark rate unchanged in a range of one to one point two five percent but they're hinting they may raise rates in december a fed statement notes that the economy has been rising at quote a solid rate despite hurricanerelated disruptions last week the government estimated that the economy has been growing at a three percent annual rate in the last few quarters despite severe damage from hurricanes fed officials believe inflation will resume a slow rise towards a two percent target rate there are also proceeding to shrink the central bank's bond portfolio that was built up during the two thousand eight financial crisis i'm jennifer king that the new.

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"mary shelley" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on KOMO

"No way can start in mary shelley's frankenstein in 1994 and of course every good icon deserves a smooth dressed gene wilder and peter boyle ian young frankenstein two now culture frankenstein is more than a doctor were monster as freely points out in his work just about every left field technological development has earned the frankenstein tag from cloning to robotics to genetically modified foods franken paid for the past two hundred years frankenstein has always represented science runamuck crazy we will see whether i'm crazy can that's unlikely to change for the next two hundred years when he komo news grachev corny get extra candy tonight kobo do so i wonder 44 we're going to talk about trigger treating for both the kids annuar pets than how it could be careful you have costume pick out there i was door at this year oh how nice i'm dressed up as of paul manafort i think i don't know what's the radio you never know right hopper traffic checked so we still have our crash in seattle northbound i five approaching 520 partially blocking the right lane but there are delays as he slog your way along from the west seattle bridge they also the crash in bothell south of route five seven at two hundred ninety six that taking up the right lane was thinking about a halfmile slow down there southbound i five is now failed in from five 2003 downtown and southbound 405 is that in turkey for my nike tsekov creek your next report's at 1224 i'm kiera jordan on komo news komo forecast for the sunshine goes down the clouds are gonna roll in the low about forty six degrees and we're gonna get a chance for rain tomorrow with a high of about fifty three showers at about fifty degrees for thursday in friday it looks like going to have some rain on saturday and sunday as well 52 tacoma 55 now in seattle everett and olympia twenty minutes of nonstop news continues on komo news one thousand fm ninety seven seven and komonewscomfire 145 on.

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"mary shelley" Discussed on You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mary shelley" Discussed on You Must Remember This

"As we discussed last week the first director assigned to frankenstein was robert florey who wrote the films original treatment condensing mary shelley's novel and then he adapted his treatment into a screenplay and directed a test real featuring lugosi and makeup but universal moved florey onto murders in the room mark and rewrote his screenplay stripping his credit after james wale agreed to direct frankenstein once wale took the job any chance of bela lugosi playing the monster vanished whale believed the monster needed to be played by an actor that was more as he bought it likeable whale believed that lugosi had the ability to be truly frightening but frankenstein's monster was not just scary he was also scared and whale wanted an actor that could do both that casting was easier said than done and while every other part and the film was cast a vacancy remained for the monster boris karloff had dozens of film credits by 1930 but his name wouldn't have been recognizable to anyone other than the most eagleeyed credits watch hurts as a character actor an early thirties hollywood he mostly played supporting part says crooks in gangster movies or dawned degrees of brown or yellow face to play ethnic villains every step forward such as aplomb role as a muckraking journalist posing as a man of the cloth and mervyn low roy's fivestar final would be followed by a step back or sideways in the gloria swanson romance tonight or never released three weeks after frankenstein.

director robert florey mary shelley frankenstein bela lugosi boris karloff roy james wale hollywood mervyn three weeks