14 Burst results for "Mr. Culverhouse"

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Shifting gears here this very interesting store you talk about the concept of putting your money where your mouth is or walking the talk the university of alabama board of trustees voted last friday to return to give back a twenty six point five million dollar donation give it back to a top donor who recently called on students to boycott the school over the stage new abortion ban if i'm not mistaken alabama has adopted i think it's a heartbeat ban so once a heartbeat can be detected than abortion is no longer legal hugh f culverhouse seventy year old real estate investor and lawyer had already given twenty one point five million dollars to the university after his pledge last september with the rest to come but in a news release last Week. He urged students to participate in a boycott of the school. hours later alabama announced it was considering giving back his money the biggest donation ever made to the university and is expected to remove his name from the law school that was named in his honor that is a big big big change of course while cobra house said he has no doubt alabama's retaliating over his call for boycott the university said the dispute has nothing to do with that instead officials there say it was an ongoing dispute with culverhouse over the way his gift was to be handled university said that on may twenty eighth the day before culverhouse is boycott call it's chancellor recommended to the trustees that they returned the donation that is that is just gigantic money in academia especially in alabama University said donors may not dictate the university admission administration and that Culverhouse had made an made numerous demands regarding the operation of the school university administrators, and trustees did not respond to requests for comment Culvahouse acknowledged telling the university that the law school should admit more students, and that his donation was intended to fund scholarships to achieve that goal. However, he said he thought the matter had been resolved after the trustees vote, Mr. Culverhouse said that he had his father, who bears, the same name senior had donated to the university over the years in part to rid Alabama of a certain stereotype. He said, I quote, we are the land of the backward. We are Hicks. We, we lacked the sophistication to see two sides to an argument. What you have done, what have you done Alabama, you have affectionately put a twelve gauge in your mouth and pulled the trigger. Culverhouse said you have reinforced, the horrible stereotype, that my father, and I have tried so hard to eliminate. robert kelton a professor of higher education at seton hall university in new jersey said it's unusual for a gift of this magnitude to be returned so quickly adding that disputes of this start typically develop over years and typically honestly when there's usually contract language have been involved in some some business along these lines and there is explicit language that says that donation does not give the donor any thorny over setting policy or steering the administration of the school professor catch and said this the dust up could pressure more politically liberal donors to cut off support to the university so that may have been a miss misdirected course of action there culverhouse did not attend alabama but his parents did and the business school bears the name of eucheuma house sooner a wealthy tax lawyer and developer who owned the n._f._l.'s tampa bay buccaneers culverhouse called the university officials liars over there Account of the situation, he acknowledged there were some disagreements over the handling of, of his gift. He said he told the university president steward bell that the law school should admit more students, and that his donation was to fund scholarships to achieve that. But he said he thought the matter had been resolved. He also said he was stunned by the university stand. But he also confessed you probably shouldn't put a living person's name on a building. Because at some point, they may get fed up and start talking. He pledged a record twenty six point five million dollars to the university and September. But in a news release last week or students to participate in a boycott of the school, I suppose, that's not going to class not not enrolling not supporting the football team, obviously football power and the decision or his, his concern about that is over the states abortion lot, of course, university Alabama is a state school. The Alabama of a ban would make abortion at any stage of pregnancy. A crime punishable by ten years in to life in prison for the provider with no exceptions for rape, or incest. The loss. Eight set to take effect. November is the most hardline of the antiabortion members measures in acted this year as of states emboldened by the new conservatives on the US supreme court take aim at Roe versus Wade. Of course that was the nineteen Seventy-three ruling that legalized abortion nationwide. So I don't know what, what do you think about? That if, if when somebody donates in his, his goal he says was to increase the, the enrollment in the law school there. If that's his plan. That's what he wants. And if there's, there's specific language in that in the document, which is effectively, a contract that says, by virtue of receiving these contributions, there is no authority, and it is not the intent that the institution shall take direction on policy or administration from the donor. on the one hand if if they're standing on principle and saying we don't need your money if if you're going to boycott the school and call for something that's disruptive to the institution and we stand by our convictions as a as a school a state school in the state that had called for this this particular course of action on the other hand is it does it become predictable that that it it could lead to more incidents in the future where people may be inclined to to retract their donations are called for the donations to begin back and it could tie things up in litigation i was part of an effort not terribly long ago in terms of a a group put together the still stands to enhance the effectiveness of the criminal justice system in the state of california there was a rather generous donation made to this cause and at the behest of somebody highly placed in in public policy in the state of california the government of the state of california That the, the donors called for that contribution to come back. And my response was now this was a donation of contribution may with no strings attached. It was not alone. It was not, not anything with any conditional component to it. So no that, that donation, stands, and ultimately, that was accepted by the donor. But is it a donation? Is it a gift, if it is a gift, especially when it's specifically established through language that, that gift comes with no strings attached. Is it wise policy to, to stand on principle, and refund that money and not be able to do the things that the institution had sought to achieve, and perhaps growing, the, the law school would be something that would be beneficial to that institution, maybe other schools or colleges within the university that, that could benefit from it as a result. The, the scholarship idea, there are different ways to, to donate scholar. Ship causes that don't have a specific link to the to the school of choice. But the person who applies in his admitted to various schools can be the beneficiary of scholarship contributions to, to ultimately meet the same and state, but not restricting it to one particular school. You got thoughts nine one six nine to one fifteen thirty eight hundred eight three four fifteen thirty for long distance callers. Get your calls right after this. Don't go away voices. You.

alabama Mr. Culverhouse university of alabama alabama University seton hall university california cobra house US chancellor Hicks Culvahouse tampa rape professor new jersey football president robert kelton
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WDRC

"I think that people should live by their principles. I certainly try to live by my principals every single day. And I tell you on the air if I decide to violate one of those principles, I better have a pretty good reason for doing so, but one school has decided to return the largest donation the school ever received because they're standing by their principles which, as I said, is something I admire specially a lot of people live by their principles until it costs them some money or it takes away something. They really want to have thought I'd bring on Rachel Bavard, whose political director for the conservative partnership institute, Rachel. It's good to have you back. The university of Alabama announced this is just a about a month ago about few weeks ago announced its plan to return to return a twenty six and a half million dollar donation from the largest single donor in university history. The announcement came just hours after the donor Hugh Culverhouse junior called for students to boycott the university. In response to Alabama's recent ban on abortion Culverhouse claims, the university returned his donation because of his statements on abortion university says no, no, no. That wasn't. The reason they insist their decisions based solely on Culverhouse's attempts to control the administration. He then went on to publish an op Ed about a week ago in the Washington Post attributing the university's decision to his stance on abortion, Rachel, if donor is going to comment on a major public policy issue, than, than we're going to turn the money back and tell him we don't want this. Money for our school. Let's be clear did more than just comment here. He actively promoted telling the students to boycott the school because of Alabama's recent recent abortion that pretty significant position for him to take. And it was a pretty significant provisions for the school to take to say, no here, you can have your twenty six million dollars back, by the way, which was the largest nation the school had ever received. So this talk about principle. That's exactly what university of Alabama did here, and they pretty much sent shockwaves through the community doing a lot of people stood up applauded for it. Well, and in fact, I'm wondering how Culverhouse even ties together the university and decision made by state lawmakers in that state who at least in principle are speaking of principles in principle. They are the representatives of all the people in that state not just the people at the university. So why is it that, that I mean he, he has his own right to his point of view on? Abortion and the Alabama legislature has a right as a state to, to take a position on abortion from a legal standpoint. But why, why is that decision by the state of Alabama being tied to the university of Alabama, which is just an it's a state funded or state owned educational institution, but does it have to take responsibility for what the legislature does? In his mind, apparently the university did not come out and protested decision loudly enough. He really wanted the university to take position opposed to the state legislature had done. They refused to do that. And then he made his displeasure known by saying, okay, you need to boycott, the state, and everyone who does not come out and opposed as loudly enough. He wanted an outrage mob, any didn't get it. And there, he organized or attempted to organize the boycott of the institutions that, hey, we can't, this is directly, contrary to what we believe. So here's your money back. Stop bothering us new funny because Rachel I happen to be on the side of the state of Alabama. I believe that the law that they passed absolutely appropriate. And I thought that was completely in keeping with the principles of very conservative state. Like, Alabama, I applaud them for making the decision the state certainly had a right to change the law, and Mr. Culverhouse can object. But when he says that he thinks that because he's given. A big donation to the university of Alabama that he has a right to then use them as some kind of political sounding board. I think he's completely wrong. But it does show the extent to which the pro-abortion crowd will go. He was literally willing to, to demand that the university be boycotted by students because of the decision made by the state legislature. And I don't think it would probably an easy decision for them to say this money back. But that is ultimately, what they decided they said, look, we have to right to make our own choices, visits extreme of the position that taking, as you said against the physician of representatives in the state of Alabama. So we've seen this across the country as more and more. Abortion bans are being passed, you're seeing corporate America. You're seeing a lot of people come out and say, hey, boycott, the states, you saw number of Hollywood celebrities. They will not be doing business anymore, Georgia because of the Georgia abortion ban. So, and I gotta tell you Rachel. That's the one I find kind of find funny, people listen to my show now that my wife and I both watched the entire series of game of thrones. Right. There's a young lady on there. I think she played. Yes. She played sunset stark. I can't recall her name right off. And but this young lady announced, I will no longer shoot movies if a company decides shoot movies in Georgia, and I thought hold on, you just spent eight years shooting, a series, that was shot largely in, in Northern Ireland, are you aware of Northern Ireland Ireland's position on abortion? And until there have been some changes recently, but Northern Ireland for a longtime abortion was absolutely illegal and apparently sons stark had no problem being an actress in Northern Ireland. But now has a problem when part of America makes the same kind of decision the Northern Ireland held to for so long. It's it. These folks are really showing their hypocrisy. Selling their ignorance you saw Mark Hamill, and Natalie Portman both of whom film, the Star Wars movies in Tunisia. Say the same thing about Georgia apparently unaware that in Tunisia. Illegal to be gay, you get toned in thrown in jail for being gay. So why are they okay filming a movie there, but they can't film here in the United States because of an abortion ban in Georgia. So ignorance at a level of hypocrisy that I think is shameful, honestly for them. But it's now part for the courses virtue signaling is expected from people on the left from the Hollywood elites, and from people with money like Culverhouse. So it's an unfortunate thing we're seeing thing in a lot across the country. And by the way, Rachel Culver house is Georgia reser, Alabama resident is not has been for longtime. Correct. But, but his he unaware of the politics of his state, he lives in by choice. Obviously, if he's got money like that he could move anywhere in the world, he wants to move, but he chooses to live in Alabama, knowing that it's a very conservative state, and then he surprised by the fact that the Alabama legislature with the changes in the supreme court says now's the time to take a stand for life. And he somehow surprised that the state of Alabama is taken that position problem with this type of virtue, signaling, it has no respect for the will of the people has no respect for Representative democracy. It just cannot abide people who disagree with them, and therefore anyone who disagrees is in the evil and not entitled to that opinion. So that seems to be where he Culverhouse come down on this question. You know, I guess I if I've been the university, I think I would have made a different decision said, we've got your money, you may disagree with us on principle, but we you've already given the donation we're going to hang. Hang onto it, because giving it up hurts the students and handing it back does not change anything and you can run around, writing op-eds. So the Washington Post all you want. You can run around suggesting that students boycott the university. We don't think they're going to we think they like going to the university owned, by the way, they'll be I mean, I think it's Rachel I get people who occasionally say, LARs, why does your show sometimes have commercials on it from liberal groups, and I said, because their money's just as green as anybody else. And if liberals are willing to run liberal commercials, political commercials on a show that espouses conservative principles. I think I feel like I've, I've just had Christmas in June because because you don't often get the liberals to support you on your conservative positions. But if they're willing to put their money out there to support a conservative show. I say God bless them in their ignorance. You know, I think university of Alabama, I did not want to be by carbon by Culverhouse Rachel Bavard is.

Culverhouse Rachel Bavard Alabama university of Alabama Georgia Mr. Culverhouse Hugh Culverhouse Washington Post Hollywood Northern Ireland America Northern Ireland Ireland political director Rachel Culver Tunisia legislature Ed United States Mark Hamill
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

10:51 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Peachtree street three oh seven. I'm Mark Alewine? News ninety five AM seven fifty WSB. Depend on it. Dana show. I think just in general Republicans understand the terrorists are attacks on American consumers, and we don't want to see them in place term, nor do I believe President Trump. Does he he's using as leverage and trading Goshi Asians at the use them as leverage in this situation? Brilliantly, quite honestly, I know for my part after those news reports were published last week I called Mexican embassador and said, regardless of what you read in the press understand if the president, imposes terrace and he's dead serious about this. They're not votes. Override it so take that threat. Very seriously. You know you have to do more. This is an uncontrolled situation the border. Well nets Ron Johnson from Wisconsin. And he's correct on that. If so, that was, I guess that was the. It was Friday. I guess it came out Friday after we finished everything I was trying to remember the timing of when that news came out, and I was really fascinated by some of the media reactions for it as well which we're going to get into welcome to the show. I'm Dana lash at D lash on Twitter, official data lash on Facebook, also. And you can find me on Instagram and Snapchat, and all that jazz. So the situation with regards to the trade, d- agreement, he's decided to revoke because the terrorists were going to raise incrementally. I think like what five percentage points every certain period? So it, it actually worked out, everyone said that it wasn't going to work out, but it kinda worked out, right? I, I mean, I don't like tariffs as much as the next person and I get really, you know, I get a little bit iffy. About it when the discussion comes up, but everything that I heard going into this was that it was going to fail spectacularly, and it was just going to cost American taxpayers so much money, which suddenly they were concerned about American taxpayers. That's okay. They can suddenly concerned about American taxpayers, but it ended up actually working out quite well. Although if you hear people like Chuck Schumer, and everyone else, they kept saying what, by the way, what fascinated me about this after the president announced it and said that they came to a deal and everything that he was discussing originally with the implementation of the tariffs was that was now off the table, because Mexico and there and he said that they were going to be more struck were concerned, not just their border there with the United States, but also other countries with Guatemala believe, and as he said, this abundance of an. Looking at just random tweets of it because I saved a bunch of them. A bunch of lawmakers were saying, yeah, we don't we don't even have any confirmation. This is probably a lie just like random, some of them were not big named Democrats. That's probably ally. Sure thing, Trump, wink, wink, and then a bunch of verify journalists were doing the same thing. And then, what was it like thirty minutes later Mexico released a statement, basically confirming everything that he had said and nobody walked. Nobody said nobody walked any of that back. I thought that was just really fascinating nigga that. So with regards to this. He he's also using this with China to the president wants to use the same strategy. Well, maybe it'll maybe it'll work. Maybe it won't China's a little bit of a different horse. But we will see however this is. I mean it's good we and I'm, I'm pleased to see Mexico do at least something with regards to the border, because previously, I mean, so I think what was that they said that they were going to, and we're going to talk more about this later. They were going to also send out their own national guard to help police, the border, it's not entirely formed yet, but they're trying. So that's something, and they're also going to make it to where individuals that are crossing over and trying to claim amnesty, in the United States, you're going to have to do, so I originally in Mexico, which was literally something I asked Friday McGuire. They not why is that not the thing if you're, if you're trying to claim amnesty, then wouldn't you wouldn't you just stop in and you just stop in Mexico and just do that. I just seems. To be the most obvious thing we're going to get into that a little bit more in depth. But there are a couple of other things that I wanna point out to before we get swinging into everything. I was really, really pleased university Alabama. I was so pleased to see them do this. So the university Alabama, they don't play, by the way, and what ended up happening is that in this again. Everything happens like Friday. Right. The moment we go off air. Everything happens at Friday. What happened is that the university of Alabama, they got a big was it the twenty seven twenty six million dollar donation from this guy named Hugh, Culverhouse, June? And he sent he had this donation to the school of law, and they renamed it, the Hugh Culverhouse junior school of law at the university of Alabama. But then after Alabama passed that heartbeat Bill. He went off and was telling people to boycott the state, and he was telling people to boycott even the university of Alabama. He he was urging students, this is in a have this, this is from the Montgomery advertiser. He had already given a twenty one million to the university after his pledge last September the rest of us still to come, but he actually put out a statement where he was urging people to boycott the school because of the state's abortion law so university of Alabama didn't take too kindly to that. So they returned his whole damn donation. And they chipped his name off the building. They literally chipped his name off the building. They stay took video of a to its savagery of which there is no comparison, they Bama, went out, they sent to dudes, and they chipped, the men's name off the side of the building with I don't even know what those tools are called the cheaper tool things, chisel, stink, you, it's Monday. Don't judge? Kane. Kane comes in clutch. We're glad you're back. So he I mean, they didn't even mess around the moment. He I mean they're like, not done. And so, then he got really indignant about it this, Mr. Culverhouse, which sounds like a good name because you're immediately thinking, hamburgers, but no, no. This is not the good one. So he got really mad. And he said, oh, it's, it's such a shame that they don't like free speech and all of this jazz, and, oh, it's so bad. I mean I simply disagreed with the abortion on liquid Banda does so again, bama's not playing. They released all of his emails, and then look what? Oh, he. And then it showed that he was trying to boss them around us to how to spend his money. This had nothing to do with the abortion thing. Apparently they were getting tired of this, this Bossie moneybags for quite some time. And this is just the straw that broke the camel's back. He was like, I guess, I get to control everything about you, because I'm donating money and bama's like, nah, you can give us your money. We'll put your name on the building, but by that's about it. You don't get to tell us what to do. You're not the boss of us is. I'm just boiling this down. And so after he was I mean, who does that, by the way, you're, you're a big donor, too? And he lives in Florida. He doesn't he doesn't live in Alabama anymore, but he's like, but I was born and raised there. Yeah. But you left and said he was trying to use that card in play to that. And then he was trying to say it was because the universities backwards and they completely they got mad at him over the abortion thing. He was telling people to boycott the school that, that is what did it? And then before then they have all of these emails, and it showed that there, it's all. Over the internet now where he was trying to tell the board of trustees how to run the entire school, and it was to the point where it was becoming a distraction to their primary mission of educating people. And so they said that was pretty much it I had, if I have a feeling that without this law, this was going to happen anyway. But the fact that he was trying to be the sympathetic figure and lie and act as though. Oh, well, it's because these people are these people are bigots. They couldn't stand difference of opinion. Actually, it seems like it was you do. That's what it seems like. So I want to dive into that a little bit more because that was so delicious that it's one of my favorite videos ever. It is. It is one of those satisfying, things like office space when they took the printer out to the cornfield or the field or whatever. And they beat it with bats. It was similar to that. I mean you could it was just it was like it was like office space, but university style, and they had these two dudes and Bama shirts and they went up there and just chip chip chip roll tide and they just took that man's name right off that building. That was amazing. So we got to come back to that. I gotta do it better Justice than just this few minutes. Oh, and then and then did you guys see this story about this little bakery? Gibson's bakery. Probably didn't you probably weren't following it. Were you were you following this little, we talked about it once in a headline and that was pretty much about that's pretty much as far as we went with it? Because it was still an ongoing thing. So this bakery, got itself in trouble, because overland accused it of racism, because it prosecuted three students for shoplifting. This is back in, like two thousand seventeen they three students shoplifted from this bakery. They were caught and the bakery decided to pursue it. But hey, social Justice warriors says it's not a crime, depending on your ethnicity. And so they accused the bakery of racism, and apparently they had an agreement where they do business, the overland wet, the students accused it, and then apparently the university got on track with it. The they, they, they did it. So then the bakery decided to file suit in which they accused the vice president of Oberlin college of libel and slander, they alleged that the administrators supported students in an unfounded campaign to paint the establishments owners as racist, the so and it went against the dean of students, and all of that the students held us big protests in front of their their bakery. And, and one of the students by the way was white, but it's still racism, apparently because if it's against a progressive, it's the same thing. And one of the Alan Gibson, who is the, the little guy that owns it..

Bama Mexico president Alabama President Trump Dana lash university of Alabama United States Mr. Culverhouse China Alan Gibson Mark Alewine university Alabama Kane Montgomery Chuck Schumer Hugh Culverhouse junior school Wisconsin vice president
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley Audie Cornish today. The House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today judiciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced a breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill, and to let's start with that agreement reached between the judiciary committee, end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turn over in his words key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important to remember that Muller, did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president obstructed Justice in the reported made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front and kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capabilities now there's this evidence. Should start coming over as early as today. He said every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the what did you did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor tomorrow. With Democrats are bringing to the floor tomorrow, essentially authorizes, the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people administration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas. It's a type of civil contempt now they're says if bar DOJ complies with this request that you're not going to have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off. The resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony and documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is, you know, a bit about politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move for four forward formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration accountable. It is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit. In the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report, then we turn on C span, and basically, we see the former Nixon White House counsel, John dean. I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why did they call them, you know, they're clearly trying to draw a parallel here between Nixon what Nixon was to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump? Dean did invoke Watergate and saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment. This is a term that was used for a secret report that was written by. Watergate prosecutor Lee under war ski who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee that kind of said, here's the case. Now you go make it. The top Republican on the committee, Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kinda made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what? Right, none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Muller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Collins said to listening to people on a cable news panel talk about what they think should happen. We should note that dean is off. Syncing on cable news talking about this very matter. But it does it also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the Miller report, they really struck out so far. So this is in some ways seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is going to come up and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state, at least that is the reason according to cover house. The university says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing at admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of covert houses gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this, in an op-ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to history. On abortion. I the time second that time, third, the timing and the timing as you see it was what the timing is. It was a matter of our my press. Release came out, and with a short period of time, the chancellor's statement came out in which he said he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money I don't believe that, and believe if they decided to return money they would have returned it before. I just want to make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks. But no, thanks so reconcile that with this E mail that I'm looking at, I'm looking at a copy of an Email dated Saturday, may twenty fifth. It's from you to the president of the university of Alabama Stewart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance. You're, you're asking for money back. This, this was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion. Yes. Can I explain that please? Okay. Ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of the schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half. It was my statement that you have not spent any money at a twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships then return the ten million advanced and I'll pay it back to you over the schedule. I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated win there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I had the big issue was I've felt the class. Sizes were too small. They were denying to Alabama students access. At some point the bane greet increase the starting class eight percent that result, ma'am. Baiter issue, it sounds as though you believe that with your money. With your gift should come some say into how the law school is run, sure. If you look at my speech when it was announced, I clearly stated I intend to be in mentally involved. I'm not giving the money that my name on a building, none of the money I've ever given way. I don't give for buildings. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama. Say yet. My whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are loose in the middle. Class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked for dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama. Deb hello. Hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure. I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad second. What does the university have to say about covert houses allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in quote, what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy? And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press, since he called on students to boycotting university on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion ban into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from Email records released by the school that covers house himself had I. Asked for some of that donation back. Well before that. Right. And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming today as well. What let you? Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott. There was this E mail traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and the outside world frightens him now, I spoke with a law. Professor who says, faculty, the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene in academic policy date back as far as? February this professor also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is how much control does a mega donor deserve were indeed and two very different and conflicting views on, that, it sounds like playing out there in Alabama.

Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama Alabama judiciary committee Robert Muller House Judiciary committee John dean Jerry Nadler Culverhouse DOJ president congress President Trump Susan Davis Doug Collins NPR attorney White House
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Mary Louise Kelley and Audie Cornish today, the House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today judiciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced a breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill, and to let's start with that agreement reached between. In the judiciary committee, end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turn over in his words key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important. Remember that Muller did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president obstructed Justice in the report made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front and kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capabilities. Now, they're said this evidence should start coming over as early as today. He said every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the did you did did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor tomorrow. What Democrats are bringing? The floor tomorrow, essentially authorizes, the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people administration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas. It's a type of civil contempt now they're says if bar DOJ complies with this request that you're not going to have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off. The resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony and documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is, you know, a bit about politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move for four forward formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration accountable is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit of in the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report. Then we turn on C span, and basically, we see the former Nixon. White House counsel John dean. I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why did they call them, you know, they're clearly trying to draw a parallel here between Nixon what Nixon was to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump? Dean did invoke Watergate and saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment. This is a term that was used for a secret report that was written by. Watergate prosecutor Lee war ski, who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee that kind of said, here's the case. Now, you go, make it the top Republican on the committee, Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kind of made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what? Right, none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Muller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Colin said to listening to people on a cable news panel talk about what they think should happen. We should note that dean is often seen on. On cable news talking about this very matter. But it does it is also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the Miller report. They really struck out so far. So this is in some way seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is going to come up and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state. At least that is the reason according to Culverhouse, the university, says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing, and admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of Culverhouse's gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this in an op Ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us. Today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to his stance on abortion. I the time second that time, third, the timing and the timing as you see it was, what of the time, it was a matter of hours, my press release came out and with a short period of time. The chancellor statement came now in which he said he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money. I don't believe that I believe it say decided to return money. They would have returned it before. I just want to make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks. Thanks cora. So reconcile that with this Email that I'm. Looking at I'm looking at a copy of an E-mail dated Saturday, may twenty fifth it's from you to the president of the university of Alabama. Stuart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance. You're, you're asking for money back. This, this was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion. Yes. Can I explain it, please? Okay. The ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of this schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half it was my statement said, you have not spent any money at a twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships then return, the ten million, I advanced, and I'll pay it back to you over at the schedule, I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated win there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I had the big issue was felt class. Sizes are too small. They were denying to Alabama students access. But at some point the denegrate increase the starting class, eight percent that result mom, major issue, it sounds as though you believe that with your money with your gift should come some say into how the law school is run. Sure. If you looked at my speech when it was announced, I clearly stated I intend to be in mentally involved. I'm not giving the money that my name on a building. None, not the money I've ever given as way I don't give her buildings. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama. Say it Ma whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are loose in the middle. Class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into it. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama hijab. Hello, hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure. I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad second. What does the university have to say about covert houses allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in quote, what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy? And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press since he called on students to boycotting. Diversity on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion man into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from Email records released by the school that covers house himself had I asked for some of that donation back. Well before that. Right. And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming today as well. What left out you. Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott. There was this E mail traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and the outside. World. Frightens him. Now I spoke with a law. Professor who says, faculty, the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene, and academic policy date back, as far as February, this professor, also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is how much control does a mega donor deserve were indeed and two very different and conflicting views on, that, it sounds like playing out there in Alabama NPR's,.

Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama Alabama judiciary committee Robert Muller House Judiciary committee John dean Culverhouse Jerry Nadler DOJ congress president Susan Davis President Trump White House attorney NPR Bob Muller chancellor
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:35 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tonight's will ease up at nine o'clock and tomorrow will be another spare the air day. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley. And I'm Audie Cornish today, the House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today, doodoo -ciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced aid breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill, and to let's start with that agreement reached between the judiciary committee, end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turnover in her his words, key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important to remember that Muller, did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president of struck did Justice in the report made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front. And kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capabilities, now they're said this evidence. Should start coming over as early as today. He said every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the what did you did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor tomorrow. With Democrats are bringing to the floor tomorrow, essentially authorizes, the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people administration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas. It's a type of civil contempt now they're says if bar and DOJ complies with this request that you're not gonna have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off. The resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is, you know, a bit about politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move forward. Four four word formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats a chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration accountable is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit. In the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report, then we turn on C span, and basically, we see the former Nixon White House counsel, John dean. I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why do they call them, you know, they're clearly trying to draw parallel here? Between Nixon what Nixon wants to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump. Dean did invoke Watergate in saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment? This is the term that was used for a secret report that was written by. Watergate prosecutor Lee under war ski who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee that kind of said, here's the case. Now you go make it. The top Republican on the committee, Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kind of made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what right. Like none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Miller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Collins said to listening to people on a cable news panel talk about what they think should happen. We should note, the dean is often seen on cable news talking about this very matter. But it does it is also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the Miller report. They really struck out so far. So this is in some ways seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is gonna come up and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state. At least that is the reason according to Culverhouse, the university, says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing at admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of Culverhouse's gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this, in an op-ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us. Today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to his stance on abortion. I that time, second that time third, the timing and the timing as you see it was, what all the timing is, I it was a matter of our my press. Release came out, and with a short period of time the chancellor statement came out, and which he said, he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money. I don't believe that I believe it say decided to return money. They would have returned it before. I just wanna make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks. Thanks core. So reconcile that with this Email that I'm. Looking at I'm looking at a copy of an Email dated Saturday, may twenty fifth is from you to the president of the university of Alabama Stewart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance here. You're asking for money back this, this was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion. Yes. Connects plane that please. Okay. The ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of the schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half. It was my statement that you have not spent any money at twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships then return the ten million advanced and I'll pay it back to you over the schedule. I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated when there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I had the big issue was I've felt the class. Sizes were too small. They were denying to Alabama students access at some point the denegrate increase the starting class by percent that result, my major issue. It sounds as though you believe that with your money with your gift should come some say into how the law school is run, sure. If you look at my speech when it was announced, I clearly stated I intend to be in mentally involved. I'm not giving the money that my name on a building, not the money I've ever given as way. I don't give for building. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama. Say it Ma whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are losing the middle class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked for dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama, Deb. No hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure. I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad second, what does the university have to say about Culverhouse's allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in quote, what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy? And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press since he called on students to boycotting. Versity on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion ban into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from Email records released by the school that covers house himself had I asked for some of that donation back. Well before that. Right. And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming today as well. What left out you. Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott. There was this Email traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and the outside. World. Frightens him. Now I spoke with a law. Professor who says, faculty, the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene, and academic policy date back, as far as February, this professor, also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is how much control does a mega donor deserve. Right. Indeed. And two very different and conflicting views on that it sounds like playing out there in Alabama NPR's, Debbie Elliott, thanks so much. You welcome. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Eighteen minutes.

Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama Alabama judiciary committee Robert Muller House Judiciary committee Jerry Nadler Culverhouse NPR congress DOJ president John dean Susan Davis President Trump Debbie Elliott White House Bob Muller
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:01 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fire, but there's no indication of anything more than that videos posted by onlooker showed emergency vehicles in the street. But no obvious damage to the skyscraper we will continue to update. You on traffic and other developments activities are rallying outside Manhattan criminal court building this afternoon and evening, after a transgender woman died on Rikers island last week. New York City's department of corrections says Twenty-seven-year-old Laline Palumbo was found unconscious in her cell Friday afternoon. She was pronounced dead about an hour later. A spokesperson Ford says they found no evidence of foul play. Palanca was arrested in mid April on misdemeanor, assault and drug possession charges. The investigation is ongoing and a New York City councilman with roots in the Dominican Republic says public concern about safety on the island nation. Maybe out of proportion with reality broken council member Rafael SB. Now is the son of Dominica. Immigrants and says he's been in touch with his father who lives on the island Espinel says so far reported deaths of American tourists appear to be isolated incidents. You're making your decision on whether or not to visit the what's happening in the contract to hotels is compatible. You say that you sit in the United States because Miami's having one or two hotels, Espinel says visitor should simply remain cautious and be aware of their surroundings. Currently sixty eight degrees in central park. Support for NPR comes from the law firm. Cooley LLP with offices in the US Europe and China Cooley, advises entrepreneurs investors financial institutions and established companies around the world where innovation meets the law. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley. And I'm Audie Cornish today, the House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today judiciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced a breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill, and to let's start with that agreement reached between the judiciary committee, end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turn over in his words key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important to remember that Muller, did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president of structed Justice in the report made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front. And kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capabilities now. There's. Said this evidence should start coming over as early as today. He said every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the what did you did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor tomorrow, would Democrats are bringing to the floor tomorrow, essentially authorizes, the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people in the ministration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas. It's a type of civil contempt. Now they're says, if bar and DOJ complies with this request that you're not gonna have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off. The resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony and documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is, you know a bit about. Politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move for four forward formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration accountable is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit. In the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report, then we turn on C span, and basically, we see the former Nixon White House counsel, John dean. I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why do they call him, you know, they're clearly trying to draw a parallel here between Nixon what Nixon was to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump. Dean did invoke Watergate in saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment? This is the term that was used for a secret report that was written by Watergate prosecutor. Leandra war ski, who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee, that kind of said, here's the case. Now you go. Oh, make it the top Republican on the committee. Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kind of made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what right. Like none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Muller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Colin said to listening to people on a cable news panel talk about what they think should happen. We should note, the dean is often seen on cable news talking about this very matter. But it does it is also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the Miller report. They've really struck out so far. So this is in some ways seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is gonna come up and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state, at least that is the reason according to covert house. The university says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing at admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of covert houses gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this in an op Ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us. Today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to his stance on abortion. I the time second that time third, the me and the timing as you see it was, what all the time, it was a matter of hours, my press release came out, and with a short period of time the chancellor statement came out in which he said he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money. I don't believe that I believe if they decided to return money they would have returned it before. I just want to make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks. Thanks core. So reconcile that with this Email that I'm. Looking at I'm looking at a copy of an Email dated Saturday, may twenty fifth it's from you to the president of the university of Alabama Stewart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance. You're, you're asking for money back. This, this was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion connects plane that please. Okay. Ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of the schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half. It was my statement that you have not spent any money at twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships then return the ten million advanced and I'll pay it back to you over the schedule. I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated win there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I had the big issue was I've felt the class. So since we're too small they were denying to Alabama students access. But at some point the Dana greet increase the starting class eight percent that result, major issue. It sounds as though you believe that with your money with your gift should come some say into how the law school is run, sure. You look at my speech when it was announced, I clearly stated I intend to be in mentally involved. I'm not giving the money that my name on a building, none of the money I've ever given as way. I don't give for buildings. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama. So yet, Ma whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are losing the middle class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama. Hi, deb. Hello. Hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure. I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad true second. What does the university have to say about covert houses allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in quote into what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy? And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press since he called on students to boycotting. Versity on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion man into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from Email records released by the school that covers house himself had I asked for some of that donation back. Well before that. Right. And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming today as well. What left out you. Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott. There was this E mail traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and the outside. World. Frightens him now I spoke with a law. Professor who says, faculty, the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene, and academic policy date back, as far as February, this professor, also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is how much control does a mega donor deserve where indeed and two very different and conflicting views on that, it sounds like playing out there in Alabama NPR's, Debbie.

Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama Alabama judiciary committee Robert Muller House Judiciary committee Jerry Nadler Culverhouse NPR congress John dean United States president New York City Rikers island Susan Davis President Trump White House Manhattan
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KCRW

"Seventy five in Santa Monica at four, oh, six this is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley. And I'm Audie Cornish today, the House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today judiciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced a breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill. And so let's start with that agreement reached between the judiciary. Committee end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turnover in his words, key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important to remember that Muller, did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president of struck did Justice in the report made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front and kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capabilities, now there's this evidence should start coming over as early as today, he said, every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the what did you do did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor. Tomorrow would Democrats are bringing to the floor. Tomorrow, essentially authorizes the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people in the ministration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas. It's a type of civil contempt. Now they're says if bar DOJ complies with this request that you're not going to have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off the resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is, you know, a bit about politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move for four forward formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration accountable is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit. In the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report, then we turn on C span, and basically, we see the former Nixon White House. Counsel. John dean, I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why did they call him? You know they're clearly trying to draw a parallel here between Nixon. What Nixon was to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump. Dean did invoke Watergate in saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment? This is a term that was used for a secret report that was written by Watergate prosecutor. Leandra war ski, who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee, that kind of said, here's the case. Now, you go, make it the top Republican on the committee, Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kind of made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what? Right, none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Miller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Colin said to listening to people on cable news panel, talk about what they think should happen. We should note that dean is often seen on cable news. News talking about this very matter. But it does it is also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the Miller report, they've really struck out so far. So this is in some ways seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is going to come and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state, at least that is the reason according to cover house. The university says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of covert houses gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this in an op Ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us. Today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to his stance on abortion. I that time, second that time third, the timing and the timing as you see it was, what all the time, it was a matter of hours, my press release came out, and with a short period of time the chancellor statement came out in which he said he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money. I don't believe that and believe if they decided to return money, they would return it before I just wanna make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks, but no, thanks core. So reconcile that with this E mail that I'm. Looking at I'm looking at a copy of an Email dated Saturday, may twenty fifth it's from you to the president of the university of Alabama Stewart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance. You're, you're asking for money back. This, this was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion. Yes. Can I explain it, please? Okay. The ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of the schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half. It was my statement that you have not spent any money at twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships then return, the ten million, I advanced, and I'll pay it back to you over the schedule. I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated win there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I had the big issue was I've felt class. Sizes were too small. They were denying to Alabama students access. At some point the denegrate increase the starting class eight percent that result, major issue. It sounds as though you believe that with your money with your gift should come some say into how the law school is run, sure. You look at my speech when it was announced, I clearly stated I intend to be in mentally involved. I'm not giving the money that my name on a building, none of the money I've ever given as way. I don't give for buildings. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama and say, it Ma whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are loose in the middle. Class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama hijab. Hello, hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure, I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad second. What does the university have to say about covert houses allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in, quote main into what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy. And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press since he called on students to boycotting. Versity on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion man into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from Email records released by the school that covers house himself had I asked for some of that donation back. Well before that, right? And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming through today as well. What left out at you? Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott there was this Email traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and the outside. World. Frightens him. Now I spoke with a law. Professor who says, faculty, the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene, and academic policy date back, as far as February, this professor, also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is, you know, how much control does a mega donor deserve were indeed and two very different and conflicting views on, that, it sounds like playing out there in Alabama.

Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama Alabama House Judiciary committee Robert Muller John dean judiciary committee Jerry Nadler DOJ Culverhouse president congress Susan Davis President Trump NPR Watergate Bob Muller Santa Monica
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley. And I'm Audie Cornish today, the House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today judiciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced a breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill, and to let's start with that agreement reached between the judiciary committee, end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turn over in his words key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important to remember that Muller, did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president obstructed Justice in the report made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front and kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capable. Abilities. Now, they're said this evidence should start coming over as early as today. He said every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the judiciary did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor tomorrow, would Democrats are bringing to the floor tomorrow, essentially authorizes, the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people administration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas. It's a type of civil contempt now they're says if bar DOJ complies with this request that you're not going to have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off. The resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony and documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is. You know, a bit about politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move for four forward formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats a chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration accountable is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit. In the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report, then we turn on C span, and basically, we see the former Nixon White House counsel, John dean. I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why did they call him? You know, they're clearly trying to draw a parallel here between Nixon what Nixon was to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump. Dean did invoke Watergate in saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment? This is a term that was used for a secret report that was written by Watergate prosecutor Leandra war ski, who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee, that kind of said. Here's the case. Now, you go, make it the top Republican on the committee, Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kind of made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what right. Like none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Muller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Collins said to listening to people on a cable news panel talk about what they think should happen. We should note, the dean is often seen on cable news talking about this very matter. But it does it is also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time, you know, getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the mullahs report. They really struck out so far. So this is in some ways seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is gonna come up and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state, at least that is the reason according to covert house. The university says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing at admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of Culverhouse's gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this in an op Ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to history. On abortion. I time, second time third, the timing and the timing as you see it was what all the time. It was a matter of hours, my press. Release came out, and with a short period of time the chancellor statement came out in which he said he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money. I don't believe that I believe it say it decided to return money. They would have returned it before. I just want to make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks, thanks. So reconcile that with this Email that I'm looking at, I'm looking at a copy of an Email dated Saturday, may twenty fifth it's from you to the president of the university of Alabama Stewart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance. You're, you're asking for money back. This. This was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion news. Can I explain it, please? Okay. Ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of the schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half it was my statement said, you hip not spent any money at twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships been return, the ten million, I advanced, and I'll pay it back to you over the schedule, I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated win there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I hit the big issue was I've felt class. So since we're too, small, they were denying Alabama students access. But at some point the Dana greet increase the starting class eight percent that result, major issue. It sounds as though you believe that with your money with your gift should come some say into how the law school is run sure he looked at my speech win. It was announced I clearly stated I intend to be in mentally involved. I'm not giving the money to have my name on a building, none at the money I've ever given way. I don't give for building. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama. Say it Ma whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are loose in the middle. Class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked for dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into it. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama hijab. Hello, hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure. I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad second. What does the university have to say about covert houses allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in quote, what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy? And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press since he called on students to boycotting. Diversity on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion man into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from Email records released by the school that covers house himself had I asked for some of that donation back. Well before that, right? And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming through today as well. What left out you. Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott. There was this E mail traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and the outside. World. Frightens him. Now, I spoke with a law professor who says faculty at the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene, and academic policy date back, as far as February, this professor, also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is, you know, how much control does a mega donor deserve were indeed and two very different and conflicting views on, that, it sounds like playing out there in Alabama NPR's, Debbie Elliott. Thanks so much. You're welcome. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Ninety point three k as e you NPR for the Monterey Bay area in traffic in celinas highway one southbound north main street, we have reported a single car crash there. The car hit the center divide, expect slowing emergency crews on the way support for Casey, you comes.

Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama Alabama judiciary committee Robert Muller House Judiciary committee Jerry Nadler Culverhouse NPR DOJ congress president John dean President Trump Susan Davis Doug Collins White House
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Flyers been extinguished. There was some amount of fuel league which we mitigating Morgan Aries works on the fourteenth floor of the Bill. Building and says it took him about ten minutes to evacuate took some time, only because there was stops and goes stops and goes, if it was free flowing whole time, it would it took less time to get out, governor. Andrew Cuomo says it was likely not an act of terrorism, but the pilot was within the no fly zone and the FAA has declared that to be around Trump Tower wants the president took office in two thousand seventeen seventh avenue remains closed between fiftieth and fifty seconds street. And the investigation is ongoing trans activists are rallying outside. The criminal court building today after a transgender woman died on Rikers island last week New York City's department of corrections saying, twenty-seven year old Laline Polanco was found unconscious in her cell Friday afternoon. She was pronounced dead about an hour later. A spokesperson for the DOT says they found no evidence of foul play. Palanca was arrested in mid April on misdemeanor, assault and drug possession charges and investigation. Is ongoing. And the filmmaker Camille Bill of says died Billups best known for documenting her complex relationship with her daughter, Krista Victoria, who she gave up for adoption when Krista was four Phillips died in Manhattan on June first. She was eighty five years, old, it, sixty four degrees at five oh, six. Support for NPR comes from tirerack for the past forty years, tirerack has remained committed to helping people find the right tires wheels and performance parts. Learn more at tirerack dot com, helping drivers find deliver, and install this is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelley. And I'm Audie Cornish today, the House Judiciary committee began hearings on lessons from special counsel, Robert Muller's report on Russia's election. Interference also today judiciary chairman, Jerry Nadler announced a breakthrough in talks with the Justice department to hand over evidence Muller used to draw his conclusions NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis joins us now on the latest from Capitol Hill and. Let's start with that agreement reached between the judiciary committee, end DOJ. What are the terms? So in a statement judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler, said that DOJ agreed to turn over in his words key evidence that was used in its investigation over whether or not President Trump obstructed Justice. We don't know explicitly what this evidence is. It's always important to remember that Muller, did not draw a conclusion on whether or not the president of structed Justice in the report made a point to say the president was not exonerated on this front and kind of turned it over to congress for their oversight capabilities, now there's said, this evidence, should start coming over as early as today. He said every member on the panel will be able to view it, and it will continue to be part of their ongoing investigation. If there is a deal will Democrats call off that vote tomorrow to hold attorney general bar in civil contempt. No, it's still on. It's really important to make a distinction here, though. So the judiciary did back in may the committee is they did vote to hold bar in contempt of congress. That is not what's going to be coming to the floor tomorrow. Oh, would Democrats are bringing to the floor tomorrow, essentially authorizes, the judiciary committee to fight the attorney general and other people administration in civil court to enforce their subpoenas? It's a type of civil contempt now they're says if bar and DOJ complies with this request that you're not going to have to take that route, but they're not gonna take the pressure off. The resolution also applies to former White House counsel, Don Mcgann and testimony and documents. They're seeking from him. I also think it's important to see this view. This vote happening tomorrow is, you know, a bit about politics. Democrats are still pretty divided over whether to move four four four word formerly with an impeachment inquiry. It does give Democrats chance to go on the record and say they are doing something to hold this administration. Accountable is not legally necessary in order to fight it in the courts. But it does give them a little bit. In the meantime, the judiciary committee launched its oversight investigation into Robert Muller's report, then we turn on C span and. Basically, we see the former Nixon White House counsel, John dean. I mean he was a key witness in the Watergate scandal, testifying. So why did they call him? You know, they're clearly trying to draw a parallel here between Nixon what Nixon was to Watergate Democrats are saying Muller could be to President Trump. Dean did invoke Watergate and saying that the mullahs report could be seen as a quote roadmap for impeachment. This is a term that was used for a secret report that was written by Watergate prosecutor Lee under war ski, who provided a report to the House Judiciary committee, that kind of said, here's the case. Now, you go, make it the top Republican on the committee, Doug Collins, he's a Republican from Georgia kind of made the point about the this panel of hearings is so what right. Like none of the witnesses at the hearing today were involved in the Miller investigation. There was also a couple of former federal prosecutors that testified, there were not substantial. Quickness witnesses in the investigation into either the interference or the administration. It wasn't that dissimilar Collins said to listening to people on a cable news panel talk about what they think should happen. We should note, the dean is off syncing on cable news talking about this very matter. But it does it is also serves as a reminder that Democrats have had a hard time getting people in the Trump administration to come up and testify about the Miller report. They really struck out so far. So this is in some ways seen as the best they could do as a starting point. Now they're says he's still confident. Bob Muller is gonna come up and testify before the committee in public. Even though Muller has said he does not want to do that, Jerry Nadler has not ruled out using a subpoena, if he won't, but he still says he's not willing to go there, just yet. That's NPR. Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you. You're welcome. The biggest donor in the history of the university of Alabama says the school is choosing, quote zealotry over the wellbeing of its students. The donor is Florida businessman Hugh Culverhouse last year. He pledged twenty six and a half million dollars to the university on Friday. The board of trustees voted to give it back all the money. He's given so far and to remove his name from its law school. The reason his objections to Alabama's controversial new law banning nearly all abortions in the state, at least that is the reason according to covert house. The university says it was Culverhouse's desire to influence hiring firing at admissions on campus. And the university has released emails showing the return of covert houses gift was under consideration days before he waited on abortion, Culverhouse wrote about all this, in an op-ed published by the Washington Post, and he spoke with us today about it. I asked him, why thinks the decision was tied to history. On abortion. I the time second time third. The timing and the timing as you see it was what all the time. It was a matter of hours, my press. Release came out, and with a short period of time the chancellor statement came out, and which he said, he was returning the money and he said the day before they had decided to return the money. I don't believe that I believe it say it decided to return money. They would have returned it before. I just wanna make sure I understand. So you're saying you made public remarks laying out how clearly you disagree with the Alabama state law on abortion, and that after that the university said, here's all your money. Take it back. Thanks. Thanks cora. So reconcile that with this Email that I'm looking at, I'm looking at a copy of an Email dated Saturday, may twenty fifth it's from you to the president of the university of Alabama Stewart bell subject line return of ten million dollars paid in advance. You're, you're asking for money back. This. This was an Email dated five days before your public remarks on abortion. Yes. Can I explain that please? Okay. Ten million dollars was money. I had paid in advance of the schedule. It was not asking to be paid back. Twenty one and a half. It was my statement that you have not spent any money at twenty one and a half million dollars some of the money being there for twenty months if you're going to sit there and not do scholarships and professorships then return the ten million advanced and I'll pay it back to you over the schedule. I suppose the broader point being without getting deep into the weeds of what check was dated win there appears to be a paper trail, documenting disagreement and rancor that predates, your public remarks on abortion. Well, the issue I had the big issue was I've felt class. Sizes. We're too small. They were denying to Alabama students access. But at some point the denegrate increase the starting class, eight percent that result, major issue. It sounds as though you believe that with your money with your gift should come some say into how the law school is run, sure. You look at my speech when it was announced a clearly stated I intend to be in mentally and ball. I'm not giving the money that my name on a building, none of the money I've ever given as way. I don't give for buildings. I'm sure it's crossed your mind, Mr. Culverhouse that the, the losers here are going to be the current and future students of the university of Alabama. In say it, my whole goal is to create a middle class, because we are losing the middle class is becoming the upper lower class. I'm fortunate my dad worked dioramas. We weren't born into money, but we worked our way into. Everybody should have that same chance that I did. He did. Hugh Culverhouse the Florida real estate investor who gave twenty six and a half million to the university of Alabama talking with us. There about schools decision to give it back, Mr. Culverhouse. Thank you. Thank you very much. For more on this. We turn to NPR's, Debbie Elliott in orange beach Alabama. Hi, deb. Hello, hello. So two points, one for the sake of disclosure. I should mention you are a university of Alabama grad true second. What does the university have to say about covert houses allegations of retaliation? Well the university's position is that Culverhouse is somehow trying to rewrite history by injecting, quote, one of society's most emotional divisive issues in quote into what was the abortion law into what was really a dispute over his attempts to influence academic policy? And, you know, Culverhouse has been getting a lot of national press since he called on students to boycott. University on may twenty ninth that was two weeks after the governor signed that abortion man into law. And now as you noted before the interview with, with Culverhouse we know from E mail records released by the school that covers house himself had I asked for some of that donation back. Well before that. Right. And you've looked at all that Email evidence that I was coming through today as well. What left out you. Well, I think the fact that days before Culverhouse called for the boycott. There was this E mail traffic that the chancellor and attorneys had decided to return his donation and take his name off of the law school. Now that Email chain also included, some of Culverhouse's missives to school officials. He was trying to have a say in who was hired for a constitutional law professorship named for him. And he belittled, the dean of the law school as in several emails, I'm going to, quote, one of them, he said that this dean, quote would always be a small town insecure, dean, and that outside. Side world frightens him. Now I spoke with a law. Professor who says, faculty, the Alabama law school had concerns about Culverhouse's efforts long before this dispute that his efforts to intervene, and academic policy date back, as far as February, this professor, also questioned why the university of Alabama should take the blame for a law passed by state lawmakers when several professors at the law school had spoken out against the abortion ban. So I think the broader question here is how much control does a mega donor deserve. Right. Indeed. And two very different and conflicting views on that it sounds like playing out there in Alabama NPR's, Debbie Elliott. Thanks so much. You're welcome..

Hugh Culverhouse Alabama university of Alabama Robert Muller judiciary committee president NPR House Judiciary committee John dean Jerry Nadler Culverhouse DOJ President Trump Trump Tower Susan Davis Rikers island Nixon Debbie Elliott
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"News ninety six five WDBO the data show on news ninety six point five WDBO, I think, just in general Republicans, understand the tariffs are taxed on American consumers, and we don't want to see them in place long, nor do I believe President Trump does either. He's using tear. As leverage and trading oceans. And I think you use them as leverage in this situation. Brilliantly, quite honestly, I know for my part after those news reports were republished last week, I called Mexican Basseterre and said, regardless of what you read in the press understand if the president, imposes terrace and he's dead serious about this. They're not votes. Override it so take that threat. Very seriously. You know you have to do more, this is an uncontrolled situation at the border. Well, and that's Ron Johnson from Wisconsin. And he's correct on that. And that was, I guess that was the. It was Friday. I guess it came out Friday after we finished everything I was trying to remember the timing of when that news came out, and I was really fascinated by some of the media reactions for it as well which we're going to get into a welcome to the show. I'm Dana lash at on Twitter, official data lash on Facebook, also. And you can find me on Instagram and Snapchat, and all that jazz. So the situation with regards to the trade, the agreement he's decided to revoke because the terrorists were going to raise incrementally. I think like what five percentage points every certain periods? So it, it actually worked out, everyone said that it wasn't going to work out, but it kinda worked out, right? I mean, I don't like tariffs as much as the next person, and I get really, you know, I get a little bit iffy about it when the discussion comes up, but everything that I heard going into this was that. It was going to fail spectacularly, and it was just going to cost American taxpayers so much money, which suddenly they were concerned about American taxpayers as that's okay. They can suddenly concerned about American taxpayers, but it ended up actually working out quite well. Although if you hear people like Chuck Schumer, and everyone else, they kept saying what, by the way, what fascinated me about this after the president announced it and said that they came to a deal and everything that he was discussing originally with the implementation of the tariffs was that was now off the table, because Mexico and there and he said that they were going to be more struck were concerned, not just their border there with the United States, but also other countries with Guatemala believe, and as he said, this a bunch of, and I'm looking at just random tweets of it because I saved a bunch of them. A bunch of lawmakers were saying, yeah, we don't we don't even have any confirmation. This is probably a lie just like random, some of them were not big named Democrats. They it's probably ally. Sure thing, Trump, wink, wink, and then a bunch of drip, verify journalists were doing the same thing. And then, what was it like thirty minutes later Mexico released a statement, basically confirming everything that he had said, nobody walked that nobody said, nobody walked any of that back. I thought that was just really fascinating at that. So with regards to this, he, and he's also using this with China to the president wants to use the same strategy. Well, maybe it'll maybe it'll work. Maybe it won't China's a little bit of a different horse. But we will see however this is. I mean it's good we and I'm, I'm pleased to see Mexico do at least something with regards to the border, because previously, I mean, so I think what was that they said that they were going to we're going to talk more about this later. They were going to also send out their own national guard to help police, the border, it's not entirely formed yet, but they're trying. So that's something, and they're also going to make it to where individuals that are crossing over and trying to claim amnesty, in the United States, you're going to have to do, so I originally in Mexico, which was literally something. I asked Friday McGuire. They not why is that not the thing? If you're, if you're trying to claim amnesty, then wouldn't you wouldn't you just stop in and you just stop in Mexico and just do that. I would just seems to be the most obvious thing we're going to get into that a little bit more in depth. But there are a couple of other things that I wanna point out to before we get swinging into everything I was really, really pleased university, Alabama. I was so pleased to see them do this. So the university Alabama, they don't play, by the way, and what ended up happening is that. And this again, everything happens like Friday. Right. The moment we go off air. Everything happens at Friday. What happened is that the university of Alabama, they got a big was it the twenty seven twenty six million dollar donation from this guy named Hugh Culverhouse junior, and he sent he had this donation to the school of law. And so they renamed it, the Hugh Culverhouse junior school of law at the university of Alabama. But then after Alabama passed that heartbeat Bill. He went off and was telling people to boycott the state, and he was telling people to boycott even the university of Alabama. He he was urging students this was in a have this, this is from the Montgomery advertiser. He had already given a twenty one million to the university after his pledge last September the rest is still to come, but he actually put out a statement where he was urging people to boycott the school because of the state's abortion law so university of Alabama didn't take too kindly to that. So they returned his whole damn donation. And they chipped his name off the building. They literally kicked his name off the building. They stay took video of to its savagery of which there is no comparison, they Bama, went out, they sent to dudes and they chip the man's name off the side of the building with I don't even know what those tools are called those Chipper tool things the chisels. Thank you. It's monday. Don't judge Kane. Kane comes in clutch, we're glad you're back. So he I mean, they didn't even mess around the moment. He not done. And so, then he got really indignant about it this, Mr. Culverhouse, which sounds like a good name because you're immediately thinking, hamburgers, but no, no. This is not a good one. So he got really mad. And he said, oh, it's so it's such a shame that they don't like free speech in all of this jazz, and, oh, it's so bad. I mean I simply disagreed with the abortion law liquid Bana does so again, bama's not playing. They released all of his emails, and then look what look at. Oh, he and then it showed that he was trying to boss them around us to how to spend his money. This had nothing to do with the abortion thing. Apparently they were getting tired of this, this Boston moneybags for quite some time. And this is just the straw that broke the camel's back. He was like, I guess they get to control everything about you, because I'm donating money and bama's like, nah, you can give us your money. We'll put your name on the building, but by that's about it. You don't get to tell us what to do. You're not the boss of us is. I'm just boiling the sell them. And so after he was I mean, who does that, by the way, you're, you're a big donor, too? And he lives in Florida. He doesn't he doesn't live in Alabama anymore, but he's like, but I was born and raised there. Yeah. But you left and so he was trying to use that card and play to that. And then he was trying to say it was because the universities backwards and they completely they got mad at him over the abortion thing. Well, actually, he was telling people to boycott the school. That is what did it? And then before then they have all of these emails, and it showed that, what was there. It's all over the internet now where he was trying to tell the board of trustees how to run the entire school, and it was to the point where it was becoming a distraction to their primary mission of educating people. And so they said that, that was pretty much it. I had if I have a feeling that without this law, this was going to happen anyway. But the fact that he was trying to be sympathetic figure and lie and act as though. Oh, well, it's because these people are these people are bigots. They couldn't stand difference of opinion. Actually, it seems like it was you do. That's what. It seems like so I want to dive into that a little bit more because that was so delicious. It's one of my favorite videos ever. It is. It is one of those satisfying, things like office space when they took the printer out to the cornfield or the field or whatever. And they beat it with bats. It was similar to that. I mean you could it was just it was like it was like office space, but university style, and they had these two dudes and Bama shirts and they went up there and just chip chip chip roll tide and they just took that man's name right off their building. That was amazing. So we got to come back to that. I gotta do it better Justice than just this few minutes. Oh, and then and then did you guys see this story about this little bakery? Gibson's bakery. Probably didn't you probably weren't following it were you were you following this little, we talked about it, once like in a headline and that was pretty much about that's pretty much as far as we went with it, because it was still an ongoing thing. So this bakery, got itself in trouble, because overland accused it of racism, because it prosecuted three students for shoplifting. This is back in, like two thousand seventeen they three students shoplifted from this bakery. They were caught and the bakery decided to pursue it. But hey, social Justice warriors says it's not a crime, depending on your ethnicity. And so they accused the bakery of racism, and apparently they had an agreement where they do business with overland, what the students accused it, and then apparently the university got on track with it. The they, they, they did it. So then the bakery decided to file suit in which they accused the vice president of Oberlin college of liable and slander. They alleged that the administrators supported students in an unfounded campaign to paint the establishments owners as racist, the so and it went against the dean of students, and all of that the students held us big protests in front of their their bakery. And, and one of the students by the way was white, but it's still racism, apparently because if it's against a progressive, it's the same thing. And one of the Alan Gibson, who is the, the little guy that owns it. I don't mean that pejorative way because I mean, the guy who owns it is, is an elderly man his family's ran it forever. They know his father's David Gibson, he called the police, the son, Alan Gibson was assaulted by the protesters, and by by some of the people who I mean, this is just like insane. He was physically. Well, he was physically assaulted during the shoplifting incident. And I mean it was not it's not wasn't even a question. They were they were guilty of shoplifting and aggravated trespassing and because the bakery called the police, and they were going to prosecute the college the college faculty, including the dean's. They were actually participating in the protests. Oh, yeah. So guess who won the bakery? They want to big fat lawsuit that could end up being millions and millions and millions of dollars gotta make. I'm done with it. I think you, you just do that. You fight back. I'm all about that. We're gonna we we're gonna have this more on this and a ton more. We're also going to get into cringe in Iowa, because all the democrat candidates were there, and it was just as cringe tastic as you can possibly imagine more developments on that fight the, the controversy, New York state, I guess, rathers this elderly man had been killed instead of defending himself. They went after him for illegally. Possessing a firearm, that he didn't register, but inherited from his dead father. So we're going to get into all of that, and a bunch more purple heart foundation is a great. We're going to volunteer veterans who organized to help other returning veterans and their families. This is how they serve those families, and they do it in a number of ways, they help those veterans who are returning go through all the paperwork, that is required to get your benefits through the VA sometimes I think it's prohibitively ridiculous. They also get help get homeless veterans off the street. And get them back on their feet. They have educational scholarships. They have a job training. They have canines for combat veterans. They also have specialized programs for female veterans. They cover a whole bunch of stuff, and they don't get federal money. Everything is run off of your generous, generous donations, and they don't draw salary. These are volunteer veterans, helping assist other vets. So whether it's a car donation or cash, which is tax deductible, by.

Bama Mexico Alabama president President Trump Alan Gibson university of Alabama shoplifting United States China Mexican Basseterre Wisconsin Kane Hugh Culverhouse junior school university Alabama Dana lash Hugh Culverhouse Facebook Twitter
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

13:18 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"I add. I'm sorry. Actually not sorry about sorry. The shows that I turned down in motor speak to you would be very impressed with yourself data that I could use in live around the world, are you a citizen or are you a subject because I'm a citizen, and I'll ask whatever question I want to win ever. I want to if you're subject, you go on and UPS subject. I'm a citizen Dino show. I think just in general Republicans understand the terrorists are attacks on American consumers, and we don't wanna see them in place. Long-term nor do I believe the President Trump. Does he he's using as leverage and trading Goshi nations? And the use them as leverage in this situation. Brilliantly, quite honestly, I know for my part after those news reports were published last week I called Mexican bastard, regardless of what you read in the press, understand, if the president, imposes terrace and he's dead serious about this. They're not votes to override it. So take that threat. Very seriously. You know you have to do more. This is an uncontrolled situation the border. Well nets Ron Johnson from Wisconsin. And he's correct on that. If so, that was, I guess that was the. It was Friday. I guess it came out Friday after we finished everything I was trying to remember the timing of when that news came out, and I was really fascinated by some of the media reactions for it as well which we're gonna get into welcome to the show. I'm Dana lash at D lash on Twitter, official data lash on Facebook, also. And you can find me on Instagram and Snapchat, and all that jazz. So the situation with regards to the trade, d- agreement, he's decided to revoke because the terrorists were going to raise incrementally. I think like what five percentage points every certain periods? So it, it actually worked out, everyone said that it wasn't going to work out, but it kinda worked out, right? I mean, I don't like tariffs as much as the next person and I get really, you know, I get a little bit if. He about it when the discussion comes up, but everything that I heard going into this was that it was going to fail spectacularly, and it was just going to cost American taxpayers so much money, which suddenly they were concerned about American taxpayers. That's okay. They can suddenly concerned about American taxpayers, but it ended up actually working out quite well. Although if you hear people like Chuck Schumer, and everyone else, they kept saying what, by the way, what fascinated me about this after the president announced it and said that they came to a deal and everything that he was discussing originally with the implementation of the of was that was now off the table, because Mexico and there, and he said that they were going to be more struck were concerned, not just their border there with the United States, but also other countries with Guatemala believe, and as he said, this a bunch of an. Looking at just random tweets of it because I saved a bunch of them. A bunch of lawmakers were saying, yeah, we don't we don't even have any confirmation. This is probably a lie just like random, some of them were not big named Democrats. They it's probably ally. Sure thing Trump, wink, wink, and then a bunch of verified. Journalists were doing the same thing. And then, what was it like thirty minutes later Mexico released a statement, basically confirming everything that he said and nobody walked? Nobody said nobody walked any of that back. I thought that was just really fascinating that. So with regards to this. He he's also using this with China to the president wants to use the same strategy will maybe it'll maybe it'll work. Maybe it won't China's a little bit of a different horse. But we will see however this is. I mean it's good we and I'm, I'm pleased to see Mexico do at least something with regards to the border, because previously, I mean so I think, what was it? They said that they were going to, and we're gonna talk more about this later. They were going to also send out their own national guard to help police, the border, it's not entirely formed yet, but they're trying. So that's something, and they're also going to make it to where individuals that are crossing over and trying to claim amnesty, in the United States, you're going to have to do, so I originally in Mexico, which was literally something I asked Friday. Like, why are they not? Why is that not the thing? If you're, if you're trying to claim amnesty, then wouldn't you wouldn't you just stop in stop in Mexico and just do that? I just seems. To be the most obvious thing we're going to get into that a little bit more in depth. But there are a couple of other things that I wanna point out to before we get swing into everything. I was really, really pleased university Alabama. I was so pleased to see them do this. So the university Alabama, they don't play, by the way, and what ended up happening is that. And this again, everything happens like Friday. Right. The moment we go off air everything. Has friday. What happened is that the university Alabama, they got a big was it twenty seven twenty six million dollars or nation from this guy named Hugh, Culverhouse, June? And he sent he had this donation to the school of law. And so they renamed it, they Hugh Culverhouse junior school of law at the university of Alabama. But then after Alabama passed that heartbeat Bill. He went off and was telling people to boycott the state, and he was telling people to boycott even the university of Alabama. He he was urging students, this is a have this. This is from the Montgomery advertiser. He had already given a twenty one million to the university after his pledge last September the rest of still to come, but he actually put out a statement where he was urging people to boycott the school because of the state's abortion law so university of Alabama didn't take too kindly to that. So they returned his whole damn donation. And they chipped his name off the building. They literally chipped his name off the building. They took video of to its savagery of which there is no comparison, they Bama went out they sent to, and they chipped the men's name off the side of the building with I don't even know what those tools are called those cheaper tool. Things the chisels. Thank you. It's monday. Don't judge Kane. Kane comes in clutch. We're glad you're back. So he I mean, they didn't even mess around the moment. Hey, I mean they're not done. And so, then he got really indignant about it this, Mr. Culverhouse, which sounds like a good name because you're immediately thinking, hamburgers, but no, no. This is not the good one. So he got really mad. And he said, oh, it's so it's such a shame that they don't like free speech and all of this jazz, and, oh, it's so bad. I mean I simply disagreed with the abortion law, look what Banda does. So again, bama's not playing. They released all of his emails, and then look what he and then it showed that he was trying to boss them around us to how to spend his money. This had nothing to do with the abortion. Apparently they were getting tired of this, this Bossie moneybags for quite some time. And this is just the straw that broke the camel's back. He was like, I guess, I get to control everything about you, because I'm donating money Obama's like nah, you can give us your money. We'll put your name on the building, but by that's about it. You don't get to tell us what to do. You're not the boss of us. Is just boiling this down? And so after he was I mean, who does that, by the way, you're, you're a big donor, too? And he lives in Florida. He doesn't he doesn't live in Alabama anymore, but he's like, but I was born and raised there not. Yeah. But you left. And so he was trying to use that card and play to that. And then he was trying to say it was because the universities backwards and they completely they got mad at him over the abortion thing. He was telling people to boycott the school that, that is what did it? And then before then they have all of these emails, and it showed that there it's all over the internet now where he was trying to tell the board of trustees how to run the entire school, and it was to the point where it was becoming a distraction to their primary mission of educating people. And so they said that was pretty much it. I had I have a feeling that without this law. This was going to happen anyway. But the fact that he was trying to be the sympathetic figure and lie and act as though. Oh, well, it's because these. People are these people are bigots. They couldn't stand difference of opinion actually seems like it was you do. That's what it seems like. So I want to dive into that a little bit more because that was so delicious. It's one of my favorite videos ever. It is it is one of those satisfying, things like office space when they took the print out to the cornfield or the field or whatever. And they beat it with bats. It was similar to that. I mean you could it was just it was like it was like office space, but university style, and they had these two dudes and Bama shirts and they went up there and just chip chip chip roll tide and they took that man's name right off that building. That was amazing. So we got to come back to that. I gotta do a better Justice than just this few minutes. Oh, and then and then did you guys see this story about this little bakery? Gibson's bakery. Probably didn't you probably weren't following it were you were you following this? We talked about it once in a headline and that was pretty much about that's pretty much as far as we went with it, because it was still an ongoing thing. So this bakery, got itself in trouble, because overland accused it of racism, because it prosecuted three students for shoplifting. This is back in, like twenty seventeen they three students shoplifted from this bakery. They were caught and the bakery decided to pursue it. But hey, social Justice warriors says it's not a crime, depending on your ethnicity. And so they accused the bakery of racism, and apparently they had an agreement where they do business with Oberlin, what the students accused it, and then apparently the university got on track with it. The they, they, they did it. So then the bakery decided to file suit in which they accused the vice president of overland college of libel and slander, they allege that the administrators supported students in an unfounded campaign to paint the establishments owners as racist, the so and it went against the dean of students, and all of that the students held us big protests in front of their their bakery. And one of the students by the way was white, but it's still racism, apparently because if it's against a progressive, it's the same thing. And one of the Alan Gibson, who is the, the little guy that owns it. I don't mean that in a pejorative way because I mean, the guy who owns it is, is an elderly man his family's ran it forever. They know his father's David gates, and he called the police, the son, Alan Gibson was assaulted by the protesters, and by by some of the people who I mean, this is just like insane. He was physically. Well, he was physically assaulted or in the shoplifting incident. And I mean it was not it's wasn't even a question. They were they were guilty of. Shoplifting and aggravated trespassing and because the bakery called the police, and they were going to prosecute the college the college faculty, including the dean's. They were actually participating in the protests. Yeah. So guess who won the bakery? They want a big old fat lawsuit that could end up being millions and millions and millions of dollars. Got him. I'm done with it. I think you, you just do that. You fight back. I'm all about that. We're gonna we we're gonna have this more on this and a ton more. We're also going to get into cringe in Iowa because all the democrat candidates were there. And it was just as cringe tastic as you can possibly imagine more developments on that fight the FIS controversy, New York state, I guess, rathers this elderly man had been killed instead of defending himself. They went after him for illegally. Possessing a firearm, that he didn't register, but inherited from his dead father. So we're gonna get into all of that, and a bunch more purple heart foundation is a great. We're gonna to volunteer veterans who organized to help other returning veterans and their families. This is how they serve those families, and they do it in a number of ways, they help those veterans who are returning go through all the paperwork, that is required to get your benefits through the VA sometimes I think it's just prohibitively ridiculous. They also get help get homeless veterans off the street and get them back on their feet. They have educational scholarships. They have. Job training. They have canines for combat veterans. They also have specialized programs for female veterans. They cover a whole bunch of stuff, and they don't get federal money. Everything is run off of your generous, generous donations, and they don't draw salary. These are volunteer veterans, helping assist other vets. So whether it's a car donation or cash, which is tax deductible, by the way, you can be a.

Mexico president Alabama Bama Hugh Culverhouse university of Alabama shoplifting Alan Gibson United States university Alabama China Wisconsin Kane Ron Johnson Montgomery Chuck Schumer New York Dana lash Obama
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

13:18 min | 2 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I'm sorry. Not sorry. That's all right. The shows that I came down in motives, bec-, you, you would be very impressed with yourself that I could use in live around the world, are you a citizen or are you a subject because I'm a citizen, and I'll ask whatever question I want to win ever. I want to if you're a subject, you go on Nubia subject. I'm a citizen for dinner show. I mean just in general Republicans understand the tariffs are attacks on American consumers, and we don't want to see them in place. Long-term nor do I believe President Trump. Does he he's using terrorist as leverage and trading Gauchet shins and use them as leverage in this situation? Brilliantly, quite honestly, I know for my part after those news reports were were published last week I called Mexican bastard and said, regardless of what you read in the press understand if the president imposes terraced and he's dead serious about this. There are not votes to override it. So take that threat. Very seriously. You know you have to do more. This is an uncontrolled situation at the border. Well, that's Ron Johnson from Wisconsin. And he's correct on that. If so, that was, I guess that was the. Friday. I guess it came out Friday after we finished. Everything I was trying to remember the timing of when that news came out, and I was really fascinated by some of the media reactions for it as well which we're going to get into welcome to the show. I'm Dana lash at D lash on Twitter, official data lash on Facebook, also. And you can find me on Instagram and Snapchat, and all that jazz. So the situation with regards to the trade, the agreement he's decided to revoke because the terrorists were going to raise incrementally. I think like what five percentage points every certain period? So it, it actually worked out, everyone said that it wasn't going to work out, but it kinda worked out, right? I, I mean, I don't like tariffs as much as the next person, and I get really, you know, I get a little bit iffy about it when the discussion comes up, but everything that I heard going into this was that it was going to fail spectacularly, and it was just going to cost American taxpayers so much money, which suddenly they were concerned about American taxpayers as that's okay. They can suddenly concerned about American taxpayers, but it ended up actually working out quite well. Although if you hear people like Chuck Schumer and everyone else, they kept saying, by the way, what fascinated me about this after so the, the president announced it and said that they came to a deal and everything that he was discussing originally with the implementation of the tariffs was that was now off the table. Because Mexico and there and he said that they were going to be more struck were concerned, not just their border there with the United. States, but also other countries with Guatemala believe, and as he said, this a bunch of an I'm looking at just random tweets of it because I saved a bunch of them. A bunch of lawmakers were saying, yeah, we don't we don't even have any confirmation. This is probably a lie just like random, some of them were not big named Democrats. They it's probably ally. Sure thing, Trump, wink, wink, and then a bunch of verify journalists were doing the same thing. And then what was it like thirty minutes later. Mexico released a statement basically confirming everything that he had said. And nobody walked. Nobody said nobody walked any of that back. I thought that was just really fascinating nigga that. So with regards to this. He and he's also using this with China to the president wants to use the same strategy. Well, maybe it'll maybe it'll work. Maybe it won't China's a little bit of a different horse. But we will see however this is. I mean it's good we and I'm, I'm pleased to see Mexico do at least something with regards to the border, because previously, I mean so I think, what was it? They said that they were going to, and we're going to talk more about this later. They were going to also send out their own national guard to help police, the border, it's not entirely formed yet, but they're trying. So that's something, and they're also going to make it to where individuals that are crossing over and trying to claim amnesty, in the United States, you're going to have to do, so I originally in Mexico, which was literally something I asked Friday. Like, why are they not? Why is that not the thing? If you're, if you're trying to claim amnesty, then wouldn't you wouldn't you just stop in when you stop in Mexico and just do that? I would just seems. To be the most obvious thing we're going to get into that a little bit more in depth. But there are a couple of other things that I wanna point out to before we get swinging into everything. I was really, really pleased university of Alabama. I was so pleased to see them do this. So the university Alabama, they don't play, by the way, and what ended up happening is that in this again. Everything happens like Friday. Right. The moment we go off air. Everything happens at Friday. What happened is that the university of Alabama, they got a big was it the twenty seven twenty six million dollar donation from this guy named Hugh Culverhouse junior, and he sent he had this donation to the school of law. And so they renamed it, the Hugh Culverhouse junior school of law at the university of Alabama. But then after Alabama passed that heartbeat Bill. He went off and was telling people to boycott the state, and he was telling people to boycott even the university of Alabama. He he was urging students this present a have this. This is from the Montgomery advertiser. He had already given a twenty one million to the university after his pledge last September the rest is still to come, but he actually put out a statement where he was urging people to boycott the school because of the state's abortion law so university of Alabama didn't take too kindly to that. So they returned his whole damn donation. And they chipped his name off the building. They literally chipped his name off the building. They stay took video of a to its savagery of which there is no comparison, they Bama, went out, they sent to dudes and they chipped the man's name off the side of the building with, I don't even know what those tools are called those cheaper tool, things chisels. Thank you. It's monday. Don't judge Kane. Kane comes in clutch. We're glad you're back. So he I mean, they didn't even mess around the moment. He I mean they're like, not done. And so, then he got really indignant about it this, Mr. Culverhouse, which sounds like a good name because you're immediately thinking, hamburgers, but no, no. This is not the good one. So he got really mad. And he said, oh, it's so it's such a shame that they don't like free speech in all of this jazz, and, oh, it's so bad. I mean I simply disagreed with the abortion law liquid Vanna does so again, bama's not playing. They released all of his emails, and then look what look. Oh, he and then it showed that he was trying to boss them around us to how to spend his money. This had nothing to do with the abortion thing. Apparently they were getting tired of this, this Bossie moneybags for quite some time. And this is just the straw that broke the camel's back. He was like, I guess, I get to control everything about you, because I'm donating money bama's like nah, you can give us your money. We'll put your name on the building, but by that's about it. You don't get to tell us what to do. You're not the boss of us. It is. I'm just boiling this down. And so after he was I mean, who does that, by the way, you're, you're a big donor, too? And he lives in Florida. He doesn't he doesn't live in Alabama anymore, but he's like, but I was born and raised there. Yeah. But you left. And so he was trying to use that card and play to that. And then he was trying to say it was because the university is backwards. And they completely they got mad at him over the abortion thing. Actually, he was telling people to boycott the school that, that is what did it? And then before then they have all of these emails, and it showed that was there it's all over the internet now where he was trying to tell the board of trustees how to run the entire school, and it was to the point where it was becoming a distraction to their primary mission of educating people. And so they said that was pretty much it I had, if I have a feeling that without this law, this was going to happen anyway. But the fact that he was trying to be the sympathetic figure and lie and act as though. Oh, well, it's because these people. Are these people are bigots? They couldn't stand difference of opinion, actually it seems like it was you do. That's what it seems like. So I want to dive into that a little bit more because that was so delicious that it's one of my favorite videos ever. It is. It is one of those satisfying, things like office space when they took the printer out to the cornfield or the field or whatever. And they beat it with bats. It was similar to that. I mean you could it was just it was like it was like office space, but university style, and they had these two dudes and Bama shirts and they went up there and just chip chip chip roll tide and they just took that man's name right off that building. That was amazing. So we got to come back to that. I gotta do better Justice than just this few minutes. Oh, and then and then did you guys see this story about this little bakery? Gibson's bakery. Provident you probably weren't following it were you were you following this? We talked about it once like in a headline and that was pretty much about that's pretty much as far as we went with it, because it was still an ongoing thing. So this bakery, got itself in trouble, because overland accused it of racism, because it prosecuted three students for shoplifting. This is back in two thousand seventeen they three students shoplifted from this bakery. They were caught and the bakery decided to pursue it. But hey, social Justice warriors them says it's not a crime, depending on your ethnicity. And so they accused the bakery of racism, and apparently they had an agreement where they do business, though. Berlin, what the students accused it, and then apparently the university got on track with it. The they, they, they did it. So then the bakery decided to file suit in which they accused the vice president of Oberlin college of liable and slander. They allege that the administrators supported students in an unfounded campaign to paint the establishments owners as racist, the so and it went against the dean of students, and all of that the students held us big protests in front of their their bakery. And one of the students by the way was white, but it's still racism, apparently because if it's against a progressive, it's the same thing. And one of the Alan Gibson, who is the, the little guy that owns it. I don't mean that in a pejorative way because I mean, the guy who owns it is, is an elderly man his family's ran it forever. They know his father's David Gibson, he called the police the sun. Alan Gibson was assaulted by the protesters, and by by some of the people who I mean, this is just like insane. He was physically. Well, he was physically assaulted during the shoplifting incident. And I mean it was not it wasn't even a question. They were they were guilty of shoplifting and aggravated. Trespassing and because the bakery called the police, and they were going to prosecute the college the college faculty, including the dean's. They were actually participating in the protests. Oh, yeah. So guess who won the bakery? They want a big old fat lawsuit that could end up being millions and millions and millions of dollars got I'm done with it. I think you, you just do that. You fight back. I'm all about that. We're gonna we we're gonna have this more on this and a ton more. We're also going to get into cringe in Iowa because all the democratic candidates were there. And it was just as cringe tastic as you can possibly imagine more developments on that fight the Fiso controversy, New York state, I guess, rathers this elderly man had been killed instead of defending himself. They went after him for illegally. Possessing a firearm, that he didn't register, but inherited from his dead father. So we're going to get into all of that in a bunch more purple heart foundation is a great. We're gonna of volunteer veterans who organize to help other veterans and their families. This is how they serve those families, and they do it in a number of ways, they help those veterans who are returning go through all the paperwork. That is required to get your benefit. It's through the VA sometimes I think it's just prohibitively ridiculous. They also get help get homeless veterans off the street and get them back on their feet. They have educational scholarships. They have a job training. They have canines for combat veterans. They also have specialized programs for female veterans. They cover a whole bunch of stuff, and they don't get federal money. Everything is run off of your generous, generous donations, and they don't draw salary. These are volunteer veterans helping assist other butts. So whether it's a car donation or cash, which is tax deductible, by the way, you can be a.

Mexico Bama president university of Alabama President Trump Alan Gibson shoplifting Alabama China Nubia Wisconsin Gauchet Kane university Alabama Chuck Schumer Hugh Culverhouse junior school Hugh Culverhouse Ron Johnson Montgomery
"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on Know Them From Adam

Know Them From Adam

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"mr. culverhouse" Discussed on Know Them From Adam

"Well i i would say i'm not bragging when i say this with thirteen out of the fourteen years i was out i had someone approached me and asked me if i was interested in being interviewed and i had free direct offers to coach of j two of them on the phone one of them told me if i would take his job i could write my own contract because he had so much money could spend it or his family could spread it in his lifetime and he was tired or lose and where you tempted i thought about it you know i i'll tell you exactly what happened and this is the truth yet i was home at christmas vacation visiting with my father who only had weeks left to live with pancreatic cancer and the they found meet at the home and talk to me on the phone it was hugh culverhouse wow and i told my dad i said dad you can't believe will just happen i had mr culverhouse just offered me an opportunity to come coach the tampa bay buccaneers and i could write my own contract and he said what are you going to do and i said i don't know and he said if you need the aggravation that i said no then he said don't do it so i didn't do it while but it whenever a blank cheque see and that's the biggest difference when i get the privilege and honour of working with all these men who coached in the game i always tell them that they will not have the highs and lows that they did coaching but they will lead a much more balanced peaceful stable life the did as a coaching you understand that as a former broadcaster any former head coach rightly the broadcast i ended up better spent when i went back in in ninety seven i understood that yeah i understood with john wooden knowledge told me your career in successor going to be german by not out many games you win your success is going to be determine how you handle the adversity the losses and i learned at i home loan to that in my first two years with the rams were were brutal they were tough but uh we got it done the old fashioned.

pancreatic cancer mr culverhouse rams christmas tampa bay john fourteen years two years