14 Burst results for "Mr. Cabana"

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:31 min | 2 months ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That's when the Fed would get concerned, But I think that you know, seeing the 10 year yield just above 1% does not yet seem to be a level whereby those long and rates are really beginning to bite in terms of the real economy and broader financial conditions Mark Rohnert to the bull market. And the equity space whether it's double digit tech returns, even what we're beginning to see in small cap recovering so nicely. We forget that if I look at Bloomberg Barclays Total return It's been a persistent bull market of higher price, lower, yield and years space. Have we forgotten what a bond bear market is? To some extent, yes, given that U. S interest rates have recently been at historic lows on the equity market did incredibly well despite the pandemic, and I think that the market is going to have to adjust to the notion that long and interest rates will be rising. Now again, we think that this rate rise will not necessarily constrain the economy in a material way if it does the federal step in, But I think investors we're gonna have to get accustomed to the fact that they should expect to see a twist. The prices of bonds go down to some extent as rates three price and growth and inflation does pick up over time. We welcome all of you on this historic day in Washington, Mark Cabana of the Bank of America with US Here on rates, and we do this with futures, red and green in the screen a little bit better tape than three hours ago. The yield 1.1% Mark Cabana, I want you to talk to savers out there, not the fancy guys like you doing fancy hedging strategies and trying to manage with a higher price. Higher. Yield lower price. Milieu. What does the average person do in fixed income if you're telling me higher yield and lesser price? Yes. So I think that if you're a savor, what you want to do is that you want to carefully think about extending out the curve, trying to pick up some additional yield. Based upon your own risk tolerance in your comfort level. Maybe think about moving into the corporate space more than the government space. But you're gonna have to be careful and you're gonna have to recognize that you wanna leg into this strategy over time because we do anticipate that rates will be slowly rising. If you're an institutional investor, what you want to do is that you probably want to Hugh a little bit shorter on your overall duration allocation, as do re price higher. Now we do think that it's great that we're seeing rates move today, given some of the news out of Georgia and the implications that it has for Washington, But we still think that fundamentally the big great re pricing that we'd see towards 1.5% will likely take place in Q two or later. Again as the vaccine is rolled out, And as we get more information, the economy is indeed recovering on a price. He'll basis the fancy guys talk about duration and the second derivative convexity, which I'm gonna call acceleration guys like you call it Gammon up. I don't make a general gamba means I have no idea what gamma means. How about Convexity? Mark? Kid? Banna, what is going to be the accelerated forces as we go through 2001. Also as we go through 2021 11 more thing. We do think we're going to see again is that sell off? That will likely really accelerate again from Q two onwards. Q. One is gonna have a very significant head went from Cove it We don't know how effective the anybody treatments will be to the new strain of the vaccine. We don't know how quickly vaccines will be rolled out. But after that is generally behind us. We do think that rates will need to re price to the new reality of Strong fiscal fairy tale wins and the fact that we're likely going to see the economy operate meaningful E above trend from Q two through the end of the year, and that we think is going to take rates higher. So we do expect to see a more accelerated move leader in the And today, it just seems like the market is reprising a bit more to the fact that you need to sign Hi rods to a democratic control of the Senate. Then you did previously marked Obama. Thank you. So much of the Bank of America this morning, Lisa, come on. I got to go over to you, Lisa. Fancy words here convincing and all the acceleration of price down and yield up Lisa that's positively blooming. I mean, it's always everything so gloomy. You could always paint it from some gloomy perspective. I mean, otherwise, I wouldn't be true to my name. Look, I will say looking at the bond market. There's a real question of what contrive yields higher. I mean, it was really interesting to hear marks a 1.5%. You gotta think of a time when you've got record amounts of negative yielding debt around the world that 1% would look like high yield at what 10.2 buyers start coming in. I don't know, Tom. That seems reasonable, considering the fact that you know, investment grade bonds are building 2%. Not that money. We make jokes about this folks. But I would say that media business media is about 85% equity markets and they toss in a morsel about bonds. Here and there. But Lisa, I'm sorry. What we're talking about is yield up. Whether it's a politics of President Biden and others in price down and it retail. It's easy. You get three months of your statement, and you know you're losing money and you're upset institutionally is Mr Cabana mentioned these air. Really? These are great challenges into, say Fourth of July. Gina Martin Adams of Bloomberg Intelligence yesterday made an incredible point that one of the reasons why evaluations of equities It looked so good right now, even though they're so high on a historic basis is because of how low yields are. At what point do yield start to look more attractive. Given how high valuations are stocks have become the new bonds to so many investors. When does that reverse? And how much does that challenge the feds hand? Regardless of what the economy does, Tom back to the politics of the moment here and of course, last night 10:11 p.m. one a. M. Some movement mineral not minute by minute, but maybe every 30 minutes We had Georgia voting results. I haven't seen any numbers since about five o'clock this morning. Maybe even 4 30 this morning and that's where we are. Now. Let me point out War not takes a trophy against La Flor. AP has announced that along with many other organizations. Jonah's off ahead of Senator produced No but by a razor thin margin, and it is within the recount margin as well That with AP saying, 98% of the vote in stay with us through the morning as we look at that vote return and also the challenges Washington. Isaac Boltanski Compass point with us again, we say good morning across this nation on Bloomberg Radio and Bloomberg Television..

Mark Cabana Lisa Washington Bank of America Bloomberg Barclays Georgia Tom AP Fed Mark Rohnert U. S Isaac Boltanski Compass Obama Mark Gina Martin Adams Jonah Banna Bloomberg Intelligence Gammon
"mr. cabana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:40 min | 2 months ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Good morning bloomer. Surveillance had an historic day for the United States of America in Washington and across, I should say across Georgia, and particularly in Atlanta, we're looking for results. There is well, we're going to stay on the markets. We're gonna do a day to check here and there, but what you need to know The tape. Not is jarring as it was two hours ago. Lisa Abramowitz in time King John Farrow is off today. Although John Farrell Lisa notes Russell 2000 really was some of that small cap indication, and you see it now. With a better Dow Dow futures up 100 points even with NASDAQ Negative four The vics comes in Lisa 24.44. That's a better tape. All in all, Yeah, and I will say so. The Russell 2000 up nearly 3% in pre market trading, But if you take a look at financials, that's what I'm watching. Today. You're seeing J. P. Morgan, for example. Up more than 3% 3.2% ahead of the open, and this comes as you have the biggest steeping in the yield. Kirby right now have the biggest gap between two and 10 year yields going back to 2017. How much is inflation? How much is the expectation that the Fed will be actually comfortable allowing yields to rise over the longer term? Tom barely mentioned foreign exchange always an important issue for it. Incoming president and we see that with dollar not weaker, but nevertheless, dollar pushing new weakness right now and D x Y Renminbi. 6.45, of course, is always important. That's what that Hong Kong News it we saw out there earlier this morning on multiple multiple arrests. We heard the shock from our Hong Kong News bureau earlier euro dollar 1 23 45 Lisa Before we get to our good guest, Mr Cabana. I want to walk through the formula, which is nominal. Yield higher. But at the same time inflation expectations of higher, which means the real yield hasn't moved all that much that residual. It's an interesting juxtaposition of those three numbers. Lisa. Basically, the implication here is that Central Bank, the Federal Reserve, in particular, will continue to buy. No more than $100 million of bonds for the foreseeable future, suppressing yields because otherwise it doesn't make sense. If you're expecting 2% inflation over the next 10 years to get 1% for a 10 year treasury you're losing money in real terms, Tom and that is the conundrum. The other conundrum is. Is this a head fake The move that we're seeing today, both in Treasury yields and beyond. Mark Obama has been covering all things rates. Bank of America Global Research Head of U. S Rates Strategy Mark. I love your sense of that. Another words yields a kind of peaked out here and could be headed lower. His people reassess the enthusiasm about faster growth and more stimulus. They could. But what we anticipate is that Rachel gradually rise to around 1.5% by the end of this year. Now we assume that even with the bass case of a divided government if the Democrats do end up winning both of these Georgia seats tow us that raises the risks that you see the rate re pricing occur little bit faster and potentially higher than we anticipate. There's a number of headwinds in the near Term Cove. It is going to restrain economic activity in Q one. But we do anticipate that as the vaccine is rolled out, and his global growth and US growth picks up, you're going to see long and rates re price higher and importantly, we think that this long and rate re pricing will be due to quote unquote healthy factors. I eat better growth, higher inflation expectations. As the economy prospers. And if the Democrats win both of these Georgia seats and naturally means more fiscal stimulus and likely higher deficits as well. How high can Treasury yields go before the feds steps in So we think that it's less about a level and it's more about the set of conditions that's pushing rates higher. If you see this again Quote unquote healthy rate repressing where you see higher breaking events where you see stable Tonto higher risk asset prices a stable to weaker dollar. There's no real level that we think the Fed is going to grow uncomfortable with. However, if you see this rate move that is in a liquid move, or it's due to concerns over too much treachery supply. That's when the Fed will step in and just as you and Tom we're talking about. We think that it's really all about the distribution between breakevens and real rates. If rates are rising, because breakevens they're widening. The Fed is going to see that as a generally healthy move, and they're not going to step in and all set it Now. If you saw rates really quickly moved to 1.5% that would probably be a bit more than the economy can handle it present on the Fed would need to offset that. But if it's a more gradual move, then we think that the Fed will likely tolerate and you know, in fact, embrace the move. If it's driven by better inflation expectations. Although Mark as we're seeing today in the big tech stocks and other stocks that are considered havens or other securities that are riskier that have been bid up in large part because of how low bond yields are, there is a question of whether the federal respond to a disruption and financial conditions or if you want to put it more bluntly. Selloff in anything on step in or perhaps, you know, try to suppress yields quicker than many other be worthwhile just to keep everything intact and make it look like everyone's happy and still getting Gates. Absolutely so. The Fed is looking at financial conditions broadly and they do not want to see a destabilizing rise and long term interest rates that causes financial conditions to tighten materially, and that causes the economy to slow down. But are they concerned about a couple of percentage point selloff in tech stocks when they've had such an incredible run? No, not in particular. Would they be concerned? If that turned into a 20% correction? Yes, And would they be concerned if there were signs that too high of interest rates were beginning to In the real economy is slowing down the housing market things of that nature..

Federal Reserve Georgia Tom John Farrell Lisa United States Mark Obama Lisa Abramowitz Hong Kong Russell John Farrow J. P. Morgan Term Cove America Hong Kong News Kirby Atlanta Washington president
"mr. cabana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:23 min | 2 months ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Really not the problem facing you Tell me right now, level interest rates is not holding the economy back. You look at the house inspector doing very well in summer. Goebbels has been great. Well, so if the Fed did more, it really wouldn't have that much consequence. The house is sectors flying the labor market at the moment, not so much. That was Bill Dudley, the former New York Fed president for our audience worldwide this morning. Good morning from New York and London alongside Tom Keen, at least rebranded some Jonathan Farrow coming up on the open in about 15 minutes time, BancAmerica Securities had a US race strategy. Mark Cabana. Very timely conversation with Mr Cabana coming up. In the next hour. Tom Kean, Jon, You and I have just one show left together after this, e. They got me medicated, John, you should stay around because if you ever come back to New York, you're gonna want the first six months free, right? I will be once in the first six months. Three of you seen what the brokers they're doing right? Rough ring The 14 month contract with two months for free, so that you get the luxury of that low rent for 14 months and then, pop? Yeah, snap back to normal. Maybe Some point in spring 21. Some have someone in your entourage as you leave us take notes here with this show, which Rochelle's Mitchell Show is wonderful. Closing in the negotiating for making partner Macro trends. Advisors on real estate. We got a huge response. And Mr Rochelle is I'm Mitch. I got commercial questions. I got residential questions, But let's pick it up for young Farrell here is well, how desperate are they did rent Units in these big pandemic cities. They wouldn't say it's desperation right now, because I think demand to start until Leach back into the market, so at least they're they're making progress. I think months ago, they were felt like they were in free fall, and they were lowering rents and giving free rent simultaneously. Now they're trying to figure out how to strike the right balance. John mentioned the 14th month lease. That's one of the tricks that they're using, so I don't think it's panic mode. But certainly landlords want to do whatever they can to get the building film is construction dead. Yeah. New construction. You know, If you see a crane in the skyline, they'll likely finish what they started. But I don't see new speculative construction of apartments in cities for quite a while. Which is there any way to get a true read on some of these big urban areas in terms of real estate values until the pandemic subsides. A to least I think the spring buying season when people are sort of out in about will be the first leading indicator about what condos air trading for the problem is, there's tremendous overhang on the market of people who have listed their condos for sale meant taking them off of the market on That's messing up prices because if you have a two bedroom condominium, and you can't sell it, what do you do? You rent it? So now you're competing with the landlord's S O. I think we have to wait until the spring to further for first market clearing prices that we can rely on to see where it landed. All right. Before we get those sort of tea leaves, you have a sense of how much credence this exodus from big cities really is in terms of having lasting power. I think it's it's other than temporary, but it's not permanent. I didn't mean to overly nuance that so I think there was a pre existing trend of people wanted to move out of the cities for a variety of reasons that got accelerated, But it's some of the folks can't find homes to buy in the burbs. They're staying, but you're also seeing is people moving from outer boroughs. That were cheaper into Manhattan because Manhattan's been re priced Mitch a question. I've asked you before you gave me a really smart answer, but it's still confounds me and our listeners and viewers. All those stores air empty. Why don't they just lower the rents? That that is the question on. Hopefully, I could harking back to my smart answer from the past, but I think it's happening now, Tom. They getting there. The problem is that their remaining empty because there's no one to take them. So I think for a while, landlords were being greedy for lack of a better term on trying to keep the rent level that they wanted. But right now, I really think there's a tenant for some of those faces. You see some pop up stores for the holidays. But now when you enter this new phase of, you know, no indoor dining is we've taken restaurants out of the mix. I don't think I think there's just a dearth of tenants for some of that space. And I don't know what becomes of it. So what do you say to the politicians struggling this with this in your political battle? What is the urgency? Metro Shell has to get some enthusiasm and commercial and retail America. I think we need to create incentives for people to start businesses and the thing that will likely happen. Tom is all of these businesses that go out of business. Tragically, somebody new is going to sort of take over that restaurant that closed And I think we need to do is create incentives in cities for people to want to put capital at risk and open businesses, even retail ones. I mean, New York City's of foot traffic city, so storefront retail makes sense. It has to be re priced, and I think politicians need to find a way to incentivize people to take risks..

New York Mr Rochelle Fed Tom Mark Cabana John New York City Bill Dudley Tom Keen Jonathan Farrow Goebbels BancAmerica Securities US Tom Kean Manhattan president
"mr. cabana" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:16 min | 10 months ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hi this is Michael sheets I'm with CNBC my question is for Jim and Bob can probably help I got a little color here I Jim you've asked people to stay home for this mission given you know we're all my mass brawl social distancing here on site but these visitor complex reopened the day after the scrub so this launch attempt is going to see people be able to come to the visitor center and as well as it's done because it's the weekend people have to take off work if they want to come try to watch the first time we've launched crew in almost a decade so what kind of measures is NASA taking that's different than we saw on Wednesday on Wednesday and that what kind of crowds are it is NASA expecting in the local area and even to welcome on site so just so you're aware yes I don't know if the account is but lots and lots of people came out to the Cape to watch this launch so I'll tell you what we're considering as an agency this is an important mission for us we also have in July we're launching a robot to Mars and so we have to protect the safety and the health of the work force here at the Kennedy Space Center and then of course once demo to is successful which it will be once demo to a successful we're gonna launch crew one so right here at the Kennedy Space Center we have no shortage of opportunities in front of us and we have to make sure that without question yeah we're doing everything we can to keep our people safe right here at the Kennedy Space Center keeps them healthy remember if we have an outbreak all of the contract racing begins and then all of these mission essential people end up could be kind of getting sidelined that is not the outcome that that we're looking for so the visitor center is open yeah there is no doubt times are changing and people are going to travel and the visitors center is going to be open what we expect is that when people come here they follow the guidance of the governor of the state of Florida that they follow the guidance for social distancing and and the personal protective equipment if you're not going to maintain that distance and and if people do that they're going to be safe but we will make sure that the people that are involved in these mission essential functions for this country launching American astronauts on American rockets from American soil launching our next rover to Mars that these mission essential functions will not be placed in jeopardy NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine this is live at the Kennedy Space Center I'd like it at first off at the visitor center it's a limited opening it's not full capacity they limited the number of people that day could come on to the main complex are no bus tours you're not going out to the Saturn five so it's in keeping with what Disney has done and the universal is done at city walk not even all the venues on the main complex are going to be open and this was planned open you know Hey we launched on time it would have been after the launch it just turned out with the scrub it now those folks who come to the visitor center gonna be able to view it from from the visitors center but they have strict rules in place first CDC guidance you know I can say is they're doing it in the safest way possible in keeping with that governors sentences guidelines for helping to open up the state of Florida but is by no means a full opening a space visitors center Kennedy visitor center it is a limited participation here on site as the administrator mentioned you know we're still in stage three for our guidelines on site for the corona virus you know we require folks to wear masks in common areas you know in buildings if they cannot be six feet apart they have to wear a mask in hallways common areas elevators and so on so we are taking this seriously we have to protect our work force to ensure that we can complete NASA's mission essential work that is director of the Kennedy Space Center this is a repair C. span radio programming from Friday hi I can turn your times hi this how questions wondering what Bob and Doug were doing during these two days of downtime that they of course did not want so they'll they will problem I don't know honestly they might spend a little time at the beach house I again I don't know but I would guess that's probably what they they'll do they've they started a new tradition of of launching little rockets I don't I don't know if you've seen any of that but they started a new tradition of launching rockets from the beach at the beach house before they launch and so I would imagine they're probably getting some downtime there probably you know thinking about what's what's coming maybe some changes that they like to have for their next their next route to the to the rocket shelling the cold you guys have any insight here that was NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine so I launched on a Soyuz rocket out of biking or even with our lunch well we experienced a delay gels Lindgren and I'm certain you know you certainly get excited about the launch you're prepared your mindset is such that that you're ready to fly it's certainly Bob Doug we're ready to do that on Wednesday and and so describe the delay this represents an opportunity for the team took to learn and then and an opportunity for them to reunite with their families and other spending time with their families and and enjoying the sun a little bit of time before they get ready to fly again I'm sure they're getting briefings from the SpaceX came from the NASA team what the weather looks like how the vehicle looks and then and then getting back into the zone for whatever we decide decide for tomorrow or Sunday and here's Astor and we're we're going to see if astronaut Nicole Mann speaks but I guess she's staying back on the podium good morning high great alone spectrum news thirteen this is for the administrator also Mr Cabana you know it's been nine years nine years since the space coast since Americans all want now this area was devastated after the shuttle retired lots of people laid off what type of inspiration after nine years does this flight mean for the space coast in particular and Florida thanks it's it's absolutely huge not I cannot compliment Bob Cabana and his team here at the Kennedy Space Center in not as you mentioned when the space shuttles were retired nine years ago that this area was devastated and then that was with the cancellation of the moon program constellation so all of those jobs that were anticipated were also eliminated and it was it was all at once and it was absolutely devastating and so what has happened now is Bob and his team have put together and I'm saying this because Bob won't brag about himself but they put together this multi use space port so we've got commercial we've got civil and of course you've got military launches that are happening from this facility now in a very robust way and and the economy has come back the markets are are working here in a way that we couldn't have even envisions nine years ago and now we have you know a budget a NASA budget that is the highest it's ever been in history in nominal dollars and it's as high as it's been you know obviously Apollo in real dollars was higher but we're our trajectory is right yeah when I took over this this job our budget was nineteen billion dollars and the budget request for next year is twenty five billion dollars for the first time since nineteen seventy two we have a human landing system funded to go to the surface of the moon and not just funded but also under contract for the development of the human landing system and of course with the the development of the space force than the forty fifth space wing Cape Canaveral Air Force station there's gonna be lots and lots of economic opportunity happening here some of it for good reason because we want to do exploration science discovery some of it for not so good reason because we've got that bad actors around the world that are making space more dangerous than we need the forty fifth space wing we need the Air Force to do what is necessary to keep our country and our exploration and the commercial capabilities of space say but I'll tell you right now we're thrilled to have the support from the administration at the level that we have it we've got strong bipartisan support one of my jobs in the NASA administrator and I took this very seriously when I took the job how do we create a program that is sustainable how do we create a program that's not gonna invest billions of dollars and then get canceled well we do it by getting strong bipartisan support which we are having we do it by making sure our international partners are engaged and contributing significantly in dollar values and capabilities which they are doing we think about the gateway building a space station in orbit around the moon our international partners want to go to the moon with us and we of course welcome that the president's space policy directive one said go to the moon goes to Spain Italy go with international partners go with commercial partners we now have when when we go to the moon in twenty twenty four we're gonna go with a commercial human landing system so we're expecting our providers to go get customers that are not NASA driving down our costs increasing access so we're building the markets that make it sustainable because the history of spaceflight is that the government created the demand and the government created the supply and when you do that your all is limited and you are subject to the whimsical budgets of politicians and that's where we were nine years ago because the great work of Bob and his team because of the vision to commercialize space that's not where we are today we need a resilient space program that includes the best that America has to offer from a government perspective from a commercial perspective we need to bring a coalition of nations with us which is what the international partnerships or are all about we need bipartisan support and more than anything the reason I'm here we need these people that are watching on television right now to support the program and they do and that's why we do so much communication outrage if we have public support then of course we get the support of the representatives in Congress which of course provide NASA's budget and they have been overwhelmingly supportive in a bipartisan way so yes we all remember what happened nine years ago we remember it and we're doing everything in our power to make sure that that doesn't happen again and that's my job is the NASA administrator Bob all it's just a few words Jim Bridenstine here's the Kennedy Space Center director Bob Cabana thank you for your kind words and just extremely pleased to be a member of this team it is awesome what we've accomplished and Greg is that we haven't seen a launch in nine years I'd like to say any time a rocket ship leaves planet earth I don't care what's on it it is an event in worthy of note that yeah you know you talk about humans and what it means I happen to see a picture of the Max brewer bridge for the last wanted him in at Titusville there and it looks like a the last flight of the space shuttle yeah our nation it means a lot to see our astronauts launching on U. S. rockets from U. S. soil and anytime you put a human on a rocket it all it it's another step up I mean it it raises the level of concern it raises their level of importance it raises the level of are looking into it to make sure that everything is right and yeah it's awesome yeah I can't tell you what it's going to mean to me to see a U. S. rocket launching cruise again off that pad out there that's what they were designed for we went to the moon from that pad I launched three times up that Pat you know to see Bob and Doug launch up at an end to get that Boeing watching we are on the verge of a new era in human space flight this is just the beginning it's only gonna get better so yeah it means a lot and I truly am excited about it to me.

Jim Bob Michael CNBC
"mr. cabana" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:19 min | 10 months ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Coverage of a news conference by NASA in anticipation of tomorrow's scheduled manned space launch with SpaceX we hear first from NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine well thank you Bob yeah that that's that's right our highest priority is and always has been Bob and Doug and of course couple days ago we had we had too much electricity in the atmosphere and the challenge there is not that we were in a lightning storm or anything like that the challenges that I'll launch could in fact trigger lightning in fact the rocket itself could become a lightning bolt and and so we ate we had this that these parameters that ahead of time both the the NASA and SpaceX teams knew exactly what the parameters were those parameters were limitations I should say those limitations were exceeded and and that put us in a position to delay the launch I think this is certain though we are going to launch American astronauts on American rockets from American soil and we will do it with the absolute that the absolute priority being the safety of our astronauts and I'll tell you I'm very proud of the NASA team very proud of the SpaceX team yeah a lot of that lot of comments I had in the interviews at a time were are you gonna feel undue pressure because of you know the all of the attention on this not just the tension in the United States but attention globally all of the VIP's that were here are you gonna feel undue pressure to launch and you know we've all been in agreement that there will be no pressure we will launch when we are ready and I'll tell you the president the vice president we're proud of the NASA team and the SpaceX team for making the right call for the right reasons and and again when we do this again Saturday if we do it again on Sunday we will feel no pressure we will go when we are ready safety is the highest priority and that's what we're focused on so with that will open it up to questions Jim did you want to have a few words here and you bet absolutely add yet more of our deputy NASA administrator and I'll tell you that a great friend and we are honored to have him as our deputy having worked many years in the Senate he helps us a lot with the the political aspects of the job that that I deal with every day so thank you Jim thank you Jim good morning you know I just really want to start by saying you know we're at the dawn of a new age they were really leading the beginning of a space revolution and think about it this is really something much bigger than all of us but really our hope and prayer for tomorrow is to inspire the next generation and to give hope for many people who need it right now it also to unite our country in the world and you think about I guess what I'm trying to say is we need your support and I hope you'll stay with us as we get this flight test whether it's tomorrow or the next day or whenever we go after that deflating once said he was mercury seven astronauts he said a good scrub is better than a bad lunch any day and that's where we're at thank you questions will just go to go to questions hi morning Jim Irene Klotz yes very aviation week for you are Mr Cabana was there anything at all out of the first the countdown on forgot what day already Wednesday that is being changed week to anything the team's learnt that's going to be applied for this and I have a quick question from the call the of course this isn't Boeing's day today but there's another we're gonna do this all again in a in a little while can you just give us an update on where you are with your training for your flight thanks yes so certainly this was interesting we we have done a dry dress rehearsal we have never done a wet dress rehearsal and so getting from a position of you know feeling the rockets and arming the launch abort system in these kind of things that we went through and then D. feeling and and those so yes there were there were learning opportunities there were always gathering data but I will tell you that the rocket was ready to go the crew capsule was ready to go all the ground systems were working according to plan so no I would say not a whole lot of no no big changes but it is good for the agency to have a wet dress rehearsal behind us so that's all very positive and every time we do one step further we learn things so that's that's good for the agency the second question was what for a call about that starliner thanks thank you yes we are absolutely tremendously so proud of the NASA and SpaceX team and you know what we are calling this the beginning of flight test season and it really is what you're going to see is the historical launch of the NASA SpaceX crew dragon hopefully tomorrow or this weekend following that next year you're going to see the launch of Boeing starliner and then right on the heels of that you're going to see the launch of a Ryan on SLS and so we talked about the beginning this first step in this road map of us going to the moon in the artist's mission there's gonna be a lot of launches coming up from Florida and there's gonna be a lot of movement and it's starting with the SpaceX launch morning Eric Monica WKMG TV CBS Orlando so nice to be here god speak tomorrow thank you for taking our questions want to ask you about the the forty fifth task force specifically as as you know America's bass just down the coast from us at Patrick Air Force base we met them are going to rescue Bob and Doug god forbid something goes wrong they end up in the water somewhere they showed us the equipment they've been training as you know for years in fact what they told us is they really started their training after the shuttle program ended in twenty eleven they're so excited they have this warehouse full of stuff a hundred and fifty men and women and the only step in as you know with something goes wrong if not we're not going to see about them we're not going to hear about them they didn't say this but I sensed a little bit of sadness that that they're not going to get the glory when Bob and Doug finally do come home and we can welcome our heroes back right is there any way to give them some of the glory they know this is SpaceX's show we understand that is there any way to involve them a little bit considering what they're gonna do and probably never be seen so I'll be happy to take that and of course I'll tell you Bob Cabana works with the forty fifth space wing day in and day out they are amazing partners for NASA but yes that you know debt three which is part of the forty fifth space wing is the organization that should something go wrong and the launch abort system is is triggered they will be rescuing Bob and Doug and they're also going to be involved in in recovery but even beyond that the forty fifth space wing does so so so much more than just recovery the forty fifth space wing is involved in helping us understand second by second what the weather is helping us with the data helping us with back the numerical weather models for the weather they help us of course with the range making sure that we have everything we need for the range and clearance of the range this is their range and and they are they are amazing partners this whole launch we are what we have branded this it you know importantly this is not launch NASA it's not launch SpaceX its launch America this is America's lunch and the inter agency is critical to this effort and of course the the the forty fifth space wing which is you know a new component of the brand new space force I don't want to re emphasize that that's that's they are now part of the space force and emphasize that we have other partners as well the FAA is very involved in this watch the department of transportation of course is is the parents of the FAA so this isn't all of America effort and and when we launch it will be it will be launched America NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine this is live at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida Bob you know I just want to emphasize with the administrator said spaceflight is a team sport none of us are successful unless all of us are successful and I I we couldn't have a better relationship than we do with that general Douglas yes and the forty fifth space wing it we wouldn't be here without them everything that we have done working with the space when working with that the FAA to improve our operations to enable commercial operations in a more user friendly environment you know this has been years in the making getting us to where we are right now and that you know it it's not just the engineering team it's not just Nassar's not just the commercial crew program I mean this is across the board it's all of the support organizations within NASA and Air Force that are helping make this a successful launch is it minister said this is a launch America this isn't just launched New York commercial crew so our whole nation needs to take pride in this and everybody has had a role to play you know they need the onus it's it they they are part of it we wouldn't be here if everybody wasn't playing a role in making a successful administrator great to see you again this is G. O. bonitos over at ABC news of obviously this is Florida the weather can do whatever it wants to do but the forecast aren't looking so great for tomorrow and for Sunday so some of our viewers have been wondering why not wait till the weather is good why go through the whole process when you have lightning in the area and such yeah so we're balancing so many different things right now and that's an important question and I just want people to know that when we balance all of these things there is always always always going to be uncertainty we could wait another week and we can see that the weather's going to be good the question is why is the weather good a week from now and the answer is well because the winds are going to be is to west and so all of the all of that the the cumulonimbus clouds all of the the storm systems are going to be on the west coast of Florida the weather looks like it's going to be fantastic the problem is when the when the when the winds are what used to last if we have a pad abort capability which we now have which we didn't have under the space shuttle we have a pad abort triggered yeah we're gonna have our astronauts landing on land and that is not is not that is not an option for us so we're balancing a lot of things were also balancing the time of day that we launched making sure that we we have to consider the sleep cycles of the crew to make sure that they're not you know in the midst of a of a very critical portion of the flight when they've been you know without sleep for a period of you know twenty four hours and then that won't happen by the way because we're managing for that but it's not just the sleep cycles on the crew itself as sleep cycles on the international space station and all of these things that were balancing have to match so we we have these very unique opportunities of time it's interesting when you talk about launching to the international space station your launch window is not a window at all it's instantaneous and if you don't need it you don't go so you have to have of all of these things met up you know ahead of time and then you you select the window and if the weather is good you go if the weather is not good you don't go and then it was so we do have these different opportunities in the.

NASA Jim Bridenstine Bob NASA administrator Doug
"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

13:31 min | 1 year ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Thinking about the fact that this is a team that make all this happen and we know that it takes an army from design through construction through delivery through preparation. How big of a team are we talking about on launch day? You know we will have folks folks in Mission Control as part of the team there in Houston we also will have folks that are in The Orion their engineering team that sits in the Orion Murra we have a team of SOS the SOS Engineering Support Team that sits in the SEC. which just a part of the hoskin in at Marshall and then we have our team here And so asking. How big is our team? It's always a tough one for me. Because I know how many people in the firing room we have Just under a hundred folks. That will sit in fine room one. And then we have a support launch team of folks that it's about sixty So really between the two rooms were about one hundred and fifty folks so that's an easy question to answer but for me. I believe that everyone everyone that develops this hardware. Everyone that tests this hardware. Everyone that gets us to launch is part of our launch team whether they're sitting in a firing room or in an engineering support center on Launch Day Day or part of the effort to got us to that day and it's been there part of the launch team regardless of where they are but to answer your question about one hundred fifty bucks between the two firing so Jessica. I'll start with you. You not knowing the exact situation. How long is this countdown? How far out from zero do we really? We start kind of. Do we really feel like. Hey it's launch day like how far away are we. Well I would say our launch countdown stars. Today's You know prior to that not not Sierra timeframe. There's a lot of preparations that have to go down. Like Charlie said we have to power out of the vehicle we have to do multiple tracks and again they're all driven by requirements And then we have to start the vehicle Kreil loading and you know that event happens you know. We have to check whether the weather's going going to support a lot of different factors that have to be taken into account but that decision to go ahead and do If we're going to go ahead and tank vehicle is done you know somewhere in like seven hours prior to the line that timeframe and dot takes awhile and we have a large vehicle so ought to put it in simple terms so we have to know balance that commodities that go-between the core stage and the ICY PSA upper stage of the vehicle and Point you know that takes probably the majority of class seven hours of it and you know we have to monitor ground systems. Monitor the vehicle to make sure that everything's going has plan so we'll say I mean those last two days or what we consider to be the launch countdown. I don't know I put in simplistic terms for something that is our countdown. Just under two days just covered it well I was sitting here thinking when you were asking the question about. When does it feel like lawn? Trade countdown. Two days prior That's called the stations. I think it will will feel like launch when we roll to the pad because we know that when we roll out of the V. A. B. That you know we are we have some work to do at the pad prior but that is our commitment toward that launch date and that that season that we have where we have several days awesome which we can go launch and so I think that final roll out is going to be an amazing event and is this thing about the countdown again. Is this two days around the clockwork or is this. Today's like on shift time. It is Two days around the clock. It'll be three shifts a day. Yep Oh it's going to be great and so are you. Having a hundred people like per shift in the ready to go or is this just like certain teams have to be there just certain teams What happens is that it's really based on the work that has to get done so we have something we call a bar chart which lays out sequentially The work that is accomplished in launch countdown and so there is an the the personnel in the room. Kind of come and go during. I'd say that First Day of launch countdown. But once we get ready for Criollos the rooms the rooms pretty full and and it will remain that way through t zero but certainly that first day it depends on the work. That's that we have their their positions like the test directors are always in the room integration consuls always manned But the other consoles are staffed based on the work that they have to do and as the launch director. I'm assuming that there's going to be part of you. That will want to to be present for forty eight hours straight. That's probably an unwise decision. All things considered so how how are you. Have you thought through how to break apart your time during those two days. Yes yes I actually have started to think about that. I haven't gotten to the final answer yet. But Luckily for me I have great support and And and so I'll have to figure out those from tanking on. I'll definitely be there continuously in that first day you know. I'm really really blessed because I have a really we strong on our program has a really strong. A test management group the NASA test directors as well as the toss tests conductors and they execute that launch launch countdown on behalf of the launch director. And so they are staffed around the clock through there all the time and they really served during launches as is in the ears of the launch director. So if there's something that they believe that I need to know they certainly reach out. I check in with them regularly on that first day of launch countdown down And and then you know just will be involved as well and and she'll have some some ships where she'll be in the in the in the firing room. I'm kind of doing that. Same thing you know if their issues and let me know but I have started to think about that. I haven't laid it out as to you. Know which shifter after which time period but definitely from tanking down continuous and then prior to that They'll be they'll be shifts that I'll be in the firing room and and then somewhere out depend hang on the test directors or my sister launched director Jess as technical assistant to help with that. And I would be remiss if I didn't didn't make a special point to say that you're Nasr's first female director which has gotta feel like a huge honor and I was actually talking with somebody had. Are You the first female director period. Because I don't think I did a little bit of homework and couldn't find anybody else. So first female launch director on Earth. That is it accurate. I don't know about on Earth uh-huh I would say the first one for NASA and we know that's true no question about it. I don't know about the I don't know if it's bigger than that. But so so when you when you got assigned or I guess the question is I like how does that happen. Is that like you get appointed to that. Did you apply for this job. Like how does this. How does this transpire So there was an announcement and And I applied for it and interviewed for it and and was selected so it was That part of it. It is kind of the I would say the normal process that like many of us got our jobs so it wasn't like an appointed thing. It was Canal came out and and I applied I'll never forget when I got the phone call though That's when it really Kinda it became I would say real Is that a holy smokes moment. You're like wait a second. I gotta go to launch a rocket now. Well I'll tell you I I was actually walking walking across to a meeting I was in. I was At the time my office was in NC and I was actually walking To a meeting Evan headquarters in my phone rang and I looked down. And it said Bob Cabana and Senator Director and so I said what am I Mr Cabanas calling me and probably so he you know Offered me the job and it was posted my interview. You had been several days before and he offered me the job and when he first said it. I I remember saying Bob. Can you repeat that I just WanNa make sure I heard you correctly. Klay and he he repeated in and then it was the moment of. Wow what a great opportunity. And what an honor awesome. Yeah congrats again on that. I know that it's been awhile since that happened but I'm sure it's still kind of an. I'm sure won't fully set in until you see Iraq pat and then it's like man. That just happened. Yup absolutely definitely looking forward Definitely looking forward to that launch day but I will say you know I I am extremely blessed In this role and I do feel honored. I am also very blessed to have the team that I that I have because I think as a launch director you know. You're you're as you're as good or your as has effective as the as the folks on your team and and I have an incredible dedicated team. that you know is working in towards launch and making sure that we're taking all the right steps and that we're working our products and that were getting launch countdown ready and sulfur is coming along and and all all of our progress and our sins and just all of that. It's a lot of work and I'm really. I'm really blessed to have such a great team and I know that you're probably so focused that this question might seem like a foreign concept but is this the the final career stop. Is there somewhere to go pass. This is there. Is there more career wise or is this like I'm good here. I can just hang out until I retire. That that's a tough one You know policy. Let me think about that for a second so I think about it. Like this A couple of summers ago I went to Like Zion National Park and Bryce Canyon and every place we went. I thought this is the most beautiful. We'll place in the world and the next day there was another most beautiful place in the world and each of those you you stop for a moment and kind of took that in and so I think all of our careers It's a path right. It's a path and it's a it's a journey and every job that I've had I've taken that moment kind of like those different destinations within a national park. Where you say this is an incredible audible opportunity? This is a wonderful place And I could stay here for a long time and then something else came along And you know when I was working in payloads I felt that way when I had an opportunity to go the test director office I felt like Oh it's time to you know. Continue that journey. I absolutely absolutely right. Now cannot imagine a job That more appealing than the one that I have like I love. I love what I do. I love the people I work with. I can't wait to see that vehicle out on the pad and so for me. It's hard to think beyond on that but I never want to say no. This is it because you never know what life has in store you know. And if I had stopped at some of those other locations and decided decided not to take that path to the next one. I wouldn't be where I am today. I wouldn't get this opportunity so I don't like to say no. There's there's nothing else after this but I will tell you is hard to imagine job better than the one that I have and there is no other job right now that I would one go. Just any interest in becoming on stricter someday now I told her I mean the amount of responsibility. She has in that job. I don't know if I could deal with it but I am just glad to be part of her team supporting her Like I said I don't know where my career would lead like Charlie early. I've taken different roads. Still Led me to a different place. I never really had a you know. Plan career path that I said yes. I'm going to be supporting the. Em One lunch team and yet here. I am so I'm just honored to be you know where it came side by side with Charlie and you know being part of that. Em One launch lunch-tine so fantastic. We're going to the moon. We need to not forget destination here. We're not just launching a rocket. We're going somewhere. We're we're going to the moon. President has a charge to be boots on the moon. Twenty twenty four five years from now that wrote appears to run through the space launch system. mm-hmm which means it runs through your firing room. Tell me about what. That's like to hear the announcement. Come out about hey twenty twenty four. Let's go exciting right. I think about Our first crude flight. I mean. You're absolutely right rain..

director NASA Charlie SOS Engineering Support Team Jessica Orion Murra Bob Cabana Mission Control twenty twenty Houston Criollos Senator Director Iraq NC Nasr President Zion National Park Klay Canal Jess
"mr. cabana" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"You had a series of steps that you know if in the event that you had an engine engine that got shut down or you ended up You know having a cut off on the pad. You always had your fingers sleeved into those contingency steps because you knew that you're going to run those stabs and you're gonNA run them quickly and I can tell you even now it's been years since our last shuttle launch and I can still run through those first few steps on for memory because you know you practice. I just said you practice them in a Sim. It was something that was a part of every single time you knew that they were time critical steps and they needed to be executed as such and so I would imagine that everybody on our team. We'll have those areas that are most important and most critical for them and they will absolutely no that countdown countdown. There's no doubt in my mind and so when you were asking that question I was shaking my head. Everybody's going to know that and how much of that is because of the way. Okay that you operate as far as like. Are you like drilling your team. Do you have like drills. Like what are these Sims like to to get people ready to be prepared for that drills kind of a tough word so I would say the question I would say that. What is the style I mean? We certainly have an expectation. spectating of of excellence within our team and And I and I would say that's for all of us myself included We definitely practice. I mean you know. We're at the beginning of our sin. you know arsim planning and at the beginning of our of our SIM regime and so my expectation tation is different today than it will be six months from now. But that's the reason we go through. These is so that by the time we get to launch those those there's challenges as technical problems that can come up those critical situations where you need to execute Very quickly and very decisively. Our team has had an opportunity to practices and practice them and practice them again and thinking about the fact that this is a team that make all this happen and we know that it takes an army from design through construction through delivery through preparation. How big of a team are we talking about on launch day? You know we will have folks folks in Mission Control as part of the team there in Houston we also will have folks that are in The Orion their engineering team that sits in the Orion Murra we have a team of SOS the SOS Engineering Support Team that sits in the SEC. which just a part of the hoskin in at Marshall and then we have our team here And so asking. How big is our team? It's always a tough one for me. Because I know how many people in the firing room we have Just under a hundred folks. That will sit in fine room one. And then we have a support launch team of folks that it's about sixty So really between the two rooms were about one hundred and fifty folks so that's an easy question to answer but for me. I believe that everyone everyone that develops this hardware. Everyone that tests this hardware. Everyone that gets us to launch is part of our launch team whether they're sitting in a firing room or in an engineering support center on Launch Day Day or part of the effort to got us to that day and it's in their part of the launch team regardless of where they are but to answer your question about one hundred fifty bucks between the two firing rooms so Jessica. I'll start with you. You not knowing the exact situation. How long is this countdown? How far out from zero do we really? We start kind of. Do we really feel like. Hey it's launch day like how far away are we. Well I would say our launch countdown stars. Today's You know prior to that not Sierra timeframe. There's a lot of preparations that have to go down. Like Charlie said we have to power out of the vehicle we have to do multiple tracks and again. They're all driven by requirements And then we have to start the vehicle Kreil loading and you know that event happens you know. We have to check whether the weather's going going to support a lot of different factors that have to be taken into account but that decision to go ahead and do If we're going to go ahead and tank vehicle is done you know somewhere in like seven hours prior to the line that timeframe and dot takes awhile and we have a large vehicle so ought to put it in simple terms so we have to know balance that commodities that go-between the core stage and the ICY PSA upper stage of the vehicle and Point you know that takes probably the majority of class seven hours of it and you know we have to monitor ground systems. Monitor the vehicle to make sure that everything's going has plan so we'll say I mean those last two days aren't that funny what we consider to be the launch countdown. I don't know I put in simplistic terms for something that is our countdown. Just under two days just covered it well I was sitting here thinking when you were asking the question about. When does it feel like lawn? Trade countdown. Two days prior That's called the stations. I think it will will feel like launch when we roll to the pad because we know that when we roll out of the V. A. B. That you know we are we have some work to do at the pad prior but that is our commitment toward that launch date and that that season that we have where we have several days awesome which we can go launch and so I think that final roll out is going to be an amazing event and is this thing about the countdown again. Is this two days around the clockwork or is this. Today's like on shift time. It is Two days around the clock. It'll be three shifts a day. Yep Oh it's going to be great and so are you. Having a hundred people like per shift in the ready to go or is this just like certain teams have to be there just certain teams What happens is that it's really based on the work that has to get done so we have something we call a bar chart which lays out sequentially The work that is accomplished in launch countdown and so there is an the the the personnel in the room. Kind of come and go during. I'd say that First Day of launch countdown. But once we get ready for Criollos the rooms the rooms pretty full and and it will remain that way through t zero but certainly that first day it depends on the work. That's that we have their their positions like the test directors are always in the room integration consuls always manned But the other consoles are staffed based on the work that they have to do and as the launch director. I'm assuming that there's going to be part of you. That will want to to be present for forty eight hours straight. That's probably an unwise decision. All things considered so how how are you. Have you thought through how to break apart your time during those two days. Yes yes I actually have started to think about that. I haven't gotten to the final answer yet. But Luckily for me I have great support and And and so I'll have to figure out those from tanking on. I'll definitely be there continuously in that first day you know. I'm really really blessed because I have a really. The strong on our program has a really strong a test management group the NASA test directors as well as the toss tests conductors and they execute that launch launch countdown on behalf of the launch director. And so they are staffed around the clock through there all the time and they really served during launches as is in the ears of the launch director. So if there's something that they believe that I need to know they certainly reach out. I check in with them regularly on that first day of launch countdown down And and then you know just will be involved as well and and she'll have some some ships where she'll be in the in the in the firing room. I'm kind of doing that. Same thing you know if their issues and let me know but I have started to think about that. I haven't laid it out as to you. Know which shifter after which time period but definitely from tanking down continuous and then prior to that They'll be they'll be shifts that I'll be in the firing room and and then somewhere out depend hang on the test directors or my sister launched director Jess as technical assistant to help with that. And I would be remiss if I didn't didn't make a special point to say that you're Nasr's first female director which has gotta feel like a huge honor and I was actually talking with somebody had. Are You the first female director period. Because I don't think I did a little bit of homework and couldn't find anybody else. So first female launch director on Earth is. That is that accurate. I don't know about on Earth uh-huh I would say the first one for NASA and we know that's true no question about it. I don't know about the I don't know if it's bigger than that. But so so when you when you got assigned or I guess the question is I like how does that happen. Is that like you get appointed to that. Did you apply for this job. Like how does this. How does this transpire So there was an announcement and And I applied for it and interviewed for it and and was selected so it was That part of it. It is kind of the I would say the normal process that like many of us got our jobs so it wasn't like an appointed thing. It was Canal came out and and I applied I'll never forget when I got the phone call though That's when it really Kinda it became I would say real Is that a holy smokes moment. You're like wait a second. I gotta go to launch a rocket now. Well I'll tell you I I was actually walking walking across to a meeting I was in. I was At the time my office was in NC and I was actually walking To a meeting Evan headquarters in my phone rang and I looked down. And it said Bob Cabana and Senator Director and so I said what am I Mr Cabanas calling me and probably so he you know Offered me the job and it was posted my interview. You had been several days before and he offered me the job and when he first said it. I I remember saying Bob. Can you repeat that I just WanNa make sure I heard you correctly. Klay and he he repeated in and then it was the moment of. Wow what a great opportunity. And what an honor awesome. Yeah congrats again on that. I know that it's been awhile since that happened but I'm sure it's still kind of an. I'm sure won't fully set in until you see Iraq pat and then it's like man. That just happened. Yup absolutely definitely looking forward Definitely looking forward to that launch day but I will say you know I I am extremely blessed In this role and I do feel honored. I am also very blessed to have the team that I that I have because I think as a launch director you know. You're you're as you're as good or your as has effective as the as the folks on your team and and I have an incredible dedicated team. that you know is working in towards launch and making sure that we're taking all the right steps and that we're working our products and that were getting launch countdown ready and sulfur is coming along and and all all of our progress and our sins and just all of that. It's a lot of work and I'm really. I'm really blessed to have such a great team and I know that you're probably so focused that this question might seem like a foreign concept but is this the the final career stop. Is there somewhere to go pass. This is there. Is there more career wise or is this like I'm good here. I can just hang out until I retire. That that's a tough one You know policy. Let me think about that for a second so I think about it. Like this A couple of summers ago I went to Like Zion National Park and Bryce Canyon and every place we went. I thought this is the most beautiful..

director NASA SOS Engineering Support Team Bob Cabana Jessica Zion National Park Charlie Criollos Orion Murra Senator Director Mission Control Iraq NC Nasr Klay Bryce Canyon Houston Canal Jess
"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

14:12 min | 1 year ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Services to gateway. That includes a launch an space craft the space craft will include a logistics module, so volume that can carry cargo, whether it's inside pressurized, and hook up to a docking port. And astronauts can go enter that habitable volume and do science or takeout food, or loaded with trash. And it's also the external ability to lock payloads onto the outside or other pieces of gateway that we might want to bring up like a robotic arm. And so, so Johnny, where do you fit in this picture with gateway? I am supporting Mark in helping the setup. What I'll call the project control type stuff inflection in his voice, because he's not sure it was titled, Ed. So, so project control mean, unpack that for me, it was like all the background backbone type stuff risk management conflict management, budget resource workforce, standing up during his ation data management. How do we all Claburn and work together cohesively as a team? So, so hopefully it's all the behind the scene type stuff. It just makes things work easier. He's selling himself short. So I mean, the amount of whiteboard sessions, we've done in the bath, I don't know if there's a title for like, strategist I mean that's what was spent a lot of time in the beginning trying to brainstorm. How do we pull in and leverage the rest of the center how to how do we do this, and that he's got great creative brain? So it's been the huge help. What's got you really excited? What are you really focused on going into this project? I love doing what I'm doing right now. So today has been this really cool day where we did these two town halls at the center, and I get to sit in this like, padded room. That's not because I'm banging my head against. Trying to make sure like I can get the message out. I, I enjoy trying to inspire others and connect them with this awesome mission that we get we do a lot of hard things in this agency, and it's so easy to get wrapped up in the art of what's impossible, and I get to try to help inspire people to the art of the possible, and that's what gets me out of bed. So explain to me a little bit about kind of the path forward for gateway. So obviously, you guys are it seems like you're really in kind of a, a brainstorming and planning, period. So how much? How much do other operations of gateway impact you guys? And how much of it is. You guys just really trying to figure out like we need to be masters of what our, our, our peace here. We need to make sure we can connect to the other guy. But we're just doing our thing. There's so much of that going on right now. It's, you know, the traditional NASA way of doing things as lineup all these requirements decompose requirements for a long time. Get them all perfect. And then let's go move forward. And we don't have that time. So we won't you talk about Johnny's in the throes right now of, of a bottoms up, you know, we, we have to figure out what this is going to cost for the next ten years. And you're starting at zero ten years, man figure out how many. Have we been here, ten years? I don't think I've been in the Senate in August. We've been here, ten years. I'm gonna fast, but I mean it's hard to think about the early years of your career and saying, all right. What am I gonna do for the next ten years? That's hard. But it does feel like it's all right. You told me if I'm wrong, but it feels like it's like project national one on one to degree where all right. And let's start this massive new project. What will it take a I got a symbol the team? I, I gotta figure out roles and sponsored worthy crucial first steps, I need to outline out there, let that get some trashing let they grow a little bit. And then as a team grows as the responsibility grows will just keep on expand a little more, but the core building blocks have to be their terms of, like requirements operations schedules. You know, stuff like that. Yeah. And you know, it's, it's more it brings more emphasis delight of, how you have to trust people in leverage expertise, right? Delegate things down to the lowest level ask people what they think is right? And, and make sure you have open communication transparent communication as you roll that stuff up. And everybody understands the trade you're bouncing around in your head because you're spitball on it. You're, you're trying to take that early wag and then the requirements traits base. And that's eating our lunch right now, trying to level, two would like to realize they level to the program office at JC. Right. They're working hard to try to nail down exactly what this is, but it's a commercial partnership. So there's only so much they know. And we don't have the time to wait for everything. So we're trying to run in parallel with them and communicate along the way. All right. We're writing this down. Does that look like it lines up with you? And as long as we set up our contracts appropriately, and have the flexibility, you can always change things, I might cost you money to change things. But if you, you set it up the right way, and you and you push down a thority to the contracts as well. You should have the flexibility to enable this in the long run sustainability. Is a big component of our return to the moon. But what's that mean we gotta be sustainable? We have to find a way to be reusable, right? I mean, we're spending the taxpayers dollars. Well, it's not just throw it all away. In one shot. We want to go there to stay and ultimately, we wanna find ways to, to push towards deep space transportation capabilities, so that we can go out further in our solar system. So this is the, the bound, you know, the, the learning the early building blocks for us to get there and on a technical level. What do you see as being the greatest engineering challenges? Are we are we talking about? We're just repackaging lots of great technology or a we like cutting edge stuff here. So the environment out there in the lunar vicinity is much harsher. So a lot stronger radiation environment. The extremes of hot and cold or definitely definitely tougher. The biggest challenge in our member and early control board talking through this. We're not going to have a crew there. Twenty four seven so how do we make sure we're not just throwing things up to our garage. And it sits there forever like cabins up. The house. So there's a lot of talk about how do we make sure we have interviewed robotics? And how do we design things now for capabilities? We're not sure of how will use them yet. So we got like, really leveraged flexible design, so that we can do many things autonomously as possible. I I've been told that the orbit is not what you would typically think about for, like orbiting body SP space station stays fairly similar range to the earth as it orbits. It's like something one hundred fifty two hundred fifty miles, but have heard that the orbit around the moon for gateway is much different is that is that accurate? It's a highly elliptical orbit. So it gets really close. Right now, they're looking at again this halo orbit near recommend it'll halo orbit. It's, it's an elliptical orbit. I don't know. We're starting to get in my wheelhouse. This is why we're leveraging honesty because the PR only goes so far. You know, the orbital mechanics. Thanks, a lot of smart, people that know exactly what they're doing. It's, it's in that highly livable orbit, we're orbiting the earth just like the moon. So we just showed some views in a town hall where if you step back gateway orbits, the earth goes around the earth, you know, in the same period of the moon. And then if you look at it from a different perspective. It's this highly elliptical orbit around the moon and kind of leveraging some of the equilibrium points in gravity. Legrand points out there, so that it's, it's pretty stable. It's easy to get in and out of, and it's a great place to leverage science opportunities. So spitball me some numbers when we're at our how close, did we get at our closest and how far do we get away at our furthest? I know I'd be making it up. Hey, you said you. That's what you're doing right now. Right. Said you've just making it up. Let's say you're in like. I don't even know hundreds of kilometers at the closest, and then it's probably tens of thousands at the furthest, I go back and look at that, and then everybody can laugh at me and say, Yep. Keep him doing podcasts and actually run intend to paper. It's definitely. It's not as close as space station, when it gets in that low orbit around the moon, I wish I still had Joe Dan, he was just in here with us with a town hall. You know, we got some really sharp people across the center that are that know this stuff better. But it I don't think it gets us closest space station us today, so you gotta have the lunar Landers have to bring the capabilities actually descend. But again, the gravity. Well is a lot different. It's not as strong so it's easier to get down. And then they got to have the capability to get back so gateways kind of that safe haven for them to get back to and be able to stage, the crew get back on a Ryan and get back home. Mark was actually pretty close. We got a hold of Joe. Dan, who is the ranking member of the gateway team representing safety and mission assurance and he was able to confirm that gateways Appleton or furthest point from the moon is seventy five thousand kilometers, and it's pair loon or closest point to the moon is thirty two hundred kilometers at its closest that's about the diameter of the moon and at its farthest it is to about twenty percent. Of the distance between the earth and the moon. And so why is this kind of an orbit better than just kind of staying close to the moon and kind of keep in that, that tight orbit around the moon? Because then it's, it's easier for Orion. Get to right. So we don't have to have the tight tolerances of getting Orion really close to to the moon. You can kind of you can go rendezvous with gateway when it's further away, and it's, it's not as hard to, to get into it gives you a little bit less. Delta v to get there. And then you ride this orbit, you know when you switch planes a little bit and ride this orbit in closer to the surface, and I know you mentioned, ten years for budget, planning that's a long time. So what's the projected timeline for things coming together? Like and when you think about a ten year plan, what are you guys putting in that ten year plan? Kind of like you mentioned the first element a lot. I just got a couple of guys staring each other really like it's like changing every day. So we had to look like what happened this morning again. There's a manifest out there. So there's a high level guidance as far as like, here's gateway, here's the essential building blocks for that. And here's when we want to launch it, and put it all together, so we have a rough master plan per se to, to build against. And that's what we're executing against as rela- in the details for each of this components. We find tunes, okay? I think this is much more realistic, or hey, I think this is not so realistic, or who needs some more money to make this happen or not. So I think that's where this cycle all comes together and say, was like, we, we have the rough blueprints, but as you get with this project management review. I think we'll see exactly okay. This is highly achievable this. We need to carry a risk against, and we can work on over the next couple of years. You know I mean space station took. Ten twelve years for semi complete, you know, you know that I f g b in the note, I think went up ninety eight Mr. Cabanas I like scratching their head. Wondering why? I don't know the exact date, which is mission. So that was the first two pieces going together. The first crew went on orbit that was when I first started working was in October two thousand and went through the end of the shuttle program was getting all the major pieces up there in assembling it. So, right. We're not a space station mentioned that before it's something smaller. So it's like six launches, the, you know, to get all the main pieces, we need put together. So, so everything that we're looking at in this ten year period is in the short term it it's excel A-Rated, a little bit to get boots on the moon, even sooner and is the focus really on the moon at that point. Or is there opportunity to use gateway for further exploration? So the focus is definitely on the moon. But what gateway is showing it's that, that test objective for us to start to understand what would it take to go to Mars? So the agencies looked at for years, a, a deep space transport capability, which. Which would have to be something small to, to have habitable volume for a crew and have to have some kind of propulsion. Right. That could get him out there and you'd probably Dhakal Ryan to it. So gateways kind of a first analog for what that might become and help us learn from that just like we learned in low-earth-orbit space station. Now, we're going to go, learn quarter million miles away from home something, a lot smaller that camping trip and start to understand how we can explore deep space. Will there be a regular human presence on board? Like we see with space station today. So, no so space station. Right. It's got twenty four seven human operations gateway is that camping trip. So we're setting it up to go out there for thirty day mission at first and as we start to expand the habitable capabilities of the modules, we can hopefully get to sixty ninety days. You know, maybe go a little bit beyond, but we're trying to size it for that small go once a year and go for thirty sixty ninety days and as the leader of the team here at KFC, do you guys feel a significant weight this year with the fiftieth anniversary of, of our I walk on the moon. So I am blessed to have some amazing people at the space on her helping me. And I couldn't get there without all the expertise, all the passion that's coming from this team. And it's definitely, you know, we all look around a lot of us. Don't have memories of fifty years ago. Right. So we know we're standing on the shoulders of giants, and it's, it's pretty nostalgic and pretty emotional about the opportunity this before us. So we're all really excited about that. That definitely that definitely makes it much more impactful and exciting. I've had the opportunity over the course of my career to work a couple times, where you get to put together something that people don't think you're able to do sort of agencies founded on, right? I mean this whole failure is not an option. Right. That's what we're doing and gateway. So I mean, we are totally focused on trying to, to mold the clay into something that's, that's going to be sustained excitement for the space coast for Florida for our agency and something that we're proud of going forward and we're getting a little bit ahead of ourselves with this question. But thinking about the future obviously thinking about whenever you start a new project. You're thinking about your end goal. What do you think is going to be, like, how are you going to be feeling when we start seeing pieces of gateway fly, and when we turn on the lights? So I've thought about this question. A couple times as I go through it, you know, there's so many times where you lose sleep. Your head is just spinning trying to understand what information is being thrown at you and how you're going to put it all together and you. You get a little bit of reprieve when you step back and think about how awesome of a challenge. It says we're doing I have a feeling that when the day comes that we I turn on the lights, I'm going to be so buried and trying to figure out how to make sure we get past the next problem that I'm not going to be able to step back and enjoy it. But I hope someone pinches me and we do because we're going back to the moon. I mean, this is it's hard to even fathom this it's really amazing. I mean, this is the stuff that inspires the next generation, I was inspired by movies, and so many people find little things in science fiction and turn it into science fact. And we're paving that ground for, you know, for our kindergarteners in our sixth graders. And, you know, the child is not born yet, which is really neat.

Joe Dan Johnny Mark Dhakal Ryan NASA Florida Delta Senate Legrand rela Appleton KFC ten years ten year seventy five thousand kilomete thirty two hundred kilometers
"mr. cabana" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"Assurance and he was able to confirm that gateways Appleton or furthest point from the moon is seventy five thousand kilometers and its paralleling or closest point to the moon is thirty two hundred kilometers at its closest that's about the diameter of the moon and that it's it is to about twenty percent. Of the distance between the earth and the moon. And so why is this kind of an orbit better than just kind of staying close to the moon and kind of keep in that, that tight orbit around the moon? Because then it's, it's easier for Orion. Get to right. So we don't have to have the tight tolerances of getting Orion really close to to the moon. You can kind of you can go rendezvous with gateway when it's further away, and it's, it's not as hard to, to get into it gives you a little bit less. Delta v to get there. And then you ride this orbit, you know, when you kind of switch planes a little bit and ride this orbit in closer to the surface, and I know you mentioned, ten years for budget, planning that's a long time. So what's the projected timeline for things coming together? Like and when you think about a ten year plan, what are you guys putting in that ten year plan? So, like you mentioned the first element a lot. I just I got just an. got a couple of guys staring really like it's like changing every day. So we had to look like what happened this morning, James again, there's a manifest out there. So there's a high level guys as far as like, here's gateway. Here's the essential building blocks for that. And here's when we want to launch it, and put it all together, so we have a rough master plan per se to, to build against. And that's what we're executing against as relating the details for each of this components. We find tunes, okay? I think this is much more realistic, or hey, I think this is not so realistic, or who needs some more money to make this happen or not. So I think that's where this psycho all comes together and say, we, we have the rough blueprints, but as we come and get with us project management review. I think we'll see exactly okay. This is highly achievable this, we need to carry a risk against, and we can work on over the next couple of years. You know I mean space station took. Ten twelve years for assembly complete and, you know, you know that I f g b in the node, I think went up in ninety eight Mr. Cabanas, I like scratching their head. Wondering why I don't know the exact date, which is mission? So that was the first two pieces going together. The first crew went on orbit that was when I first started working was in October two thousand and went through the end of the shuttle program was getting all the major pieces up there and assembling it. So. Right, we're not a space station mentioned that before it's something smaller. So it's like six launches, you know, to get all the main pieces, we need put together. So, so everything that we're looking at in this ten year period is in the short term it it's excel A-Rated, a little bit to get boots on the moon, even sooner and is the focus really on the moon that point, or is there opportunity to use gateway for further exploration. So the focus is definitely on the moon. But what gateway is showing it's that, that test objective for us to start to understand what would it take to go to Mars? So the agencies looked at for years, a, a deep space transport capability, which..

Appleton Delta Mr. Cabanas James ten year seventy five thousand kilomete thirty two hundred kilometers Ten twelve years twenty percent ten years
"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Houston. We have a podcast. Welcome to the official podcast of the NASA. Johnson Space Center episode seventy three the international space station begins part two. I'm Gary Jordan, and w host today on this podcast. We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs. Because we had this this wall of E V A that people are starting to talk about where we'd done almost no spacewalks at all in the shuttle program to date. And now we were talking about the entire simply and survival of the international space station was going to be based upon having to do literally hundreds of spacewalks. So we started to do some relatively simplistic spacewalks on some of the shuttle missions to gain experience undoing doing that. Because we lost a lot of the experienced people after the challenger accident, engineers conflict, controllers ends and drew members. So we started doing that to build

MIR station Jerry Ross Johnson Space Center ISS NASA Kennedy Space Center official SDS Gary Jordan Houston. Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
"mr. cabana" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs..

MIR station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center NASA SDS Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Official Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
The International Space Station Begins

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:22 min | 2 years ago

The International Space Station Begins

"So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time

Mir Station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center SDS Zara Spacewalking Nasa United States Jim Newman Commander Official Mr. Cabana Director Mr. Bob Nineteen Ninety Eight Hour
"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Do. So far we've covered land antsy now to the air keeping an eye on the ranch from up above is helicopter pilot. Dave ramsey. All right. I'm this morning with Dave Ramsey who has the extrordinary task of flying? Helicopters for us here at the Kennedy Space Center. Good morning. Good morning and tell me a little bit about yourself, your background. How you got here in and what you do for for Casey. Well, I'm Dave Ramsey. I'm the chief of flying operations here can space center my day in and day out job is to be a helicopter pilot and manage the aviation assets here on KABC. So that means I get the flyer helicopters and work with our drone guys to make sure we're giving you guys the products you need. So obviously, people know what desk jobs are like. But people don't know what the job of a helicopter pilot really looks like. So what do you do when you're in the air? Are you just flying around taking things out what what's going on? So here at Kennedy. Yes, we we use the helicopters for a number of purposes. Primarily we are security. We've flying around making sure people aren't doing things in places that they shouldn't be or aren't in places. They shouldn't be looking for fishermen who are or hunters who are doing, you know, poaching game or or in the wrong areas in advertently. So that's the primary mission that we do. We also support our our biological guys. Here are via research guys who keep kind of their fingers on the the health of the wildlife community here, so counting birds county manatees looking at eagles every year hatchlings those types of things making sure that the are just recording the populations and seeing growth or or identifying trends, we help with that. And then as we talked about earlier those videos for if you want to beat your Rozhin video, and and you wanna see after storm, for example, what what the impacts were we take teams up to video and document. And just check out this center to make sure after hurricane. We always take Mr. Cabana up. So he can fly over the center to get a good feel for the safety. And when to bring people back, and that type of stuff, so you mentioned a couple times people being places, they shouldn't or other things of that nature. Do you all find people out here a lot? We're in the middle of a pretty big green area a national wildlife refuge. Do you find people or things that shouldn't be here? Yeah. I mean, more than you would think, and it's a lotta time Spearman just in places they shouldn't be or we we've had people picking the saw palmetto berries from the wildlife refuge, which is allowed. So we we've had run those guys off, and and detain people for that sort of stuff. So yeah, I mean, most of it is is just people not knowing. So we as politely as we can from the air the move along. The move along honcker horn at them and don't get moving. So what what do you do when it comes to launch time? I know that we use our aircraft for security and other things, but how are you involved with launches? Yes. So as we get back to crude flight, we will we're ramping up. Now, we're doing some exercises. Now as far for a couple of things astronaut support we will escort. We'll do that again, which has been done previously security of the air during during those flights. So we will be ready to respond again, we'll be up in the air during launches looking for anyone looking trying to do damage to the rocket or just make themselves famous. So we look for those those kinds of things people coming into the airspace that that's restricted during those launches is a good indicator that maybe something's some was not paying attention or to do something bad. And so we do those things and we also do the the meta VAT caz Vach in case, there is something if something goes wrong and prior to launch or during launch we are ready. We have one aircraft standing by. To be a chasm aircraft to help move personnel. Travel one centers or wherever directed basically once we when we departed the SF. There was a just as we were departing. There was an anomaly on one of the pads couple years ago. We had just departed the Esa laughing. We were flying towards the beach fine right for that pad. When it exploded thinking about that that has to be the I couldn't in my mind. Could you know process? What was going on at the time? I was like why is there fire burning? But the explode, obviously, people remember how the noise and so all of our team thought that we'd we'd just departed. So they thought that crashed and that wasn't explosion Lazar helicopter. So everyone's kind of on high alert during that for a number. They no one knew what was going on just like here on centers will I'm sure but in situations like that and others. Do you all take on or have training for supporting kind of fires or other like extreme situations like that? So what we we do have Bambi buckets which are. Far fighting buckets that hang under the aircraft that we can put water on things. It's not a primary mission we do, but we can't support that obviously in that situation that's not appropriate. But what we did in that situation is just we picked up our local fire team far chief here, flew them over the scene. So then they could talk to the guys on the ground. We actually landed and picked up the on scene commander got him into the air. So he could look at you know, what was going on where the fires were, you know, passageways to get to them pad those types of things. So we do provide that minimizes the risk for for those guys who those first responders have to go in if they can get the safer look from the air before their ground guys have to go in. And then later we brought the drones in Mike downs and his crew brought the drones into fly again that same route and life stream it to the convoy commanders team or the there on the ground. So they could get look and figure out kind of what their plan of attack. Be to get people in there. So it was a good coordination low effort between all the the aviation assets here on on Kennedy to help out the air force as well. Yen wanna make sure to be clear that nobody was injured in that incident. Obviously not a great day for losing a rocket into space spacecraft. But there were no people injured would grain and pretty early on for your time here, right? Matt to be a little bit stress inducing like, hey, like, I'm not very long on the job here, and I'm dealing with a serious issue like this. Yeah. I mean in those times everybody just wants to help, you know. So, but you don't want to get in the way. But we we do believe that having that platform having an aerial platform here on the center gives you the ability to to see the things during those times that and really provide insight that can guide those responding personnel. Keep them safe and keep everyone safe. So I think it's it's nice to be a part of that team that can provide answers when when things get a little crazy so date. How are you guys involved with the wildlife that is out here? I know that there's a big effort there again because it is a wildlife refuge that the view from the sky is very helpful a lot of ways. So how are you guys involved with that? Yes. So we we do a lot overflights of like mosquito lagoon and the rivers it's hard to count manatee from any. Other way, you know than being looking down on them from the water. So we will we'll take the guys up and and fly so they can count and get routine counts to see what what the populations doing when they're migrating those types of things. So we do that at least once a month. We'll take take the guys out for a couple of hours and fly pre patterned routes that we fly every time. It's the exact right? We fly every time just trying to keep a consistent count going. So they can form those trends, and and see what's going on with the health of the wildlife. Dave appreciate being here this morning. Good luck out there be safe and thanks for all you before. Yeah. Awesome. Thanks.

Dave ramsey Kennedy Space Center Kennedy Casey advertently honcker horn Mr. Cabana eagles commander Esa Lazar Mike downs Matt
"mr. cabana" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"mr. cabana" Discussed on Welcome to the Rocket Ranch

"The flyer helicopters and work with our drone guys to make sure we're giving you guys the products you need. So obviously, people know what desk jobs are like. But people don't know what the job of a helicopter pilot really looks like. So what do you do when you're in the air? Are you just flying around taking things out what what's going on? So here at Kennedy. Yes, we we use the helicopters for a number of purposes. Primarily we are security. We've flying around making sure people aren't doing things in places that they shouldn't be or aren't in places. They shouldn't be looking for fishermen who are or hunters who are doing, you know, poaching game or or in the wrong areas in advertently. So that's the primary mission that we do. We also support our our biological guys. Here are via research guys who keep kind of their fingers on the the health of the wildlife community here, so counting birds county manatees looking at eagles every year hatchlings those types of things making sure that the are just recording the populations and seeing growth or or identifying trends, we help with that. And then as we talked about earlier those videos for if you want to beat your Rozhin video, and and you wanna see after storm, for example, what what the impacts were we take teams up to video and document. And just check out this center to make sure after hurricane. We always take Mr. Cabana up. So he can fly over the center to get a good feel for the safety. And when to bring people back, and that type of stuff, so you mentioned a couple times people being places, they shouldn't or other things of that nature. Do you all find people out here a lot? We're in the middle of a pretty big green area a national wildlife refuge. Do you find people or things that shouldn't be here? Yeah. I mean, more than you would think, and it's a lotta time Spearman just in places they shouldn't be or we we've had people picking the saw palmetto berries from the wildlife refuge, which is allowed. So we we've had run those guys off, and and detain people for that sort of stuff. So yeah, I mean, most of it is is just people not knowing. So we as politely as we can from the air the The move move along. along honcker horn at them and don't get moving. So what what do you do when it comes to launch time? I know that we use our aircraft for security and other things, but how are you involved with launches? Yes. So as we get back to crude flight, we will we're ramping up. Now, we're doing some exercises. Now as far for a couple of things astronaut support we will escort. We'll do that again, which has been done previously security of the air during during those flights. So we will be ready to respond again, we'll be up in the air during launches looking for anyone looking trying to do damage to the rocket or just make themselves famous. So we look for those those kinds of things people coming into the airspace that that's restricted during those launches is a good indicator that maybe something's some was not paying attention or to do something bad. And so we do those things and we also do the the meta VAT caz Vach in case, there is something if something goes wrong and prior to launch or during launch we are ready. We have one aircraft standing by. To be a chasm aircraft to help.

eagles Mr. Cabana advertently honcker horn Kennedy