17 Burst results for "Mr John Kerry"

"mr john kerry" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"Your favorite form centreback chelsea roads mr john kerry aged other ways to connect including a now extinct amazon emporium which is transformed into the mini blazes bald mart anytime you buy something big or small from the palmar we get a tiny percentage allows us to produce additional content. What are you putting in the ball. Mothers we raja a book o- tr- mirror reflections on self-delusion by g tolentino not now a provocative book of nine essays on our culture in the internet age for the new yorker staff writer. She's essentially the zhao felix of cultural criticism criticism feel like to read and think as you do read by this book. I couldn't put it down the way tolentino fuses emotionality and a rigorous intellectualism electoralism without ever really letting go aviv. This is one of our sentences which i love and if you don't read the book think about this 'cause it's important. She wrote like many amongst amongst us. I've become acutely conscious of the way my brain degrades when i strap it into receive the full coverage of the internet these limited channels all constantly constantly reloading with new information birth death boosts bombings jokes job announcements ads warnings complaints confessions political disasters disasters blitzing afraid neurons and huge waves of information that pummel us and then our instantly replace. This is an awful way to live. It's wearing us down found quickly. When i read that i thought well it's like trying to follow every major football league in europe that never better summed up by this book now approach approach i love cars are really that yourself 'cause appointments of a new car last week a drinker abort myself in two thousand nine to c._n._n. I played tennis tournament in la bull francois frans when sixteen years old and i played one of the best matches ever played in my life i literally blitz this kid off the call who was meant to be better than me was meant to be really good. I played so well is it coco. Growth knows a french kit and at the end of the match he walked off looking just destroy annoyed and this beautiful black doc porsche picked him up and the door flung open and he got into this car is dad was driving this car and instantly. I was like oh laugh like amount of beating him but he's one in life because his dad has a car that my dad driving around in a morris traveller which is basically made of wood. Would that car can't you so at that. Midlife issues in you like each made it aspire. I've lived my life waiting. Midlife issues is my middle name believer. I'm sixty years old nine hundred eighty two. I was like i want myself. A porsche didn't even know what a portion was ready. Then didn't certainly didn't know what nine eleven was didn't know the history of the nine eleven. I love the nine eleven. The nine eleven is just the car i have dreamt and fantasized about owning every single nine eleven ever made. I got an email a couple of weeks ago from my mate shema aw upper portion of danbury. I'm not being paid for this not getting anything from shaimaa or portion angry but my word they are the greatest porsche dealership in the world raj in the in christendom and i got a call that they had my exact car. I picked up my car last week on tuesday and drove it down to new york city and then out to bridgehampton dr kenny kenny look in danger so i love that song wrote it was not playlist actually played blue monday one of the tom demarco and stopping driving this car around most things in life

g tolentino porsche mr john kerry dr kenny kenny danbury europe amazon francois frans staff writer tom demarco new york sixteen years sixty years
"mr john kerry" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on WTVN

"All powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other than Stanton like, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of Larry's considering the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently was radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls, and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas is in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast, Richard. Thank you for taking my call. And I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England was going to intervene. The south southern states, and it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And curious then Lincoln was the I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy was the whole greenback controversy and. What was that all about? Well, the question and that actually do that in the book the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing, but itself, and it was bags, and that theory, some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly editorial I quote from it. I could not find original source work, but it's been bandied about many books about that. If if this chief is policy or something comes to passable at the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something the same. Mm sort when he printed his limited silver greenback. Type of currency surely pests nation. Thanks for the call Thomas. Wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, in the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being funny. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln as far as the so we really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I size Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's. But if it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra to Mr. Jeffrey. Thank you, both Jeffries. I'm curious to know, if forgive me, I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work, this if in your studies and researches you have been compass considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany Federick Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them. It moves students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driving call the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years and every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcated into the system in the United States, and in particular, the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted it to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now graduate be overtaken from the inside out down to including present day in which very recently? We had Georgia. Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this show raid of being against whether other for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please are good call. Thank you. Thank you. What you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier.

Lincoln United States Thomas Connecticut Stanton president John F Kennedy Bank of England California Russia Larry Yale University of New Haven Richard England Archer Jeffries Hawaii Mr John Kerry
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:59 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"He called the brotherhood of death and that in the following year eight. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as Russell trust. And that every year since for the last two hundred ninety six years and every generation and every year since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated and inculcate it into the system in the United States, and in particular the educational system. So the graduate the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted it to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against one another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that place are generally call? Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well with what we talked about earlier without him. Why shot because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, and obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Joy. Good morning. Very very good program. Tonight, two things. I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm beating he's nine amount of the. Ships coming over here. And to me, he wasn't getting his money money were of when you return, so the names and land after him, but. My one question when we didn't have any intention of Rena say where did the idea come with after this neighbor, freed forty acres and a mule came in? Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I don't I don't quite go back as far as the day. That'll be the next book other the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres and a mule certainly was a kind of like the broken treaties with the American Indian. So that the US government, obviously, their word is never been good in situations. Like that and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises made really unrealistic promises made to the freed slave. And that was certainly the most popular one way, I believe, I guess Malcolm X made a big deal about it that later, and I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly a no one got there for meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a broken homes. Join thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers. Imagine the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I take it in my opinion. I think it crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But in my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know for the constitutional convention. They seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that. And I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of it kind of impacted had is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially if one of the forgotten zoning fathers university, it's my neck of the woods out here, but they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights that it because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So my heart probably would go with the. Articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue. If it was actually followed by leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised, and what you say to those scholars who sit who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people look at the people who want to update it, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than what they're talking about updating. They're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that which you know, hate the you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it in one of those things I discovered while writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, that's great hero. Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote the the decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So most people most Americans, I don't think they kind of take that with inherited. No it wasn't. And no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. What would the founding fathers think about the the first amendment in in where we're at with free speech today? I would I would hope they'd be outraged again other than what they expected of Alexander. Hamilton would probably be cool with it. But the rest of I think certainly Jefferson would it be as Krista the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. I rant and rave about that constantly. And maybe the only one nominal on the left that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech. They certainly wouldn't like the free speech zones that we've seen crops and son eleven and things like that. I I don't think I don't think the founding of the very pleased with any that our government is done this war. But it's certainly especially a lasted years or so. First time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Hey, how you doing? Well, thank you. Good question is this. So we're talking about Lincoln Lincoln. The only corn is like copper. We we get leaking as the. For you the slaves, but he's not great was late because he was a all complexion. He was a more descent. So I think he'd be laid because he was like. Well, that's a new one on me too on. Did you wanna comment on that? I guess I've heard that he was he was called derogatory names like that. He's certainly a lot by his opponents. I don't know that he was it was ever insinuated that he was part black. Maybe it was appointed certainly came up with lots of names from that is interesting that I never really thought about why why the the penny is the only one that's made a copper, I don't know that it has any racial significance. But you bring up an interesting point. We what about the the second amendment the state of the second amendment. I mean, we seem to go back and forth on this. What what the founding fathers meant by a well armed the right to bear arms to provide for a well, armed militia. And that seems to be the crucial point. What did they mean by a well, armed militia, the citizens or an actual organized almost like a, you know national guard. Well, I think that I published a lot of quotes from the founding fathers on this. And I think it's I wish they had been a little more. Clear certainly they provided a little more specific detail what they meant by the second amendment, but it certainly in their arguments, and I provide a lot of the quotes, look,.

United States Mr John Kerry Patrick Henry Russell George Mason US government Connecticut W Bush Amerigo Vespucci Troyes Malcolm X trilateral commission Oliver Wendell Holmes Rena Lincoln Lincoln
"mr john kerry" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

14:53 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To speculate that I mean, I I don't again, we don't really know in all these things all we can do is look kind of kind of questionable behavior. And certainly, however, whatever you speculate us, the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that and whether anyone other Stanton like I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kinda hilarious considering at the way Lincoln treated and and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. Hi, richard. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about the Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England was going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not gonna do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I'm sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question and that actually address that in the book of the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and that's greenbacks. And that's there some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly editorial I quote from it. I could not find the original source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If this if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy Lincoln, certainly was a threat to the Bank because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later and John F Kennedy would do something of the same. Mm sword when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency fascination. Thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being fun inst-. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as bag. So we really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I crow size Lincoln tremendously the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much. Mr, sir. Did Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you, both Mr. Jeffreys. I'm curious to know if forgive me, I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence. And that if you're very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering this if in your studies, and researchers you have been comforting considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany, February Hegel died in eighteen thirty two sweet top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them, it moved to students at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driving. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years in every generation and every years since fifteen numbers of this secret society had been infiltrated in inculcate it into the system in the United States in particular, the educational system, so the gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please. Archer? Good call. Thank you. Thank you. What what's your describing is? I think really fixing well with what we talked about earlier with Adam I shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there were both scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people I in in into the Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other, maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that's really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very good program. Tonight, two things I would warning about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm gonna be he's mine amount. The trips coming over here, and he wasn't getting his money the money where of he would return. So the needs of land after him. But my one question when we didn't have any any tensions of Rena say where did the idea come up with after mislabeled freed forty agents in new came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as the day. That'll be the next book other the prequel prequel to it or whatever you can older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres a mule certainly was kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indian. So that the US government, obviously, their their word is never been good in situations. Like that and yeah that was certainly that's that's just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. And we've I believe I guess Malcolm X made a big deal about that later. I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for a meal. So it was just yet on unfortunately, a bourbon problems joy, thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I think it in my opinion. I think crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know, for the country show convention, they seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose panic confederation of states. And I think if central government had even less power under that, and I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of it kind of impacted had is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights is crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially as one of the forgotten founding fathers and universities my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So my heart. Probably would go. The articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue. If it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised. And what do you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people just look at the people who want update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than when they're talking about updating if they're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that which you know, hate the you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it and one of the one of those things I never want writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, that's great here. Oliver Wendell Holmes. We struggle with wrote the the decision for this frame court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So most be most Americans. I don't think they kind of think that was inherent in. No it wasn't. And no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. What of the founding fathers think about the the first amendment in in where we're at with free speech today. I would I would hope they'd be outraged. Again, we'll catch it of Alexander. Hamilton would probably be cool with it. But the rest of them, I think certainly Jefferson would be as crested the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. And I I ran and rave about that constantly. And I maybe the only one nominal on the left that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech. They certainly wouldn't like the free speech zones that we've seen crops and son eleven and things like that. I don't think I don't think the founding of the very pleased at any that our government is done since the civil war. But it's certainly especially. Oh, I said two years or so first time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Hey, how you doing? Well, thank you. So my question is this. So we're talking about Lincoln. Why linking the only corn is like copper? We. We was leaking as. The free the slaves, but he's not great feeling late because he was a all of complexion. He was of more descent. So I think he'd be slave because he was that's my. Well, that's a new one on me too on. Did you wanna comment on that? I guess I've heard that he was he was called derogatory names like that. He's certainly a lot by his opponents. I don't know that he was it was ever insinuated that he was part black. Maybe it was because opponents certainly him up with lots of names from that is interesting that I never really thought about why why the the penny is the only one that's made of copper. I don't know that it has any racial significance. But you bring up an interesting point. We went about the the second amendment the state of the second amendment. I mean, we seem to go back and forth on this. What went the founding fathers meant by a well armed the right to bear arms. You know to provide for a well, armed militia. And that seems to be the the crucial point what did they mean by a well, armed militia, the citizens or an actual organized almost like a, you know, national guard. Well, I think that I and I published a lot of quotes from the founding fathers on this. And I think it's I wish they had been a little more. Clear certainly.

Lincoln United States Thomas Archer Patrick Henry Connecticut Stanton Bank of England George Mason president Russia California US government Don John F Kennedy richard England Mr John Kerry
"mr john kerry" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on WRVA

"Strange. So is that suggesting that Ulysses grant also knew something was up and was told you don't want to be there. Well, I know that would that would certainly lead one to to to speculate that I mean, I I don't again, we don't really know in all these things we can do is look kind of the kind of questionable behavior. And certainly, however, whatever you speculate us, the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other Stanton like, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering at the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans. Apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast, Richard. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England was going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics, and I'm sort of curious. Then Lincoln was the I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy, and what was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do dress that in the book the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing we can did because Lincoln recognize that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and that's it was greenbacks and that Syria, some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly an editor like quote from it. I could not find the original source for it. But if in bandied about in many books about that if this if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and. Under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something of the same sort when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency shortly cores fascination, thanks for the call Thomas. Wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being fun inst-. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln it as far as the greenback. So we really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I crow size Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's. But it it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra, dimissed Jeffries. Thank you, both this Jeffries. I'm curious to know, if give me I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering this. If in your studies and researches you have been compass and considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany, February Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them, it moved to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was the driving. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years in every generation and every year since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated in inculcate it into the system in the United States, and in particular, the educational system. So the graduate the very people who did not want the United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets same secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please archer. Good call. Thank you. Thank you. Then what what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier with Adam why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to with W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there were scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in in into. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other, maybe working for the shame group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very very good program. Tonight do things I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm going to be he's trying the. Coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money. The money worth of easy when fair return. So the needs that land after him. But my one question when we didn't have any any tensions of Rena say where did the idea come up with after stable freed forty agents in the MU came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as this today. That'll be the next book the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres and a mule certainly was a kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indians that the US government, obviously, their their word is never been good. It situations like that. And yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises may really unrealistic promises made to the freed slave. And that was certainly the most popular one way if I believe, I guess, Malcolm X made a big deal about it that later, and I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for a meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a broken homes. Join thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I'd take it in my opinion. I think is crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know, for the country show convention, they seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose kind of confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution not had any kind of the kind of impacted head is kind of a just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially with one of the forgotten founding fathers and his university is my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So yeah, my heart. Probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue. If it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised, and what do you say to those scholars who's who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people look at the people who want to update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than when they're talking about updating. They're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which you know? Hey, you you can't have free of frigging the speech with any concept of hate speech is hate is in the eye of the beholder. So you have free speech or you don't have it. And one of the one of those things I just everyone runnings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theater restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, that's great hero. Oliver Wendell Holmes straightway wrote the the decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One underwear Welson. So most people most Americans, I don't think they kind of think that was an. No it wasn't. And no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. Would the founding fathers think about the the first amendment in? And where we're at with free speech today. I would I would hope they'd be outraged again other than what they catch it center. Hamilton would probably be cool with it. But the rest of I think certainly Jefferson would be as P crested the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. And I ran in rave about that constantly. And I maybe the only one nominally on the left that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech. I certainly wouldn't like the free speech zones that we've seen crop up since nine eleven and things like that. I don't think I don't think the founding of the very pleased with anything that our government is done since the civil war. But it's certainly especially in the last eight years or so. First time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Hey, how you doing? Well, thank.

United States Lincoln Thomas Patrick Henry Stanton W Bush Mr John Kerry Russell George Mason Ulysses US government California Bank of England Don Richard president John F Kennedy Connecticut
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KGO 810

"The system in the United States, and in particular the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place. One is to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including out present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because it covered both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please archer. Good call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him, I shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to W Bush and John carrying so many other powerful people out there were both scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in in. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that's really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very good program. Tonight, two things I would warning about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm gonna be he's nine amount of chips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money. The money were of he would return. So the needs of land after him. But my one question when we didn't have any Indian tensions of Rena say where did the idea come with after mislabeled freed forty agents in new came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as go. This today. That'll be the next book. Although the prequel prequel to it or whatever you get older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres and a mule certainly was a kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indians that the US government, obviously their word is never been good in situations. Like that, and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. And we've I believe I guess Malcolm X made a big deal about it that later, and I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly. No one got there for a meal. So it was just yet on unfortunately, a broken homes. Joy. Thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I take it in my opinion. I think is crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know for the constitutional convention. They seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose panicking. Confederation of states, and I think central government had even less power under that. And I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of the kind of impacted head is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially was one of the forgotten founding fathers and universities my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So my heart probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue. If it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised. And what do you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's an leaving and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought of all go like at all because. You know, when they say updated, the people didn't look at the people who wanna update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than when they're talking about updating if they're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type stuff into it more state power, the idea of hey speeds, like that which, you know, hey, you you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it and one of the one of those things I discovered writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, that's great here. Oliver Wendell Holmes straightway wrote the the decision for this frame court.

United States W Bush Patrick Henry George Mason Mr John Kerry US government Troyes Oliver Wendell Holmes Amerigo Vespucci trilateral commission Malcolm X Rena Troy Norfolk Virginia Russell
"mr john kerry" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In all these things we can do is look at kind of the kind of questionable behavior. And certainly, however, whatever you speculate. It's the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other than Stanton, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kinda hilarious considering at the way Lincoln treated and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. Hi, richard. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene for the south the southern states, and it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I'm sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do a dress that in the book the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and it was greenbacks. And that there are some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly and aditorial I quote from it. I could not find the original source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about it. If it's if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually destroyed the money and just going going around them completely end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something the same. Mm sort when he printed his limited silver greenback. Type of currency shortly before a test nation. Thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you in the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being fun inched. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as the greenback. So we really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I criticize Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest parent America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast evening. Thank you very much. Mr. Serra de Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you, both Mr. Jeffreys. I'm curious to know if you give me I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence. And that if you're very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering this if in your studies, and researchers you have been compasses considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany, February Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his three top disciples, lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call it, and it moved to students at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driving. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years and every generation and every year since fifteen members of this secret society had been instilled trated inculcate it into the system in the United States in particular the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets same secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that place? Archer the call. Thank you. Thank you. And what what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush and John carrying somebody other powerful people out there were scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an aluminum type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into the. The Russell trust and to the Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the shame group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. This is very very good program. Tonight, two things. I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm gonna be he's nine amount of the trips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money. The money were of the return. So the need the land after him. But my one question when meet you didn't have any intention of green play where did the idea come with after neighbor freed the forty agents in the new came in. Yeah. I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as the day. That'll be the next book other the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres and a mule certainly was a kind of like the broken treaties with the American Indians that the US government, obviously their word is never been good in situations. Like that and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you've had reconstruction, and you had promises made really unrealistic promises and to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. We've I believe I guess, Malcolm X, and they made a big deal about that later. I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for a meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a broken problems joy. Thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers. Imagine the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I think it in my opinion. I think crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But in my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know for the constitutional convention. They seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose that I confederation of states. And I think if central government had even less power under that, and I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution not had any kind of it kind of impacted had is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially is one of the forgotten founding fathers and university is my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So my heart probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution it's hard to argue with if it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised. And what do you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people just look at the people who wanna update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than what they're talking about updating. They're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which, you know, hey, you you can't have free freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech is hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it in one of the one of those things I just never want writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, great here. Oliver Wendell Holmes strike wrote the. The decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So it must be most Americans. I don't think they kind of think that was inherited. No it wasn't. And no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. Founding fathers think about the the first amendment in in where we're at with free speech today. I would I would hope they'd be outraged again other catch it of Alexander Hamilton who probably be cool with it. But the rest of my think, certainly Jefferson would be as a Krista the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. And I I ran in rave about that constantly. And I maybe the only one nominal on the left that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech. They certainly wouldn't like the free speech zones that we've seen crop up since nine eleven and things like that. I I don't think I don't think the founding of the very pleased at any that our government is done since the civil war. But it's certainly especially in the last eight years or so first time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Hey, how you doing? Well, thank you. So we're talking about Lincoln. Why linking the only corn is like copper?.

Lincoln United States Thomas Archer Stanton John F Kennedy W Bush Russell Bank of England George Mason president California US government Don richard Patrick Henry Connecticut
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KNSS

"On such an occasion is very strange. So is that suggesting that Ulysses grant also knew something was up and was told you don't want to be there. Well, I know that would that would certainly lead one to speculate that I mean, I I don't again, we don't really know in all these things we can do is look kind of kind of questionable behavior. Certainly, however, whatever you speculate us, the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending a theater with the president states. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other Stanton, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated and administered the war but for. Some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics, and I've sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do dress that the book the greenback question of actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the best thing we can did because Lincoln recognize that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and that's it was great bags. And that's there. Some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly editorial I quote from it. I could not find the regional source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I don't have the exact in front of me, but readers can read the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something of the same. Sword when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency, surely fascination, thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that. Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being funny. And you know, that's why I it. It's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as greenbacks. We really kinda. I'm kinda torn there because I size Lincoln tremendously the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast evening. Thank you very much. Mr. Serra, did Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you, both Jeffries. I'm curious to know, if give me I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work. I'm wondering this. If in your studies in researchers you have encompassed in considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples, lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call. Then it moves students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driven. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as the Russell trust and every year since for the last hundred eighty six years and every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated and inculcate it into the system in the United States in particular the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be bored in the first place wanted it to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say the society that would now graduate be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently? We had Georgia. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether other for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please archer. Good call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is. I think really fits in. Well with what we talked about earlier without him. Why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush and John carrying so many other powerful people out there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in in into the Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones that unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line Choi. Good morning. Very good program tonight do things I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm gonna be that he's lying about the chips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money money were of the fair return. So the need of land after him. But my one question when we didn't have any any tensions of the where did the idea come with after neighbor freed forty agents in the mmu came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as the that'll be the next book, the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres mule certainly was a kind of like the the broken treaties with American Indians that the US government, obviously, their their word is never been good situations. Like that and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one if I guess Malcolm X made a big deal about it that later, and I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly. No one got there for a meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a broken problems. Joy. Thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers. Imagine the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I take it in my opinion. I think is crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know, for the custody show convention, they seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose kind of confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution had any kind of the kind of impacted had is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially was one of the forgotten founding fathers, universities my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected onto the constitution. So my heart probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue. If it was actually followed by leaders, which rarely has been especially since civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man of ever devised, and what do you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's a living and breathing document. Don't like at school thought at all don't like at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people look at the people who want update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than what they're talking about updating. They're talking about creeping social Justice warriors type stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which you know? Hey, you you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you have free speech or you don't have it and one of the one of those things I ever writings, but I didn't even know it. But most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, great hero. Oliver Wendell Holmes straight with wrote the. The decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So most people most Americans, I don't think they kinda think that was inherited. No it wasn't. And no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. The founding fathers think about the the first amendment in in where we're at with free speech today. I would I would hope they outraged again, other exception of Alexander Hamilton probably be cool with it. But the rest of I think certainly Jefferson would be as the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. And I I ran in rave about that constantly. And maybe the only one nominally on the list that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech. I certainly wouldn't like the free speech owns that. We've seen crops and son eleven and things like that. I don't think I don't think the founding of the very pleased with any that our government is done fisa, civil war. But it's certainly especially in the last eight years or so I time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Hey, how you doing?.

Lincoln United States Thomas Stanton John F Kennedy president Ulysses US government Bank of England Don Connecticut Patrick Henry Germany Russia California Amerigo Vespucci England
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

13:31 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"All over the place that night and for for especially an indication like that when the war was finally over it was something of a victory celebration. So for all these celebrated personalities to not go out in public on such an occasion is very strange. So is that suggesting that Ulysses grant also knew something was up and was told you don't want to be there. Well, I know that would that would certainly lead one to to to speculate that I mean, I I don't again, we don't really know in all these things all we can do is look at kind of the kind of questionable behavior. And certainly, however, whatever you speculate us, the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other than Stanton, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had theory would be that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually, which is kinda hilarious considering at the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war but for. Some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast, Richard. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England was going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I'm sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do a dress that in the book the greenback question of actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and that's it was greenbacks. And that's there. Some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly and aditorial I quote from it. I could not find original source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If if this mischievous policy or something comes to pass, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy Lincoln, certainly was a threat to the Bank is because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something the same. Sword when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency, Shirley, fascination. Thanks for the call Thomas. Wasn't that? Also, you bring up his point going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's I obviously these wars were being financed. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln it as far as the greenback. So we really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I criticize Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra, dimissed Jeffries. Thank you, both this Jeffries. I'm curious to know and forgive me. I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work. I'm wondering this. If in your studies and researches you have encompassed in considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany, February Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples, lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them, it moved to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was the driving. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as Russell trust. And that every year since for the last one hundred eighty six years and every generation and every year since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcate it into the system in the United States, and in particular, the educational system, so the gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? These are the call. Thank you. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to with W Bush and John carrying so many other powerful people out there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina tie type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into the. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very very good program tonight two things. I would wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm gonna be he's nine amount of trips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money money were of would return. So the need that land after him. But my one question when meet you didn't have any intentions of Rena say where did the idea come win after neighbor freed forty agents in the new came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as this. That'll be the next book. Although the prequel prequel to it or whatever older conspiracies, but yeah, the forty acres a mule certainly was a kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indians that the US government, obviously their word is never been good in situations. Like that, and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just part of the bitter legacy of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe really unrealistic promises made to the freed slaves, and that was certainly the most popular one. And we've I believe I guess, Malcolm X, you know, made a big deal about it that later, and I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a bourbon problems joy, thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I think it in my opinion. I think is crafted the the most perfect form of government imaginable. But in my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know, for the country show convention, they seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose kind of confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that. And I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of it kind of impacted had is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick, Henry, George Mason. Especially was one of the forgotten founding fathers university is my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected onto the constitution. So yeah, my heart probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution it's hard to argue with if it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised. And what do you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people just look at the people who want update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than when they're talking about updating. They're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which, you know, hey, you you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it in one of the one of those things I ever while writings, but I didn't even know it and most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, great here all of the Wendell Holmes strike wrote the. The decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So it must be most Americans. I don't think they kind of think that was inherent in the no it wasn't. And no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. What would the founding fathers think about the the first amendment in in where we're at with free speech today? I would I would hope they'd be outraged again other they catch it of Alexander Hamilton. We'd probably be cool with it. But the rest of I think certainly Jefferson would be as a Krista the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. I rant and rave about that constantly. And I maybe the only one nominally on the list that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech is certainly wouldn't like the free speech zones that we've seen crop up since nine eleven and things like that. I don't think I don't think the founding of the very pleased with any that our government is done since the civil war. But it's certainly especially in the last eight years or so. First time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Hey, how you doing?.

United States Lincoln Thomas Connecticut W Bush Stanton John F Kennedy Russell George Mason president Ulysses US government California Bank of England Richard dimissed Jeffries Patrick Henry
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

13:52 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"You'd want to speculate that I mean, I I don't again, we don't really know it all these things all we can do is look at kind of kind of questionable behavior. And certainly, however, whatever you speculate us, the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that and whether anyone other than Stanton, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually, which is kinda hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. He was clear that the monarchy England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene. For the south southern states, and it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics, and I'm sort of curious, then Lincoln was the guess I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy, and what was that all about? Well, the question that that actually I do a dress that in the book of the greenback question of actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln can did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and it was greenbacks. And that's there some people believe that. The bankers. The international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly editorial I quote from it. I could not find the original source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If it's if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy Lincoln, certainly was a threat to the Bank because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something of the same sort when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency Gore's fascination, thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that. Also, you bring up this point going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the. Charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being financed. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln it as far as the greenback had really kinda I'm kinda toward their because I criticize Lincoln tremendously the book. And I think he's the greatest parent America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast with moving. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra dimissed, Jeffrey, thank you both. It's jeffries. I'm curious to know, if you give me I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work. I'm wondering news if in your studies in researchers you have been compass and considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call then it moved to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was the he called the butter hood of death and that in the following year h. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as Russell trust. And that every year since for the last two hundred ninety six years and every generation and every years since fifteen members of your secret society had been infiltrated and inculcate it into the system in the United States in particular the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say society that would now graduate be overtaken from the inside out down to including present day in which very recently? We had Georgia. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets same secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against, weather and other presidential election. Do you have any comments about that these Archer the call? Thank you. Thank you. What what's your describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him, I shot because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an aluminum die type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into the. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that's really fits in. Well, really with any at some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. This is very very good program. Tonight, two things. I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm be that he nine amount of the trips coming over here. And to me that he wasn't getting his money. The money were of the return. So the need of land after him. But one question when he didn't have any intention of Rena thing where did the idea come with after neighbor free agents in the new Pieman? Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I don't I don't quite go back as far as the day. That'll be the next book other the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracy. But yeah, the forty acres mule certainly was a kind of like a broken treaties with the American Indian. So that the US government, obviously, their their word is never been good situations. Like that and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. We've I believe I guess Malcolm X made a big deal about that later. I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly a no one got there for your meal. So it was just yet on unfortunately, a bourbon problems joy, thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I think it in my opinion. I think is crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know, for the country show convention, they seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that. And I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that's had any kind of it kind of impacted head is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially as one of the forgotten zoning fathers, and those universities my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights, so really our rights were not protected onto the constitution. So my heart probably would go with the. Articles confederation. But the constitution it. It's hard to argue with if it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised, and what do you say to those scholars who's who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought it all go. I gotta go. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people didn't do look at the people who want to update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than whether they're talking about updating if they're talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that which you know, hate the you can't have free frigging speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free feature. You don't have it in one of the one of the things I discover what writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, great hero. Oliver Wendell Holmes. We start with wrote the decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So it must be most Americans. I don't think they kind of think that was inherited. But no it wasn't. And then no one thought of that until World War One when they were trying to crush dissent. What would the founding fathers think about the the first amendment in in where we're at with free speech today? I would I would hope they'd be outraged again other. We'll catch it of Alexander Hamilton who probably be cool with it. But the rest of I think certainly Jefferson would be as Krista the outrage, and they certainly would not have understood the concept of hate speech. And I I ran and rave about that constantly. And maybe the only one nominal on the left that is still doing that. But I don't think you can have free speech when you come up with something called hate speech. They certainly wouldn't like the free speech zones that we've seen crops and son Levin and things like that. I don't think I don't think the family would be very pleased with anything that our government is done since the civil war. But it's certainly especially in the last two years or so. First time caller line. Bear is in Durham, North Carolina bear good morning. Welcome to coast. Well, thank you. Mrs. We've talked about Lincoln linking. The only corn is like copper. We we didn't get leaking as the. For you the slaves, but he's not feeling late because he was a all of complexion. He was a more descent. So I think he'd bigger slave because he was. That's like. Well, that's a new one on me too on. Did you wanna come on? I guess I've heard that he was he was called derogatory names like that. He certainly.

Lincoln United States Thomas Bank of England Stanton Russell president Russia US government California Don Mr John Kerry Connecticut John F Kennedy Patrick Henry Troyes Amerigo Vespucci Durham
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Over it was something victory celebrations. So for all these celebrated personalities to not go out in public on such an occasion is very strange. So is that suggesting that Ulysses grant also knew something was up and was told you you don't want to be there. Well, I know that would that would certainly lead one to to to speculate that I mean, I I don't again, we don't really know in all these things all we can do is look kind of kind of questionable behavior. Certainly, however, whatever you speculate us, the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other than Stanton, like if I tend to believe in my personal theory, if I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an. Inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast, Richard. Thank you for taking my call and dawn. I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about a Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England was going to intervene. For the south southern states, and it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics something, and I'm sort of curious then Lincoln was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy, and what was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do a dress that in the book the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing we can did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing, but itself, and it was great bags, and that's their some people believe that. The bankers. The international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly an editorial I quote from it. I could not find the original source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If this if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something of the same sort when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency shortly cores fascination, thanks for the call Thomas. Wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the. Charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being financed. And you know, that's why I it. It's for someone to do with Lincoln as far as the greenback's. And it really kinda. I'm kinda torn there because I size Lincoln tremendously the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much, Mr. Sarah, domestic Jeffries. Thank you both. It's jeopardy's. I'm curious to know, if the give me I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering this. If in your studies in researchers you have been compasses and considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his three top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call it moved to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driven. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last one hundred eighty six years in every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated in call catered into the system in the United States, and in particular, the educational system, so the gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted it to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now graduate be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had Georgia. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this show raid of being against whether another presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please archer. Good call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier with Adam I shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to with W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there were scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into the. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So you know, that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very good program. Tonight, two things I've been wondering about Amerigo Vespucci, I'm gonna be he's nine amount of the chips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money is money. Where of you return, though, the need that land after him, but my one quicker when we didn't have any intention of Freemuth play where did the idea come with after stable free agents in new came in. I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. And I I don't quite go back as far as the that'll be the next book, although the prequel prequel to it or whatever you could older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres mule certainly was kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indian. So that the US government, obviously, their word has never been good in situations. Like that and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises made really unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. If I believe, I guess, Malcolm X made a big deal about it. That later I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for a meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a broken problems. Join thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I take it in my opinion. I think is crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know for the constitutional convention. They seem to with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose panicking. Confederation of states, and I think the central government had even less power under that. And I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of kind of impacted is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially was one of the forgotten founding fathers and universities my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So my heart probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution it's hard to argue with if it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man of ever devised, and what you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that it's leaving and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because you know, when they say updated, the people look at the people who want update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than when they're talking about updating. They're talking about creeping social Justice warriors type stuff into it. More state power, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which you know? Hey, you you can't have free of frigging the speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech where you don't have it in one of the one of those things I ever want writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, that's great hero. Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote the. The decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So most people most Americans, I don't think they kinda think that was inherent in. No it wasn't..

United States Lincoln Thomas Patrick Henry Connecticut W Bush Mr John Kerry Stanton Russell president Ulysses California Bank of England US government Richard John F Kennedy Oliver Wendell Holmes
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"People. I think we should certainly question that and whether. Anyone other than Stanton? 'cause I I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. Hi, richard. Thank you for taking my call and dawn. I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about a Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene. For the south southern states, and it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I've sort of curious then Lincoln was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy, and what was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do dress that in the book the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and that's it was greenbacks. And that's a some people believe that. The bankers. The international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly an editorial quote from it. I could not find the regional source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If this if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something the same sort when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency shortly fascination. Thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the. Charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being fun inst-. And you know, that's why I it. It's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as greenback's, and it really kinda. I'm kinda torn there because I size Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest power in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did the go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra, Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you both. It's jeffries. I'm curious to know, if give me I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work. I'm wondering this. If in your studies and researches you have been compasses and considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his three top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call and it moved to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driven. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as Russell trust. And that every year since for the last one hundred eighty six years in every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcated into the system in the United States in particular, the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrecy fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? These are generally good call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina I type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into the. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So you know, that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very good program tonight two things. I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm gonna be he's nine amount of the. Coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money. The money were of the return. So the need that land after him. But my one when he didn't have any Indian tension of Rena say where did the idea come with after this neighbor, freed forty agents in the MU came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as they go this. That'll be the next book the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres and a mule certainly was kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indians that the US government, obviously their word is never been good in situations. Like that and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy. Of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. We've I believe I guess, Malcolm X, you know, made a big deal about it. That later I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for a meal. So it was just yet on unfortunately, a broken homes. Join thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article you think was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I think it in my opinion. I think is crafted the the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know, for the country show convention, they seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose kind of confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that. And I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of it kind of impacted had is kind of just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick, Henry, George Mason. Especially one of the forgotten founding fathers is university is my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights that it because without the Bill of rights, really our rights were not protected under the constitution. So yeah, my heart. Probably would go with the. The articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue. If it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since the civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised. And what do you say to those scholars who who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because you know, when they updated the people look at the people who want update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than what they're talking about updating their talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it more state tower, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which, you know, hey, you you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it and one of the one of the things I ever while writings, I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, great here. All of the Wendell Holmes was wrote the the decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So most people most Americans, I don't think they kind of think. That was inherent in the..

Lincoln United States Thomas Mr John Kerry Connecticut Stanton Bank of England Russell George Mason John F Kennedy richard US government England Russia California Patrick Henry Amerigo Vespucci
"mr john kerry" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"In all these things all we can do is look kind of the kind of questionable behavior. And certainly, however, whatever you speculate. It's the reason why certainly all those powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other Stanton like, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. All right, Richard. Thank you for taking my call. And Don, I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about the Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics some bad, and I'm sort of curious then who ankle? Was the I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do dress that in the book the greenback question of actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I believe that was really the the the best thing like did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and it was greenbacks and that Syria, some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly an editorial I quote from it. I could not find the regional source for, but it's been bandied about many books about it. If it's if this mischievous policy or something comes to pass, it will I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy Lincoln, certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something. The same sword. When he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency shortly before tests nation. Thanks for the call Thomas. Wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being funded, and you know, that's why it's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as the greenback. So we ended really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I criticized Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest parent America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback. But it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast leaving. Thank you very much, Mr., sir. Dimissed jeffries. Thank you, both Mr. Jeffreys. I'm curious to know, if the give me I've only just in recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work I wanted to miss if in your studies and researches you have been composting considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany, February Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples, lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call. It moves to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was German, he called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years and every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcated into the system in the United States in particular the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be bored in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say the society they would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including a present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets same secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please are generally call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him, I shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to W Bush, and John carrying somebody other powerful people there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an aluminum, I type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people I in in into the. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very very good program. Tonight, two things. I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I mean that he's nine amount of trips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money. The money were of he he would return. So the need that land after you know, but my one question when we didn't have any any tensions of Freemuth may where did the idea come away with after mislabeled free, forty acres in new came in. Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I don't I don't quite go back as far as this today. That'll be the next book. Although the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracy. But yeah, the forty acres and a mule certainly was a kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indian. So that the US government, obviously, their their word has never been good is situations. Like that. And yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises made really unrealistic promises made to the freed slave, and that was certainly the most popular one. We I believe I guess, Malcolm, X know made a big deal about that later. I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly. No one got there for a meal. So it was just yet. Unfortunately, a broken problems. Joy. Thank you for the call. The articles of confederation versus the US constitution. Obviously, the the US constitution was adopted. But which article do you think? Was or document rather was closer to what the founding fathers imagined the United States should become. Well. Certainly the constitution. I think it in my opinion. I think is crafted the most perfect form of government imaginable. But it my heart tells me also that the the people I truly admired people like Patrick Henry who said he smelled a rat. You know for the constitutional convention. They seem to side with the articles of confederation. I think it was more of a loose kind of confederation of states. And I think central government had even less power under that I think without the without the Bill of rights. I think the constitution that had any kind of the kind of impacted is a kind of a just a fantastic concept, but the Bill of rights was crucial there in people like Patrick Henry, George Mason, especially as one of the forgotten founding fathers, and those universities my neck of the woods out here. But they were instrumental in getting the Bill of rights at it. Because of that the Bill of rights really our rights were not protected onto the constitution. So yeah, my heart. Probably would go. The articles confederation. But the constitution. It's hard to argue it if it was actually followed by our leaders, which rarely has been especially since civil war. It would be about as good governance. I think man has ever devised. And what do you say to those scholars who sit who say that the the the US constitution needs to be updated and revised that, it's living and breathing document. Don't like that school of thought at all don't like it at all. Because. You know, when they say updated, the people didn't do look at the people who wanna update, and you can see okay, what is their philosophy? What is their perspective? I think than when they're talking about updating their talking about creeping, social Justice warriors and type of stuff into it more state tower, the idea of hate speech and things like that. Which, you know, hey, you you can't have free of freedom of speech with any concept of hate speech because hate is in the eye of the holder. So you either have free speech or you don't have it and one of the one of those things I ever writings, but I didn't even know it. But then most people know that the old the old fire in a crowded theatre restriction on free speech. Didn't come about until World War One. When the great again, great hero. Oliver Wendell Holmes. We start with wrote the. The decision for the supreme court to justify the suppression of free speech during a World War One under Woodrow Wilson. So most people most Americans, I don't think they kind of take that was inherited the no it wasn't. And.

United States Lincoln Thomas Stanton John F Kennedy Russell George Mason president California Don Bank of England Richard US government Connecticut Oliver Wendell Holmes Patrick Henry W Bush
"mr john kerry" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Powerful people not attending theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other than Stanton, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war but for. Some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. Hi, richard. Thank you for taking my call and dawn. I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about a Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I'm sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do dress that in the book the greenback question is actually I back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognize that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and it was great bags and that Syria. Some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly an editorial I quote from it. I could not find the original source work, but it's been bandied about many books about that. If it's if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something of the same. Mm sort when he printed his limited silver greenback. Type of currency short pass nation. Thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being financed. And you know, that's why I it. It's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as the greenback's. And it really kinda. I'm kinda torn there because I criticize Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra, dimissed Jeffries. Thank you both. It's jeopardy's. I'm curious to know if forgive me, I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence. And that if you're very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering this. If in your studies in researchers you have encompassed in considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty two his three top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them, it moved his students at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was the German. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as Russell trust. And that every year since for the last one hundred and eighty six years in every generation and every year since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated and inculcate it into the system in the United States, and in particular the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place. One is to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say the society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? These are generally the call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to with W Bush and John carrying so many other powerful people out there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an alumina type of organization over all of it. Then you would have people in in into the. The Russell trust and to Rhodes scholars and skull and bones at unbeknownst each other maybe working for the same group above them in some kind of demented pyramid scheme. So you know, that that really fits in. Well, really with any some kind of whatever conspiratorial shenanigans going on. Thanks for the call. Let's say hi to Troyes in Norfolk Virginia on the wildcard line. Troy. Good morning. Very very good program. Tonight, two things. I'm wondering about Amerigo Vespucci. I'm to be that he's nine amount of tips coming over here. And to me he wasn't getting his money the money where of he would return. So the need than land after him. But my one question when meeting didn't have any intentions of Rena Faye? Where did the idea come with after the freed the forty acres in new came in? Yeah. Well, I think that was thanks for the question. Yeah. I I don't I don't quite go back as far as the day. That'll be the next book. Although the prequel prequel to it or whatever even older conspiracies. But yeah, the forty acres mule certainly was kind of like the the broken treaties with the American Indians that the US government, obviously, their their word is never been good in situations. Like that, and yeah, that was certainly that's that's just just part of the bitter legacy of the aftermath of the civil war because you had reconstruction, and you had promises maybe really unrealistic promises made to the freed slave. And that was certainly the most popular one wave. I believe I guess Malcolm X made a big deal about that later. I can understand being bitter about it. But certainly no one got there for a.

Lincoln United States Thomas Stanton W Bush John F Kennedy Russell president California Bank of England US government Connecticut Malcolm X Russia England richard Amerigo Vespucci America
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KTRH

"About many books about it, if it's if this MRIs policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy Lincoln, certainly was a threat to the Bank because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely an end around. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something at the same. Sword when he printed his limited silver greenback type of currency shortly fascination. Thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's I obviously these wars were being funny. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln it as far as the greenback. So we really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I size Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did the go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast leaving. Thank you very much, Mr. Serra de Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you both. It's jeffries. I'm curious to know and forgive me. I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence. And that if you're very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering this. If in your studies and researches you have been compasses and considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his sweet top disciples, lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call it moved to students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second checker of what was the German. He called the brotherhood of death and that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years and every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcated into the system in the United States in particular, the educational system, so the gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place is it to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets same secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? Please Archer could call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is.

United States Archer John F Kennedy Lincoln Connecticut Mr. Jeffreys Mr John Kerry Thomas Yale University of New Haven America Hawaii Germany Mr. Serra W Bush George Russell two hundred eighty six years
"mr john kerry" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Anyone other than Stanton, I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually, which is kinda hilarious considering. At the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war, but for some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas welcomed the coast to coast. Hi, richard. Thank you for taking my call and done. I will definitely buy your book. Great research. My question is about Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I'm sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question, and that actually I do a dress that in the book of the greenback question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognized that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing but itself, and it was greenbacks and that Syria, some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly editorial I quote from it. I could not find original source for it. But it's been bandied about many books about that. If this if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but we just can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely. And and of course, later, and John F Kennedy would do something of the same. I'm sort when he printed his limited silver greenback. Type of currency. Sure. The nation. Thanks for the call Thomas wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war of eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being fun inched. And you know, that's why it's for someone to do with Lincoln it as far as the greenback. So we didn't really kinda I'm kinda torn there because I criticize Lincoln tremendously the book, and I think he's the greatest in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast leaving. Thank you very much. Mr. sir, did Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you both. It's jeopardy's. I'm curious to know, if forgive me, I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence, and that of your very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering if in your studies and researches you have been compass considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany feathery Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his three top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them. It moves students at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driven. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years and every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcated into the system in the United States, and in particular, the educational system, so the gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted it to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say a society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against whether another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that place? Archer the cough. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well with what we talked about earlier without him. Why shot because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to the W Bush, and John Kerry, and so many other powerful people out there. What scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission, obviously the council foreign relations. If you speculate that there is an aluminum,.

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"mr john kerry" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"mr john kerry" Discussed on KTOK

"Those powerful people not attending a theater with the president of the United States. It really makes people. I think we should certainly question that, and you know, whether anyone other than Stanton 'cause I tend to believe in my personal theory. If I had a theory would be that Stanton was the the leader of the conspiracy. And it was an inside job because they they didn't feel Lincoln was actually which is kind of hilarious considering the way Lincoln treated, then and administered the war but for. Some radical Republicans apparently wasn't radical enough. All right. Let's dive into the phone calls and we'll go to the wildcard line and Thomas in LA Hoya, California. Good morning Thomas. Welcome to coast to coast. All right, Richard. Thank you for taking my call and dawn. I will definitely buy your book great research. My question is about a Lincoln and the civil war and sort of the economic geopolitics. It was clear that the monarchy of England and the central Bank of England what's going to intervene for the south southern states. And it is recorded in history that the czar of Russia threatened England and said, no, you're not going to do that. And there was a lot of geopolitics on that. And I'm sort of curious then Lincoln. Was the as I understand it the author of the whole greenback policy. What was the whole greenback controversy and? What was that all about? Well, the question and that actually I do address that in the book of the greenback. Question is actually back when Lincoln was one of my heroes. That was I, and I believe that was really the the the best thing Lincoln did because Lincoln recognize that the government had the power to print money backed by nothing, but it self, and that's it was green bags and that Syria. Some people believe that the bankers the international bankers got together. In fact, they're supposedly editorial I quote from it. I could not find the original source for but it's been bandied about many books about that. If it's if this mischievous policy or something comes to passable, I I don't have the exact quote in front of me, but readers can read it in the book, but it's supposedly came from some banking source and under this policy. Lincoln certainly was a threat to the bankers because he was circumventing them actually distributing the money and just going going around them completely in Durant. And of course, later in John F Kennedy would do something of the same. I'm sort when he printed his limited silver greenback. Type of currency test nation. Thanks for the call Thomas. Wasn't that? Also, you bring up this point that going back to the war eighteen twelve that that was kind of payback by the international bankers. Because again, they the the United States had revoked the charter. Right. And then we were you know, with the question of debt. I mean, that's obviously these wars were being fun inst-. And you know, that's why I it's for someone to do with Lincoln did as far as the greenback's, and it really kinda. I'm kinda torn there because I crow size Lincoln tremendously in the book. And I think he's the greatest tire in America ever had. But he did do that one pretty fantastic thing. So I'm not sure what compelled him to print the greenback's, but it could have been revolutionary because it did it did go around the completely cut off all the bankers influence over the money supply. Let's see let's say hi to Archer in Hawaii west of the Rockies Archer. Good morning. Welcome to coast moving. Thank you very much. Mr. sir, did Mr. Jeffreys. Thank you, both jeopardy's. I'm curious to know and forgive me. I've only just recent hours become aware of your presence. And that if you're very fine and venerable work, I'm wondering if in your studies in researchers you have been compass considered that in eighteen thirty one in Germany, February Hegel died in eighteen thirty to his three top disciples lieutenants, emissaries, whatever you choose to call them. It moves students at Yale University of New Haven, Connecticut and open the second chapter of what was driving. He called the brotherhood of death. And that in the following year eighteen. Eighteen thirty three that was incorporated new heavy Haven, Connecticut as a Russell trust and that every year since for the last two hundred eighty six years in every generation and every years since fifteen members of this secret society had been infiltrated inculcated into the system in the United States, and in particular, the educational system. So that gradually the very people who did not want United States to be born in the first place wanted to be an abortion. They didn't succeed. So what they had been succeeding is doing is preparing a amenable. How do I say the society that would now gradually be overtaken from the inside out down to including our present day in which very recently. We had George. W Bush, and Mr John Kerry, both members of secrets fame secret society because they cover both sides of the game. And they were both supposedly playing out this charade of being against one another for presidential election. Do you have any comments about that? These are generally the call. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. What what you're describing is I think really fits in. Well, with what we talked about earlier without him why shop because that kind of a little known society, and skull and bones, which you alluded to with W Bush and John carrying so many other powerful people out there Rhodes scholars there's so many of these groups I in more recent times things like the trilateral commission,.

Lincoln United States Thomas Stanton John F Kennedy W Bush Connecticut president Bank of England Russia England California Richard Germany trilateral commission Archer America Mr John Kerry