12 Burst results for "Mr Garner"

"mr garner" Discussed on Journey of Ruth

Journey of Ruth

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"mr garner" Discussed on Journey of Ruth

"We have All that stuff. That's what i do as a spiritual formation. Just anything to help. Our students grow in their face. Yeah well part of the reason why we got connected is because of my love for discipleship and my belief and my passion for the fact that it is so important for all of us and your is actually. Put that into your program. So can you talk about discipleship program that you do with the students at northwest. Absolutely absolutely and speak for you. Courtney and i i love hearing your like go up a notch you start talking about disciples with that is and and you got the original right. The jesus was the original youth pastor. Yeah and he twelve guys in his youth group and one of them went south it so even that he jesus night see some fruit in his ministry for three years he sought. It's like people make their own decisions. We can get the logical about judas later but so our program here in a nutshell. Our discipleship program We have Community groups they meet on chapel days which is wednesdays and every week and they are groups of anywhere from five to nine students and they have a leader. If you're a freshman year leader is a junior sophomore. Year leader is a senior since we kinda grow on. It's not adult students eating. No yeah so it gets kind of passed out so those those leaders are being kinda Ruled by teachers. Okay and then all our other kids that aren't in a group aren't leaders. They're in a group with teacher so if that makes any sense i think it does a little bit. Yeah our our freshman sophomore disciple by their peers. Almost by kids a couple years ahead of them which is beautiful and messy right but you're also allowing opportunity for those that maybe don't feel comfortable leading a group you're still giving them that discipleship through teachers juniors and seniors. That was probably about about seven to ten percent of our kids will be a leader see. You're talking ninety percent are in a group get to be a junior senior. Okay i would imagine that you don't just throw those juniors and seniors into a group of freshmen sophomores in safety. Go oh my goodness we tell the kids every year. According you notice being around students when they're juniors got a freshman bunch of freshmen. They don't know each other is awkward. Every mr i can't do this. Mr garner they will listen to mr garland walk. Just relax okay. You gotta give it. You have to give it a year. Yeah you might not see any kind of relationship until they're sophomores and some of them don't wanna put in that time but any anytime we're talking about discipleship. We talked about jesus a second ago. Three and a half years invest in these guys night in bay twenty four seven We're talking about once a week. you're not gonna it takes time it takes and those kids say say course..

Courtney Mr garner mr garland
"mr garner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"mr garner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Georgetown sociology professor and Baptist minister with a new book, written as a collection of letters to victims of racial violence, as if they had not been killed. There's a letter to George Floyd a letter to Briana Taylor a letter to Ahmed Armory and Emmett Till and Eric Garner. The book is called long Time Coming Reckoning with race in America, and It includes parts in which Professor Dyson speaks directly to White Americans as well as all the other parts. We will also get his take on some stories in the news. Like he had an article on Agrio on Tuesday that defends Joe Biden, at least so far from criticism over the diversity of his Cabinet picks. There's also breaking news on that, just in the last few minutes, biting his top tapped Susan Rice. To be his top domestic policy adviser. Ah, position that does not need confirmation by the Senate. Professor Dyson. Always great to have you welcome back to W N. Y C. Always great to be here, my friend. I have since moved on to Vanderbilt University, So I'm glad to join you from that great institution as well. And I apologize for missing that transition. That's not your fault. And I think whoever Biden pick picks for his Cabinet will pale by comparison in American history to the police killing of George Floyd this year. So do you want to start there? Why did you want to write a letter to George Floyd? And why a book of letters as an organizing principle? Yeah, well, the epistolary form, you know, well known, saying fiction with the color purple or in sonic literature with knives, writing a letter. Two people in jail. Um, you know, in hip hop, I thought that I would appropriate this form to try to articulate the sense of both. Intellectual acuity around grappling with the historical genealogy of white supremacy in this culture, starting from the get go from slavery down to the present. And link that to the emotional outpouring that inevitably is occasion when we talk about the relentless murder of black people, either by white vigilantes. Or by police. People who bear the badge, The gun, the Taser and the baton of the state, and the imprimatur is well on. We're caught between those two forces constantly and repeatedly, and so I wanted to think out loud. About these issues. I don't want to talk about these figures and further objectify them. In a way I wanted to speak to them Commune with them. Talk to them. As you said, as if they were here as if they could hear to allow us as we visit grave sites to think about our lives. We literally know that those folk can't hear us, but we talk Nontheless and I wanted to Create that kind of intimacy and kinship with these figures, So I write to Eric Garner and address George Floyd. So what did you write to George Floyd? Well, the letter is addressed to Eric Garner and what I say to George Floyd in the book. I talk about George in the book, and I talked so much about you know the parallels between Eric Garner And what he suffered what he endured there in Staten Island. The horror of the infamy of Daniel Pantaleo, the cop who took him down and then I draw a parallel, and when he claimed to look 11 or so times I can't breathe. And then to see George Floyd repeating the same thing in the sequel to that film, and I wanted to say to Mr Garner and to George Fluid that the horrors of your death Have inevitably led you to be conscripted into the war against white supremacy. Usually martyrs have intention to use their death to court death. As a means of their vocation to underscore ideals, noble aspirations for which they are willing to die and potentially sacrifice, blood body and limb. For a higher goal and a deeper purpose. And in this case, many of these figures were killed, not knowing that their deaths would somehow highlight. And elevate issues after their death that they couldn't get resolved during the time they live. So how we make use of their deaths is a measure of their market him so I wanted to talk to George Floyd about the horrors of his death, the lethal limits imposed by white supremacy and by policing that is out of order. That refuses to acknowledge the humanity of black people. And how that death that signal sacrifice of life inspired an entire social movement and certainly the greatest protests against racial injustice in terms of number that we've ever seen. One victim of a police killing, who's lesser known who you draw attention to in the book is Elijah McClane. Can you tell us some of what you write to Elijah McClane and introduce him to some of the listeners who may not have heard anyone say his name out loud before? Yeah. Elijah McQueen is a young black man 23 years old, who died last year at the hands of the police in an especially tragic case. You know he was a young man allegedly potentially on the spectrum. A young man who was highly sensitive, One of his co workers said he walked as if a gold orb Surrounded him at all times. He played his violin to the pigeons and birds to calm them. He was a sensitive, sweet soul 23 years old with a ski mask on walking home from a convenience store. He had anemia and therefore he needed Hey, got cold rather easily. And therefore had the mask on somebody called the police thinking well, he's probably not a real problem. But just in case I wish White brothers and sisters who do that might think twice. Not because they're intense, are not good. Their intention is not redeeming. But because the consequence so often for black people is lethal. And in this case, it was here was a man who weighed less than £150 accosted by police people to a three of them..

George Floyd Eric Garner Professor Dyson Elijah McClane Joe Biden Cabinet professor Susan Rice George Emmett Till Ahmed Armory America Senate Vanderbilt University Elijah McQueen murder George Fluid Briana Taylor Daniel Pantaleo Nontheless
"mr garner" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"mr garner" Discussed on Reports from the Spiritual Frontier

"Remains an implacable. our that owns a political party But but it definitely means that people have begun to imagine different futures and and start to demand them. Also say it's become easier to imagine what happens if we don't do anything because thirty years ago. We were kind of speculating about what climate change would bring. We were speculating correctly. It turns out and now we see what that feels like to have oracle forest fires happening in multiple parts of the world that wants to have thirty hurricanes in the tropical atlantic in the course of a single season to have these are heat temperature. You know the temperature in california reach hundred and thirty degrees fahrenheit this year You know all those and and we begin to see how in very real and graphic terms how it connects to these issues of justice. The iron law of climate change is the less she did. Because the sooner in the harder you get it will twenty twenty was a good year to realize that the most important thing anybody said in two thousand and twenty was george. Floyd says he got murdered two. I can't breathe and it was not the first person to say that you know as they were being murdered by the police mr garner. Staten island is the same story. You know well. People can't breathe because there's a cop kneeling on their neck. And i can't breathe because there is a power plant down the street and is always same street and they can't breathe because the governor is told them to go inside and tape their window shot against wildfire smoke and the can't breathe because it's one hundred and thirty degrees out and it's just too hot for human survival so the way so. We have both the positive imagination network now in the negative imagination. And we can see. We can see the if we don't take strong action no matter what we do we're going to build a new world and the world were building right at. The moment is terrible. So now we have to figure out how to summon the imagination through a positive future hundred building ruled. That actually works as you as you talk one of the things. I notice how you locate imagination on the margins that inevitably imagination of what's possible starts in places that are marginalized putting solar panels on your house. Used to seem like a crazy thing to do or suggesting. A presidential candidate suggesting that that america needed to break its relationship with the oil industry. One point would have been a political killer and likewise how it is those on the margins who perhaps will feel have already felt most deeply the impacts of climate crisis continues to worsen and this is where i wanted to turn to you reverend your would because i've noticed one of the things you do really well is put a face to the climate crisis to help people envision the deep personal costs that people are already paying due to environmental degradation. I've noticed this. Especially in giving voice to the silent stories of many people who are marginalized who most deeply suffer from this crisis. Who already are suffering deeply from this crisis and its intersections with With america's started with racism. As i think bill mentioned the beginning climate justice. And i'm really justice are very much intersected. Could you share with us. More.

mr garner oracle Staten island Floyd california george america
"mr garner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Denver sat on the bottom step. There was nowhere else gracefully to go. They were a twosome saying, Yo, daddy and sweet home in a way that maybe clear both belonged to them and not to her. That her own father's absence was not hers. Once the absence that belonged to Grandma Baby, a son deeply mourn because he was the one who had bought her out of there. Then it was her mother's absent husband. Now it was this hazelnut strangers absent friend. Only those who knew him knew him well could claim his absence for themselves just is only those who lived in sweet home could remember it whispering and glance sideways at one another while they did. Again. She wished for the baby ghost. It's anger, thrilling her now where it used to wear her out. Where her out? We have a ghost in here, she said. And it worked. They were not a twosome anymore. Her mother left off, swinging her feet and being girlish memory of sweet home dropped from the eyes with men. She was being girlish for He looked quickly up the lightning white stairs behind her, so I hear he says, but sad. Your mama say it, not evil. No, sir, said Denver not evil, but not sad, either. What the Tribute. Lonely. And rebuked. Is that right? Cody turn to suffer. I don't know about lonely said then was Mother mad? Maybe, but I don't see how it could be lonely spending every minute with us like it does. Must be something. You got it. Bones set this road. Just a baby. My sister said Denver. She died in this house. Paul D. Scratched the hair under his jaw Reminds me of that headless bride back behind. Sweet home. You remember that stuff used to roam them Woods regular. How could I forget? We're is some How come everybody run off from sweet home? Can't stop talking about it like if it was so sweet. You were to stay, girl. Who you talking to? Nobody laughed. True. True. She's right. Suffer it once we And he's so one home. He shook his head. But it's where we were state suffer all together. It comes back whether we wanted to or not. She shivered a little alight ripple of skin on her arm, which she caressed back into sleep. Denver, she said, Start up that stove. You can have a friend stopped by and don't feed him. Oh, I don't go to any trouble on my account, Paul d said on bread in trouble. The rest I brought back from where I work least I could do cooking from dawn and noone is bring dinner home. You got any objections to Pike? You don't object to me, I don't object added again fought Denver. Go back to them. She just off the kindle ing and almost lost the fire. Why don't you spend the night Mr Garner You and Mam can talk about sweet home all night Long Southern took to swift steps to the stove. But before she could yank Denver's collar, the girl leaned forward and began to cry. What's the matter with you? I never knew you to behave like this. Leva B. Said Paul D. I'm a stranger to. Well, that's just it. She's got no cause to act up with a stranger. Oh, baby, what is it? Did something happen? But Denver was shaking now and sobbing so she could not speak the tears. She had not shed for nine years. Wedding her far too. Womanly breasts. I can't no more. I can't know Maur came. What What? What Cage? I can't live here. I don't know where to go. What to do, But I can't live here. Nobody speaks to us. Nobody comes back. Boys don't like me. Girls don't either. Honey, what you're talking about? Nobody speaks to you as Paul D. There's the house. People don't is not. It's not the house. It's us and is you Denver Leave off seven. It's hard for a young girl living in the haunted house. That can't be easy. Why it's easier than some other things. Well, think, Seth. I'm a grown man with nothing new left to see or do And I'm telling you It ain't easy. Maybe you all ought to move who owns his house. Over Denver shoulder set the shot Paul D. A look of snow. What you care. They won't let you leave. No Southern. No moving. No Leaving is all right the way it is. You're gonna tell me it's all right with this child half out of her mind. Something in the house. Braced. And in the listening quiet that followed set a spoke I got a tree on my back and a hate in my house and nothing in between. But the daughter I'm holding in my arms. No more running from nothing. I will never run from another thing on this earth. I took one journey and I paid the ticket. But let me tell you one thing. Paul, D Ghana, it costs too much the gimme it cost too much. Just sit down. And eat with us. Or leave it speak. Baldy fished in his best for a little pouch of tobacco. Concentrating on his contents and the knot of its string. While Seth let Denver into the keeping room that opened off the large room he was sitting in. He had no smoking papers. So he fiddled with the pouch and listen through the open door to Seth quieting her daughter. When she came back, she avoided his look and went straight to a small table next to the stove. Her back was.

Denver Paul D. Seth Pike Grandma Baby Paul d Paul Ghana Cody Mr Garner Maur Cage Leva B.
"mr garner" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"A little bit of a Taylor. This is cut 12. A little bit now for some tough love on the subject. The reason there are so much violence and chaos in the black precincts is the disintegration of the African American family. He's got a point. In fact, He's got more than a point. Bill. Raised without much structure. Young black men often reject education and gravity of Greek culture, drugs, hustling gangs. Nobody forces them to do that again. It is a personal decision. He is right about that, too. Oh, summations. He doesn't go far enough. Because black people if you really want to fix the problem here is just five things that you should think about doing. Here's number five. Pull up your pants. Number four. Now is the n word. Now number three respect where you live. Start small by not loving way. Get a weekend of Cuban Twitter mob. This is this is why we might get in trouble for playing this. That is very controversial stuff right there. John Lamone, how far he's fallen. But now he's super super woke. He would never say anything like that. And now all he's talking about us. How all of us credulous boomer rubes are lying about the high crime rates in Democrat run cities, So everything has changed. I want to talk. Speaking of Cancel culture a little bit here, Howie. About Scrabble. Ah, string him out today that the Scrabble Association bans racial ethnic slurs from its official word list. They have never done this before. I do not believe And they said they got both sides of it. Some people were saying, if you start banning words that you can't serve banning words from Scrabble, a word for it is worth other people saying If you don't be in these words, I will never play school again Be two kinds of Scrabble tournaments, woke Scrabble and a Nwoko Scrabble. Has. The thing is that there's issues that you don't think people are going to get riled up about. People love their Scrabble. I'm personally a banana grams girl, but I could see why some people do enjoy it. It's a little bit. It's a little bit complicated for me. You know when the woke bridge tournaments from now on You know you're not going to get the bid. Parts or clubs or spades or a diamond. Watch it. Watch it with them. Aggressive language. You're going to get you only going to get to make one bid. In bridge from that wanted the woke tournaments. You know what the bit is No Trump no Trump and you'll get around a golf class around for all your bridge friends. A professor is doubling down on his prediction model of Trump's chances in 2020 Thiss Stony Brook professor. His name is Helmet North Path. He's doubling down that Trump will have a 91% chance of winning in November. He has predicted five out of the past six elections since 1996 correctly and every single election but to in the past 108 years. Oh, he's been around for a while, huh? He's but he's older than Joe Biden. Well, I don't know if he himself Maybe it's something they pass on from one another. But it was interesting to hear the two that he got wrong. The two elections, the model failed to predict where the 1960 election of JFK and the 2000 election of George W. Bush. I would not say that was stolen, but some people would. But how Here's an interesting part of this column, it says. The terrain of Presidential Kant contest is littered with nominees who saw poll lead in the spring turned to dust in the fall. The list is long and discouraging for early front Runners Caucus said that the last week he gave an interview. He's on this list it says Thomas Dewey in 1948 Richard Nixon in 1960 Jimmy Carter in 1980 Michael Dukakis in 1988 George H. W. Bush in 1992 and John Kerry in 2004 to site just the most spectacular cases. So I don't think it's his wrapped up as other people think it is. Oh, that's just my opinion, and I also wanted to read something else. Howie here quickly. I found this interesting article today. It said how the how the greatest generation begat the stupidest generation and lost America. So I did not realize how he that Obviously the greatest generation. They had to go through a lot more than the average generation. They had the Depression. They had a lot of wars, and then they spoil their Children. And then what this article points out is those Children became professors, and they taught the current generation. So when you see all these people screaming and throwing water bottles at police officers And burning statues of the Elks and Bernie statues of Melania Trump. It is a cause of These generational divides. Every generation had something and they tried to do the opposite. And this is what happens. Every generation in recent times has got a lot of splainin the dough Grace. Everybody except the only one is the greatest generation that gets the thumbs up, But they produced the boomers. I always thought the boomers weren't that bad. But according to this article, You are pretty bad, too. If you're thinking of replacing your carpets due to pet stains and odors, you must try. Genesis 9 50 1st It breaks down the bonds of stains and odors. So they're gone from carpets and padding for good you can use in a carpet cleaning machine and it's green. So it's safer family and pets. It's the go to cleaner for when Mr Garner has an accident is older dogs like my pug so often do Getting new carpeting is such a pain you have to measure you have to go to the carpet store, maybe closed and again, many believed that costs a lot of money much easier to try. Genesis 9 15 and how you know what ends up happening. Little lunar ends up waddling over to his favorite spy going the bathroom in your brand new carpet Lot want one gallon of industrial strength. Genesis 9 50 makes up the seven gallons of cleaner and it's not just for pet.

Melania Trump Trump professor Howie Scrabble Association African American family Joe Biden John Lamone George W. Bush Mr Garner Helmet North Path golf front Runners Caucus Thiss Stony Brook Depression America Thomas Dewey JFK official John Kerry
"mr garner" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

11:02 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"On W. Devi. It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most to you. Now. Here's your host Dave Graham. Good were Vermont, it is Wednesday June, the twenty, fourth, two, thousand and twenty, and we have a good show lined up for you this morning. We are to be talking in the first forty five minutes, or so about legislation that would ban the chokehold. You use of the chokehold by police officers in Vermont, of course to have become. Really notorious and. Around the country. After the George Floyd killing, in Minneapolis, and of course, the wasn't the first time that someone had been. Killed by police officer without by basically being denied the ability to breathe. Another famous case was the Eric Garner case in New York City a few years ago and That that That was the first time they've the phrase. I can't breathe. Really became famous because that's what Mr Garner was trying to tell. Officer Pantaleo as officer Ventalio was has had his arm around. Around Mr Garner's throat and was denying Mr Gardner the the ability to breathe eventually. Killing Mr Garner George Floyd had the neon his neck also being denied the ability to breathe. We're GONNA be talking with one of the people heavily involved in this legislation Vermont senator. dixie is the chair of the Senate judiciary. Committee here also I think it'd be hearing from John How he is a member of the Vermont State Employees Association He. He is a state worker who is a reliigous, strongly supportive of of this ban There's a lot of consternation in the union the. The other day, a trainer from the Vermont. Police Academy in Pittsford was presenting the Vermont. State Employees Association testifying in front of the the Senate Judiciary Committee drew bloom. Longtime police trainer in Vermont was saying he does not want to see chokehold abandoned does not wanna see use of chokehold subject to a criminal penalty Vermont which I'm pretty sure this legislation contemplates We can talk to dig Senator Sears about that in just a couple of minutes and the. The. Police trainer drew drew bloom was saying that there are rare occasions when somebody's in a very close quarters, fight in for institute both reaching for. A weapon that has been dislodged to see. There's a gun on the ground and. The police officer in the suspect are both reaching for the gun and the police officer might want to use his hands on the suspects throat to prevent the suspects from getting the gun and and would not want to be be forbidden and criminally penalized for doing something like that so we can talk all about that with senator sears I i. WanNa mention the later on in the program. We're talking about the subject of a TV. Safety ATV crashes are have tripled in Vermont so far this year compared to. The same time period last year, the we talking. With A. Injury Prevention expert. Abby bearman from the University of Vermont Medical Center, they issued a statement the other day talking about ATV safety and Making recommendations we. Also, were going to be speaking with Danny Hale? He is the president of the VASA. As it's known of Vermont, ATV. Sportsman's Association, and will we have that conversation to the second hour of the program I believe we also have a conversation. With Ken Squire? The longtime owner of wd radio radio, and who is well known broadcaster of NASCAR. Events Ken Squire has some stuff he wants to tell us about recent developments with Nascar. Of course it's been much in the national news recently isn't has tried to turn away from a history which many people see as being somewhat somewhat steeped racism and so on. Confederate flags of band, NASCAR events for instance and we'll. We'll be talking with Ken about that into Latin. In the latter part of this hour. Okay well, let's get right into with the first Senator Dick Sears Democrat of Benedict County Longtime Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee Senator Sears. Thank you so much for joining me this morning. David, thank you for having me. Uh certainly timely and board subject. and. So tell us. About this legislation, what is the bill a? Bill for us for tenure around the Senate our. Cover a couple of issues before we get and then maybe questions. But if you look at the fourth amendment to the United States, constitution. The right of people to be secured their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures. Shall not be violated and no warrant so issue, but apart probable cores caused by oprah affirmation. And particularly describing the place could be searched and the persons. You're things to be seized. So when you have. over the years? As the US Supreme Court and in some cases with launch pay court has looked at the use of force. It's been guided by the fourth amendment. And then a particularly In the Graham case in the US Supreme Court. they established. What's called a reasonable officer? Standard. And that reasonable officer standard in terms of use of course is what guides currently legislation both in the state, federal level and That standard is coming under fire. And part of that region for the hat is. reading now from an earlier draft of. At nineteen. the authority to use visit. The forest is a serious responsibility, but she'll be q dot exercise judiciously with respect, human rights and dignity, and for the sanctity of every human life. Every person has a right to be creep accessory abusive forced by. that. Statement I. Think is an important one and understanding how we got where we are. The Senate Judiciary Committee's version of us to nineteen adopted unanimously yesterday. By the full Senate. Improper. Strengths Meaning which prohibited lists the use of any new a person that applies pressure to the neck, wrote Windpipe Dorato artery. May prevent interbreeding reduced intake of air or impede the flow of blood or oxygen to the brain, showing and say chokehold is not necessary. That's not how it's described. The building collapsed although it in in a sense as the same think. There are two sanctions for a prohibited restraint wanted be where there is no doubt of serious bodily injury, and it could be a kind of great be on. Offense that the criminal justice training. Council would look at a person could be. The move fired at sector dealt with that that way. If serious bodily injury. or depth results from a prohibited restraint, then officer could stay up to twenty years in prison plus other. Charges including not limited to murder. Manslaughter succulents so this what we tried to do this is I think. Allow for case by case review, but the courts of any case came to court so the concerns. That have been expressed by. The gentleman from the Training Council I. Think is addressed frankly calm by a case by case with you of anything that happens. Obviously if they. Is Description. I believe was. An opposite struggling where they posted. They've been subject to arrest. Tries to grab his gun or something like that is Christ. Danger Skill. Has All the rights accorded any citizen Kind of review as to. The totality of the page. I I, think and as you look at what other states done. In talking with police and others And pray frankly in my own. Experience as you know. I was director of the program for troubled youths. We had to be taught restraint. and. I retired in two thousand and six I received before I retired actually restraint trading that. was clearly do not use any kind of chokehold or any kind, those Restraint would. Hit that the person's ability believer and it just was. So. How. Anyone could look at what happened in Minneapolis. And Justify. That is beyond me frankly. I! Don't think anyone I don't think anyone has done that and group. Bloom from the from the Criminal Justice Training Council Vermont. Police Academy was very clear that he thought that that that action by the officer Derek Show van in Minneapolis was horrible I think I was the word you used, and by the way I was hoping to get drew bloom on the program this morning. He is tied up today unable to join us, but I talked with him at length yesterday afternoon. I listened to his testimony. I believe. It was last Thursday in your committee. Senator Sears and. And and he you know He. He has a definite. Definite point of view here, one of the one of the interesting aspects of this of course. Is that there? where he comes from representing state employees, he was actually there from what I. Understand is a as a witness for the Vermont state employees. Association State Workers Union and and and it took this stance against the legislation. Banning Choke holds obviously quite controversial. There are many union members who favor a such legislation and. I?.

Vermont officer Senator Sears Senate Judiciary Committee Senate Bloom Minneapolis Police Academy Vermont State Employees Associ Senator Dick Sears George Floyd Mr Garner Dave Graham University of Vermont Medical Eric Garner Ken Squire Officer Pantaleo NASCAR US Supreme Court Criminal Justice Training Coun
"mr garner" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"How can we trust that? This prosecutor is really going to act in the public interest, and not in a in a way, a biased way to the favor of the officer. I think that appearance regardless. Of The mere appearance of that can shake public confidence, and in a case like this, it is exceptionally important to maintain public confidence. I tend to generally be supportive of outside prosecutors. Both because I think their decisions are less likely to be influenced by. By. because I think they their decisions appear to the public to be less influenced by bias and that that's a really important point. We go. Down to the manslaughter or we got more on the road. justic year that we're good on emerges. Let me, ask you what's what's your thought process on? The Difference Between this case in the Eric Garner case. Both had we know in both cases. There's. Outrage I'm understanding now that every there's at least a city in off at the states are blowing up or having some type of protest blown up spreading the wrong word, some type of protests all fifty states. Yeah wants the world. What's different about that? Compared to the Eric about this compared to Eric Garner case. When it comes to the underlying cases I, don't know that they're actually that different right, but I think that's why we see a lot of public reaction right now. Because we as a as a country as a world. Didn't we just see this? Didn't we just see Eric Garner? Saying that he couldn't breathe and then dying as a result of similar, although not identical actions, I think the fact that this is a repetitive problem is part of what's driving public sentiment here right? If this was a one time thing that had never happened before and everyone in the country thought surely the police in the prosecutor. We're going to respond appropriately here. I, don't think we would be seeing the protests in all fifty states, but it's not. It's a repeat issue. It's a repeat issue at this particular agency. Right I can take you back to twenty thirteen I believe a gentleman named David Smith The city of Minneapolis paid out a three million dollar settlement to the family of David Smith after he suffocated to death, while being held in the prone position with his hands, cuffed behind his back for more than four minutes. Sound familiar right, so I think we see echoes of Eric Garner in this case, and that's infuriating to see the same problem again. I also think that this is more egregious case than the Eric Garner case. In the Eric Garner case they're. The officers were I. I apologize for the phrasing here because I'm not quite sure how to say what I want to say, but the officers were active. There was a struggle they were they were. Moving around. So at least gave the appearance that that stuff was going on Mr. Garner was still resisting in some way and here. You don't have any of that. You have George Floyd laying. Even while he's talking, he's laying passively his movements or minor at best..

Eric Garner prosecutor officer George Floyd David Smith Minneapolis
"mr garner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:48 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A cove in St contract people legal things and give giving the outside world some sense of how the sausage is made as a work I've got no time for that and that's got to stop we'll take your calls on this and other issues on the next as governor Murphy tomorrow night at seven on W. NYC this is in the most in a statement last night protests in the name of George Floyd a black man who was killed by a white police officer continued around the country and around the world in an attempt to quell the tension some cities implemented curfews which many protesters ignored other law enforcement officials attempted to show support for protesters by taking a knee or marching alongside them but there are still numerous clashes between police and protesters a clear example of just how strange the relationship between police and black people in this country has remained in New York City police officers were overheard on Tuesday the city wide police scanner threatening physical violence against protesters hello John I'm tense innovator and today and the take away we're exploring policing in the United States and we start with a look at how deep the cultural biases are in police departments across the US and what can be done to root them out we're joined now by Phil Stinson professor and criminologist at Bowling Green State University in Ohio and a former police officer Phil tracks police misconduct allegations and he's also the author of the book criminology explains police violence and waiting for us when the police response to the recent uprising we'll keep in mind we have more than eighteen thousand state and local law enforcement agencies across the country and it's not just the large cities that are having to deal with protesters and demonstrations over the last week or so it's small towns it's in large cities and suburban areas it's it's pretty much everywhere and I don't think that many law enforcement agencies understand the deep rooted problems they're giving rise to so many people so many different walks of life wanting to get involved wanting their voices to be heard in wanting to get out in public and shared the moment with their friends and their neighbors the problem is when we all watch that video where Mr Floyd was was killed in front of our eyes it was troubling on many levels one of the concerns is that people of all walks of life look at that video and they if they haven't experienced being roughed up by the police being beaten up by police officers being treated with a heavy hand by police officer they may well know somebody who has been treated that way and it's touched so many lives that people have just had enough they think we see this over and over again and the fact of the matter is these types of incidents where police officers manhandle somebody with a rough somebody up where they used to much force gratuitously happen every day across this country so I want to break down a little bit more that because I feel like the you know again a lot of the images that I'm seeing are reminiscent of when I was covering the events in Ferguson after the death of Michael brown and the moment that re the black lives matter catalyzed and became you know really the head of what we were seeing in terms of protests around the country what we're seeing now I think that's different and I'm curious to know your thoughts is that there are some police departments that are shown some solidarity as we mentioned marching with protesters that feels new is it a PR stunt is it authentic is this PT's who realized you know we really need to get our act together and so we're going to March in solidarity how do you assess those I think it's sincere and I think it's from the heart I think what's different in this incident is that often in past incidents they will have an explanation they'll say well you're not understanding the big picture there's another side to the story you don't know what we deal with on a daily basis I'm not hearing that this week what I'm hearing from law enforcement officers from friends and former colleagues and people who contacted me is that everybody is absolutely dismayed and without words to explain it it's not explainable you can't rationally explain what happened other than it was a willful and deliberate act it went too far and it's troubling to other law enforcement officers because at some point a few minutes into that video one of the other officers who was on the scene there should have tackled the officer that had his knee and Mister for its neck and removed him it was out of control and the fact that the other officers just stood by tell me that's normal behavior not to kill somebody but to arrest somebody up to take it too far to teach somebody a lesson it was frankly a gleeful exercise of street justice that's what we saw that it was teaching Mister Floyd lessons so he will give them a hard time if they ran into each other in the future I mean we've seen this happen before with the death of Eric garner again on video saying the same words that Mr Floyd said which is I can't breathe and in that instance again another loss another death of an unarmed black man for living living his life and so I wonder what it is that change now well what's different about that incident what law enforcement officers have told me is that with Eric garden they were still trying to secure him they're still trying to get him a hand cost if they were trying to affect an arrest here the situation is completely different one point seems like they had Mr forehand custom in a police cruiser and then he ends up handcuffed on the ground he was no threat at all to the officers there in that video that we watched and I think that's the difference is that law enforcement officers looking at this video they see a difference and they can't explain it and they're starting to realize maybe there is a problem even when they don't want to admit it maybe there's not a problem in their department they say but we get we're starting to get it and I think that's what's happening that's what's different in this video and people all across the country can tell you these are not isolated events but this one law enforcement officers can't explain it away they just can't and that's the difference I mean I would argue that they couldn't explain away Eric garner either but that would be you know for another segment of another show you know the law enforcement in this country does have a history in some elements of they had often talked about as bad apples right cops like the one who killed George Floyd for example but there are deeper systemic issues in in law enforcement and police departments across the country that are tied to racism what element here is about police training well as to the bad apples theory it we've gone way beyond that you know in the New York police department's Mullin commission back in nineteen ninety four I thought that they had gotten rid of the bad apples theory proved it wrong I mean this is not a few bad apples this is the police sub culture this is normal please behaviors in terms of using too much force on a regular basis it's not a situation of a few bad apples you can't explain it that way it's way beyond that so it is an issue of training it's an issue of supervision and it's an issue of the socialization process within police departments into the police culture the police sub cultures I call it at a local level it's very complicated and new ones because there are many levels here that has to be dealt with there's no easy fix to the situation but it's systemic there's institutional racism in the criminal justice system and there certainly institutional racism in policing across the country and I can tell you it's complicated by the fact that the Supreme Court gives deference to police officers in St encounters they've allowed racial profiling to occur without any accountability across the country so there's so many different levels here it's not an easy fix let's talk a little bit about the systemic racism part of this we know for example with Eric garner the move in question there was the chokehold that was used on Mr garner here at the Minneapolis police department there was a neck restraint used by the officer who ultimately killed George Floyd we know that data from the Minneapolis police department shows that two thirds of the people who were put in neck restraints by police there are black explained to us that tactic and is it going to come under investigation as the chill cold day here in New York after the death of Mister garner well the data from the Minneapolis police department I reviewed it and it's it's frankly shocking there's four types of neck restraints that they documenting their data and the numbers are just very troubling in terms of you know African Americans who were subjected to these compliance procedures if you will and one of the most troubling once was they actually have a procedure that allows an officer to render someone unconscious with a choke hold on to me that is just shocking you know I was a police officer for a few years a very long time ago and I can tell you when I was a recruiting Hampshire police academy in nineteen eighty six that certainly wasn't allowed it was well understood that in my training that certain types of neck holds would be the application of deadly force in other words you don't do it unless you're intending to kill somebody to stop the threat in hand to hand combat it's just it's not acceptable it's shocking it shouldn't be allowed and I think the problem here is that you know one of the deep dark so secrets of the police sub cultures that there's a general fear of black men and boys and that's what's at the root of all this it's just that police officers for whatever reason handle their encounters with black males African American males different than they do with anybody else I want to stop you there because I want to make sure we're being clear we're talking about how police engage and handle their encounters with black men and boys are we talking about all police white police multiracial police who are we talking about I'm talking about is a generalization I don't say all police officers but frankly that really is what I'm trying to get it I'm not saying some police officers and I'm not saying it's implicit bias it's way beyond that we can't cure this and fix our way out of it with a few hours of implicit bias training it's a deep rooted fear that police officers are socialized into and it frankly we see this with officers of color as well it's part of their make up as a police officer it's part of the type of policing they do think about the fact that we are always dealing with wars right we've got a war on trying to get a war on drugs everything's handle is at war and we'd send the police officers into their jobs every day as warriors they don't live and work in the same communities they typically live elsewhere their children go to different schools then the children in the neighborhoods in which they work as police officers for family worship the different places they shop at different schools they go to job is if they're going to war every day and they really treat African American males men and boys as a threat they're fearful of black men and boys let's be clear that.

governor Murphy W. NYC George Floyd officer
"mr garner" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on The Takeaway

"I'm Tansy Nevada today on the takeaway were exploring policing in the United States, and we start with a look at how deep the cultural bias are in police departments across the US, and what can be done to root them out? We're joined now by Phil, Stinson Professor Criminologists at Bowling Green State University in Ohio and a former police officer Phil tracks police misconduct allegations, and he's also the author of the Book Criminology Explains Police violence and weighed in for us on the police response to the recent. We'll keep in mind. We have more than eighteen thousand state and local law enforcement agencies across the country, and it's not just the large cities that are having to deal with protesters and demonstrations over the last week or so it small towns. It's large cities. It's suburban areas. It's pretty much everywhere and I. Don't think that many law enforcement agencies understand the deep rooted problems that are giving rise to so many people so many different walks of life wanting to get involved wanting their voices. Voices to be heard and to get out in public and share the moment with their friends and their neighbors. The problem is when we all watched that video last week. The eight to ten minute video where Mr Floyd was killed in front of our eyes. It was troubling on many levels and one of the concerns. Is that people of all walks of life? Look at that video and the if they haven't experienced being up by the police being beaten up by police officer being. Being treated with a heavy hand by police officer, they may well know somebody who has been treated that way, and it's touched so many lives that people have just had enough. They think we see this over and over again, and the fact of the matter is these types of incidents where police officers manhandle somebody with a rough somebody up. They use too much force gratuitously happen every day across this country, so I want to break down a little bit more than because I feel. Feel like you know again. A lot of the images that I'm seeing are reminiscent of when I was covering the events in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown and the moment that really black lives matter catalyzed, and became really the head of what we were seeing in terms of protests around the country. What we're seeing now I think that's different. And I'm curious to know your thoughts is that there are some police departments that have showed some solidarity as we mentioned marching with. With protesters that feels new. Is it a PR stunt? Is it authentic as this? PD's who've realized you know. We really need to get our act together and so we're going to march in solidarity. How do you assess those I? Think it's sincere and I. Think it's from the heart. I think what's different in this incident. Is that in the past when we've watched videos? When we've looked at photographs when I talked law, enforcement officers across the country often at past incidents they will. Will have an explanation. They'll say well. You're not understanding the big picture. There's another side to the story. You don't know what we deal with on a daily basis I'm not hearing that this week. What I'm hearing from law enforcement officers from friends and former colleagues and people who've contacted me is that everybody is absolutely dismayed and without words to explain it. It's not explainable. You can't rationally explain what happened other than it was a willful and deliberate act. It went too far and. And it was troubling to other law enforcement officers, because at some point a few minutes into that video, one of the other officers who was on the scene, there should have tackled the officer that had his knee and Mr Floyd's neck and removed him. It was out of control and the fact that the other officers just stood by. Tell me that's normal behavior not to kill somebody to rough somebody up to take it too far to teach somebody a lesson. It was frankly A. A gleeful exercise of street justice. That's what we saw their teaching. Mr Floyd lessons, so he wouldn't give them a hard time if they ran into each other in the future, I? Mean we've seen this happen. Before with the death of Eric Garner again on video, saying the same words that Mr Floyd said which I can't breathe, and in that instance again another loss, another death of an unarmed black man, living living his life, and so I wonder what it is that changed now. Well what's different about that incident? What law enforcement officers have told me? Is that with Eric Gardner? They were still trying to secure him. They were still trying to get him a handcuffed that they were trying to effect arrest here. The situation completely different at one point. It seems like they had Mr Floyd handcuffed in a police cruiser, and then he ends up handcuffed on the ground. He was no threat at all to the officers there in that video that we watched and I think that's the difference. Is that law enforcement officers looking at this video day? Day See a difference, and they can explain it, and they're starting to realize. Maybe there is a problem even when they don't want to admit it. Maybe there's not a problem in their department. They say, but we get it. We're starting to get it and I. think that's what's happening. And that's what's different in this video and people all across the country can tell you these aren't isolated events, but this one law enforcement officers can explain it away. They just can't and that's the difference I. Mean I would argue that they couldn't explain away Eric Garner. But that would be for another segment of another show. A law enforcement in this country does have a history in some elements of that had often talked about as bad apples, right cops like the one who killed George Floyd for example, but there are deeper systemic issues in in law enforcement in police departments across the country that are tied to racism. What element here is about police training well as to the bad apple theory. We've gone way beyond that. You know in the New York Police Department the Mollen Commission back in Nineteen Ninety four thought that they had gotten rid of the bad apples theory and proved it wrong. I mean this. This is not a few bad apples. This is the police subculture. This normal police behaviors in terms of using too much force on a regular basis. It's not a situation of a few bad apples. You can't explain it that way. It's way beyond that, so it is an issue of training. It's an issue of supervision and it's an issue of the socialization process within police departments into the police culture of the police subcultures. I call it on a local level. It's very complicated in nuance because there are many levels here that have to be dealt with. There's no easy fixed the. The situation, but it's systemic. There's institutional racism in the criminal justice system, and they're certainly institutional racism in policing across the country and I can tell you. It's complicated by the fact that the supreme. Court gives deference to police officers in St encounters, they've allowed racial profiling to occur without any accountability across the country, so there's so many different levels here. It's not an easy fix. Let's talk a little bit about the systemic racism part of this we know for example with Eric Garner the move in question. There was the chokehold that was used on Mr Garner here at the Minneapolis. Minneapolis Police Department. There was a neck restraint used by the officer who ultimately killed George Floyd. We know that data from the Minneapolis Police Department shows that two thirds of the people who were put in neck restraints by police. There are black explained to us that tactic, and is it going to come under investigation as the chokehold did here in New York after the death of Mr Garner, will the data from the Minneapolis Police Department I reviewed it and it's frankly shocking. There's four types of neck restraints that they documenting their data and the numbers are just very troubling in terms. Of African Americans who were subjected to these compliance procedures. If you will and one of the most troubling ones was they actually have a procedure that allows an officer to render someone unconscious with a choke. Hold in to me. That is just shocking. You know I was a police officer for a few years very long time ago, and I can tell you when I was recruited Hampshire Police Academy in one, thousand, nine, hundred six. That's certainly wasn't allowed. It was well understood then in my training that certain types of neck holds would.

officer George Floyd Minneapolis Police Department Eric Garner New York Police Department Hampshire Police Academy Mr Floyd United States Ohio Tansy Nevada Eric Gardner Bowling Green State University Phil Ferguson Minneapolis
"mr garner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Hoping I pray to god that no one would pull a gun out and do something yeah and and it happened Klein says he can't make decisions on emotion only evidence and he says the videos tell the story Mr garner's we know now I said I did I did what I did to defend myself and we find it we can't disprove that from the evidence that we have line breaks down the events with the videos after that push the Klein says J. Gardner showed his weapon that's what got the attention of nineteen year old Elena Melendez as soon as I hear she's like there's a gun I run over in the video you can see Melinda's grab Gardner from behind and tackle him she said she was trying to keep Gardner in the gray tee shirt from firing that weapon so in just a few moments we're gonna be speaking with the father of James Scurlock who was shot and killed tragically in the shooting in just a few minutes but that woman you just heard in that report Elena Belinda's who tackled the shooter joins us right now on the show a lady thank you so much for being here how are you how late are you there I think we I think we might have just lost a late hopefully we can get her back on the line but again kind of tracing back to this story and tracing back to what we are covering here on the show we have this bar owner that was arrested he was in jail for I believe a little over twenty four hours and then we have he's letting him go and as you just heard of the sound bites in that press conference that they let him go and he hasn't been charged with a crime I believe we have Elena Melinda is back on the line Elena can you hear me OK there do we still not have a lan I don't I think we're having some technical difficulties with our phone lines but the issue is very simple the issue is this can you leave your is this walk outside with a gun and you know protect yourself if somebody tackles you now I don't have a problem with defending yourself if somebody physically attacked you but which is what which is what happened but the question yet but that's what happened that led to that that I have a problem with and I'll explain what I have an issue with his the father should have been out there making physical contact with anybody regardless of his if his business is being threatened or or you know damaged you cannot take it in your own hands to physically assault somebody that's breaking the law even though those people were breaking the law by by damaging your property that is what law enforcement is there to do that's number one number two he's seventy years old he should have been out there to begin with and number three we got a guitar gas but number three I don't think that is an excuse for somebody to brandish a gun and go out there you're causing your you're asking for trouble but joining us right now on the line is Elena Melendez for the third temple see if she's she's on the line with Elena can you hear me OK yeah great thank you so much for coming on we appreciate it okay so explain to me this the situations that lead up to you tackling this man with a gun what do you remember what you recall and just start from square one if you can't well actually offer we parked at night you.

Klein
"mr garner" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Over the years all of these unions have become enamored of the of their ability to get away with murder the teamsters went went through this they're now much better much better off as a result of the monitor shift that's been in place for almost thirty years and but there are hopes that look at the United auto workers I mean they are understated yeah and and like likely to go into a monitor shipped a federal basically a trusteeship of and well hi guys I think the top twelve guys in the U. A. W. or formally pop twelve guys have all been indicted and they were I mean they were stealing supper luxury villas in resort areas Mr garner's I mean just everything yes the where with the lawyers who were doing the outside legal work for the United auto workers I mean that's my interest is where would the lawyers both inside and outside the United auto workers where were they the answer is there were nine they were doing their jobs properly and they were making a lot of money these union lawyers that work with these unions they get a lot of money and that most of the ones that I've seen do a very good job the United auto workers I can't imagine what in the world their auditors and their lawyers we're doing I cannot imagine yeah what's a let's look at a couple other things here from the deep state to be here I guess judicial watch's still keeps getting more and more of the page struck communications we why is it taking it why is the F. B. I. just dripping in putting these out in dribs and drabs why don't they just release everything I mean I thought Christopher Wray worked for president trump we've talked about it before but this is disgraceful so wow that's a big go ahead go ahead so you won't have to pick it up but the problem with Christopher rated he's not an FBI director you think he'd feel like anything is a bad lawyer anything like an accountant with a green eye shade he has no leadership qualities an empty suit it was a bad choice Chris Christie recommended him because Chris Wray defended him during Bridgegate anybody holding something in trial god bless and just you know trusted Chris Christie and he ended up with a horrible FBI director and if he is re elected I'm I'm assuming Chris ray is not long for this world because this this is an example of how incompetent he is they are protecting the institution they're not protecting the people of the United States and they're not obeying federal law on freedom of information act request and it's also a problem inside the justice department which represents the F. B. I. in federal court in it the civil division in main justice which bill Barr has not taken control of that we hear something from by the the judicial watch I guess the latest batch of documents that they've received remember when when when the Anthony Weiner laptop was discovered get supposedly discovered at the end and call me said that his agents had reviewed all three hundred thousand of the you know in a matter of hours they had a they had reviewed all three hundred thousand of the documents and they had exonerated Hillary Clinton of any wrongdoing now according to red state reportedly only three thousand seventy seven of the more than three hundred thousand emails found on the Weiner laptop or directly reviewed for classified or incriminating information three F. B. I. can fit officials completed that work in a single twelve they support the day before call me again cleared Clinton of criminal charges this was only days before the twenty sixteen election well there's no doubt that the economy Hey Randall lane Sally Yates review of the Clinton email fiasco was in fact a fraudulent investigation which was designed to exonerate her James Comey took a dive so if the alley gates and everybody else in the justice department just think about this for a minute the FBI says we didn't find anything and everybody in the.

murder teamsters
"mr garner" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

11:32 min | 2 years ago

"mr garner" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Our interesting facts aren't you may not have heard but yesterday in San Diego the U. S. Mexican border crossing southbound was closed for five hours because of a near riot church apparently formed a group called pastors for peace they organized an effort to get computers and Cuba to assist in medical care US customs received in four weeks back about the effort challenged the church with potential criminal action should the group temp the border crossing custom said that due to long standing embargoes no computers go to Cuba the church rented trucks had over three hundred computers for what they say is to help the many people are being seriously hurt by our embargo so the whole border got closed down going south bound for about five hours there are a lot of border guards there is a military I think that we are anticipating some difficulties at the Mexican border that Sir just my take on things first time caller line you're on the air hi all right hello great to talk to you end user where are you I'm in Wickenburg Arizona listening to you on on the skip J. O. B. out of Albuquerque tonight well that's what a dude you bet I can't get K. FY I I'm not far from Phoenix but because the A. M. well you're you're probably in a weird area for direction for me I'm I'm about sixty miles out of being in the AM power goes down but I find you on the skip wherever you are okay Beason smasher you bet Hey listen friend of mine called me a little earlier this evening and told me that a friend of his called him and was telling him about a mind that a mining operation north of west Yellowstone Montana yes but that had been shut down by the United Nations one day while I don't know that I was shocked when my friend called me nine well where did your friend here this any said on the news and they also said that the people in Butte Montana were very upset about it will buy gifts you know guns type thing I have heard nothing so I thought of anybody of heard anything about this whether you or some of your listeners there in the Butte Montana area or west Yellowstone I'm sure they pick you up in that country they sure do and are Helena and we know Great Falls any that area I'm I I go to Montana for my summer times and found something weird and bizarre down I don't know but this is what I heard he told me he heard it from another friend him as they call him nobody heard this on the news about the United Nations shutting it down I don't know what businesses that of theirs but well with the guy we have in the White House nothing seems to surprise me of what goes on any longer well I I never say never so let us open up you know will open it as a question to the audience see what we can find out thank you are take care yourself take care thank you anybody know anything about that of mine near Butte Montana shut down by blue Troszyn company for whatever reason for the price of gold that one's got me quite surprised is rising very very rapidly right now and I'm telling you that's what you better watch where people are putting its flight to safety that means they're anticipating something east of the Rockies you're on the air hello this is Mike hi Mike where are you I'm in Wichita Kansas all right the reason for my call is I just got back from Australia last week you did and I had are you a friend of mine record your conversation with can garner yes and I have seen rabbits in wheelbarrows and god really about call I want your fax and Mr garner's facts so I can give you guys some information long give you mine I don't have Mister Goddard's handy anyways from Oregon right my fax number is area code seven oh two seven oh two yes seven oh two seven two seven eight four nine nine now make a note do not send including cover more than three pages if you do my fax machine automatically does does not probably just have one page yeah that's gone Mason because when I request if you find it interesting enough because in listening to this stuff can garner was talking of ours control disease control that's right yup etcetera yes I've got all those notes number your conversation about it all I've done I've got a little article here can Goddard was saying that rabbits are not closely related primates and then a day and the day after he said that an article came out saying guess what rabbits are closely related to prime hits yes they are I saw that article as well so I have my notes here and I would like to send you a fax and I can probably find can Goddard's number anyway I know he's in we're gonna check is it no you Jane Hughes and well I got one to send you a fax regarding that because I just got back from Australia I was there visiting and took a little trail of the outback and I saw a dump trucks full of dead rabbits yup I know raising their dying by the millions amazing I know I I appreciate your call Sir thank you they're dying by the millions in Australia it is a designer virus it was on on island off Westralia and they thought nothing can go wrong we will simply tested on this island but of course it got out and when it did in the rabbits began dying by the millions at first the Aussies clapped and yelled and screamed because they've got a plague of rabbits and they were really happy now it may well be that they're beginning to get a little worried of because of because all the rabbits may die before they do they may pass this on to another host and it is a form of hemorrhagic fever related in some way to Ebola same family same idea dissolving organs that kind of thing and one of these days we're going to do something we're going to be very sorry for that may not be this day but one of these days east of the Rockies you're on the air high hello this is forced in Lexington Kentucky yes Sir yeah you were over the past couple days you've been asking about the Clinton's insurance bill in health bill well this this Kennedy Kassebaum bill that would mandate that insurance companies would accept you when you get sick even with some sort of prior condition you know yeah if you'll take a look at Kentucky's H. bill seventy one right I believe you'll find it word for word probably since the house passed that bill mopped it turns premium has gone to three hundred percent wow well how could it not I mean if people are allowed not to get insurance into all they need is as like saying you don't have to have car insurance but listen if you get into a terrible accident you go down to the all state or whoever and they they're forced to sell you insurance and pay off on the accident I don't think so well that that's what they're doing here we've got a morning talk show that comes on directly after yours does right after you go off with an hour after but you still got an hour we don't hear right the talk show personalities key terrains he can fill you in more on that if you can contact him at your local affiliate and I'm sure you've got the number sounds like you'd be worth talking to yeah he's a user I'm just approaching this from a common sense point of view if an insurance company is forced to accept you after the fact then they're really not you can't call them an insurance company anymore and I'm not even sure you can call them in business very long now we're we're down to and there's only one way that that company if you want to call that could stay in business under those conditions and that is it would be subsidized by the federal government is just a sneaky way for the president to get what he wanted all along anyway and that's healthcare for everybody period well but Kurt macos of them led got four we've got for clients and no one can be turned around from one if you can afford them the majority of the working people and I am in that clients are going to be able to for I'm not gonna be able to afford to keep my family insured after my policy runs out in about three months well yeah but supposed let's say you can't afford it so you drop it okay you're on insured now you get the big city you come down with cancer well according to the way I'm reading this you can go back and get your insurance after you've got the cancer and they can't turn you down yeah all that well not away at work okay well that's good and you know the way we were raised that's a good deal for you that isn't to yeah it it it voids the whole concept of insurance it's not insurance it's a national socialized healthcare plan it out so I look there are two segments to the Kennedy Kassebaum bill one is portability and I think that's fine if you're buying insurance there is no reason that you should lose it when you change jobs I'm all for that easy to do with the legislation but this this you cannot be turned down business removes the whole the the very basis of the idea insurance and companies will ensure you based on risk in other words a as you get older insurance costs more if you are a risky lifestyle it cost you more and so forth and so on and based on that they can eke out a profit but if you if you are allowed to go down and run and get insurance after the fact then who's going to carry it who could afford it the people who do Kerry insurance would have such a burden placed on them premium wise to take care of all those people who wouldn't go down and get it till they get sick that the whole thing would collapse but it wouldn't you see because the government would subsidize so then what would we have we do have the Clinton plan right through the back door.

San Diego Cuba US