4 Burst results for "Mr Adrian Nouvelle"

"mr adrian nouvelle" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

07:51 min | 4 months ago

"mr adrian nouvelle" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with <hes>. College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career <hes>. At the same time my company was so gracious that <hes>. They paid for my mba. So <hes>. i went to <hes>. Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my <hes>. General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and <hes>. And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and <hes>. There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that <hes>. That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all <hes>. Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past <hes>. But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and <hes>. A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and <hes>. My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic <hes>. Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and <hes>. So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That <hes> definitely had <hes>. A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and <hes>. And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and <hes>. And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been <hes>. We've been pretty pretty successful doing that. How have you. You mentioned multicultural marketing. How you see you know multicultural marketing involved being. I mean you've gone. I guess a pepsico all the way to creating a entire business unit this kind of like got its measure of <unk>. Market success it's not. It's not the historical tack on her on. That might have happened in the past at different organizations. How do you think about the evolution of multicultural marketing. I guess it's related to. What is the current makeup of our population <hes>. Which is very multicultural <hes>. So in in a way like our everything. We do should be multicultural. Because that's the fabric of our country <hes>. But that's not always that embrace necessarily in that way so <hes>. So i think it's come. It's come a long way to recognize that you do need dedicated resources to unlock it to learn about that consumer really intimately in order to then figure out how to drive the right cultural relevance <hes>. You can't do one. Size fits all. You can't assume that. Okay well you know h-h-hispanics in this case writer are part of the general market. So general market stuff should work <hes>. Should you know resonate just as well right. The reality is that you know if you look like hispanic segmentation. There's different things going on depending on someone's <hes>. Background story you know. I gave you a little bit about what the narrative was for my family story behind every hispanic every multicultural consumer that is in this country and so understanding. That can help you then better. Connect to those emotional subconscious cues in their mind to then build your brand build relevancy so <hes>. One-size-fits-all is not is not gonna work. So how it's evolved. It is getting even more personalized. It's getting even more specific. So even saying multicultural. Marketings probably not correct because now it's hispanic marketing and within hispanic doubleclick. It's mexican from la versus mexican from el paso or ecuadorian. From new york. Cuban from miami which might be different from tampa like it's real localization. Now and that i think is the unlock to really building brands longer term.

Ecuador north america adrian nouvelle Esperanza tisdale thirty Mike second Today stamford latin america first jobs Uconn english today equator first grade third grade a week ago first shift first thing
"mr adrian nouvelle" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 4 months ago

"mr adrian nouvelle" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Let's talk about the professional path and <hes>. You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with <hes>. College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career <hes>. At the same time my company was so gracious that <hes>. They paid for my mba. So <hes>. i went to <hes>. Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my <hes>. General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and <hes>. And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and <hes>. There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that <hes>. That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all <hes>. Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past <hes>. But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and <hes>. A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and <hes>. My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic <hes>. Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and <hes>. So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That <hes> definitely had <hes>. A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and <hes>. And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and <hes>. And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been <hes>. We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

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Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

05:14 min | 4 months ago

Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale

"Let's talk about the professional path and You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career At the same time my company was so gracious that They paid for my mba. So i went to Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and all i need to go into marketing because marketing guides what we're doing in sales and i think they could do a better job and so i was lucky that my General manager at the time created a job and that was that was the beginning of my marketing career. So very classically trained at unilever and then pepsi around marketing from like you know the analysts all the way through up till now you know a vp gm. Which i'm really proud and excited about and And yeah i feel like i'm in a really great role. Right can make a big impact on the careers of our of our folks drive to mercy inclusion and drive the business results faster than general market because the population is growing so quick so and There's just so many things that are benefiting from being in this role that That i'm really grateful about. But that's kind of the the journey really. It was not linear at all Did not start off wanting to and marketing that side of my brain and that analytical process orientation i think does just a market yeah i think increasing edge to a home maybe ten years ago when you made the original switch i think today it's much more analytically rigorous than it has been in the past But yeah no. That's that's phenomenal. And i've had a few folks on the show. That have transitioned from engineer to sales marketing. And it's it's funny the way you went through that transition in how you described it because a few of them have described it similarly meaning they. They went from engineering the sales and then they realized my words not yours. How bad marketing screws it up. And they need to go help marketing. Try to figure that out because it it comes down to the sales folks at some level whether their marketing is getting it right or not so. It's an interesting learning curve and A pathway that. I've heard before. So what would what drove what drove the creation of the hispanic business unit. And how are you guys thinking about like measuring success. That's a that's a big scene seemingly to me as an outsider like it seems like a big big thing like a big shift in how you're organized. Yeah this was created. I believe in twenty eighteen by out. Carrie who at the time was still pepsi. Co when of are really incredible leaders kirk. Tanner who's our ceo and My current boss. Greg lyons our cmo and they just really realize that you know the hispanic Business is untapped potential and if we have a fixed mindset about it and we're not going to capture that growth and So what's the do different because in the past. Yeah we had a multicultural team. That definitely had A role but didn't necessarily have ownership and so the do different had to be to create an organization that was dedicated to this and have the right resources. And that's what they did and And it's been pretty successful. Ever since the the key measures to the other question you had really is around. Hey can we help grow faster with hispanic consumer than the general market. Can we help build equity with this fan of consumer and And those are some key metrics we look at and so far. We've we've been We've been pretty pretty successful doing that.

Mr Adrian Nouvelle Arment GM Pepsico Uconn Pepsi Stamford Unilever Connecticut Greg Lyons Carrie Tanner Kirk
"mr adrian nouvelle" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

07:25 min | 4 months ago

"mr adrian nouvelle" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Business unit in north america as bronzes got an extensive history at pepsi beverage began her career as a brand manager for the last sixteen years. She's had a range of roles driving business results across brands including pepsi propel aquafina and lipton to name a few on the show. Today we talk about what is the hispanic business unit. why was it created. What's the purpose. And how is it being measured pepsico. We also talked about her understanding and and advice for driving diversity and inclusion initiatives within companies and much more. I hope you enjoy this conversation with. Esperanza tisdale will welcome to the show. Thank you very much for having me. Will i know in our last conversation that you are the daughter of immigrants. And i'm just want to start off with what this what does it mean to you. It means that They sacrificed a lot to come to the. Us saliba a better life and it's a it's a really great story where they had to leave their country and come here and not be able to do the jobs then. They held before because they didn't really speak english so they had to take their first jobs wherever they could get them and something that my mom told me was that when they arrived Remember where they came from was Ecuador which is on the equator in latin america in it's typically super hot and humid and sometimes rainy but hot and when they came here they came in the winter so the first thing they had to do was buy winter coats and my mother told me that they went to salvation army to do that. Which fast forward the woman constantly was saying. You have any close to give away. I'm going to go to the salvation army and drop stuff on anything to give away and I do the exact same thing all the time. In fact in my closet. Right now. I have a whole bunch of clothes that i pulled out a week ago. to collect of my family. Say hey guys. Let's go put some stuff in these bags. We'd go donate them because someone else need them. They should be sitting in your closet. that's so important. I mean in in the world today. there's so much going on. I mean obviously covid in the pandemic but just this ongoing conversation about equality and equity and barriers. That people have to achieving the same things that others may not have right privileged privileged. That comes along with that. And it's it's it's as simple as having the rate winter clothes you know so yeah no. It's a great great story a great sentiment in. Wow you know like what would create Heritage to have For yourself coming to it coming for them coming to this country and and making a go of it a successful one at that with you so yeah lot of Resiliency too i. I guess that's the other word that i would point out because i recall the time so my dad didn't have a job. He got hurt at work had to be out and And then you know really. My parents for most of their career worked in factories. They were subsequently workers so they basically had their workstation and then they had their their project that they had to do and when they were done they would give that back and do another one. But you know really. Their their careers ended up being a very blue collar jobs where they had very fixed hours. And as a child. I actually grew up as a latchkey kid which i didn't realize what this meant until i was probably thirty. Two zero is in an hr conference for work and they talked about the concept which in essence was head kind of raised myself in the sunset. Parents went to work. Then i went to school. I came home. I locked the door stayed home until they arrived and that was in first grade and that continued. And i'm like all my god. I can't imagine. Mike crazy children having the keys and being expected to go to school in come back and do exactly what they were told in first grade but they had to work. I mean right. They had to work to sustain our family. And i needed to go to school so it was. It was the while anita on the highly responsible person as you can imagine with that With that type history. Yeah no exactly you have to be. You had no choice. No yeah so that's amazing I was not first grade. But i was a similar latchkey kid by the second or third grade will but but yeah working mom dad and that they actually worked at. I don't know if you've ever experienced this. But they they worked at such. That mom worked first shift. That works second so There occasionally occasionally with some overlap. Where i would get home. That hadn't left yet right to to go into work. Depending on how many activities add after school. So yeah anyway yeah. It's a interesting to have working parents but see to your point. Like i can't imagine my my my daughter who's now a preteen or teen early teen Can't imagine having given her the same like latitude that i was given. Yeah let's talk about the professional path and You are now the vp gm of the hispanic business unit for pepsico. What was your path to get there. Yeah i am studied engineering for college. So i was math and science person in high school and my physics teacher mr adrian nouvelle who actually was so important to my life that he came to my wedding by way and kind of steered me into the space helped me with College application letters recommendation. And so i studied engineering before. You're so i've been in a manufacturing environment for awhile. Bump steel toed shoes uniform union arment. And that's really where i started my career At the same time my company was so gracious that They paid for my mba. So i went to Uconn in stamford connecticut to take classes at night and really got more exposed to concepts of business management marketing research and just really loved it and so then when i asked for a new gig they said finance or sales and unlike okay sales and sales and.

Ecuador north america adrian nouvelle Esperanza tisdale thirty Mike second Today stamford latin america first jobs Uconn english today equator first grade third grade a week ago first shift first thing