35 Burst results for "Mozarts"

The Heads of the Orchestras Don't Appeal to Noble People

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:16 min | Last month

The Heads of the Orchestras Don't Appeal to Noble People

"You would think that the music critics of this country would be the great defenders of the canon. But they are the first to crap on it. In other words, classical music has produced leaders who have utter contempt for the very art they were entrusted with. It also proves a thesis that was the most painful feces of my life because I love classical music so much. And that is that Bach and Beethoven and Mozart and brahms and so on. They don't appear to ennoble people necessarily. They can, but they don't appear to have done so. You can love and play Beethoven. Beautifully. And be a moral idiot. As so many members of our orchestras unfortunately are and certainly the heads of the orchestras.

Beethoven Brahms Bach Mozart
Mike Gallagher: Salzburg Is Famous for Two Things

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:57 min | Last month

Mike Gallagher: Salzburg Is Famous for Two Things

"Well, thanks, Carl, greetings from Salzburg, Austria, without a doubt, the most magnificent magical enchanted city I've ever seen in my life. I'm so glad we got to come to Salzburg. Of course, Salzburg is famous for two things for the tourists. Wolf Wolfgang, Amadeus Mozart. This was his birthplace, and where he spent much of his life. And of course, the sound of music, some scenes that were filmed there. The architecture, though, beautiful churches and cathedrals everywhere. This is a beautiful, beautiful Austrian city nestled on the river and with the Alps and the beautiful fortress believe it or not, overlooking the city that encloses all of it. Just the history, the charm, and of course everything is Mozart Mozart Mozart. This is where he was born. See this house here, with the yellow painting on the outside. That's the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He lived here for a number of years. He moved to Vienna, became disenchanted with Salisbury because he felt they didn't recognize his greatness and wow, his greatness, of course, prolific and felt the world over. Interesting facts about sound of music. We saw a couple of the places where the movie was filmed, including when Julie Andrews came running through the courtyard with her guitar. We saw where they had the big music festival where the von trapp family flat fleas at the end of the movie for the big dramatic finish, but our tour guide explained that locals don't really like the American version of the sound of music because the sound of music was the story of Maria von trapp was originally captured in the early 1950s by a German film. So the Broadway musical, which was mounted in 1959, and then the movie a few years later, for them was just a reprise and they didn't care. People in Austria and even Germany, they didn't care very much for the sound of music. Believe it

Salzburg Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolf Wolfgang Mozart Mozart Mozart Austria Carl Maria Von Trapp Salisbury Vienna Julie Andrews Germany
Naomi Wolf on Living in a Time Where Virtue Is Out of Fashion

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Naomi Wolf on Living in a Time Where Virtue Is Out of Fashion

"Naomi, look, you and I were in college at a time where I feel like even the concept of virtue was already out of fashion. It was mocked, honor. These things were already being locked in the culturally elite circles where we went, that that's for rubes. That's for people in flyover country to talk about patriotism, or love of country, love of truth. What is truth? That's been percolating for many decades. And this is the fruit. Yeah. You really opened my eyes to that in our early conversation, the you're right. And I do think that the CCP has had a profound impact on college campuses. There's Institutes called Confucius Institutes that were opened across the country. I'm sure you've spoken about that before. And I see the impact on our curriculum and it's making me rethink everything, like feminism, feminism should be about embracing women's role in every aspect of our lives, including maternity and family. And in the west, it's been distilled down to just abortion, right? Well, that's kind of a satanic and Marxist way to look at this complex issue of how women can be free. And there's so many examples. You know, you and I talked about deconstruction and how it strips poetry of meaning and it strips literature of meaning and its trips these are culture of dimensional meaning, human meaning. Will this escalate it and I really tease this out in the bodies of others where I look at what got targeted culturally and what got targeted in terms of faith, culture makes us strong in cultures where the western values of the lessons about morality and honor and meaning get transmitted. Well, culture got targeted. You know, you could go to a liquor store, you could go to a pot store in some states, you couldn't go to the theater, you couldn't go to hear a concert, you know, you couldn't hear Mozart in a group of human

Institutes Called Confucius In Naomi CCP Mozart
Traditional vs. Contemporary Classical Music

Rescot Creative

02:16 min | 11 months ago

Traditional vs. Contemporary Classical Music

"Today we are talking about the somewhat controversial topic of traditional versus contemporary. And this is a debate in pretty much all areas of life or art forms, whether you are thinking literary. So where you have a more traditional or even historical type fiction versus contemporary fiction or in music, if you like the traditional sounding songs, very classical, or a more contemporary pop genre, and obviously to apologize to everything else, like politics, if you have your more traditional people and your more contemporary progressive people anyway, I personally believe that it's important that we can appreciate things on both sides. Of the line. So when it comes to more traditional sounding violin music, you're going to think, especially a lot about Bach baro, classical era, music like Mozart, so here's a little box. Okay, so this very ornate decorative sounding music or you might have something even from the romantic time period, which was 19th century. Right? Now, if you are actually trying to do something more contemporary, you might do a little bit more with improvisation, although actually in the baroque era Bach did improvise a lot. But for example, if this was like twinkle little star. You know, Abu Dhabi in French Mozart did a ton of variations on that. But a contemporary version of that could be.

Bach Baro Mozart Abu Dhabi
"mozarts" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:36 min | 11 months ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Certainly is the case that there are. There are many tools in both the transfer space on the ice space. That enable you to do it but it is certainly a best practice to get basically as much as you're sort of going to be making decisions off of data together in in your data warehouse expense and i'm curious if you have any thoughts on the evolution of a team growing in a startup per amid sized company with the availability of tools like yours. It seems like maybe a data engineer could be delayed a bit because some of the fundamental stuff can be done in an automated fashion. I don't believe we'll ever eliminate the date engineer position. I think the tooling just scales the professional. But i'm curious to get your thoughts on how these things might be evolving in the modern tech group. I agree with you that the data engineers job is not going away. In fact the demand for data engineers is massively. outpacing the supply. So i wouldn't be worried about your employment prospects if you were a data engineer not because of the existence of mozart or similar tooling just because demand for data the end people very capable of moving manipulating in summarizing data is just honestly increasing. It feels like by the minute so the point is not totally obsolete. They'd engineer that said it's not not to do that and i. I actually attended a talk by george frazier of by tran and five hundred organization of many hundreds of people that doesn't have a data engineer. Now their business is to obsolete the data engineer. But i would say that you can see very large very successful businesses that would typically rely on not a single data engineer but a team of data engineers to do certain work. What you don't want is people that are becoming increasingly more. Scarce and increasingly more valuable and their output is becoming increasingly more leverage. Doing highly wrote work. That like as dan mentioned in some senses a solved problem where people are solving it at scale. So i think i'm i'm religiously of the camp of the tooling including mozart is now at eight. That's good enough. That can certainly push your first data. Higher not necessarily be an engineer or a date engineer or a hybrid data engineer and data analysts. Instead you should be looking for essentially the types of skills that you should leverage a tool like moats are and then hire for the types of skills that are are important for teasing out insights from the data. I'm curious if you have any thoughts or are seeing patterns as the product grows around the right point of adoption. Is this something early. Stage companies are picking up. 'cause they see the need and they don't wanna build all these connectors or is it something a later stage companies adopting so the answer is both. I am surprised at just how early companies are essentially getting on board with data again most of the companies that i joined i joined as employee number one hundred and that was the time where they were making big investments in data teams. Today you know we obviously have sold to companies in our y c batch that were just a few people even before they started generating a lot of revenue or certainly a lot of data again. Part of that is like i mentioned in an earlier. Answer part of that is that you can just get started so much more inexpensively right so aside from the people cost you can buy a trivial amount of compute so basically there's a variety of reasons. Why the sort of use of data is happening at an earlier and earlier stage. But it's mostly because it's demanded of these companies so it can be demanded by the market to behave optimally right so to figure out what's working what's not and double down into those that's working and there are so many tools that are much better at sending you signals about what's working you know you can hook up a product analytics tool and instantly see what users are doing and how they're interacting with your your website similarly. It's the case that it might be demanded by the by the capital market the so in order to get venture funding people like to know. These are your metrics and the ability to gather like standard set of metrics very quickly and update them with a single click is a really powerful tool for for raising money. So really i would say that. The reason that the movement has been like has gotten data to to show up earlier and earlier stages and now it's really not uncommon for for precede companies especially technically savvy ones to to be using data and even a lot of data is because one again it's sort of like supply and demand. There is an increased demand for it and it and again it's also like a lot easier. So there's there's an increase supply of of tooling avoiding the reinvention of the wheel is one of the most appealing things to me for a tool like mozart data. I've got plenty of stuff. I need my engineers to build. Why redo yet another stripe integration or something like that but then of course the added benefit of that that a lot of people miss is that i also don't have two main maintain it. That's your problem. Are there any challenges. You've seen Especially over time. Maintaining such a large number of connections in light of you know possible breaking changes from vendor. Api's and things like that. I mean this stuff scales pretty well when we fix a connector. We fix it for all of our customers and now if we didn't exist in those people weren't using a similar tool. That's you know ten x the word hundred x the work. So i mean this to me seems like the efficient way to do it physically. Pull it in in a very generic way and then each each person can transform it in whatever way is is unique to their needs and then we have to maintain like that initial which is get it all out. We're going to naively put it in your database and then you can take it from there. We all want to know that we have enough to get where we want to go. For instance you either have enough energy to run a marathon. Or you're on the side of the road wheezing how about your startup..

george frazier tran mozart dan
"mozarts" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:23 min | 11 months ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Very neat. what loved to talk through. Maybe a hypothetical integration. Let's say some e commerce company. We've got a shop store. And i would like to update my crm records when sales are made. What's the process like to get that going to qualified. You mean like a reverse. Etl you want you want. Data pushed from shop. Affi- into hub spot or maybe we should revise the question just looking to explore concrete user story. Got it so we we do have some customers that are using exactly shop by and hub spot so we don't all kind of go back to my previous statement. We don't actually do reverse. Etl much will let you sink things to google sheets. But if you wanna go like from chevy in hub spot into your data warehouse we cover that and then if you wanna do some analysis or combine your shop by user info with your hub spot support info perhaps and then push that back into shop fire spot. We don't currently cover that part of the data stack we we partner with a couple of companies Were really like high touch for that. For example got just so. It's really about empowering the analyst. I guess pulling all data together in a common sequel interface. I think like dan highlighted that. We stop where the data becomes specific to you. We are big believers in having having humans that have sort of an intimate knowledge of the tables and the business in the business logic. Definitions really drive the insights and combining very often the types of tools. That sort of out of the box can do this for you. I think fall short or miss the key insight that you're trying to drive out of the data just because there's i mean i think sort of we can call it messy data but it's really just sort of misleading data because you know essentially Typically more is better. And then like somebody trained that knows the data can can refine it down the the centralization here ends up paying off in dividends that you don't really expect to see with one person's work empowering somebody else's work so like you know the the cleaning and organizing the he was talking about a few minutes ago that could be done in a in a bi tool but if one analyst does that in their bi tool. That's not helping anybody else. Do their job better. But if you centralize that and it's in you know effectively a shared repository of code and got these production tables than maybe one team can be empowered to answer their questions. In tableau now the analysts had also have cleaned up data to do whatever machine learning or just you mix them charts that they want to do. And then maybe saying some other team once that data piped back into hubs spots so that their customer support folks can have some extra information when they're dealing with with people that doesn't actually live in hub spot unless it goes through a process like this gets cleaned up and then then put back into the toll. And this is i think a lot of what has inspired the change of the acronym so in general people are now saying yell tea or et l. T. it's really highlighting the importance of that last sort of t- stage before the bi of the last transform stage before the bi so it has really become a common best practice to be cleaning and transforming and sort of having a uniform set of definitions. One layer above your tool. I think what you look back. In my day the practice was always do messy copy and paste of sequel or of dragging drop definitions in your be. Bi tool today. You know it's it's been well surfaced. That a very very very common problem is that you know. It's one question. Several different quote correct answers. One of the not like cure alls but one of the best ways of addressing. This very common problem is to have common definitions written essentially before the bi layer interesting. So in that regard. I would describe mozart. Data is like foundational that it's going to have maybe a few key services that you'd offer in that transform layer. I'm thinking like data enrichment could be one a little bit of cleanup What are some of the appropriate things that you see people using it for before hitting their layer joining so like unionizing enjoining so again. I think this is where the power of like you know. This is where one plus one definitely doesn't equal to. It is certainly. The case and dan gave an example where you can very easily sort of assess a coward. Google ads doing our facebook. Ads doing But when you really actually wanna know is is is often further down the funnel than is than is easy to measure when you're assessing things like and ltv you're often making assumptions once users get to a certain stage if you're only able to analyze data from your essentially your marketing sources. You also have a slightly tough time comparing marketing sources. Because you know you. Can't you might see you know that each is providing you the same cost to get leads to the same place but those leads might perform incredibly differently and then if there is such a thing as attribution. You can't do it. Well when you're doing individual source is most often. If you were to ask say google how how they're doing in terms of what credit they deserve on a lead they would say and that might not actually be true. You might have learned about in another place and the the last touch might have been actually through search but i think like the typical answer is that it is really important to join. Data together were union data and that's not necessarily specific to to mozart. Certainly is the case that there are. There are many tools in both the transfer space on the ice space. That enable you to do it but it is certainly a best practice.

dan google mozart ltv facebook
"mozarts" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:40 min | 11 months ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You there. Danpilla and peter welcome to software engineering daily. Great to be here. Well the kick things off. Tell me a little bit about how the two of you guys got connected. How'd you first meet. We'll dan and i met over twenty years ago when we were both in college. Dan's best friend in high school was my college roommate so on a trip down to duke. Dan and i ended up meeting each other and then we lived in boston together. And then later we lived in berkeley together. We've known each other for over twenty years for the last kind of fifteen. We've both been bouncing around different technology companies across silicon valley and then last year at the start of the. We decided to found most data together. Dan and i also co-founded hot sauce company together that we're really proud of about twelve years ago. We started baking hot sauce. The world's first and greatest big flavored hot sauce so for ten years. We were hot sauce entrepreneurs and now we've pivoted to the data space fulltime very cool. Why don't generally see a lot of overlap between the two industries. Tell me a little bit about some of each of your backgrounds in the data world. Sure i've i'm more of a data engineer. Pete is more of a did analysts data scientist. I've worked oliver. The bay area generally startups. That are a little bit smaller. Founded a few companies have been in early engineered if you companies. I generally prefer working organizations twenty or fewer people. I've done some data science myself. But but more often i'm sort of the engineer alongside folks who are doing analysis and i really enjoyed building building tools to help them do their job better. And i've been leading in running analytics teams had mostly late stage startups and in the past only late stage startups could really take advantage of all the data that they were generating. So i've generally built teams and data stacks and data tooling at late startups. Like play them and yarmur and benefits and open door and most recently ease. What have you guys seen changing in the data landscape over the time. You've been in the industry. So i think the data landscape has has massively changed. I hate to do the back in my day. But i'll i'll start there back. In my day. To get your data pipelines going. It would require hiring a few data engineers spending a lot of money on fancy database essentially buying a large contract that that really locked you in and today i think the biggest change is that to get started with data instead of building. Everything a lot of times you can get away with buying or buying for a long amount of time and the other part is that you need. Many fewer did engineering resources than before. I think the the biggest change is that the by solutions have just gotten so much better so much more standard and now basically people can start a data team with basically a credit card. And that's to me a giant change in in data tooling and then of course you know the the obvious things like they're more data professionals similarly a. There's a lot more data being generated collected but also it's become table stakes. You know when when. Dan and i were starting careers. The types of companies that would hire data. People were like google today. You know you talk to most seeds. They start ups. they're already thinking about hiring. Not just like say someone out of college to analyze the data that they're creating but like actually a full fledged data professional at a pretty early stage because data has become table stakes for competing in the standard sort of categories of embiid sas in in dc. It's really even just the reporting of it has become table stakes raising series seed series. Am beyond. i'd i'd add to that that there's a lot more people that are comfortable in tool in things like writing sequel and answering their own questions so people that would never call themselves a data engineer or data analyst. But they've they've picked up sequel over the years Just to be better at their job And they're able to announce sort of t- take advantage of a lot of these advances as well. So what is mozart data. And where does it fit into the landscape. Data is the easiest way to spin up a modern data stack. What that means is that we manage yell for you. We provide you a managed snowflake warehouse and we provide a layer doing transforms so that in under an hour you can get up and running with a world class stack that late stage companies would be implementing using you can really do it with no did engineering team. So the way that we fit into the landscape is we try to bring together the best thing class pieces in the necessary pieces and the types of pieces that real practitioners ended up using. We try to put that all under one roof or or one throat to choke. So i imagine i think of the modern technology company raven really any company. They probably have a long list of sas services. They're using something for accounting maybe something for. Hr add onto that probably stripe and a few other things and we now have all these silo data sources. How does mozart data helped me with those. So that's exactly at. There's this sort of incredible explosion in sas tools but a lot of the sort of winners of these spaces are becoming quite evident and writing the extracting load from a tool like stripe today basis solve problem. And i think the idea is that data has power in these silos. So you can go to strike or you can go to shop afyon. You can look at account of your customers but what you really want to do is actually bring all this data together. So data becomes really valuable for making like insight or or or.

Dan Danpilla silicon valley berkeley dan bay area oliver peter boston Pete dc google raven mozart
Kristen Bell and Jackie Tohn Discuss Their Amazon Prime Preschool Series Do, Re & Mi

Good Inside with Dr. Becky

02:12 min | 11 months ago

Kristen Bell and Jackie Tohn Discuss Their Amazon Prime Preschool Series Do, Re & Mi

"I'm so excited to talk about how this even relate to your show because one of the probably most popular videos on my instagram actually has to do with when our kids are in really tricky moments. How everyone's like. Well what do i say. What do i do. And they feel are tone and are kind of connection and even they feel song way before they process words that we have to get their body back to a place of feeling safe. So i i always end up making up songs with my own kids and that idea for parents have. Oh i don't need to get the script right but maybe even song can help me. Regulate itself is is so powerful knocking off out there. I mean that was the impetus for this show is knowing how important music is. It's the reason why we all know. What baby mozart is. Why they say oh. Put it on your belly. It in music changes. Your brain can put you in a different mood. It can grow the neuro plasticity of your brain like there are studies that tell us that kids get better at math than that. Their social skills when they're exposed to music music education the goal. Jackie had this idea with our friend. Michael they brought it over to my living room as a guinea pig. Tester for my kids. Like hey. They looked at my little girl. They were like you like these images. You respond to these songs. And i said what are you doing. They were like well. We're trying to develop a kids show because music. Education is being cut in all public schools right now and my kids go to public school and i was like i. I want them to get as much music education as possible. Because i wouldn't be here without a music. Education sincerely would not have become an actor. It's how i discovered acting. And i have such a profound respect for it and developing the show. It's jackie labels it a sneak. Teach which i love that term. It's an original animated series in. It's it's entertaining but it's also teaching your kids music theory and emotional lesson a musical genre. All in one and like some of my greatest mom moments are when like my kids are begging us. My phone and i need to succumb to that. But i've found a puzzle game where they have to spell and i handed to them with like a sly smile face knowing they're getting educated and the apps that go along with dorian me will be that because they will be able to make music and they will be growing their brains which is really

Jackie Tester Guinea Michael
"mozarts" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Some point. The enormity of his children's talent dawned on leopold. it wasn't just a father of two musical prodigies. But this was something that could open doors to royal courts all over europe in seventeen. Sixty two the wunderkind siblings performed for the emperor francis the i and empress maria theresa in vienna. This was their big debut in their first significant public performance. It took three weeks to travel from salzburg to vienna with two small children and put the family deepen dead however their performance was a smashing success. Leopold sent home the equivalent of two year salary after only a few weeks of performing in vienna with this success. They set out on a grand tour of europe visiting royal courts all over the continent at the start of the tour and seventeen sixty. Three wolfgang was seven and non role was eleven at the beginning of the tour. Non-royal often receive top billing in a letter home. Leopold wrote quote. My little girl plays the most difficult works which we have with incredible precision and so excellently. What it all amounts to is this that my little girl. Although she was only twelve years old is one of the most skillful players in europe and quote as they travelled leopold basically acted as an agent for his children. It wasn't just the royal courts in large capital cities where they performed they would also try to arrange performances in every city they visited and leopold would often put notices in local newspapers over the course of three years. The family worked their way across germany. Belgium and the netherlands with the furthest point being london on the way back home. They went through france and switzerland. During this trip wolfgang began composing furious pace including writing his first symphony at the age of eight maria. Ana often helps your little brother and writing down the music you wrote. They returned home to salzburg in seventeen sixty six and continued to make side trips to earn money including a return trip to vienna in seventeen sixty nine leopold set out again but this time he only brought wolfgang with him if maria ana had grown up in the present day she undoubtedly would have been one of the world's foremost musicians however she grew up in the eighteenth century and she was subject to the norms and the culture of that period once she reached an age where she could marry. She wasn't allowed to perform in public again. To do so would be

Maria ana wolfgang amadeus mozart salzburg Leopold mozart leopold wolfgang jesuit school augsburg Magna
The Other Mozart: Wolfgang's Sister, Maria Anna

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

The Other Mozart: Wolfgang's Sister, Maria Anna

"Some point. The enormity of his children's talent dawned on leopold. it wasn't just a father of two musical prodigies. But this was something that could open doors to royal courts all over europe in seventeen. Sixty two the wunderkind siblings performed for the emperor francis the i and empress maria theresa in vienna. This was their big debut in their first significant public performance. It took three weeks to travel from salzburg to vienna with two small children and put the family deepen dead however their performance was a smashing success. Leopold sent home the equivalent of two year salary after only a few weeks of performing in vienna with this success. They set out on a grand tour of europe visiting royal courts all over the continent at the start of the tour and seventeen sixty. Three wolfgang was seven and non role was eleven at the beginning of the tour. Non-royal often receive top billing in a letter home. Leopold wrote quote. My little girl plays the most difficult works which we have with incredible precision and so excellently. What it all amounts to is this that my little girl. Although she was only twelve years old is one of the most skillful players in europe and quote as they travelled leopold basically acted as an agent for his children. It wasn't just the royal courts in large capital cities where they performed they would also try to arrange performances in every city they visited and leopold would often put notices in local newspapers over the course of three years. The family worked their way across germany. Belgium and the netherlands with the furthest point being london on the way back home. They went through france and switzerland. During this trip wolfgang began composing furious pace including writing his first symphony at the age of eight maria. Ana often helps your little brother and writing down the music you wrote. They returned home to salzburg in seventeen sixty six and continued to make side trips to earn money including a return trip to vienna in seventeen sixty nine leopold set out again but this time he only brought wolfgang with him if maria ana had grown up in the present day she undoubtedly would have been one of the world's foremost musicians however she grew up in the eighteenth century and she was subject to the norms and the culture of that period once she reached an age where she could marry. She wasn't allowed to perform in public again. To do so would be

Vienna Leopold Europe Maria Theresa Wolfgang Salzburg Francis Belgium The Netherlands Maria Ana Switzerland Germany ANA France Maria London
"mozarts" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Twenty seven th seventeen fifty-six wolfgang amadeus mozart was born in the town of salzburg in what was then the holy roman empire while he is a celebrity. Which makes the story interesting. This story is not about him. it's about his older sister. Maria ana who was born four and a half years before her brother wolfgang however for this story to truly make sense we have to take one more step back and talk about their father. Leopold mozart leopold was a very well educated man for the time for an augsburg. He attended to local jesuit school where he graduated. Magna coup mlada there. He developed an interest in all academic things including philosophy and science..

Maria ana wolfgang amadeus mozart salzburg Leopold mozart leopold wolfgang jesuit school augsburg Magna
"mozarts" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"Wolfgang amadeus mozart is known to almost everyone in the world. If he isn't known then as music certainly is even though he's one of the greatest composers in history. He was not the only musician in his family. In fact according to some he might not have even been the best musician in his family..

"mozarts" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"mozarts" Discussed on The Know Show

"Someone wanted to put out a nice good ghost story and so they started publishing some circulated a story that a few months before mozart died he was approached by a stranger. Who said i want you to write a requiem and He'd come back and pay mozart when it was finished. And mozart started to believe he was writing it for himself and then lo and behold he dies in the middle of writing it. This story start circulating as early as within three weeks of his death. Oh right yeah. Three weeks of his assets. Fantastic so you take a piece unlike the requiem spectacular piece of music And what this means is The the requiem was one of mozart's most famous pieces by eighteen hundred and at the same time unlike other pieces it was. He's no one had ever heard Because there had been only two or three copies made it had never been published. It had hardly so it had hardly been performed. So you've got this piece of music that encapsulates this story this this whole life story of mozart has dictum right and it's super famous because of the stories that have been told about it without anyone having look into what really happened without anyone have actually having heard the piece. That's that's amused. The most remarkable thing that you can have a biographical tradition that become so firmly established on the basis of Anecdote that can elevate a piece of music to this status. Had been one of the great pieces of music and that then inflicting the way everyone here mozart and comes from a story or a lack of scrutiny. Well yeah people didn't scrutinize things to same way in those days right and i it was a great. It's a great story. Mozart died with his boots on. So that's what the eighteenth century wanted to think. I mean there are fundamental changes afoot with respect to what constitutes a piece of music might the the split between the composer and performer which was not common in the eighteenth century. Neil bach was a performer. Handle was a performer. Beethoven was a performer. Mozart was performer But brahms is not a performer. Who for example. Okay so They're all kinds of things happening in the nineteenth century that either gothic or.

Neil bach Beethoven Three weeks nineteenth century eighteenth century Handle three copies Mozart three weeks brahms eighteen hundred two one a few months before mozart pieces
How Two Detroit Lions Inspired Marvin Gaye's Whats Going On

ESPN Daily

01:48 min | 1 year ago

How Two Detroit Lions Inspired Marvin Gaye's Whats Going On

"Just intensely. Thank you for joining me. It's an honor and privilege and a pleasure to be here. My man thank you for having. Well you bring with you a story that i'm incredibly excited about the story that you reported here for us about marvin. Gay's attempt to join the detroit. Lions i mean where does the start the two main players for the lions. That story revolves around. Is this guy lombardi. Who is an nfl hall of fame. Cornerback and mel farr. But here's how the story goes back in the summer of nineteen sixty eight farney far. They were about to start their second season with the lions and they have both earned rookie of the year honors the season before offensive and defensive of the year the rookies rookie in nineteen sixty. Seven was melpar limbaugh. What's the surprise of the season to everyone except the coaches who drafted him. Barney's playing golf at home apart. Golf course in detroit and if you know anything about detroit and the golf courses back then that that's where a lot of the black celebrities from mozart. Act joe louis so on and so forth and barney was a huge fan of marvin gaye. The attendant at the golf course so like marvin gaye lives right here. You should go introduce yourself. He not door. He didn't know what he was going to say to him. At that point and marvin revenue being annoy was actually happy to see him and barney. Two views like oh. I didn't even know you knew who i was and gave him like. Oh you're barney. He ran down his stats. Like it was like pro football reference dot com and in the late sixties. They have breakfast. They talk about sports. They talk about music and then they immediately hit it off

Lions Mel Farr Farney Detroit Melpar Limbaugh Golf Marvin Lombardi Cornerback Marvin Gaye Barney NFL GAY Joe Louis Mozart Football
The History and Development of Oral Torah

The Jewish History Podcast - By Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe

03:13 min | 1 year ago

The History and Development of Oral Torah

"Today i wanna understand the history of the transmission tower and a little bit about the nature of the transmission and the perpetuation of torah. How torah evolve. How tour was innovated. How torah change for moses until today of course that's a big subject and we're gonna only take a small piece out of it because it's very vast but we're going to give the the outline of how torah change and how it developed until today Mental today but give the the the inside the big picture of how these things work now. The first mission on practice of os tells us that the torah was transmitted from osha at sinai motion gets from god and then he passes it off to joshua with this means is that moshe passed the baton of leadership the responsibility of maintaining the accuracy in the perpetuation. The torah he passed onto the next leader of the generation namely to joshua and after tasha chorus he led the people with great skill and he passed onto the elders and the elders to the prophets and the prophets. Pass it onto the men of the great assembly. This mission of the first michigan avas actually covers around the thousand years from the time of moshe until the beginning of the second temple era around three hundred and fifty years before the common era rambam actually enumerates a more comprehensive list. He gives us the forty generations all the way from moses until arrive ashi the compiler of the babylonian talmud now over the course of these centuries and these generations we're gonna have change the torah development innovation of the torah learn about the dynamism of torah. What changed and of course what. Stay the same. And i think this will illuminate are subject in general the divinity of torah and thrilling understand. The relationship with we have today the core of which we got from moses at sinai and all the things that were added and what is the nature of those things that were added. And how does it relate to us today so we spoke about moshe already in the past. He of course received the torah sinai. Anything just get the laws. He got the details the principles the nuances and over the course of the forty years in the wilderness. He conveyed those principles and those details the people but the tells us that there were parts of moshe's transmission that he did not receive from god. The thomas in the of shabas page thirty a moshe rubbing mozart master. Gaza are comedies aeros. He decreed several decrees and he enacted several ordinances and behold they are upstanding there immutable forever. This i think adds another layer to our discussion of torah.

Joshua Moshe Sinai Osha Tasha Michigan Shabas Gaza
Pirates attack Turkish ship off West Africa; kill 1, kidnap 15

At Home

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Pirates attack Turkish ship off West Africa; kill 1, kidnap 15

"The union, saying the district safety plan falls short. This is ABC news officials in Turkey or trying to rescue more than a dozen sailors after their ship was attacked by pirates as itself from Nigeria to South Africa. Pirates have attacked two Turkish Chicago ship off the West African coast, kidnapping 15 sailors and killing one other. The Attackers spend six hours forcing their way into a secure area of the Liberian flag. Mozart where they took the sailors hostage. They disabled most of the

West African Coast ABC Turkey Nigeria South Africa Chicago Mozart
Here's a first look at Apple's $549 AirPods Max headphones

AppleInsider Podcast

09:19 min | 1 year ago

Here's a first look at Apple's $549 AirPods Max headphones

"I wanna talk to you about the airpods max. There was many rumors this fall that these were coming and being mid december. It looked like maybe we're not gonna get it before. Two thousand twenty one but no early on tuesday morning apple announced and released the airpods max. They went up for sale. I think it was like eight thirty in the morning and to everyone's shock and awe and let's just talk about now five hundred and fifty dollar price tag for the airpods. Max i would love to have your initial thoughts not only on the price tag but on the name. Because i kind of wish. They went with studio because the rumored codename airpods studio because they're over the your headphones with the cups. Noise cancelling airpods max. I don't know it sounds a little funny. What do you think william. I did as she laughed when i saw the name but only because apple keeps used to keep everything secret and now everything seems to come out but they hit us with a new name. We weren't expecting and that did the same with the apple a. m water. It is like there's a naming department that can keep a secret. I agree studios san sense better so these headphones they're very expensive. They're five hundred and fifty dollars despite that they're basically sold out until march if you try to buy a pair now it'll say twelve to fourteen weeks shipping time so even despite the price very popular you can actually go and watch him hd. And i just actually have these. They did initial videos unboxing and some initial thoughts. I'll put those links in show notes as well just kind of a quick specs. These are over the ear cups headphones controls on these. It is all physical controls. There's a large digital crown on one of the earcups that you'll use to adjust volume or you can press it down for siri. And then there's also another button to go from transparency to noise cancelling mode so they have a lot of the features of the airpods pro. They have spatial audio. They can do dolby. Atmos and seven point. One surround virtually in the headphones. So that's all very cool but a couple of the noticeable omissions will say no power brick in the box so with your five hundred and fifty dollar headphones. You do not get a powerbook to charge you. Do get a cable. You get a usb c a lightening cable so you can charge it with one of the twenty usb c charging that apple will sell you but it also does not come with the cable to physically connect these headphones to an audio source. If you would like that you have to pay an additional thirty five dollars for a lightning. Two three and a half millimeter cable to plug into an audio source and again the fact that they went with lightning on instead of usb bbc. I'm not sure i feel about that. But those are the omissions and again on that price tag at least put the cable in there. I don't know that's just me. What do you feel wind. Packwood's and i agree with you. That seems wrong. I know we got loose. Packers have old ones. So i don't know how much use they would be i. It never occurred to me to think about a physical connection with this their wireless headphones release anything else. But actually yeah. If i am a musician pro use a full who. This is a bargain but a worthwhile cost. I'm likely to want to better connection wireless bluetooth so yeah on quite taken aback. Especially if you cross into that audio file realm and one of things. I'm going to do with it I did order a pair though becoming tuesday. So i'll be able to talk about him on next week's episode personally but i'm actually a classical music fan. I don't think i've ever share this with amish on the podcast. But i'm a classical trumpet player. That's my wife degree. yes i love. Actually listening to classical music. Believe it or not and so. I'm very curious to see how these sound. On some of those mozart requiems and brahms symphonies at to see the audio quality is really up to snuff. But for five hundred fifty dollars should sound amazing. You know per se. Obviously this is in comparison and in competition with headphones. Like the sony w.h. Xm fors which usually cost like three hundred. Three hundred and fifty dollars was like attuned dollar premium for these and the bose noise cancelling headphones seven hundred are very popular. Those are around three hundred and forty dollars. So you're getting two hundred to two hundred and fifty dollar premium to pay for these airpods. Max so i really hope have to imagine that the sound quality is excellent. But you're also paying for apple's features like the h. One chips the ability to the noise. Cancelling connect your devices seamlessly switch just like other airpods and airpods pro another cool feature to the cups. The ear cushions that are on the headphones are actually connect magnetically. And so if you want to replace the earcups for whatever reason they come off very easily and attach very easily as well and hd shows that had his video looks pretty satisfying and you can also get replacement ear cushions again. Not cheap but seventy bucks on apple you can actually order them now in the apple store and on their website but you can get replacement cushions for seventy dollars again in the future if you need them and you can mix and match colors. There's actually a cool chart you know if you will have to get the space gray headphones and put some blue cushions on it. You can be fancy like that if you'd like but again you're paying a premium for all these. I don't know. I'm curious to try them. But these don't tempt you at all as i once used the bose actions that you mentioned don. I was very impressed on. I do like us. I'm more of a malla guide. The mets on no. It doesn't tempt me. Except there is one thing this one specification you've just kind of lewd to skipped a very good. That is crucial. What color did you buy on. I won't with space gray because the size of these. I mean they're large. They're over the ear headphones. And i like to be discreet when i'm around other people the rare times that happens and so white white was tempting. But i don't have so much you know every other airpod is white and i didn't like the green or the pinkish red color. Blue was the only other one that tempted me. But i don't know. I just went discreet. I want black now. You wouldn't touch. That's what it is so next day. Jiang at a party somewhere. Nobody's gonna notice because she didn't have blue headphones. That's what i would have gone full blitz. Obviously the blue did look very nice. i was tempted. Also attempt to engrave these. I've actually never engraved an apple product. I don't know why i just have never done. It and i was very close to engraving these. But i had a moment of. I don't know what to put on them. And i know shipping. Times are gonna slip. So i just four went the engraving and just sorta without. But i'm curious william. Have you ever engraved an apple product. No because of always thoughts. And i'm gonna pass it on somebody else or might resell it to somewhere right. So it's been like having a set to somebody on their name. Just you break up with something. It feels wrong in a weird way. It feels like it's studies the the pristine finish of the device as well especially if you wanna resell it. That definitely makes it more difficult but I know you have tons of tattoos. You have sleeves don't you. Have you have tattoos all over please. I'm not illustrated unless you know what you said about coming up with something to say. I know whatever. I had written on me. I would change my mind magic instantly and want to me. I did work with a young writer. Who said she was aiming to have some text for every significant part of her life tattooed on and i wished to long life and much fatness so that you have room okay. Well staying on the grieving for a second. I saw that in addition to letters you can actually engrave emojis on apple products. Now you can choose emojis if you'd like. So here's my question to you william. If you could engrave any emoji apple device what emoji do you think you would choose. Would it be the winking smiley face sticking out the tongue or would it be money flying away. What do you think is the money involved here with page to do this. I give you twenty bucks. Yeah i need more need more. I need a lot more needs to pay for the hedge funds and then i feel that's nice cost parlance I'm i'm a writer. I can't bear emojis next. Particularly i had a message from a singer songwriter. I profoundly admire but it was all in emojis. And i have no idea what she was saying. It was just. I think it's gonna start communicating with you william. I'm gonna do all emojis from now on well good by sending emerges did not sending me pat. That's where you're going wrong. You sending the wrong listen. Listen we'll see when that when the next ipad comes out the battery life on my ipad. I don't know what's going on but it is I don't know. It's a little rough. When i edit podcast. It's great at any at any other time. So that new model comes out. I don't know we'll see you keep playing this long game gas lighting me. I'll just send it off without even thinking about it.

Apple MAX William Packwood Packers BBC SAN Sony Mets Jiang DON
"mozarts" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Lobby another mazda.

Dutch Masters

Travel with Rick Steves

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Dutch Masters

"Instead of being paid to glorify the church and nobility like so much of Europe, the art in the low countries was paid for by the wealth of the Protestant merchant class are guides are Nico Febrile who lives near Bruges in West Flanders and Jodi angles door than she lives in Harlem North Holland? Nicole Yoda. Thanks for being here. Thank you. Thank you for having us. So from your perspective as a guide in the Netherlands ca you see that divide in the art world? Well, of course, it's a lot about the culture of country and like you said, our culture is all about brought stations and we had thorough formation and that are really created a big difference between some art in other countries in us. So we have very basic churches. They're all stripped down from older statues but also are monster pieces re rarely. See. Any Christian. Seems but we always have the Merchan's and because we had a Dutch republic very soon after. Yeah. So that is of you. If you see a bread of his biblical theme, it'll be from the Bible but it won't be from some Pope or something like that. Yes. If you think about you, you mentioned the reformation you have a huge church on the main square in Harlem that was a Catholic Church and it was completely painted all the pillars were painted and everything now when you go in yeah. Washed away whitewashed. Yes. Whitewashed. Yeah So a reformation came we had iconoclast where all the distance took it down and the art was little gone, and how do you recognize what the Protestants really brought into the churches was music and that is how they really lived up churches. So in Harlem, you have this giant organ. which more than five thousand pipes you can still go in and listen to it every Thursday In the summer periods. Then you have a concert for free you can visit and you can hear his Oregon play you can just. How old's organised, we've come so a ten year old Mozart played in this. So it's a it's a very different experience and it's very beautiful. So maybe four or five hundred years ago it was Catholic and then you have the reformation it becomes Protestant partisans come in there and they were kind of sort of kind of mean her. Very extreme. Throughout. All the statues they busted lot of the windows they painted everything white and they put up this amazing organ that goes it's his tallest building. It goes way to the top of those arches. Wild, it is wild and that's something that when you know the story behind, it makes a little more sense when you have a good information, know every Thursday there's a free concert Nico when you think about the Great Dutch painters who comes to mind. Of course, he think about people like don't finance house to meet. My personal is Yon Stein. Johnston because he has these scenes of just people having fun at home and it's sometimes a bit double if what he wants to say with paintings. inning. Is it the warning that you shouldn't be so? Joyful maybe in life. Or they're just fun to watch because there is there's a lot of folk way stem. Yeah. It's like I'm like don't be wasteful or if you gossip things bad things will happen or there's all these little little lessons about life but not really preaching from the Church nobody you could interpret it that way and people could hang it in their houses and say, this is what we shouldn't be doing. Right but I look at them as okay. They're having fun to me. It's a little intimate look at life for hundred years ago or whenever he owns Dean was painting, but that's a good name to. Note Yawn Seen S. T. E. N. S. these when I go to a gallery in the Netherlands I, see a lot of small paintings by a lot of people whose names I don't know rather than a few big paintings by people who are superstars and highly paid, and you got to think it's a different sort of clientele. If you're painting a King or some bishop, you can paint something big and really expensive. But in the Netherlands when they got rid of the king and they got rid of the pope, they got to have the open market business people for their clientele and it needs to be affordable. So you have small appreciate art. Or. Not Actually N- definitely. But like you said it would be anonymous or from the same workshop or around that's what you would read. You see the values of the day there I, mean, above the dining room table, you might have a still life. Yes. Still lifes is not a personal favourite, but that's something that you will find a lot. Would you see in still life because of fruits, baskets, fish 'cause it's the Netherlands. So they would have a love of fish in there as well. Easy to catch

The Netherlands Harlem Yon Stein Johnston Nico Febrile Harlem North Holland Nicole Yoda Europe Jodi Catholic Church Bruges Merchan Oregon West Flanders Dean S. T. E. N.
"mozarts" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I'm Naomi Moon Welcome to classics for. Kids. . . Let's start this show off with a bang. . You. . Know how? ? When a certain kind of music catches on whether it's rap or jazz or Latino suddenly you hear it all over well, , all over Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries you would have heard Turkish flavored music like this marked by Ludwik von Beethoven. . A very reasonable question would be if Beethoven was German, , what was he doing writing Turkish music? ? The Sultan who ruled Turkey used to have a very select group of guards called Jan Aseries, , actually, , jams areas, , what the Turkish term for new army sounded like to European ears like most armies. . The Janice series had a band and since this was a Turkish army, , the Janice every band used Turkish instruments like bass drums, , triangles, , and cymbals when the Sultan of Turkey since January, , bands to Europe people went nuts over the exotic sound of those instruments hey, , couldn't get enough of Turkish. Music. . . European composers knowing what their audiences wanted to hear started writing. . Turkish. . Sounding pieces and even set some of those pieces in Turkey This is the overture to Mozart's opera the abduction from the Seraglio. . Seraglio. . Was the Turkish Sultan's palace a palace which he kept US sizable Harem of wives. . Plural. . Very poor. . Mozart wasn't the only composer to set an opera in Turkey German composer. . Carl Maria. . Von Vaber did to and he even gave his opera a Turkish name. . Abu Hassan. . And Turkish sounds crept into orchestra music too. . For Instance Haydn's symphony number one. . Kendrick. . <music>. . Since people associated the sound of drums, , triangles and cymbals with Turkish army bands that Haydn symphony came to be known as the Military Symphony. . The best symbols in the world are still made by the same family that made them in Haydn's day the Zil jains, , the name zillion is Turkish for symbol maker a Turkish Sultan gave it to the first symbol maker in the family almost four centuries ago today zillions live in Massachusetts where they make the symbols you here in rock bands and symphony orchestras. . That's from Wellington's victory by Beethoven. . After. . The FAD for January music died down the cymbals bass drums and triangles didn't go back to Turkey those instruments. . Oh, , their place in today's orchestras and bands to the eighteenth century European craze for Turkish music of all the composer's latched onto the sound of the January band I think Beethoven did it best? ? My favorite bit of January music is tucked into the middle of the last movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. . <music>. . That Sound is a controversy soon, , the lowest pitched woodwind instrument there is it's acting almost like a bass drum. . Back when January music was popular, , you could buy a piano equipped with a special. . January pedal by thumping down on it, , you could accompany yourself with your own personal triangle and drums percussion section. . Unfortunately today, , those pianos are only found in museums when both amodio Mozart composed his Turkish Rondo he managed to get the piano to imitate Janice drums even without a special pedal. . That's Mozart's Turkish Rondo. . Now that you know about the Turkish part to find out what a Rondo is, , join me next time for classics for kids.

Ludwik von Beethoven Turkey Turkish army Mozart Haydn Seraglio Janice Europe Military Symphony Jan Aseries US Von Vaber Abu Hassan Naomi Lewin Carl Maria Massachusetts Kendrick Cincinnati Tim Lender Wellington
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Janissary Music

Classics for Kids

05:39 min | 2 years ago

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Janissary Music

"I'm Naomi Moon Welcome to classics for. Kids. Let's start this show off with a bang. You. Know how? When a certain kind of music catches on whether it's rap or jazz or Latino suddenly you hear it all over well, all over Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries you would have heard Turkish flavored music like this marked by Ludwik von Beethoven. A very reasonable question would be if Beethoven was German, what was he doing writing Turkish music? The Sultan who ruled Turkey used to have a very select group of guards called Jan Aseries, actually, jams areas, what the Turkish term for new army sounded like to European ears like most armies. The Janice series had a band and since this was a Turkish army, the Janice every band used Turkish instruments like bass drums, triangles, and cymbals when the Sultan of Turkey since January, bands to Europe people went nuts over the exotic sound of those instruments hey, couldn't get enough of Turkish. Music. European composers knowing what their audiences wanted to hear started writing. Turkish. Sounding pieces and even set some of those pieces in Turkey This is the overture to Mozart's opera the abduction from the Seraglio. Seraglio. Was the Turkish Sultan's palace a palace which he kept US sizable Harem of wives. Plural. Very poor. Mozart wasn't the only composer to set an opera in Turkey German composer. Carl Maria. Von Vaber did to and he even gave his opera a Turkish name. Abu Hassan. And Turkish sounds crept into orchestra music too. For Instance Haydn's symphony number one. Kendrick. Since people associated the sound of drums, triangles and cymbals with Turkish army bands that Haydn symphony came to be known as the Military Symphony. The best symbols in the world are still made by the same family that made them in Haydn's day the Zil jains, the name zillion is Turkish for symbol maker a Turkish Sultan gave it to the first symbol maker in the family almost four centuries ago today zillions live in Massachusetts where they make the symbols you here in rock bands and symphony orchestras. That's from Wellington's victory by Beethoven. After. The FAD for January music died down the cymbals bass drums and triangles didn't go back to Turkey those instruments. Oh, their place in today's orchestras and bands to the eighteenth century European craze for Turkish music of all the composer's latched onto the sound of the January band I think Beethoven did it best? My favorite bit of January music is tucked into the middle of the last movement of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. That Sound is a controversy soon, the lowest pitched woodwind instrument there is it's acting almost like a bass drum. Back when January music was popular, you could buy a piano equipped with a special. January pedal by thumping down on it, you could accompany yourself with your own personal triangle and drums percussion section. Unfortunately today, those pianos are only found in museums when both amodio Mozart composed his Turkish Rondo he managed to get the piano to imitate Janice drums even without a special pedal. That's Mozart's Turkish Rondo. Now that you know about the Turkish part to find out what a Rondo is, join me next time for classics for kids.

Ludwik Von Beethoven Turkey Turkish Army Mozart Haydn Janice Europe Military Symphony Seraglio Naomi Moon United States Von Vaber Abu Hassan Carl Maria Jan Aseries Massachusetts Kendrick Wellington
An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

Optimal Living Daily

06:57 min | 2 years ago

An Excerpt from the book Flirting with Darkness by Ben Courson

"An excerpt from the book flirting with darkness. Ben. Carson. Weapon number three, the magic number of greatness. I got to a point in my struggle with depression where something needed needed to change must suffering. So badly, I finally decided to do something about it. The ten thousand hour rule saved my life. His Book Outliers Malcolm Glad well demonstrated that to be truly greeted anything. You have to put in ten thousand hours of practice. People such as world chess champion Bobby. Fischer businessman Bill Joy, and IBM founder Bill Gates are among the many examples. Glad. While gives of people who excelled because they accelerated they focused and worked hard and gave at least ten thousand hours to becoming the best at what they did. Glad will show that whether you want to be a fiction writer or master criminal. Hockey player or a pianist ten thousand hours was the magic number of greatness. Bent my mind to that goal is a writer Manspeaker. A resolved to stop wasting my energies, processing psychological trauma and to go on a diametrically opposed direction. Instead of disappearing over why dreams weren't coming to pass, I decided to commit myself to working my fingers to the bone to ensure they did. Psychologists, John Hayes quote looked at how long it took the best composers of all time to create their first grey work. He found that nobody including Mozarts was a child prodigy had produced a piece of work of any significance until about ten years after they had I, taken music no amount of innate talent even in a field of genius such as music could overcome the years of practice necessary to Korea work someone may be talented. They may be lucky but they still have to go through ten years of practice in order to become a master and quote. When Churchill came to power during World War Two he said this as he was being inaugurated into office as prime. Minister quote. I. Offer you nothing save blood, toil tears, and sweat and quo. Lecture Chill Ready to go to battle anew, the path will be difficult PROC- ready to claim own finest hour. Getting better stars, which is getting off your tuition in doing something. So I did. My goal was to become a writer and a speaker put in the needed hours. My nearly worked myself to death, but it was infinitely better than brooding found the effort. Cathartic in fulfilling my spirit's began to lift. I figured I had two options number one either get discouraged that my dreams were not coming pass or number to spend the effort of getting prepared for when they did. Legendary preacher Charles spurgeon advised students to stop worrying about when they would get their shot at speaking and concentrate instead on their ability, and they'll let God take the opportunity in other words quit fretting over the how and focus on the what I took these words to heart and focused on my skill set as I improved my craft, our English word amateur comes from a French Italian an line route which means to love an obvious works when he loves the process and it feels good a professional is someone who worked seven days a week whether he feels like it or not. Today. My TV show hope generation is on twenty different networks more than one hundred and eighty countries and radio shows heard on more than four hundred stations daily. I get to speak in stadiums and arenas. My quote unquote overnight success came through hours of hard work. How you'll spend your ten thousand hours may be different from how I spend mind but you'll find as I did a clear focus and a way of getting off the existential treadmill of despair, transform your life but the age of twenty one, the average American has put ten thousand hours of practice into computer and video games when I use those hours for something more productive. How hard you hustle in the darkness determines how brightly you shine in the spotlight. To prepare for speaking to people I got really good at lecturing my furniture. My chairs were my captive audience I remember that Billy Graham. One said he got his start by preaching to alligators before he preached in stadiums. You have to start with a small stuff and work your way up. So I took every opportunity that presented itself. I spoke to classes of little kids and homeless shelters at old folks, homes, and to student clubs I volunteered to take the opportunities. Others turned down, I got lots of practice. When other speakers turned an organization or church down my said, yes I did this I several years Only the small minded person will refuse the small task for me if I had an audience of four people those enough to get some more practice to put in some more hours toward my ten thousand our goal. Jesus said that if you're faithful and a few small things, you'll be given responsibility over bigger ones Matthew Twenty five that sound good to me. Yes sometimes I did feel like surface the tragic here of Greek mythology who had to roll a boulder of a hill only to see roll back down then roll it back up again only for it to roll back down again repeatedly, I'll stubborn in my pursuit it was a great weapon against despair to keep working in spite of how I felt, which puts me in the mind of a scene from Tolkien's the Lord of the Rings in the First Book of that trilogy the Fellowship of the Ring, a band of warriors is commission travel to the ends of the Earth to destroy the evil ring of power by casting it into mount doom. During their long journey. Gandalf who was their leader was thought to be killed in the minds of Maurya in response airborne stepped up to lead the band in his stead amid his grief and despair he cried out farewell Gandalf what hope have we with you then he turned to the fellowship and said, we must do without hope let us gird ourselves and weep no more come. We have a long road. Like that trek to mount doom healing is usually a long journey. We normally don't start feeling better overnight sometimes, we must go on when we feel absolutely no hope. Our quest leads down a winding path and his sometimes fraught with trolls and Goblins and all manner of Dr Treasures. But psychological heroism is possible in such journey is were taking like Eric Gordon Frodo my set my foot upon my own path out of depression I gave them my flirtation with darkness and began to tread the road toward a grand purpose and it worked after many many years. The Dreams I had begun to despair finally came true new ones came into sight, but it all began by putting one foot in front of the other. If you allow yourself to just sit around and partly catatonic state stuffing yourself with junk food is a form of therapy and watching callous hours of television. You'll probably never start feeling better. But I. Tell You that you get off the couch and venture into the world to do something toward your goals. Things will start to change in your heart and mind if you pull yourself out of bed and get going on your dreams, that's how you'll will begin the journey to healing your broken spirit.

Writer Depression Mount Doom Gandalf Carson Charles Spurgeon Bill Gates Korea Billy Graham Hockey Dr Treasures Bobby Eric Gordon Frodo John Hayes Jesus Mozarts Bill Joy Churchill IBM
Mozart's Operas

Classics for Kids

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Mozart's Operas

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi. Lewin. Both Con Amadeus Mozart wrote more beautiful music in his not quite thirty five year lifetime than a lot of composers who lived a lot longer one kind of music that fascinated Mozart from the time he was a kid was opera. Mozart I. said he wanted to write an opera when he was eight and when he was twelve, he did up through the very last year of his life. He continued composing operas. An opera is a stage work with costumes and sets that also includes music singing as an important part of the drama instead of speaking their lines, the characters sing them. Italy. Was the country where opera got its start. So Italian was the fashionable language for writing operas even in German speaking Austria where Mozart lived. But Go to kind of opera that's related to our Broadway musical. It's called the Zing Spiel a play with singing Austrians who didn't speak Italian could understand because it was in German just like in American musical theater, there are spoken lines that move the plot along but when the characters want to let you know what they're feeling, they sing about it or August. I have two favorite Mozart operas one in each language not city Figo Godot is Italian for the marriage of Figaro. This opera is based on a very famous, very revolutionary play about a servant Figaro who outsmarts his royal master. Since, there was still plenty of royalty around when the play was written. It was pretty daring. Some kings wouldn't allow it to be performed. At the beginning of the Opera Figaro is busy measuring his new bedroom, you can hear him counting five, ten, twenty in. Italian of course. Susannah the woman Figaro's going to marry tries to interrupt. She wants him to look at her bridal veil. You can hear in Mozart's music how hard it is forces Emma to get Figaro's attention. Figaro has some Great Arias or Solos in the opera when one of the characters is sent to the army and doesn't want to go figaro things about what it will be like ticked rate in his pants, he closed for a uniform and then marched to the mud. Nine. and. My other Mozart favorite is the magic flute heat Salva Fluid a Germans ing. SPIEL. In the magic flute, the Queen of the night represents evil dark forces and Rostro represents light and truth. It's brilliant how Mozart shows the contrast between them by having the Queen of the night fast loud and very high. While rostro music is slow deliberate and very. The. Most, fun character in the magic flute is Papa Gay No. The Bird Catcher I even named a cat after him. Papa John is always looking for a wife when he finds one, her name turns out to be Papa Gain A-, and they sing a wonderful using their names to investigate the birds he catches. Wish, I had time to play you more music from Mozart operas next week a kind of music so. In Mozart's bay that classical composers latched onto it to

Con Amadeus Mozart Figaro Papa John Lewin Italy Susannah Emma
Albert Einstein - burst 1

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Albert Einstein - burst 1

"A kid to major incidents happened that changed his life forever. When he was four or five years old his father gave him a magnetic compass looking at the needle move little Einstein froze the fact that the needle moved without Einstein even touching it fascinated him. It made him believe that there was something hidden behind things. This created an Einstein, a lifelong lust for the forces of nature which would come to define who he was. that. Around the same time, his mother, a pianist made him take violin lessons. This would create and Little Einstein Lifelong devotion to music in his later years whenever he would hit a roadblock in his experiments and did not know what to do. He would take his violin and start playing Mozart's tunes or improvising melodies, and suddenly he would stumble upon a solution to the problem. These two incidents changed Albert Einstein's life completely. As a kid Einstein had trouble in learning to talk. So when he was two years old, he developed a peculiar habit before he

Albert Einstein Mozart
Albert Einstein - burst 1

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Albert Einstein - burst 1

"Albert Einstein was a kid to major incidents happened that changed his life forever. When he was four or five years old his father gave him a magnetic compass looking at the needle move little Einstein froze the fact that the needle moved without Einstein even touching it fascinated him. It made him believe that there was something hidden behind things. This created an Einstein, a lifelong lust for the forces of nature which would come to define who he was. that. Around the same time, his mother, a pianist made him take violin lessons. This would create and Little Einstein Lifelong devotion to music in his later years whenever he would hit a roadblock in his experiments and did not know what to do. He would take his violin and start playing Mozart's tunes or improvising melodies, and suddenly he would stumble upon a solution to the problem. These two incidents changed Albert Einstein's life completely. As a kid

Albert Einstein Mozart
Albert Einstein - burst 1

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Albert Einstein - burst 1

"Albert Einstein was a kid to major incidents happened that changed his life forever. When he was four or five years old his father gave him a magnetic compass looking at the needle move little Einstein froze the fact that the needle moved without Einstein even touching it fascinated him. It made him believe that there was something hidden behind things. This created an Einstein, a lifelong lust for the forces of nature which would come to define who he was. that. Around the same time, his mother, a pianist made him take violin lessons. This would create and Little Einstein Lifelong devotion to music in his later years whenever he would hit a roadblock in his experiments and did not know what to do. He would take his violin and start playing Mozart's tunes or improvising melodies, and suddenly he would stumble upon a solution to the problem. These two incidents changed Albert Einstein's life completely.

Albert Einstein Mozart
Albert Einstein - burst 1

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Albert Einstein - burst 1

"When Albert Einstein was a kid to major incidents happened that changed his life forever. When he was four or five years old his father gave him a magnetic compass looking at the needle move little Einstein froze the fact that the needle moved without Einstein even touching it fascinated him. It made him believe that there was something hidden behind things. This created an Einstein, a lifelong lust for the forces of nature which would come to define who he was. that. Around the same time, his mother, a pianist made him take violin lessons. This would create and Little Einstein Lifelong devotion to music in his later years whenever he would hit a roadblock in his experiments and did not know what to do. He would take his violin and start playing Mozart's tunes or improvising melodies, and suddenly he would stumble upon a solution to the problem. These two incidents changed Albert Einstein's life completely.

Albert Einstein Mozart
"mozarts" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

18:51 min | 2 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Let us the pianist puzzle Sigh and his Allah Turk, a jazz subtitled Fantasia after Mozart's Piano Sonata, number 11 in a major, So it's essentially fossil Sai improvising on the familiar sound of the Mozart piece, commonly known as the Rondo Alla Turkana. Mostly Mozart, the fringe Festival thie actual festival is going on up the dialling. Our classical station. W Q X are one of 5.9 FM. But Contemporary musicians have a lot to say about Mozart. So we've been listening on on this five parts. Siri's of new sounds, programs to some very contemporary looks at the music and the man. Because Mozart left behind more than just music. He also left behind. Ah lot of letters and as we've already heard on past shows, those letters have inspired a lot of music as well. Including one of the movements in a percussion concerto by the Norwegian composer Ralph Vallon. The concerto was called thus far shown. That was nice, and the story is that Mozart had a pet bird. And he taught this bird to sing one of his melodies, but the bird when it's sang the tune didn't sing it exactly the way Mozart wrote it. And Mozarts response, Wass. Thus far shown that was nice. He liked the quote unquote mistake that the bird had made. So that's the title of this percussion concerto. And then each movement has a subtitle. We're going to hear part one, which is called M Nu R, which would normally stand for Monsieur Noir, but probably here stands for Merrill Noir. Blackbird. The second part is called multiracial power. And if you were with us last night, you know that that phrase is the one that Mozart used in every letter that he wrote to his father, the composer Leopold Mozart. Play share pair. My very dear father. And then we'll hear the fourth part of this percussion concerto called S Cling It, which literally means it sounds but in the sense of it rings out, you know, it has a suggestion of Ah Kind of ringing chime ing sensation and Composer. All fallen, you can be sure makes makes some hay with that. Let's let's hear three movements from this five movement piece called Dust, Varsha. A quote from Mozart that was nice, played by percussionist Martin Gruber and the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra. Some colorful music from the Norwegian composer Ralph Wallace, played by the percussionist Martin Gruber and the Oslo Philharmonic. We heard three of the sections of volunteer percussion concerto that he calls dust far shown. As I mentioned earlier. That is a quote from Mozart hearing his pet bird sing one of his melodies, but not getting it quite right. His reaction was to say does fashion He liked it. We heard the first part of the concerto memoir, presumably standing for Merrill Noir Blackbeard. The second part was called Monterey Share pair. Mozarts salutation to his dad in the many, many letters that he wrote to him and which still survive, and then finally, the fourth part of the concerto as Kling. It it sounds, it rings out, which it certainly does. Ralph Collins, Mozart inspired piece but inspired not so much by the music as by the man himself in a very kind of human story of Mozart, having a pet bird and Liking it when it almost sang correctly. In a moment, we'll hear almost correct versions of a Mozart Horn concerto, but it's been somewhat transformed by a Cuban band with a tendency to mambo. Stay with us as we continue with new sounds tired.

Leopold Mozart Rondo Alla Turkana Martin Gruber Wass Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra Ralph Vallon Monsieur Noir Ralph Wallace Merrill Noir Oslo Philharmonic Siri Ralph Collins Varsha Kling
"mozarts" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On that Mozart aria from Michael Nyman. Senator. 101 100 Wait on expenses. Teo. Pull On you. Wait..

"mozarts" Discussed on Frequencia Urbana Podcast

Frequencia Urbana Podcast

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on Frequencia Urbana Podcast

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ESPN Posey Lavery Ikuko A. At Godfrey US Dido Palais Elliot Geico mckean Bobby Mo Morgan autonoma George Mark Bell Salami ripon Indiana Il Il Male London Baltimore
"mozarts" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

The Maria Liberati Show

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on The Maria Liberati Show

"Less amount of calories..

"mozarts" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Everybody thinks you're hanging out with us to do mark bloom is trending number one on Twitter he we I mean we're just going to have so many notable passings I'm so afraid anyway he died at the age of sixteen nine of complications from covert nineteen he is an actor we shot him in desperately seeking Susan he was Madonna's love interest and he also was in he was stage actor he was in crocodile Dundee all kinds of TV shows you recognize them if you saw and a lot of people are on lot of Hollywood people are we talking about him he also was in Mozart in the jungle I never watched that show I watched a little bit after I think I watched a good year yeah just kind I'm praying shall yeah but people just loved him I mean all like air all kinds of from Dana Delany to Malcolm Gladwell yeah John I mean a real variety of age he and yeah god no this guy because he was in so many things Dana was married to him briefly in a delay any word TV married in that's your call and he was on stage and so people are just devastated sent the index then people just all like he sounds like a cool cat I remember and I just thought he was so hot in desperately seeking Susan my boyfriend looked like mark hello he.

Twitter Susan Madonna Dana Delany mark bloom Dundee Hollywood Malcolm Gladwell mark
"mozarts" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"I just see the answer Mozart was asked. Why are you so good at playing piano? He said, I see a piano. I just play. I see a math grad just so maybe with these coaches like the great players to play and they can't explain why if I'm looking for advice, none of that helps me Moser. Thank you. But that did can't teach chopsticks, but Sally from down the road can but it is shocking to me thinking of college sports, the best one we can come up with his ear and made the point about you make a lot of money. It could also be the greats play for so long. I just need a break from this, and I'm going to do something else with my life. Maybe they don't wanna work as hard. Now a lot of people are trying to come up with ones that maybe get in the park. So the gears you, they had to be great when they played. And then they got to be great as a coach. We'll just go down the roster. Just give them to me Stephen in Florida. What do you got? Yeah. About Johnny Dawkins. Well, okay. So here's what I'd say really good to great player, but hasn't been a great coach failed in his first job. Pretty good at central Florida might still be able to be a great coach at some point, but I wouldn't say coach yet, hold on real quick at Stanford. He went to the Sweet Sixteen twice and won a NIT twice. That's pretty good. Stanford. Stay has been in the final four, Stanford's not just. So when was the last time it was in the final four nineteen ninety one or two hundred ninety eight oh, that's right. They made it ninety eight and two thousand one yeah. Exactly. I mean I mean how many programs have made the final four. I mean like in the SEC we've had what five I mean. It's not like it's a creek make force hard, correct. But that's safer Saver. stunning. Stunning twice. Johnny Dawkins was a great do player. Had a good good NBA career. And I think he's done it at two different schools. No, he got fired. Tired or not. He still won. I mean he had a better winning everybody get fired. But I have to tell me if you're if you're, if you're asking me, he still won is he made the Sweet Sixteen once so have a lot of. Maybe we say great appreciates con calling Johnny dockets. Great Coates close to grade is a player not as a coach, Pat, Louisville. Pat. Johnny majors Tennessee. Have Heisman player? And if, if Dickel it closed down, he'd been a greater coach but he did well love it. Great, great with Johnny majors is a great one. That's a little older. So they didn't come to my mind, but that's a great one. I'd say now along with Steve Spurrier, I have to let's go to JJ in Indiana. Go ahead J..

Johnny Dawkins Johnny majors Stanford Florida Johnny Mozart Moser Steve Spurrier Sally Stephen NBA Pat NIT Tennessee SEC Indiana Louisville JJ Coates
"mozarts" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on KCRW

"Also, the thing I want to ask you don't really people in mentioned to you, the style of film, and and not only seeing people like seeing Clark Gable or or Cary Grant. But also Sidney Poitier. Yeah. And and and and and and so many other absolutely Sidney Poitier was a great role model in his film, the first what you've got the award for. Oh, it was. He's wearing the white jeans and a white jacket and doing something wonderful for these nuns. Yes. So it all goes back to the church, the upbringing, and the the love of film be when I was young. I wasn't allowed to go to the movies now now because I was the only child and I had to go with my uncle of when he chose to go to movies. And I remember I was still sitting upstairs in the Carolina theatre upstairs in the segregated theater. Yeah. But then I was only allowed to go see things like the vampire films Dracula. So well, I got to school. I started films the artistic films. I will never forget how much I love Elvira Madigan. Oh, sure. Appeal of the music of the Mozart music and film. I will never forget how much I love that. But Phil was very point to be in film. It gave me of the moment to explore the kind of narrative, but I must say the films that I love the most have been Visconti Lucchino Visconti, it's films, which are very much based on literature. Like, the leopard is based on a great boss, you're apart. And of course, that's advice is based on the. Great musical, Gustav, Mahler and whole thing. That'd be the film's locator because Lucchino is not only is a great film director. But he's a great art director set designer see everything in the film becomes important. The nuances of blue had the pots there in in the lobby of the hotel, everything the luggage, the mustache the clothes. He doesn't one detail unturned that great wedding, which is also becomes the wedding in the godfather Coppola's and his point of departure as to continue with that. Evolution of the Francis. Coppola Sophia in marie-antoinette, everyone said, oh, but that was the masterpiece to be it wouldn't have been a great masterpiece that you've done it. If the silent film, the music was modern, but I think that was a mistake. But the film was to be of Hugh success because she got what Maria was as a teenager. She was a teenage Queen. So therefore, it's frivolous for voluntary parties. Dress candy bumble champagne love sex. She's not allowed to talk about a political treaty or anything. And I thought that was a beautiful film. But you know that field is still one of my favorites. When I'm down in the hotel. I look at marie-antoinette. Oh my gosh. No other films that touch. Also, researchers react to that. I love not the most carrot felt that I love that. I think is equally as important as gone with the wind. But the film today is three billboards ebbing, Missouri ebbing to every Missouri. I think that's an incredible film. It's it's a survival of the south. And that's the way the south is you have to find a way survived to all these traumatic and chaotic moments that we live in now because the world we live in. Now, it's like the world is falling apart. You're going to tell you the world's handbag, and you've got to find your way to survive, you got to hustle for survival. And you've got to find your way to sustain your dignity, and your.

Sidney Poitier Coppola Sophia Visconti Lucchino Visconti Lucchino Clark Gable Elvira Madigan Phil Cary Grant Carolina theatre Missouri marie-antoinette director Gustav Hugh Mahler Maria
"mozarts" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"mozarts" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Mozart? Have you been a Mozart? They they have these balsamic glaze cares. Yeah. But the story I love that story about the carrots. So we had cracked the Nazis code. And we were just like sniping them out of the sky because we like knew where they were because we cracked the code, but yeah. But in order to like to give them an excuse for why we were able to see them at night. We said that we were eating a lot of carrots, and like put that in our thing that we knew they were intercepting and the Nazis were so fucking stupid that they were like, oh, man. We just heard eating here. Here's the carrot thing. Nazi propaganda. Stay away from carrots, and what does the myth? Oh, a myth. I wanted to debunk is it's tied in with the whole food thing. They were talking about is the the myth that we need to eat three meals a day. That's not accurate at all. We don't eat at least five. No, you can't do this little ones. And they say what I think they even say eight little meals throughout the like little time for that. I don't I'm who does. But you don't have to. I mean, we really don't have to eat that much at all. I sometimes on Sundays. We'll just eat one meal. I do intermittent fasting all the time which is only one meal, and then I won't and like in the middle of the day. And then I won't eat again until that same time the next day, and I'll do that for weeks on end do and I feel great. And again, I don't do the whole protein thing. And how we need a bunch of protein from meat like you don't need that stuff. So like an I I've been vegetarian no meat. No meat like pork in beef related since I was thirteen I gave up chicken in two thousand seven and now, I'm transitioning. Into what happened in two thousand seven someone touched. By chicken, Colonel Colonel. You know, I fast, and I felt so good after I did the fast in two thousand seven that. I was like I don't wanna go back to feeling like that. So I just gave it up, and what is your favorite food? Oh, man. Or would you find? Right now, I'm the hell you can do vegan. I I am like it's one of those things where I feel like if I'm trying to do like an alkaline raw food vegan because I was having some health issues last year. Like, I just kept getting sick. And I was like why am I I I'm healthy. I told you I don't like I exercise. I I don't eat like terrible foods all the time. I was like I'm supposed to be like one of the healthier people. And I was like I kept getting sick. And so I just did research, and it was I just want to create an alkaline Alkalis. Yep. So that's what I'm doing as of right now. And I plan to do it. Most of the time I will have if if I go like three months, and I'm like, you know, what I want a piece of pizza. I'm going to have a pizza or I'm going to have ice cream. I'm not gonna cut anything out entirely. But I do wanna live my life mostly where I do like raw food vegetarian like our vegan fruits vegetables. Most most Lincoln which was a vegetable I, and I can't do this one anymore, and it made me very mad. I love broccoli broccoli is a hybrid is manmade as well. Brierly everything everything. No, not everything the native Americans made like, basically everything. But yeah, I mean, not with chemicals anything, right? But like everything has evolved. Everything's genetically modified. So. Yeah. No like cauliflower is not. Shavers. Vegetables, aren't good. No. They're all hybrids. So yeah. No. They're not good for you. Like, there's a list of alkaline foods, and those are not on there. Okay. It's not on there. But like their kale. You can do even spinach is like touching go like you can have a little bit. But not too much all the lettuces are fine. Except for iceberg. The trash one. The one eight sheets of rotter, iceberg wedge. But it has more to do with the blue cheese and Bandon Abakar. Yes. And the actual just thickest bacon. All right. Let's talk about McKenzie basis and Jeff Bezos they announced that they were super amicably splitting after twenty five years of marriage..

Colonel Colonel Mozart Lincoln Bandon Abakar Jeff Bezos Shavers McKenzie twenty five years three months