18 Burst results for "Mount Pinatubo"

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on Freakonomics

"To do is make the sun. One percent dimmer nine literally mean changing the sun but there are a variety of things that bounce sunlight back into space. Clouds are one of those things white clouds bounce white light back up into space. It turns out the volcanoes throw ash particles if it's a big volcano very high in the atmosphere that reflects some of that light and in fact this happened in nineteen ninety one when mount pinatubo went off it cooled worldwide temperatures by a degreed greenhalgh fahrenheit for twelve to eighteen months. Well my company has come up with some very practical and cost effective ways of deliberately putting particles into the upper atmosphere and on paper. It works out that you could nullify all of the warming that way. These geo engineering ideas are in many quarters. Quite poorly received people get extreme. Some people anyway get extremely angry. And they say oh. Technology got us in this problem. Where using technology to get us out. And that's where i come to think of saying. Well okay. so are you sincere about worrying about global warming or you're using global warming as a stalking horse for your political agenda if you're sincere about the harm of global warming you say i don't want my environment screwed up. I don't want millions of people to die so if you take that problem oriented view if we can stop that problem. That's good.

mount pinatubo
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

05:56 min | 4 months ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on Brothers of the Serpent Podcast

"One hundred thirty. Oh wow for small community Will run six thousand people on reserve and you also served in the in the us military. Grech yeah i did. Six years active duty into the marine corps and and i did a five years into new york army national guard song. Thank you very service. Yeah well served in one is in the marines. I was in desert storm right very. The war was already over by the time we got. The funding was already over. We're just there in case it went again but actually on my way there we just did a an operation iwo jima. I'm heading down to our first a protocol which is going to be hong kong and just before we got there. Mount pinatubo erupted so we had to go down to calling and we pulled into. Subic bay The day after tube. Oh you're up to and we had to evacuate and it was. I think the one considered one of the largest evacuations that we did. But i got to see the ashes among the distance. And everything else like that. So that was interesting and then we ended up going to the persian gulf after that. So what was the full like. Give us the what was the full extent of the of the confederacy. When it was at its largest life farther south farthest north Pretty much around upstate. New york is where we were but we had a lot of influence. Because we would records of us doing rate as far south as carolina's under turkey's so and i read somewhere as well. One of the big influences on all the other tribes in north america really happened because we were under. I want to to meet the french. And the british as they came came into north america with the sellers so we were wondering i wants to get firearms and once we got that we pushed everybody basically westward from there so some some tribes are. I think like could be wrong on this one by believe. It's the apaches were normally associated with the desert..

Grech Mount pinatubo marine corps Subic bay marines hong kong new york persian gulf us upstate north america carolina New york
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:48 min | 6 months ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Don't know. 13 Ft Bay window in front. And I'm thinking if I were going to shoot up homes, I'd probably shoot that 13 Ft of glass instead of an IV. But that's just me. So my friend Charles and I, the next day decided we're gonna go right down the road and find the Hawks. Find out why they hate us. And so we I'm going about whether we went down the road six or eight miles and found a village and the people there had some guns and they spoke English better than us. And they immediately told us how much they hate Americans. How's that? And what they said was during the Spanish American War. You promises our independence, and all you did was come in and everything the Spanish had taken from us. You guys took from us again. And one day you will be gone. Now. That's pretty amazing, huh? So you know, there's there's nothing worse Kurt than a child armed with the truth. So I do I go home at the dinner table get washed up. And while everything's done, I explain what happened that day. And of course, my father's an Air Force pilot, right? Do you think he was happy hearing that Maribel. I am technically still on restriction today because he put me on restriction for life. But When Mount Pinatubo blew We were going, weren't we? Night. He threw us out. So that guy that I won't say he was in his early twenties, spoke English better than I did. On that day in the Philippines said We really actually don't like y'all. And we'd like you to leave. And then here it is from 1963 to 1990. It happens. Well, if you're paying attention if you're paying attention It's always there in front of you. Without I gotta run. They love your man. Take care. Have a good weekend. And by the way, folks, that is a true story. And my father did put me on restriction for life that night. Uh, but when Mount Pinatubo blew, uh we were gone. And do I think all Filipinos dislike us? Absolutely not. There's no way I believe that. But a lot did a lot resented us because If things aren't going well for you in life, you got to blame somebody other than you and we were the scapegoats. They're coming up next major stories this week. The mainstream media didn't give much play at second hand news Next on 5 70 K. Lia, I'm tree McGee general manager, Highly Hyundai Genesis Burlison. Here's fun news. Our new 2021 Hyundai launcher. Sudan has just been named North America's car of the year. Yeah. Hyundai Elantra..

Charles six Hyundai 1990 Philippines 1963 Spanish American War Kurt North America Maribel Elantra eight miles today 2021 this week Genesis McGee English Sudan next day
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"O. eighty by and welcome back George dory with you along with Stephen Coyle as we talk about the the possibility of earthquake and volcano eruptions a couple geologists are thanking you for bringing the Cascadia story to the forefront Steve one of the most frustrating things and by the way I'm there I'm the son of a geologist my grandfather was a geologist so you know and it's it's kind of a funny story but anyway the the end thank you guys I think people need to recognize the contribution that geologists make and and you know I don't know if the guys that are are thanking you for having me on or maybe on whatever but the thing is is that there are a lot of people that want to tell the Merican people what's really going on unfortunately our you know our country has in my opinion has such an aversion to the these kind of groups that people are being kept in the dark no listened smart very smart people like for instance there's a gentleman named as his last name is Goldfinger what a great name yeah I do too and then you know once it shows but the point is is that he made the statement that should Cascadia goal in their experience of full margin rupture that we're talking everything west of interstate five you'd basically is gone and because of the way the west coast especially Oregon and Washington and even northern California the the way that these cities are built very close to the ocean and what's unfortunate is that even with the let's say a five minute warning you know it's tough to move that many people so my goal George again those Cascadia film I want to make it bought is to save the lives and I know how frustrating it is god bless a geologist that basically are are doing their best to come up with a warning system and then there are some and it's smart people verses Bernard who way the U. S. she has with the guy that really figured out harm harmonic tremors and work indicative up pending volcanic eruptions sources like mount Pinatubo and so there's some amazing work going on and then what's problematic is that because the planet now seems to have seriously it's got multiple motions of multiple plates and and pressures building up all over that it demands that the some of this pressure be released so the thing that is critical is the amount of people that that could affect the immediate full margin rupture on the Cascadia ball lightning in it what's important is this it's not just be me and obviously the title situation that what happened you know during a full margin rupture but it's also off of the coast there are actually you'll see miles which are basically underwater volcanoes and interestingly enough that not only their underwater volcanoes off of our west coast but now there are also some problematic issues up the east coast so nobody ever considers that obviously were watching importer Rico I think just the last a day there's been a close to sixty eight earthquakes and a Porter Rico sits on the deepest a tropical region the French that's right at twenty seven thousand pieces of pizza stuff in the Atlantic versus America I'm sorry versus a Marianna trench in the Pacific and then you've got the Cayman trough which is about twenty five thousand feet and deep and so what's happening Porter Rico's getting squeezed.

George dory Stephen Coyle
What is geo-engineering and how could it help tackle climate change?

Why It Matters

09:06 min | 1 year ago

What is geo-engineering and how could it help tackle climate change?

"It sounds like something out of a movie system of satellites controller with a movie with a really big disaster detention for catastrophic weather events global scale a general store but the idea of manipulating our climate in order to survive is a real thing it's being developed by scientists right now and it's called Solar Geo Geo Engineering. The problem is it's risky I'm Gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today should we dim the sky a dire warning this morning from climate experts a UN panel says governments around the world must take rapid action to curb rising temperatures plummet. Climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilization very liveability. Our planet is extinct not in ten years twenty years thirty years but right now so solar measuring is the idea that humans might deliberately liberally alter the climate somehow to change the energy balance of the earth the reduce some of the climate change that comes from accumulated carbon dioxide. They can't undo all the environmental risks of carbon dioxide Maybe it won't even undo hardy. Any of them. We really don't know very well but it best it reduces some of them mm-hmm. That's David Keith. He's a professor of both engineering and public policy at Harvard. He's also one of the world's leading researchers on Geo Engineering so I've had a big onstage argument with Al Gore and factors did few years ago. where he I think his underlying position was that it was dangerous? Even talk about Solar Jewish assuring because it would destroy emissions cuts to me the worst way to handle this is to keep the kind of Tabu intact to not bring us is out in the open to keep not talking about it and then to get to a situation. Where even if we don't talk about it some country moves forward to deployment and we have under crisis to make decisions both about the technology and about governance? Today people are starting to talk about Solar Geo engineering a little bit and if you want to know what it is you have have to start at the beginning with climate change. So here goes the most important driver of climate changes energy use fossil fuels coal and gas and oil when they're burned to provide us all the energy that allows one hundred world to work. They put carbon dioxide in the air and that increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere makes the atmosphere try or heat and it tends to warm up the climate. A good way to understand this is to think of carbon in the atmosphere as a huge blanket covering birth it traps in the heat the more carbon in our atmosphere the hotter it gets under the blanket and that causes all sorts of changes so the most obvious one is warming warming but it will say melting ice sheets and chicken race sea levels will increase the intensity of extreme storms and rainfall events. All all those collectively will produce a series of human environmental impacts and that's where solar geo engineering comes in. But how does it work. Give me just like a step by step of that process. Sure so in a very basic way we wanna get aerosols of some sort into the upper grabs fear. Probably with specially designed planes. This is achieved. SUCCI is the research governance and public engagement fellow. Hello at the Union of concerned scientists. They would admit these aerosols which then stay in the atmosphere for on average of a year or two and then we would need to continue that process again and again to maintain the temperature. We have reduced so aerosol like hairspray basically but a different different chemical compound. Okay so these planes would fly up super high release chemical compound that would then make a cloud essentially but ah more dispersed layer that would cover the whole Globe and then do what and so that layer would reflect sunlight. The idea idea here. Is that when we bounce sunlight back into space we reduce the amount of incoming heat. So you'd have to keep doing this over and have to keep doing this has it's been tested Ed. This has not been tested. The only test we have is a natural analogue of a volcano. So the the most recent volcano that exploited that got aerosols into the stratosphere was Mount Pinatubo Nineteen ninety-one and we notice that there was about a half degree of cooling that lasted for a few months so people just look at that and they were like. Oh what's do that. I think people like. Oh that's really interesting. I think we should look into that further and then that that research led into this space as a potential way to help cool the planet. We can't just wait for volcanoes to erupt so scientists are trying to figure out synthetic ways to do the same thing and aerosols in the stratosphere are just one of the options there other ideas of manipulating cirrus clouds ways as you could reduce the amount of these thin high clouds which act as heat trappers. puzzles to modify Rian stratus clouds. Kind of Lok Lousy off say say the coast of Seattle to make them a little more effective and finally at least in principle you could imagine humanity constructing some kind of reflective shield in space between between the earth and the sun aside from these methods. There's another one that involves recreating woolly mammoths. Yep you heard that right woolly mammoths. Another plan involves spreading. Sand oversee is to keep it from melting but the one method. That's getting the most attention. And the one we're talking about today is atmospheric aerosols aerosols and a big part of this conversation is risk. Scientific risks are not willing understood. We've done a lot of modeling. The space face in there is general ideas of how it could affect precipitation or extreme weather but it's not a robust understanding and especially at you know a small enough enough scale for different countries to know how it might affect them. So what are the chances that messing with our climate this way will have side effects and unintended consequences on says it's one hundred percent certain that something you do with this scale we'll have side effects an unintended consequences. Anyone who thinks that this is some magic fix that will perfectly GLI reduced climate risks and work exactly the way we expect anybody who thinks that is not. I think we can do lots of research and we could learn a lot but at the end there will still be lots of unknowns. Are there any known risks already. Oh lots of known risks so it could deplete. The ozone layer could change the circulation the stratosphere it could cause air pollution. Because we're talking about adding aerosol so the atmosphere we know those are pollutants by blocking sunlight. It could reduce crop productivity. There is a big range of risks for each of the risks. I said they're now quite a few scientific papers. Have begun to really look at those quantitatively and for each the rest. I said it looks like based on early research that the actual scale of those risks is pretty small compared to the benefits of reduced harms through the reduction climate change. But I wouldn't leap inclusion that we know that the risks are small compared to the benefits. I think we can say will call on its is. There's enough reason into believe it could dramatically reduce human. And if I'm honest is century that it deserves serious research so what. What are the chances that some regions will suffer more from the consequences of Geo engineering than others because if someone just decides that they're going to do it it's not just gonNa Hover over one country it will affect the entire world so we know for sure? There are ways that you ensuring could be that were produced hugely equal destructive destructive impacts so for example you only did it in the northern hemisphere and reflected sunlight in the northern hemisphere. Put ourselves in there and not in the Southern Hemisphere. You would shift the band of rainfall and the tropics with big big impacts. We know for sure that would be destructive. The evidence is that if it's done in a way that is globally uniform. You aim to have roughly the same because radio forcing same amount of sunlight being reflected almost almost everywhere north to South East to west. If you do that and if you do it in a way where you're not doing too much you're using it to take the edge off the the risk the pain gene for Co two in the air emit circumstance. The evidence for current models is that actually no major regions are left worse off in all regions have significantly reduce describe at risk. So you just do a little bit Geo Engineering. Not you know a ton. Well yes. The dose makes the poison

Solar Geo Geo Engineering Geo Engineering Solar Geo UN Mount Pinatubo David Keith Sierra Seattle Al Gore Harvard Professor Southern Hemisphere Union Of GLI
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We didn't mind anymore the property so we left behind which is we were just concerned all our lives and there are so many like her settling into temporary shelters this evening I'm worried about what's next you know what what lies ahead their lives have been upended and this is far from over well it I mean if it's far from over what what are we talking about here I mean what what is the danger right now from from the volcano still well that you know the there's great uncertainty here because the speed with which it xcelerated took the scientists by surprise it was in this low level what they call on rest since last year but it's suddenly rumbled to life Sunday blasting Steven Ashton pebbles and repeated that again today in plumes that the government said were a quarter of a mile and a quarter mile high and winds are caring those caring that ash north to Manila the roads are carpeted with ash the air quality is disintegrating all it disintegrates very fast as you travel toward the volcano and so does the visibility everybody's wearing masks even forty miles away from it they're wearing masks the volcano David went from level one alert to level four in just a matter of hours Sunday and today it continues to creep up and the government sorry to say that means that a major explosion could happen within hours or days the files are closed five hundred flights are suspended the people being told to stay indoors just remind me that there's a history of volcanoes in the Philippines right it's a highly active region for earthquakes and volcanoes the Philippines sits on the Pacific ring of fire the seismically active arc that extends from Japan to Indonesian you might remember mount Pinatubo I'm also on the island of Luzon erupted in nineteen ninety one and killed more than eight hundred people they hope that the evacuations all the precautions they're taking are going to avert any kind of level of of any any any any sort of of disaster that level but the country is on pins and needles.

Manila David Philippines Japan Luzon Steven Ashton
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm David drain well it's not a big volcano but it is big enough to shut down Manila's International Airport this morning the taal volcano about forty five miles south of the Philippine capital erupted over the weekend it sent ashen steam nine miles into the sky and lava into tall lake enters Julie McCarthy was in the evacuation zone earlier today she's now back in our bureau in Manila hi Julie hi there so what you see on this trip well let me just paint a little scene there's tall lake which is this ninety minute drive from Manila it's this picture perfect tourist draw on the com by the hundreds of thousands they're in inside that lake sits tall volcano the lake shore is dotted with villages that overlook the volcano and the government ordered psalm twenty five thousand people who live on the shore or near it to evacuate and fifteen thousand actually went to shelters and we were in this cavernous evacuation center in the city of no not one and some seven hundred people filled this gymnasium and there were continual lines of food being served there were so many donations that the head of the shelter told as people were eating eight times a day but there were hold all too wouldn't home they wouldn't leave there they would leave their property there were freed of looting of forty four year old Maria Georgina K. model fled her home with her two children and three other families and she said to us she's terrified but not about her property here she is speaking through an interpreter very scary and we didn't mind anymore the property so we left behind which is we were just concerned all of our lives and there are so many like her settling into temporary shelters this evening I'm worried about what's next you know what what lies ahead their lives have been upended and this is far from over well A. M. if it's far from over what what are we talking about here I mean what what is the danger right now from from the volcano still well that you know the there's great uncertainty here because the speed with which it xcelerated took the scientists by surprise it was in this low level what they call on rest since last year but it's suddenly rumbled to life Sunday blasting steam and ash and pebbles and repeated that again today in plumes that the government said were a quarter of a mile and a quarter mile high and winds are caring those caring that ash north to Manila the roads are carpeted with ash the air quality is disintegrating all it disintegrates very fast as you travel toward the volcano and so does the visibility everybody's wearing masks even forty miles away from it they're wearing masks the volcano David went from level one alert to level four in just a matter of hours Sunday and today it continues to creep up and the government scientists say that means that a major explosion could happen within hours or days the soils are close to five hundred flights are suspended in people being told to stay indoors just remind me that there's a history of volcanoes in the Philippines right it's a highly active region for earthquakes and volcanoes the Philippines sits on the Pacific ring of fire the seismically active arc that extends from Japan to Indonesian you might remember mount Pinatubo I'm also on the island of Luzon erupted in nineteen ninety one and killed more than eight hundred people they hope that the evacuations all the precautions they're taking are going to avert any kind of level of of any any any any sort of of disaster that level but the country is on pins and needles it sounds like it Julie.

NPR David
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We didn't mind anymore the property so we left behind which is we were just concerned all our lives and there are so many like her settling into temporary shelters this evening I'm worried about what's next you know what what lies ahead their lives have been upended and this is far from over well it I mean if it's far from over what what are we talking about here I mean what what is the danger right now from from the volcano still well that you know the there's great uncertainty here because the speed with which it xcelerated took the scientists by surprise it was in this low level what they call on rest since last year but it's suddenly rumbled to life Sunday blasting steam and ash and pebbles and repeated that again today in plumes that the government said were a quarter of a mile and a quarter mile high and winds are caring those caring that ash north to Manila the roads are carpeted with ash the air quality is disintegrating all it disintegrates very fast as you travel toward the volcano and so does the visibility everybody's wearing masks even forty miles away from it they're wearing masks the volcano David went from level one alert to level four in just a matter of hours Sunday and today it continues to creep up and the government scientists say that means that a major explosion could happen within hours or days the soils are close to five hundred flights are suspended the people being told to stay indoors just remind me that there's a history of volcanoes in the Philippines right highly active region for earthquakes and volcanoes the Philippines sits on the Pacific ring of fire the seismically active arc that extends from Japan to Indonesian you might remember mount Pinatubo I'm also on the island of Luzon erupted in nineteen ninety one and killed more than eight hundred people they hope that the evacuations all the precautions they're taking are going to avert any kind of level of of any any any any sort of of disaster that level but the country is on pins and needles it sounds like it have hers Julie.

Manila David Philippines Japan Luzon Julie
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We left behind which is we were just concerned all of our lives and there are so many like her settling into temporary shelters this evening I'm worried about what's next you know what what lies ahead their lives have been upended and this is far from over well it I mean if it's far from over what what are we talking about here I mean what what is the danger right now from from the volcano still well that you know the there's great uncertainty here because the speed with which it xcelerated it took the scientists by surprise it was in this low level what they call on rest since last year but it's suddenly rumbled to life Sunday blasting steam and ash and pebbles and repeated that again today in plumes that the government said were a quarter of a mile and a quarter mile high and winds are caring those caring that ash north to Manila the roads are carpeted with ash the air quality is disintegrating all it disintegrates very fast as you travel toward the volcano and so does the visibility everybody's wearing masks even forty miles away from it they're wearing masks the volcano David went from level one alert to level four in just a matter of hours Sunday and today it continues to creep up and the government scientists say that means that a major explosion could happen within hours or days the soils are close to five hundred flights are suspended in people being told to stay indoors just remind me that there's a history of Akane as in the Philippines right highly active region for earthquakes and volcanoes the Philippines sits on the Pacific ring of fire the seismically active arc that extends from Japan to Indonesian you might remember mount Pinatubo I'm also on the island of Luzon erupted in nineteen ninety one and killed more than eight hundred people they hope that the evacuations all the precautions they're taking are going to avert any kind of level of of any any any any sort of of disaster that level but the country.

Manila David Philippines Japan Luzon
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Might be meteorologists but if they're going to sell you climate change they have to understand that if America causes climate change it's not just manifested in volcanoes I mean I didn't and in the hurricane's off the United States it's a global problem it's a global challenge and by the way we're not the big offender when it comes to climate change we're not it's it's China and India to laughably emerging economies as their described in China is the number two economy in the world India is not far behind it between the two countries I've got about four billion people I mean is a very serious thing to keep in mind and and and yet does it was an emerging economy an emerging economy. which is code at the elite level for you can't hold them to account for the same standards we have in America and Europe we are sophisticated first world countries and China is emerging country. China merge a long time ago okay check China merge a long time this is not the China of the nineteen sixties this is not the China of the nineteen seventies this is not done shopping's China that is this is not now say tongues China this is a she Jim things China they have nuclear weapons they have a navy and airforce and a powerful army they they they they are a world power they are not emerging okay emerging would be like Cambodia. okay Laos would be an emerging economy you you might have an emerging economy so someplace in subsaharan Africa perhaps Burkina fossil comes to mind would be an emerging as an emerging economy right nobody sits back and says oh what is what's the trade imbalance like with Sir and I'm. not really mean surnames nice plays in the former Dutch colony there in South America but no nobody's nobody's a certain arming saying they were first to the first world economy there is an emerging economy of Mozambique is an emerging economy and goal is an emerging economy ever trade is an emerging economy okay those are places that are much of China's not an emerging economy. no the number two player on the planet are not an emerging economy they got to be held the same standards we got held. they just do but we give them fifty five chances to cheat a seventy seven ways and before you know it the mathematics are off the table I just so if you're gonna blame people for climate change let's blame everybody. okay we have a house party with a house party and a house get's rent it's not just Steve's fault Steve didn't wreck the whole house Steve didn't throw the kick off the roof. into the swimming pool every knows that that was Larry and we're not gonna say Larry's emerging drunk we're gonna say he's a drunk just like Steve and he had a party to this is what we have to say we have to call things what they are. and to be honest with you the idea that any of us are changing the climate is just absolutely fundamentally nonsensical these are the people that will tell you that that hurricanes and tornadoes our our weather events but volcanoes and earthquakes are not well I don't know why they get a lot of certain stuff getting pumped out of all casinos mount Pinatubo remember what happened in Iceland the end up putting a bunch ash into the air get a re route aircraft for like six weeks. that's whether to that's not a coal fired plant that's not a smelter that's whether to. but it's just it's really absurd folks and and we're gonna hold new account what I find to be most offensive though out of the tire tire bed a plea of nonsense from last night's of CNN town hall. the fact that they really want to sell you Gen X. as the answer to this if we just abort babies we can fix this climate change I'm looking here that she great ahead it.

China India America United States Europe six weeks
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WTVN

"Years, trying tracking down various problems and trying to understand things just didn't make sense about climate. I can now show, very clearly. The greenhouse warming theory is a mistake. That it is not physically possible. So the biggest crisis facing climate right now is the fact that most climate scientists are absolutely convinced the greenhouse gases on the causa global warming. And they don't even wanna listen to anybody. That's got a different idea. They don't want to consider the possibility. There could be anything different. Meanwhile I show on physically dash impossible dot com. It is physically impossible greenhouse warming theory is based on several assumptions that turn out not to be correct. And greenhouse warming theory has never been demonstrated by experiment. In first of all, tell us, what is the so-called, greenhouse warming theory? Basic idea is that greenhouse gases, which are actually any, any gas molecule was more than three atoms absorb certain amount of energy radiated by earth, and greenhouse warming theory posits, that if the gas absorbs is thermal, energy. It must get hotter and one way or another causes earth to get hotter. But it turns out that it's not absorbing all the energy from earth. And Furthermore, the phone, the mental thing is a body cannot be warmed by its own radiation. So tell us some of the flaws of this climate change debate in your opinion. Well, the biggest flaw right now is the fact that greenhouse warming theory is physically impossible. It is not correct all the arguments, you hear all the modeling here, predicting major warming in the future is all based on the assumption that greenhouse gases absorb infrared energy from earth makes earth, warmer, one way or another. And that's just not possible. Now in terms of 'cause, you know, we admit and you just explained how the planet has warmed up somewhat over the years. In terms of what's causing it. What are what are the possibilities? In two thousand six I was happily cruising the internet when I found some data from, Greenland ice core data whether drill down into the into the glaciers in Greenland and conceal something about the volcanic activity of the past, and the temperature of the past had fairly good resolution and looked at the data and what they showed was the greatest, volcanic activity recorded in, Greenland ice was for sightly, the time we warmed out of the last ice age from twelve thousand five hundred years ago, or twelve thousand years ago, nine thousand five hundred years ago that would imply the Balkan ISM caused warming. Now, I my first active volcano. When I was nineteen, I've studied volcanoes all my life. And I looked at that, and I said, wait a minute. We all know volcanoes cause cooling the rupture. Mount Pinatubo in nineteen ninety one in the Philippines was. Followed by about three years of cooling, about a half a degree centigrade and all major explosive volcanoes in history have caused this kind of cooling, and I said, how could they cause warming and the more, it looked that the more says these are good data the something going on here? We don't understand and to make a long story short. What I've discovered is that. Yes. Big explosive volcanoes cause cooling, and then when you have several of those per century, and it goes on for millennia you can cool a world down into an ice age. But we warm out of an ice age. It's very sudden, and that seems to correlate with a different kind of organism basaltic volcanoes like we see in Hawaii, but at a much greater scale than we see a white where the lava just flows over the land, and there was a time, for example, two hundred and fifty one million years ago when the lava filled. Area in Siberia society United States, we're talking big events here to what we find throughout geologic time is every time there was a major period of warm in there was also a major period of basaltic lava flow. So as I looked into this in more detail, I realize that basaltic lavas are very high temperature. They have a lot of chlorine, and they can they can cause, ozone depletion. And then the more I began to look at the temperature changes in the last few decades, I realize that yes, in the nineteen sixties, we were manufacturing large amounts of CFC gases. This freon used in spray cans uses solvents, and these gases when they get into the upper stratosphere get broken down by ultraviolet radiation from the sun and release atoms of chlorine. And it turns out that one atom of chlorine in the lower stratosphere in a really cold environment can destroy one hundred thousand molecules of ozone, chlorine seems to be the villain here. Well, available Corine is what caused yes. Koren's what causes ozone depletion ozone depletion allows moral tra- violet? Be radiation to reach earth, which causes warming. And so. Man turned on the warming starting in nineteen seventy nineteen seventy five by producing these CFC's. We then pass the Montreal protocol in nineteen eighty seven when we suddenly found the Antarctic ozone hole in nineteen eighty five realizing that this was a bigger problem than we thought and sure enough by nineteen ninety three the increase in CFC's stopped by nineteen ninety five the increase in zone depletion stopped by nineteen ninety eight the increase in temperature stopped so man turned it on and turn it off we caused the problem. And by mistake, we fix the problem is turned off still Peter at this point. The. One of the problems CFC's they last forever. Many CFC's have got a lifetime of fifty seventy five years, she and they're still up in the atmosphere. So we are still depleted or slowly recovering just a few percent of year, and it's going to be several decades before we get back to the ozone levels that we had back in nineteen seventy. So as long as the ozone remains depleted, we're continuing to warm, the ocean or continuing to melt glaciers were continuing to cost sea level to rise. Does the ozone layer, replenish itself, then? The ozone layer actually a molecule of ozone lasts for about eight days. The ozone layer is continually replenishing itself. And it is, in fact, the destroy the separation of oxygen to get atomic oxygen. We send forms with oxygen to form ozone than the separation of ozone back in two forms of oxygen. That's what heats the stratosphere, that's what causes the warming up of the stratosphere when we mess up the cycle when we deplete the ozone, because of CFC's, for example, then of the ozone layer becomes much thinner. Morals. Inviolate be reaches earth. And we get beige warming on earth. Is this something that you're concerned about today as opposed to fifteen twenty years ago? Well, the big problem was twenty years ago, and it was.

CFC Greenland Mount Pinatubo Hawaii Philippines Corine United States Koren Siberia Montreal Peter twelve thousand five hundred y nine thousand five hundred yea fifty seventy five years
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on EconTalk

"June joining essentially putting sunshine on the planet if you will, it's hard officially manipulating the temperature of the planet so that it cools down. We know you we can do that, because volcanoes do it back in nineteen Ninety-one Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, emitted so much selfish oxide from one volcano that reduced temperatures about one degree Fahrenheit for about three years so you can these global temperature. So you can definitely do this kind of thing that is your only real way of avoiding dramatic battle comes the other part of the conversation. And the other thing you need to remember, if you really worry about bad outcomes, surely, you don't just worry about bad outcomes from global warming. You worry about bad outcomes, from a wide range of other. Issues. And I would still argue if you worry about battle comes from club warming, you should worry about a lot of other bad outcomes like terrorism, like, bioterrorism, certainly, the issue of, of a, an asteroid killing off large parts of the planet, which we know can happen and many, many other things, and Richard Nord house, which will probably talk about later. Sorry. Bill Nord house, a professor at Yale University and got the Nobel prize in climate economics. The only economist to get that he's actually written on this, and one of his points was, we actually do have a reasonably good estimate of how much is worth for most people to secure the planet because back in the early two thousands Naza was looking at should we protect the planet from asteroids, shoot. We look for near earth objects might hit the planet. These. Are basically extinction events in these real extension of wins. We know that they've happened before probably have about a risk of one hundred million years, so not a high risk by any means, but certainly terrible outcome. They could track either ninety percent or ninety nine percent of these earth. Objects and the extra cost of tracking. The nine percent was not very high yet, congress decided not to spend that it was a couple of billion dollars safe enough of that very. Well, it very clearly tells you that we actually put a price on human survival. And when north house dosa calculation it shows that we care somewhat but not all that much about the planet. So in that sense if you worry about extinction events, which I think very, very unlikely in, in, in climate, you should certainly also worried about it.

Mount Pinatubo Richard Nord Bill Nord Philippines Nobel prize Naza Yale University congress professor one hundred million years ninety nine percent billion dollars ninety percent nine percent three years one degree
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:52 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And so we don't do that. But you, you bring up a really important point about NATO. So I mentioned earlier the NATO military strategy in our system. We have a strategy and then we have an assessment process that helps us inform. What investments from either capability or capacity perspective or necessary to implement that strategy? Nato has a storage, we not had. We now have three things that I think will be the northern the, the. Carnal direction for us to go in and NATO one is a NATO military strategy. And other is an accepted concept for NATO operations in the third will be an assessment process that helps us understand where we are relative to where we need to be an executed NATO military strategy that will never be directive in nature. I mean you know, every country is going to make its own decisions about defense investments. There's many domestic considerations that will always dominate any decision about what you buy, what you don't buy try to be country, but we can be informed as an alliance as to what the best mix of capabilities and capacities are in my counterparts, and then go back and formed by that information into the debate that takes place in their own countries. So I see that as a positive the other thing that we have done in a smaller group with other countries where we have robust until sharing arrangements with leverage those until sharing arrangements to have an assessment process. As well. That, that we conduct at the top secret level to help us all collectively understand, where the best investments may be a respective countries to achieve campaign outcomes, where we expect always to be fighting as part of a coalition. Thank you. The gentleman and the orange shirt about the eighth route earlier today at the Brookings Institution with general Joseph Dunford, chair of the joint chiefs of staff to up their thanks. And then after that very background flu tie. I French general Tony Toco from inside defense wanted to ask you about something closer to home about the border, something other issues. That'll be left for your successor in what ways, do you believe it would be appropriate for the military's mission at the us Mexico border to expand, if if it were to expand and then also is it right to be concerned about resources moving to that area when it was not identified as an unfunded priority by Pentagon. Thank you. Okay. Let me let me start with the framework that I've used to provide advice on board. And it's very simple. Number one is the mission legal number two, people have the proper training number three. Do they have the proper capability in number four? The direction that we're providing through our men and women clear and unambiguous. They know exactly what they're doing. And if we're meeting those four criteria and we are feeling legitimate capacity shortfall of the department of homeland security than emission is wholly appropriate and consistent with multiple presidents who have asked department offense to address shortfalls in department homeland security. So when you separate the politics in emotion from it, you know, my military advice is biz benchmark against those four factors. And, and everything that we have done to date is, is consistent with those four factors. Everything we're doing today is legal, all of our men and women are properly trained and equipped and they have clear direction as to what their mission is with regard to the money, you know, in my view, it's the president's budget. Right. And so this is the dialogue that takes place between the executive branch and legislative branch about how to fund the president's priority. So I'm not gonna comment on the appropriateness of taking money from the department of defense and moving into the border. We're certainly going to take opperations and maintenance money when we're tasked to perform a mission to train those forces that are going on a mission and then sustain those forces in the execution of that mission. And that's and that's what we're doing here. She's been radio programming from Tuesday. And other than that, when it comes to the broader funding of infrastructure and so forth again, I think that's most appropriate dialogue that takes place between the president and congress. And, and then we go back, and we execute the legal orders that we have been given that'd be happy to follow up question, because I think it's important, it's important to separate the emotion of the border issue in the challenge is on the border from the employment of the US, military in what is fundamentally illegal inappropriate mission. And let me address the question that you touched on. But didn't ask directly. And that is readiness. So when people say to me, well, which ended forces down to the border doesn't that make them less ready. What I say is look, if we send someone to respond to Mount Pinatubo or Sonam in Indonesia, or conduct operations in Afghanistan, or conduct operations in Iraq that unit by definition is not performing, all of the tasks that are in the design of that particular unit. How do we accommodate that we make sure that we rotate? Units fruit routinely through different missions to give them experience and training and capability in the full spectrum of missions that we expect them to perform. So I don't view the mission on the border with regard to readiness as any other mission that we've been assigned which, again, we look at missions in terms of emission you've been assigned emission for which unit was designed seldom. Do you get an assigned mission that is that fell them if ever, I would say you get a mission assigned would allow you to develop proficiency and all of the tasks for which that unit was designed if that helps you understand the question. Yes, sir. Thank you. This is Joe tub it with her. Chairman dunford. The want to go back to your remarks on Iran. How likely you are in favor of having a hotline with Iranian military, just in order to avoid any miscalculation and the region. Look at the end of the day are Milton. No relationship is fundamentally a policy decision. What I would tell you in general terms is, I believe that military military relationships and dialogue can be stabilizing influence in a relationship, but there has to be a clear framework within which that military military leadership is ongoing, and, and we don't, as you know, have a direct. Counterpart. In iran. And so we'd have to work through that. Woman in the next to last row. So on can't Washington correspondent for two way. Tonight Korea in recent interview, President Trump actually said that he wanted to five nuclear sites. Destroyed asked that too conjunction. And he only said one or two, that's why the whole talk at failed could you tell us a little bit more specifically, what those five sites represent? And at the press conference presenter, also said that he doesn't know when conjoined would be coming back to the table. If that's the case, where is a strategy at the moment. This is another will be a bit disappointing my answer. I'll talk to you from a military dimension. We look at North Korea through the winds of capability, they represent our job is to make sure we have sufficient forces to deter provocation and respond invented provocation event that deterrence fails. We're also supporting a diplomatic track by disrupting ship that ship transfers of petroleum products that are inconsistent with UN Security Council resolutions, and with regard to the framework within which we're negotiating a peaceful resolution to denuclearize peninsula, that, that is absolutely the lane in the president, and the secretary of state. And I've got to be incomplete support. I don't I don't have my own view on a policy of the framework within which we're going to dress, the Nuclear's -ation. My job said support the diplomatic track. And that's what we're doing. Yeah. View that as I am not trying to be vase. But I've you specificity that you get into as a as a policy issue. So if the president's spoke about five and Kim Jong to view that as all in normal dialogue that's ongoing in a diplomatic effort to do arise the peninsula, and I'm not gonna comment on with specificity on whether five or two or whatever it ought to be should be addressed. Time for a couple more. So let's see, we've got John Menard. The white shirt. Yes. Please. Thank you very much. My name is minimal shift from medic. I've gone service you've talked about ghanistan my conscience is that as you know that right now. Peace talks are going on in Afghanistan from the thought of thought, except the government presence in, in baddeck talk. So if fee stocks, succeeded one main demand is all of us forces from Afghanistan and US forces us officials are not going to Fisher's all the time youth, rated that they are not only tolerant threaten Afghanistan other more than twenty. Station, if you accept to withdraw from Afghanistan, but how do we deal with other terms of station as ISIS and others and Afghans, look, no one's no one's suggested that the United States is going to leave Afghanistan without our counterterrorism interesting addressed. And although I think we're very helpful to the Afghan people and those of us that have served their proud of that are fundamental interests are kind of terrorism presence in South Asia, and supportive abroad herself as your strategy, and that's not negotiable in terms of our kind of terrorism interests. You, you have correctly identified the position of a Taliban, which is a complete withdrawal of all US forces. Our interests are to make sure that are that are kind of tourism interests are addressed as well as some other principals. And I'm sure that the State Department will insist upon in the dialogue in a very important principle that we have insisted on an AFC. Gann owned Afghan-led dialogue in, in the initial work of embassador was that who God bless him because he's doing something that hasn't been done now in ten or fifteen years. And for all the skepticism people may have on what may happen in this, diplomatic track the fact is there is a diplomatic track. And so we ought to do all we can reinforce that. And we are, but you need to make sure we understand that a key part of the current diplomatic framework to ensure that the Afghan government, the Afghan people inclusive, Afghan people are participants in at brushes and finally it very last question in Marvin Cal here in the front row place. First of all, thank you very much for being today. To question the first is what is your judgment of Putin's and game? What does he really want and second among those of us who studied Russia? There's been a feeling that when Putin has domestic problems. He seeks some. What some way of getting out of that by moving extra Italy. I'm wondering if there's any evidence to suggest that. I think if you look at the demographics in Russia. You look at the economics in Russia. You look at some of the signs of this affection in Russia. You can't. I can't necessarily get inside Putin's mind and say that those three variables of affected how he reacts externally, but the, the evidence is pretty clear, the pattern of behavior is pretty clear. I don't think it's unique in Russian history to create an extraordinary challenge to accommodate a domestic issue. That's not also unique to Russia to do that. So I don't think there's any doubt that domestic politics bears, on, on President Putin's calculus. And I don't think I'm too far on my lane. Someone in uniform to make that to make that assertion with regard. What would think Russia wants as well as I think they want to be the preeminent power in Eurasia would be would be my judgment have been very clear about that if you look at the path of capability development, if you look at what President Putin has said, if you look at the actions taken in Georgia in the Crimea in the Don Bosch, you can't draw any other conclusion than that's what they're trying to do. If I could ask a favor folks to please let us have a minute to leave the stage before you get up. But please behalf of Jon Allen all of us at Brookings. Please join me in thanking chairman..

president Afghanistan NATO President Putin Russia us Iran Joseph Dunford chairman Brookings Institution Mexico Tony Toco North Korea John Menard Mount Pinatubo State Department Korea congress South Asia Taliban
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"This happen. They're doing it on their own, and why is government have to step into this? Well, it's because once against him walls is going. In paying homage to his benefactor and look in in in my view, when did this is this is truth for one we have a cleaner environment than we've than we've ever had. Absolutely. You know, we are better off as you we as Americans we are better off now than we have ever been in the past. We do better in almost on the animals every single letter gala level. Can we do better? I absolutely. But if you want, you know, what is capable in terms of renewable energy. It's not the government throwing money at renewable companies to build this stuff up is looking at the private sector on what they've already been able to do and what they've had success with. Well, and he also you gotta worry about something called price triggers because by doing this mandate by forcing this by requiring it and legislating it which you're telling then the suppliers which are the people who are creating the solar panels, and creating the wind turbines, and all these other things that they can raise their price that happens that is the concern that we have the most because if we just let this organically happening. The market will determine based on the price what they're gonna pay to build the term is and how turbines, and what the energy costs is. But it when you start putting price signals in like this you're going to Jack the prices just because the price of poker is gonna go up to build these things. Well, and the other the other the other thing that really that really bothers me on top of of all of it is something you said at the start. And that is our let's say just for the sake of argument that we were able to actually achieve the goal by two thousand fifty. The problem is not the whole the whole country is not going to the whole plan is not going to. So we're going to have to bear the brunt of this exorbitantly expensive plan that if the end of the day accomplishes, nothing nothing, zilch. It's like when we talk about the trains and a Cossio Cortez wants to, you know, stop the airline travel all that nonsense. They don't realize how big the country is what they don't realize how big the planet is. And there was that data point where you know, volcano spews a bunch of garbage in the air, and it takes away like a years worth of Prius is driving on our roadways. What natural phenomena what happened in the early nineties boys and girls, come I let's put in the jumping in the way back machine back in the early nineties. We had something called Mount Pinatubo in one. That thing went up. I think that's why it was when that baby went up we had a summer without a ninety degree temperature. Without it did not climb over ninety and all of us were going. Well, what I guess we're just gonna have all winter here now, but what nature is a bigger factor in spewing carbon in the atmosphere, and we're not going to be touching eighty five percent in this nation. We even if we go zero in the entire nation. We won't be touching eighty five percent of the carbon. That's going in the atmosphere. It's you people have to get it through your thick skulls. Let's make it work. But we don't have to. Disrupt our economy Senator Dave is make always a pleasure. Thank you so much for stopping by on your way to on your way to work on your way to Saint Paul this morning. I do have one self promotion. I'd like to do. Resort to get ready because I am holding my the first piece of twenty twenty campaign lit I'm holding a fundraiser on March twenty fifth in spring park at backchannel brewery. Okay. And we are going to have former and maybe future. I hope future congressman Jason Lewis out. So it starts at seven six o'clock. Go to David is MC dot com. The promo is there. But you know, what folks I'm raising money early because I'm not taking anything for granted around here. You know, you can't you can that that that blew creep into the suburbs keeps getting broader and broader going further and a little further. So yes, you have to you have to work really hard because because we need voices like yours in the legislature. Thanks, so the twenty fifth at six o'clock come out and see Jason Lewis and put a put a couple shekels in a back channel brewer channel brewery been there yet. So maybe they're very nice. They're right on the border between mountain spring park. All right. Maybe I'll cut Bill that way. Oh, come on up. Good to see you, buddy. Thanks, guys. Coming up. We'll go over a bit of this this article, why renewables can't save the planet. Plus, we have a dollar amount. Finally for the curtains are going to block out the sunlight at US.

Jason Lewis spring park US Mount Pinatubo Cossio Cortez Senator Dave Jack congressman Saint Paul Bill David backchannel brewery eighty five percent twenty fifth ninety degree
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:48 min | 3 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WTVN

"I don't believe that we can continue to pollute the planet with impunity. Right. But even if the US cuts back on its emissions in countries like India China Russia when they don't we don't accomplish a whole lot. We just end up. You know, kind of jacking up our way of life thinking, we're doing the right thing if the rest of the world isn't going to fall into line is it really going to matter. Here's another thing. That drives me nuts. Politicians the ones that demand we comply with these rules and regs to curb climate change. They're demanding that we change our lifestyle, but they're never ever going to change the way they live their private jets. And and they're they're they're giant SUV's, and limousines, or whatever that's only for us that, you know, the the small people, and when they start talking about taxation and paying for your carbon footprint that makes me real suspicious because they're just they're just coming after your money. I really don't think global warming is the concern. They just want the distribution of wealth. I also believe some of this is kinda cyclical we don't really know because we've only been tracking it for a certain amount of time a hundred and thirty nine years people that try to tell you they knew what was going on prior to that. They don't really know for sure again, there's a lot of these records that supposedly exists but not everybody has access to it. Because it hasn't been digitized. And if you listen to people, like Rush Limbaugh, for example. And I think he's got a very valid point. How the term global warming now is Morphing into climate change. Because now you can put anything under the client climate change umbrella and pass it off. Do we get as much snow as we used to when you were growing up? Don't you? Remember winters being a lot snow ear. I do. I I grew up in Minnesota. So maybe they were a tad more snowy up that way. But I hear people say that about Ohio all the time that they remember winters used to be snowy. Or is that some sort of romanticised memory that we have? Our summers hotter. I can't tell because when I was a kid. We didn't have central air or a C or anything. We just had fans and I lived a large portion of my younger life without a sea or air conditioning. I think when you're younger you can deal with the heat a lot easier than you can when you're older, but. I don't know if it was hotter back then in the summertime. I also like I said, I think you deal with the heat better. When you're a kid, doesn't it seem like no matter what anybody says at the end of the day, you can find another study or another professional or another talking head to refute. It. And then I'll wrap it up with this. I remember back. I believe it was in the early nineties Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted. I specifically remember hearing the news reports when Mount Pinatubo erupted they said, this thing belch more carbon dioxide into our atmosphere in that massive eruption. Then mankind has put into the atmosphere since mankind has been around. So if a volcano. Can do more than we have in our in the entire existence of mankind. Ken, we really change what we do. So let's get to the phones jump on with Dan. I Dan thanks for calling six ten WTVN. Dan. Do you believe in climate change? I believe changes as our planet all the time islands appear audiences appearance. So you leave a cyclical cyclical do I believe that? We are mankind is the cause of the warming. How arrogant to believe? I mean, gosh, we are at sunspots solar players and volcanoes account for nearly all of of climate change. And we all respect on the part of it. Now. I mean, get real. I want to believe you you sound intelligent. You sound like you know, what you're talking about. What how about would you rather deal with extreme heat or extreme cold where do you fall in that, man? It reads a cold because I can always throw on a sweater. But you stripped down so far and few listen. All right, Dan. Appreciate the call. Thanks for for buzzer. And let's get with the McCullough hunt. Real quick Michaela. Thanks for calling the six packs extend WTVN, what do you think? I would you rather deal with extreme hot or extreme cold? I rather deal with extreme hot. I think but I had to call you because I'm driving home from Cleveland about this whole global warming bed. And I was with the American fisheries society today, they're up there at the Hilton downtown, and we were having this exact conversation, and they're so sad that global warming was a really poor choice of terminology back in like the mid to late eighties or early nineties for what truly is climate change. And that from like, a marketing standpoint, even if you had to look at it that way, it was just not the right terminology because people don't get it. It truly is climate change. And and it was. Was the vibe that we are responsible for it human humankind race. So these are a bunch of scientists right now, and they're not backed by heavy lobbyists or anything like that embarrassed. Dang. I have to leave my comment with that. They're saying that we have dug up enough carbon in many different ways to impact the atmosphere is that it has a real effect. And what we say. So bear explanation of it. Are we in dire? Trouble. Do we have twelve years to turn it around like Alexandria, Cossio Cortez says right? So we were talking about that twelve year bit to today. They're saying what they see with fish. They'll tell you what they see with fish way. Fisher moving like way upstream in certain areas of the country. Even colder water is an indication them that we have a problem, and they are really concerned about it. And your comment about the folks, we're driving, limousines, and all that stuff. We need people actually to consider when it meets. I'm a very balanced standpoint. And they think we are they think we are in trouble, and we need to fix it. But they say it's more like, you know, we're looking at twenty. Fifty. We're there could be real impact, especially with pollution in streams, which comes they're saying from this climate change. All right Michaela. I appre. I got a jump here. We're kind of behind it. But once again, you're on with many Dreyer Sunday afternoons, right? Yeah. I am from four to six, but I had to call because it's great conversation. I was just on that today. Appreciate it. Michaela. Thank you. Thanks, dave. And talk to you soon. Let's get traffic and weather every ten minutes on the tens from TempStar heating and cooling products. Johnny hill. Sorry, Johnny got a little bit behind schedule. Seventy one southbound michaela's on to stuck down here near sixty one that traffic much improved after the accident scene. Dhamma sixty one was moved to the side downtown in Columbus. We look really good in all four directions. Keep an eye out for a couple of accidents scenes Hamilton road between seventy and Livingston report of an injury accident. Fender bender for Stelter, an international gateway by the airport. And of course, tonight the jackets in town at nationwide arena Puck's gonna drop here at seven traffic..

Michaela Dan Mount Pinatubo US Rush Limbaugh Johnny hill McCullough hunt Philippines Cleveland TempStar Minnesota India Ohio Stelter Puck Ken
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:06 min | 3 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have to do is make the sun one percent dimmer. Now, I don't literally mean changing the sun. But there are a variety of things that bounce sunlight back into space. Clouds are one of those things. White clouds bounce white light backup in the space. It turns out that volcanoes throw ash particles. If it's a big volcano, very high in the atmosphere that reflects some of that light. And in fact, this happened in nine hundred ninety one when Mount Pinatubo went off it cooled worldwide. Temperatures by magic. Greed Greenhalgh Fahrenheit for twelve to eighteen months. Well, my company has come up with some very practical and cost effective ways of deliberately putting particles in the upper atmosphere, and on paper it works out that you could nullify all of global warming that way these geo engineering ideas are in many quarters quite poorly received people get extreme some people. Anyway, get extremely angry. And they say oh technology got us in this problem where using technology to get us out. And that's where I come to think of saying. Well, okay. So are you sincere about worrying about global warming? Or you're using global warming as a stalking horse for your political agenda. If you're sincere about the harm of global warming. You say I don't want my environment screwed up. I don't want millions of people to die. So if you take that problem oriented view, if we can stop that problem. That's good, right? This is one characteristic of the wizards solution a large scale top-down fix many prophets. Meanwhile, think about small-scale bottom up Mary Robinson. Again, there's a lovely story of this woman that I was very impressed by she's not policy MRs tongue. She was a professor who moved from Vietnam to Australia and could have had a very good living in Sydney and came back to her country because she wanted to work with poor people in her region. She introduced me to the regional officer. She introduced me to the elders. She introduced me to the women as they had broken down the level of which women could be involved comfortably. She said if we did this at the district level women would feel disempowered. So we broke it down to eight families coming together and forming a cooperative, and we now have a number of cooperatives who are in charge of a certain parts of the forest. To maintain that forest and the regional officer at her persuasion had given them the rice to the fruits of the forest. They say the first fruits were medicine and actual fruits. And then they said next year. We'll be able to call some of the trees, but we will plant new trees, we will maintain the forest and this for me was a wonderful example, which I know is happening in indigenous communities all around the world, they actually save for us. And if only listen to indigenous peoples we would save far more for us, we need to replant and save rainforests. And if we listen to those who really understand their neighborhoods and their forests we'll do it much more quickly and more effectively a lot of the solutions that you praise and suggests that we scale up our reliant to some degree at least on behavior change on people deciding to make a different kind of consumption decision or whatnot. And as most of us know, even just from our? Own personal experience. Whether it's a diet or exercise or spending saving money, and so on behavior change and self discipline can be very difficult, and I'm curious whether you truly believe that relying on humans to quote, do the right thing on a large scale will be successful enough to have the kind of effect in the climate round that you hope for. Well, I certainly think it is important that we change our behaviour to a significant extent it is happening. People are recycling. More more young people are vegetarian or even vegan. There is a real acknowledgement that we need to do this and actually women in the home and in their community more likely to be leaders on changing behavior. That's what we're good. In the family may not always be successful. And I'm not the best myself. I mean, I'm I'm more vegetarian than you're a vegetarian. Yes. I love some west of Ireland lamb. That's the thing. But the point really is that we need to understand the health and the economic benefits that come from a change in vision about where we want to see the world. That's the most important thing. I am skeptical that we will solve it by just doing the right thing. And I mean that somewhat facetiously, but give an example, there was little books that was popular a few years ago called fifty simple things you can do to save the world. Well, those are fifty simple things that you can do to feel self righteous. And none of them were gonna save the world. And I think that approach that attitude fundamentally mistakes what the problem is. And it creates a situation where people can feel good about themselves. Oh, I unplugged my iphone charger while I was away today. And yet, no matter even if all of us did that it would not materially change what's going to happen. Global warming. We have to make actually very painful cuts, which our society isn't very good at doing. We need to be careful about how we will move rapidly to having renewable energy in developing countries. Developing countries have become very ambitious to get renewable energy. We're learning that there are human rights abuses occurring where clean energy is being put into a country in the wrong way. And the wrong way tends to be mega projects that don't have any concern for land rights or water rights are indigenous peoples rights to consent. Locally an example that I'm aware of was a big wind farm than Kenya. And it was on pasture land belonging to Masai pastoralists. Nobody thought they had land rights, but they had always brought their animals on this land and these big three hundred and sixty five wind turbines were being built, and they wouldn't have even benefited from the energy from the clean energy, the electric city. So they took a case actually in court in Kenya. And blocked the whole thing until their rights were being properly recognised. Well, then there's nuclear power so nuclear power is a carbon-free energy source that absolutely works. The United States got scared of nuclear in the well starting the nineteen seventies. And through the nineteen nineties. Then vice president gore presided over the announcement of killing the last nuclear plant in there. I'd say it's because we were going to build safe coal plants. Now, we realize inconveniently that global warming is a threat. Well, I'm not an expert on the nuclear issue. I have to admit that the way I see is nuclear energy has its own problems. And we saw that in Japan when the nuclear power plants were were flooded, what incredible problems and their lifelong problems for the Japanese. There are problems at the end of the life cycle that make it very expensive. There are problems in building nuclear power stations that make it very expensive. And meanwhile, we have the much cheaper maneuver energy coming onstream, and that I understand much better. So I'm not making a whole state. But I think it's true that nuclear power does not produce greenhouse gas emissions, and that's important France has nuclear energy and. And has benefited from it. But also has the problems now of aging nuclear power stations and the cost to the economy of getting rid of those..

Mount Pinatubo Kenya officer Mary Robinson MRs tongue Sydney stalking United States Japan France professor Ireland
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:31 min | 3 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is freakonomics radio. Here's your host, Stephen dubner. Nathan Myhrvold runs an invention. And technology firm, called intellectual ventures. He considers himself a wizard in Charles man's profit versus wizard model, and he spent some time thinking about technological solutions to the climate change problem. So climate change is one percent effect. Now, all we have to do is make the sun. One percent dimmer nine literally mean changing the sun. But there are a variety of things that bounce sunlight back into space. Clouds are one of those things. White clouds bounce white light back up into space. It turns out that volcanoes throw ash and particles. If it's a big volcano, very high in the atmosphere that reflects some of that light. And in fact, this happened in nine hundred ninety one when Mount Pinatubo went off it cooled worldwide temperatures by degree degree and a half Fahrenheit for twelve months. Well, my company has come up with some very practical and cost effective ways of deliberately putting particles in the upper atmosphere. And on paper. It works out that you could nullify all of the warming that way these geo engineering ideas are in many quarters, quite poorly received people get extreme some people. Anyway, get extremely angry. And they say oh technology got us in this problem where are using technology to get us out. And that's where I come to think of saying. Well, okay. So are you sincere about worrying about global warming? Or you're using global warming as stalking horse for your political agenda. If you're sincere about the harm of war. I don't want my environment screwed up. I don't want millions of people to die. So if you take that problem oriented view, if we can stop that problem. That's good, right? This is one characteristic of the wizards solution a large scale top-down fix many prophets. Meanwhile, think about small-scale bottom-up Mary Robinson again. Well, there's a lovely story of this woman that I was very impressed by she's not apologised MRs tongue. She was a professor who moved from Vietnam to Australia and could have had a very good living in Sydney and came back to her country because she wanted to work with poor people in her region. She introduced me to the regional officer. She introduced me to the elders. She introduced me to the women as they had broken down the level at which women could be involved comfortably. She said if we did this at the district level women would. Feel disempowered. So we broke it down to eight families coming together and forming a cooperative, and we now have a number of cooperatives who are in charge of a certain part of the forestry to maintain that forest and the regional officer at her persuasion had given them the rice to the fruits of the forest as they say the first fruits medecinal and actual fruits. And then they said next year. We'll be able to call some of the trees, but we will plant new trees, we will maintain the forest and this for me was a wonderful example, which I know is happening in indigenous communities all around the world, they actually save for us. And if we'd only listen to indigenous peoples we would save far more for us, we need to replant and save rainforests. And if we listen to those really understand their neighborhoods and the forest we'll do it much more quickly and more effectively a lot of the solutions that you praise and. Suggests that we scale up our reliant to some degree at least I'm behavior change on people deciding to make a different kind of consumption decision or whatnot. And as most of us know, even if just from our own personal experience, whether it's a diet or exercise or spending saving money, and so on behavior change and self discipline can be very difficult, and I'm curious whether you truly believe that relying on humans to quote, do the right thing on a large scale will be successful enough to have the kind of effect in the climate round that you hope for. Well, I certainly think it is important that we change our behaviour to a significant extent, and it is happening people are recycling. More more young people are vegetarian or even vegan. There is a real acknowledgement that we need to do this and actually women in the home and in their community are more likely to be leaders on changing behavior. You know? That's what we're good. In the family may not always be successful. And I'm not the best myself. I mean, I'm I'm more vegetarian than I was a vegetarian. Yes. I love some west of Ireland lamb thing. But the point really is that we need to understand the health and the economic benefits that come from a change in vision about where we want to see the world. And that's the most important thing. I am skeptical that we will solve it by just doing the right thing. And I mean that somewhat facetiously, but give an example, there is little books that was popular a few years ago called fifty simple things you can do to save the world. Well, those are fifty simple things that you could do to feel self righteous. And none of them were gonna save the world. And I think that approach that attitude finale mistakes what the problem is. And it creates a situation where people can feel good about themselves. Oh, I unplugged my iphone charger while I was away today. And yet, no matter even if all of us did that it would not materially change what's going to happen warming. We have to make actually very painful cuts, which our society isn't very good or doing we need to be careful about how we will move rapidly to having renewable energy in developing countries. Developing countries have become very ambitious to get renewable-energy. We're learning that there are human rights abuses occurring. Where clean energy is being put into a country in the wrong way. And the wrong way tends to be mega projects that don't have any concern for land rights of water rights are indigenous peoples rights to consent locally an example that I'm aware of was a big wind farms and Kenya. And it was on pasture land belonging to messiah pastoralists. Nobody thought they had land rights, but they always brought their animals on this land and these big three hundred sixty five wind turbines were being built, and they wouldn't have even benefited from the energy from the clean energy the city. So they took a case actually in court in Kenya. And blocked the whole thing until their rights were being properly recognised. Well, then there's nuclear power so nuclear power is a carbon-free energy source that absolutely works. The United States got scared of nuclear in the well starting nineteen seventies. And through the nineteen ninety s you know, then vice president gore presided over the announcement of killing the last nuclear plant in. I'd say it's because we were going to build safe coal plants. Now, we realize inconveniently that global warming. Thing is a threat. Well, I'm not an expert on the nuclear issue. I have to admit that the way I see is nuclear energy has its own problems. And we saw that in Japan when the nuclear power plants were were flooded, an incredible problems and their lifelong problems for the Japanese there are problems at the end of the life cycle that make it very expensive. There are problems in building nuclear power stations that make it very expensive. And meanwhile, we have the much cheaper maneuver energy coming onstream, and that I understand much better. So I'm not making a whole statement. I think it's true that nuclear power does not produce greenhouse gas emissions, and that's important France has nuclear energy, and and has benefited from it. But also has the problems now of aging nuclear power stations on the cost to the economy of getting rid of those..

Nathan Myhrvold Stephen dubner Mount Pinatubo Kenya officer Charles man Mary Robinson MRs tongue Sydney stalking United States Japan
"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:34 min | 3 years ago

"mount pinatubo" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nathan Myhrvold runs an invention. And technology firm, called intellectual ventures. He considers himself a wizard in Charles man's prophet vs wizard model, and he spent some time thinking about technological solutions to the climate change problem. So climate change is a one percent effect. Now, all we have to do is make the sun. One percent dimmer nine literally mean changing the sun. But there are a variety of things that bounce sunlight back into space. Clouds are one of those things. White clouds bounce white light back up into space. It turns out that volcanoes throw ash particles. If it's a big volcano, very high in the atmosphere that reflects some of that light. And in fact, this happened in one thousand nine hundred ninety one when Mount Pinatubo went off it cooled worldwide. Temperatures by maj agreed a half Fahrenheit for twelve eighteen months. Well, my company has come up with some very practical and cost effective ways of deliberately putting particles into the upper atmosphere. And on paper. It works out that you could nullify all of global warming that way these geo engineering ideas are in many quarters quite poorly received people get extreme some people. Anyway, get extremely angry. And they say oh technology got us in this problem where are using technology to get us out. And that's where I come to think of saying. Well, okay. So are you sincere about worrying about global warming? Or you're using global warming as a stalking horse for your political agenda. If you're sincere about the harm of global warming. You say I don't want my environment screwed up. I don't want millions of people to die. So if you take that problem oriented view, if we can stop that problem. That's good, right? This is one characteristic of the wizards solution a large scale top-down fix many prophets. Meanwhile, think about small-scale bottom up Mary Robinson again. Well, there's a lovely story of this woman that I was very impressed by she's not apologised MRs tongue. She was a professor who moved from Vietnam to Australia and could have had a very good living in Sydney and came back to her country because she wanted to work with poor people in her region. She introduced me to the regional officer. She introduced me to the elders introduced me to the women as Asra they had broken down the level at which women could be involved comfortably. She said if we did this at the district level women would feel disempowered. So we broke it down to eight families coming together and forming a cooperative, and we now have a number of cooperatives who are in charge of a certain parts of the forest. To maintain that forest and the regional officer at her persuasion had given them the rice to the fruits of the forest as they say the first fruits for medicine and actual fruits. And then they said next year. We'll be able to call some of the trees, but we will plant new trees, we will maintain the forest and this for me was a wonderful example, which I know is happening in indigenous communities all around the world they actually save for. And if we only listen to indigenous peoples we would save far more for us, we need to replant and save rainforests. And if we listen to those who really understand their neighborhoods and their forests we'll do it much more quickly and more effectively a lot of the solutions that you praise and suggests that we scale up our reliant to some degree at least on behavior change on people deciding to make a different kind of consumption decision or whatnot. And as most of us know, even if just from our? Our own personal experience. Whether it's a diet or exercise or spending saving money, and so on behavior change and self discipline can be very difficult, and I'm curious whether you truly believe that relying on humans to quote, do the right thing on a large scale will be successful enough to have the kind of effect in the climate round that you hope for. Well, I certainly think it is important that we change our behaviour to a significant extent it is happening. People are recycling. More more young people are vegetarian or even vegan. There is a real acknowledgement that we need to do this and actually women in the home and in their community are more likely to be leaders on changing behavior. You that's what we're good at in the family may not always be successful. And I'm not the best myself. I mean, I'm I'm more vegetarian than I want your vegetarian. Yes. I love some west of Ireland lamb. That's the thing. But the point really is that we need to understand the health and the economic benefits that come from a change in vision about where we want to see the world. And that's the most important thing. I am skeptical that we will solve it by just doing the right thing. And I mean that somewhat facetiously, but give an example, there was little books that was popular a few years ago called fifty simple things you can do to save the world. Well, those are fifty simple things that you can do to feel self righteous. And none of them were gonna save the world. And I think that approach that attitude fundamentally mistakes what the problem is. And it creates a situation where people can feel good about themselves. Oh, I unplugged my iphone charger while I was away today. And yet, no matter even if all of us did that it would not materially change what's going to happen. Global warming. We have to make actually very painful cuts, which our society isn't very good at doing. We need to be careful about how we will move rapidly to having renewable energy in developing countries. Developing countries have become very ambitious to get renewable energy. We're learning that there are human rights abuses occurring. Where clean energy is being put into a country in the wrong way. And the wrong way tends to be mega projects that don't have any concern for land rights of water rights are indigenous peoples rights to consent locally an example that I'm aware of was a big wind farm and Kenya. And it was on pasture land belonging to messiah pastoralists. Nobody thought they had land rights, but they had always brought their animals on this land and these big three hundred sixty five wind turbines were being built, and they wouldn't have even benefited from the energy from the clean energy, the electric city. So they took a case actually in court in Kenya. And blocked the whole thing until their rights were being properly recognised. Well, then there's nuclear power so nuclear power is a carbon-free energy source that absolutely works. The United States got scared of nuclear in the well starting the nineteen seventies. And through the nineteen nineties. Then vice president gore presided over the announcement of killing the last nuclear plant in that I'd say it's because we're going to build safe coal plants. Now, we realize inconveniently that global warming is a threat. Well, I'm not an expert on the nuclear issue. I have to admit that the way I see is nuclear energy has its own problems. And we saw that in Japan when the nuclear power plants were were flooded, and what incredible problems and their lifelong problems for the Japanese. There are problems at the end of the life cycle that make it very expensive. There are problems in building nuclear power stations that make it very expensive. And meanwhile, we have the much cheaper maneuvre energy coming onstream, and that I understand much better. So I'm not making a whole statement. I think it's true that nuclear power does not produce greenhouse gas emissions, and that's important France has nuclear energy and has. Has benefited from it. But also has the problems now of aging nuclear power stations on the cost to the economy of getting rid of those. I went back to Charles Manson author of the wizard and the prophet about the nuclear power conundrum..

Charles Manson Kenya officer Nathan Myhrvold Mount Pinatubo Mary Robinson MRs tongue Sydney stalking United States Japan France