36 Burst results for "Mosul"

Fresh "Mosul" from The World

The World

01:14 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh "Mosul" from The World

"Covering a wide range of subjects. Theology, philosophy, astrology, astronomy, stacks off handwritten Tex. From the 12th and 13th centuries. This collection is very important for all of humanity. Because they don't talk about just that question or just about Iraq. But they talking about human history. He was worried that Isis would destroy them. And he had good reason to be consent. His flip with them once before in 2003, he says the U. S led invasion off Iraq unleashed a wave off anti Christian attacks across the country. His church in Mosul was targeted on also, they put my name on the list over the dangerous person to be killed in 2007 Mossad thought it was no longer safe to stay in motion. But if he was leaving, he was taking the documents with him. Over several contestant trips, He moved them tow car crash about 20 Miles south of most. Then on that black night in August, 2014 he found himself doing the same thing again. We put what we had the cars. We had two cars. And also when we find many people's crying without car and they want to save their life, we asked them tow coming in our car on DH Sitting on the heritage Men, women Children sat on top of cardboard boxes full of fragile ancient manuscript. And we say we will leave together or we will die together. The cars sped off into the darkness headed to the Kurdish region off Iraq to safety at 5, 30 am a young girl to start saying, Father Father Look at your right on. I see many cars with Isis with their black and white flags. And they are ready to attack us. That's it. He thought they were about to be ambushed and I start to pray. Really? I asked God to give me 10 hands or then. Lex toe, save more strength to save the people and the manuscript as they drove away from the city. Musil remembers Kurdish security forces opening fire on the Isis convoy speeding to town. They managed to hold them back while his cart and other civilians got through the checkpoints. Archbishop Moussa and the others in the caravan eventually made it to safety, But they re lucky, says vain. Hannah, who heads a Syrian Policy Institute, a U. S based nonprofit that advocates for the rights of minorities in the Middle East. All Christians in car crash were able to leave, she says. There was a smaller number of Christians or Syrians that lived under Isis rule on Of course, these were more elderly members of the community who were not able to travel on. You can imagine that it was very traumatic experience very scary and unknown. On the day to day basis. Human rights groups have documented atrocities against Christians in areas under Isis control. They say What happened to the CD was even force genocide. Islamic state also pillaged and destroyed such sights for a while it was making money off offsetting historic artifacts on the black market. The documents that Archbishop Moussa helped save have been digitized and exhibited in France and Italy. Asked where they are now. I don't tell you exactly where it is it fair enough. But he says there's a in Iraq and he wants to keep it that way for the world. I'm sure Turkey is one of the few Muslim majority countries where abortion is legal. But Turkey's conservative government is working to limit abortion access. Many public hospitals have stopped providing them even among friends. Abortion remains a taboo subject. From Istanbul reporter Fariba Gnawa has our story. It's late morning and several. I invites me to meet her at her home in a hillside middle class neighborhood. When I arrived, she's with three other women friends. They asked me only to use their first names for privacy. Four of them get together, often drink tea and eat with laughter. But today's gathering is about to turn tense seven is a stay at home Mom who wants to share her struggle with abortion. To make it easier for others. It's rare for a Turkish woman to publicly talk about having an abortion. Your mama Jama Lucien. I became very upset. When I learned about my pregnancy. I wondered whether I could do it or not. I was already having a hard time with two kids. There was nobody that could help me. Her friend Shada is the loudest in the group. She shakes her head at Seville. I assemble in countless cool on the album ceremony. Seems it could do to prevent a pregnancy right now. It can tell your tubes used birth control. If you don't use all these options, and you end up getting pregnant with a child. You should give birth to them. Shada turns to me for validation pollution beginning. Not that I know so less situation. I feel like I'm sharing her. So this is a sin, after all Civilized, taken aback by shade is sharp judgment but keeps her cool. Civilized 38 years old with kind eyes. She dropped out of university got married and worked in health care for a while. She and her husband have two small Children. To keep up their middle class lifestyle to kids there all they can afford it. You know the hell you sick, Mitchell showed up a little on the high each trying to set higher standards for my Children and trying to provide them a good life. I can give birth to five Children and can raise them very well. But I cannot provide them good opportunities. Several. I decided to get an abortion with her husband's permission, which she needs legally. She thought the decision would be the hardest part. But finding a hospital was even harder. Private hospitals cost too much, but public ones kept turning her away. Seville. I reached out to more Chata Ah, Women's rights group that helped her find a public hospital to do it for free. But even that hospital staff gave civilized guilt trip and threatened her view. The hubbub really was shaking. Italian is it, Watson said. If you come to this hospital for another abortion We won't let you in. She had the abortion at nine weeks, one week before it became illegal. Seven. I was broken from the emotional toll and harsh treatment. The abortion itself was awful. Captain took a Tudor. I felt bad. I woke up crying. To be honest. Sometimes my heart aches. The stigma of abortion remains deep in Turkey. It became legal here in 1983. Wealthier women from Saudi in Iran where abortion is band. Come here, tohave one. But in the last decade, the conservative AK party and President Erdogan have been chipping away at reproductive rights in 2012, the government tried to reduce the 10 week. Pregnancy lament to six weeks. But feminists fought back and won. Erdogan publicly calls abortion murder and says women should have at least three Children. Public hospitals can simply refuse women access based on what the president says not the law, so low income women like Syrian refugees turned to back alley clinics, each other in some solid going On. Last year, news broke that police had raided a clinic fronting as a Syrian hair salon. Three people were arrested. Hazel. A tie is an outreach coordinator at Women on Web, a Dutch based platform that helps women get access to abortions in restrictive countries. Turkey banned women on Webb's website in 2016, but Turkish women still find ways to contact them. Hustle translate some of the recent letters she has gotten from Turkey, including this one from a woman in there's room. She's 22 years old and she wrote to us saying I'm sure distillation is difficult for everyone. But if my family learns about the pregnancy, they won't let me live. I know you help a lot of people, but you don't know where I live. And you don't know my family. You are my only hope. Here is another message from Istanbul to other letters from women in Istanbul reflect the same desperation. One woman says she doesn't have the money to get an abortion. Another has run away from a violent husband but needs his permission. Toe aboard her pregnancy been into Djalma. Listen, you're comin back and fabulous home in Istanbul. The debate rages between the four fronts. Cousin seven light gets support from her activist friend said John, As Shada continues to criticize the stage will help you with your child's in san are, you know it doesn't their baby's dying from hunger in this country, Women can't buy formula for their babies. Yeah, I got it all, but I think she had.

Iraq Turkey Istanbul Shada Archbishop Moussa Seville Mosul Isis Mossad President Erdogan U. S Lex Toe Middle East Heritage Men Jama Lucien Musil Iran
Minorities under attack as PM pushes 'tolerant' Pakistan

Hugh Hewitt

00:09 sec | 2 months ago

Minorities under attack as PM pushes 'tolerant' Pakistan

"On a tough month for religious minorities in Pakistan. Latest incident to Christian gunned down because he rented in Mosul neighborhood in northwest the shower.

Pakistan Mosul
Discipline and Determination

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

07:24 min | 5 months ago

Discipline and Determination

"First of all let me just say thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us. I certainly do appreciate it. Thank you for having me. I appreciate you having that the second thing I like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that. Many feel free to go all the way back to when Benny I started all as you can start more current day. Tell us about yourself born and raised in Detroit. Michigan will actually outside Detroit. You know a couple of years from places to Middle School. And Grosse Pointe Mosul elementaries who rose point in moved out the Southfield and went to Detroit Country Day high school where I played three sports basketball for a ranch ride one to eight inches and buy raw and one in track championship. Long Jumper graduated from there might style ship offers to play for Bond College and chose to go to Michigan State University. Where but there for five years by four years leading receiver on in junior and senior there on the Rose Bowl in twenty thirteen one of the best teams initials state history when we went thirteen one. Nedley to seminated professionally. That did not get drafted. I'm currently wanted to my season in the NFL won the Super Bowl and Denver in two thousand sixteen play my first four years in Denver for the last two years. I've played in New York last as Peyton Manning. The plane would be lamenting though nine and author. And you know that's just a little bit about me. I am a brother team. Want rather than two. I have two parents and step mom so I had a great people around me and I've been able to do things in my life with the help is a family friend fantastic. I don't even know where to start. We're GONNA take a quick left turn and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do now for you? I'm going to say outside of football. I enjoy things. I enjoy travelling. Recently you know taking a couple of trips to Mexico I would agrees go to. La Lived in New York to travel. Highlights been time with family and friends love being around my friends and you know guys that I played with friendships that I've grown throughout the year. I do enjoy reading. That's why also why I wrote a book enjoy learning from April. I and I really movie out will love data. What's your favorite movie right? Now I would say green book. I really like an movie of all time. You know you got any denzel movie really this one. The greatest actors of all time so American gangster within her faith a thousand disgrace got it so talk a little bit about your journey because a lot of times when people think about athletes we all understand how hard it is and how you have to be disciplined and Yadda Yadda Yadda talk a little bit. About what it takes to be successful not just athletically but in general you gotta work hard wood. I'd like to tell people is that success doesn't happen in a day. It happens every single day. When you say you have to be disciplined after that the right at the set goals that you really want to achieve like a new one to be a professional athlete. I didn't know if it was going to be for baller basketball but every single day like I was working towards that and our talented anybody out there. Yes be disciplined is very important but being persistent stand persisted toward your goal like Adobe Wall Time It took me twenty two years and come a pro athlete. Isn't that something happened overnight or happened. After a couple years at Michigan state not had been working for this pretty much. Whole Life. Now always consciously gone toward something but once. I started at Age Fourteen. Fifteen years old like all right. I WANNA be a professional athlete. I'm working towards that every single day. So success doesn't happen in a day. It happened every single day goal. Said you gotTA break in long-term goals down to your short term goals and your short term goals in T- long-term wills data. Thanks this so talk a little bit about your book. Why a book reflection reflection of where I met in my life and that things that I've been able to accomplish as a team as an individual and also the people that have been arrived around so great players and I've learned a lot of grey base of why not share those things with the world. Does I know with certain books have done for me in my life. And that's why I wrote one and why not inspired me. So that's why I'm so when people pick up and read it. What are they gonNA take away from it? This is like a self help. Books like self actualize books. And they're going to realize that they have all the power in everything that they have that they want to achieve their goals or dreams right inside a woman. They'll just Meyer Goldberg from a semis stories. But some of the people that I have in the book like my brother or Draymond Green Dr Quiz demarcus ware also has some fringe were entrepreneurs or in the book as well because connected. One person in the world is Allie. I want them to also learn from friends who still have the same doubts fears and insecurities still were able to overcome those things. There are ups and downs in life if you really want something. You're going to have to stay precision discipline and go after it. And that's what I just want be learning. I want people to take away from it. Give us some insight on one of the time because I know I'm in a season and in time in my life where I have had the thought. Okay I want to give up. I don't WanNa to do this anymore. What about you have you ever had a time in your life or in your career where you wanted to give up? You wanted to quit. But you didn't and help US UNDERSTAND. What made you continue on? I don't think I ever wanted to give quit. I would always tell myself dot to give up or quit in. Ireland will just know that. I would have a lot of regrets if I did give up to quit so I don't think I've had very cut moments like man. I don't WanNa feel this pain or I don't WanNa feel dizzy or fear a life. I've always told myself like you're going to regret this. If you don't go back out there or try so I don't ever want to give up but I just like everybody else. I've had my fears. That's an insecurities but I'll always tell myself. You gotta go for the asked. You knew each yourself up. If you don't get it was was one of your biggest failures if you describe it that way personally. I don't consider anything that I don't achieve as a failure but talk a little bit about some of those moments for you. What was the biggest moment in your life where he thought? Wow Man that Dingo will. I have moments like this every year but the first time. I've really felt a big failures. Probably my Richard Junior year at Michigan State. That'd be twenty twelve and I dropped. Touchdown passes on a big nationally televised game on ABC. And now that was the first time where you know they gain was really on my shoulders. I mean only happened in the first quarter. But you know you know. Lose game first quarter but I like that play could have made by different game. That was the first time night. They'll those fears and insecurities all that nervousness said. That's when I really got into understanding the mind. How strong the MY IDEAS? I can care of your mind. How IMPORTANT MODEL

Detroit Michigan State Basketball New York Michigan Denver Country Day High School Michigan State University Grosse Pointe Mosul Benny Middle School Bond College Peyton Manning Southfield NFL ABC Denzel Mexico
"mosul" Discussed on First Person

First Person

08:54 min | 10 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on First Person

"Really actually on election night there. Yeah Twenty Sixteen we had been with the ICT F- in the first neighborhood of eastern Mosul for a couple of days. So we were we were technically am also also and as I expected the ittf they were the first soldiers to step foot in Mosul. More than two years and the commander. The night of the election brought US deeper into the city into central neighborhood abuse from Mosul. And I remember with my talk for crawling up to the roof and looking out over the edge and being told that in the morning we'd be able to see the Tigris river which puts the city in half and I really felt like okay. Hey we're finally after all this where we're finally here And it really felt To wake up in Mosul so I that night I slept in a in a civilian billion home that had been commandeered by the ICT F- in a closet. And so I woke up at six. Am and there were mortars hitting outside so we kind of just woke up and there was like Children stuffed animals around the in the closet and like a toolbox to signs of the family that had lived there. I checked on twitter on my phone and and saw the you know trump had was was waiting the election and it just felt strange to thank. You know now that this battle is finally changing to the Iraqi side back at home. The same person who had who had done so much to raise fears that Isis was actually succeeding in his political efforts on on. US trip into the region to Mossel during that offensive. was there a sense of triumph. was there a sense of success. So my the last trip to Mosul was in May of twenty seventeen and that was the trip where I went to documents detailing casualties it was a sense of just. This has gotten way uglier than anyone intended. So the battle for eastern Mosul came I. That was the last battle of the Obama Administration. The battle for westernmost will was the first battle of the trump administration and there are a lot of reasons why the battle of western Mosul was much bloodier. It's more concentrated Terrain Isis pulled its forces back continually until they were just in western Mosul. It was where they made their last stand and traditionally has had more support for a guy and for Isis so it was always going to be harder harder fight there but trump also when he came into office this loosened the rules on. US Air strikes that had been intended to reduce civilian casualties. All these things combined emit Western most will just a picture of destruction so by comparison sake eastern Mosul there was destruction as I mentioned but it was here and there there were plenty of parts. Parts of the of that half of the city still standing and because of that residents were able to return fairly quickly and life was able to resume fairly quickly so I returned easternmost will after it was only a few months from Isis and people were painting. They were as clearing rubble from the streets. The markets were full of fruit. And you know they it was. It was defiant but it was returned to life. Western Mosul was just a health scape. It was just entire blocks destroyed you you know. There was a an account from a local journalist This week two years after Iraq declared victory arises they are still pulling bodies from the rubble in western Mosul. Aw I don't think anyone's thought this is the kind of lasting triumphant victory that we had in mind and I know the like I said. They had taken such care to avoid civilian casualties and they were clear with me throughout we would have to rebuild this. We're trying to win over the population here. In the East Bay succeeded by the time they they got to western Mosul. It's worth noting when I when I list all of these reasons why it was just so much more destructive there they were so weakened that the Iraqi special forces more generally. We're just part of the equation in western Mosul so in eastern Mosul they they were the entire show they did all the fighting in that part of the offensive in western Mosul. They played one role but the Iraqi federal police Iraqi military other units from the Interior Ministry all played a much bigger role and they. They had much less regard for civilian casualties. So it really it just it. All kind of broke down into really just a very very sad sad picture. How do you carry yourself I was a willing participant in this and I had always the ability to come in and out into leave and you know I try to remain grateful that these people whether it be the battalion or the civilians billions is folks who were willing to host me there to open up on what they were experiencing and to sort of be willing to support the mission of sharing that You know through my journalism it through my writing so I just try to keep that in mind like but as a new father. Now congratulations and knowing how many of these men are fathers and women although I think most of the fighters you were with. How do you perceive the loss in the sense of what you saw at this point in your life I have a story that I can't get out of my head? That sort of captures how I feel but also makes me wonder if I could have done on this if I had already had a child when I was investigating civilian casualties I learned that there was a man who he he briefly left his house. One morning to go and get gas for the families generator and when he left a US air strike hit the house and he killed his wife and his three daughters. And while while I was at the side of the House I- interviews neighbors and they told me that he would come a few times a week to the site. Of His. Douse the airstrike. And just sort of dig through the rubble with his hands and then he would sit down and start crying and ultimately just walk away and so I called him And I asked him what he was doing when he was digging through the rubble and he told me that he himself had managed to find the pieces of his wife and daughters and and that he like he buried them himself and he couldn't find part one daughters and so he wanted like that closure before he would he would finally leave Mosul. And you think like you know y name and helping this guy you know. All he wanted he told me all. I want to find my daughter and then I then I'm gonNA leave. It really kind of brought home for me. I make such an effort to kind of make Americans feel like and make myself feel like we. We are responsible in some way for these places that we fight wars the US US government made no effort to contact him. They ultimately based on my evidence that I that I I gather while I was there. They admitted to the strike. They admitted we killed his family by accident. They to reach him. They offered him no condolence payments. Even though they're congressional funds set aside for this and not even helped to dig through the rubble. And you know so when I say bodies are still being pulled from the rubble. It's you know for me. It's like that. That's part of America's his responsibility you know. and that's a little tiny picture of how bad a job we as a country do in following up and trying to to really lead these places with some measure of closure instability after the fighting stone. Mike thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks.

Mosul US ICT Tigris river Isis twitter trump westernmost America Obama Administration Mossel Iraq Mike Interior Ministry East Bay
"mosul" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

07:44 min | 10 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Really actually on election night. There Yay twenty sixteen we had been with the ICT F- in the first neighborhood of eastern Mosul for a couple of days. So we were we were technically am also also and as I expected the ittf they were the first soldiers to step foot in Mosul. More than two years and the commander. The night of the election brought US deeper into the city into central neighborhood abuse from Mosul. And I remember with my photographer crawling up to the roof and looking out over the edge and being told that in the morning we'd be able to see the Tigris river which puts the city in half and I really felt like okay. Hey we're finally after all this where we're finally here And it really felt To wake up in Mosul so I that night I slept in in a billion home that had been commandeered by the ICT F- in a closet. And so I woke up at six. Am and there were mortars hitting outside so we kind of just woke up and there was like Children stuffed animals around the in the closet and like a toolbox to signs of the family that had lived there. I checked on twitter on my phone and and saw the you know trump had was was waiting the election and it just felt strange to thank. You know now that this battle is finally changing to the Iraqi side back at home. The same person who had who had done so much to raise fears that Isis was actually succeeding in his political efforts on on. US trip into the region to Mossel during that offensive. was there a sense of triumph. was there a sense of success. So my the last trip to Mosul was in May of twenty seventeen and that was the trip where I went to documents detailing casualties it was a sense of just. This has gotten way uglier than anyone intended. So the battle for eastern Mosul came I. That was the last battle of the Obama Administration. The battle for westernmost will was the first battle of the trump administration and there are a lot of reasons why the battle of western Mosul was much bloodier. It's more concentrated Terrain Isis pulled its forces back continually until they were just in western Mosul. It was where they made their last stand and traditionally has had more support for a guy and for Isis so it was always going to be harder harder fight there but trump also when he came into office this loosened the rules on. US Air strikes that had been intended to reduce civilian casualties. All these things combined emit Western most will just a picture of destruction so by comparison sake in eastern Mosul there was destruction as I mentioned but it was here and there there were plenty of parts parts of the of that half of the city still standing and because of that residents were able to return fairly quickly and life was able to resume fairly quickly so I returned easternmost will after it was only a few months from Isis and people were painting. They were as clearing rubble from the streets. The markets were full of fruit. And you know they it was. It was defiant but it was returned to life. Western Mosul was just a health scape. It was just entire blocks destroyed you you know. There was a an account from a local journalist This week two years after Iraq declared victory arises they are still pulling bodies from the rubble in western Mosul. Aw I don't think anyone's thought this is the kind of lasting triumphant victory that we had in mind and I know the like I said. They had taken such care to avoid civilian casualties and they were clear with me throughout we would have to rebuild this. We're trying to win over the population here. In the East Bay succeeded by the time they they got to western Mosul. It's worth noting when I when I list all of these reasons why it was just so much more destructive there they were so weakened that the Iraqi special forces more generally. We're just part of the equation in western Mosul so in eastern Mosul they they were the entire show they did all the fighting in that part of the offensive in western Mosul. They played one role but the Iraqi federal police. The Iraqi military other units from the Interior Ministry all played a much bigger role and they. They had much less regard for civilian casualties. So it really it just it. All kind of broke down into really just a very very sad sad picture. How do you carry yourself I was a willing participant in this and I had always the ability to come in and out into leave and you know I try to remain grateful that these people whether it be the battalion or the civilians billions is folks who were willing to host me there to open up on what they were experiencing and to sort of be willing to support the mission of sharing that You know through my journalism it through my writing so I just try to keep that in mind like but as a new father. Now congratulations and knowing how many of these men are fathers and women. Although I think most of the fighters you were with men. How do you perceive the loss in the sense of what you saw at this point in your life I have a story that I can't get out of my head that sort of captures how I feel but also makes me wonder if I could have done on this if I had already had a child when I was investigating civilian casualties I learned that there was a man who he he briefly left his house one morning to go and get gas for the families generator and when he left a US air strike hit the house and he killed his wife and his three daughters? And while while I was at the side of the House I- interviews neighbors and they told me that he would come a few times a week. To the site of douse the airstrike and just sort of dig through the rubble with his hands and then he would sit down and start crying and ultimately just walk away and so I called him And I asked him what he was doing when he was digging through the rubble and he told me that he himself had managed to find the pieces of his wife and daughters and and that he like he buried them himself and he couldn't find part one daughters and so he wanted like that closure before he would he would finally leave Mosul. And you think like you know. Why isn't anyone helping this guy? You know. All he wanted he told me all. I want to find my daughter and then I then I'm gonNA leave it really kind of brought home for me. I make such an effort to kind of make Americans feel like and make myself feel like we. We are responsible in some way for these places that we fight wars the US US government made no effort to contact him. They ultimately based on my evidence that I that I I gather while I was there. They admitted to the strike. They admitted we killed his family by accident. They to reach him. They offered him no condolence payments. Even though they're congressional funds set aside for this and not even helped to dig through the rubble. And you know so when I say bodies are still being pulled from the rubble. It's you know for me. It's like that. That's part of America's his responsibility you know. and that's a little tiny picture of how bad a job we as a country do in following up and trying to to really lead these places with some measure of closure instability after the fighting stone. Mike thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks.

Mosul US ICT Tigris river Isis twitter trump westernmost America Mossel Obama Administration Iraq Mike Interior Ministry East Bay
"mosul" Discussed on First Person

First Person

13:13 min | 10 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on First Person

"I'm Margo Martindale. The host of foreign policies new PODCAST I spy spies. Don't talk is one of the rules of the business but herrod foreign policy we get them to open up each week. One former operative from somewhere around the world tells the story of one dramatic dramatic mission. Subscribe to ice by wherever you get your guests from it from foreign policy. I'm Sarah Wildman and this is first person this week. An American Mozell Islamic state fighters captured the northern Iraqi city of muscle at the height of the group's power in two thousand fourteen. Thousands died in the fighting and hundreds hundreds of thousands of civilians fled the city Mosul. Today we saw sporadic gunfire and burning military vehicles. The insurgents seized police stations banks banks and government buildings. Many Iraqi soldiers dropped their weapons and vanished tears later. International Coalition led by Iraqi forces embarked on in a campaign to retake Mosul terrorist. Group showed. It was not going down without a fight. This suicide truck bomb careened into a line of Iraqi tanks then exploded loaded giant flames shooting towards the sky. The journalist Mike Guilio was embedded with the Iraqi special operations forces who entered the city in his new book. Shattered the nation's Isis and the war for the Caliphate Giglio recounts the battle for Mosul and describes the soldiers and civilians. He met along the way. He's he's our guest this week. Mike.

Mike Guilio Mosul Margo Martindale Caliphate Giglio Sarah Wildman American Mozell Islamic International Coalition
"mosul" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

11:29 min | 10 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me I WANNA start with the ICT f what does it stand for Iraqi counterterrorism force. They are the lead unit of the Iraqi Special Operations forces and so they are really the most elite battalion of soldiers in Iraq and the reason that they're so special actually is because they have been fighting in one way or another are with and for the US for more than a decade so the battalion was founded in two thousand five during the Iraq war because US troops realized that if they were going to really roll up al-Qaeda networks and militia networks. They needed locals to help them. was almost a lifeline for US forces to say. Hey we need help here. This is chaos and they stood up this unit to do sensitive missions with us. Special Forces is in special operators. So you train them. They train them more importantly than that though they spent years working right alongside them. What happened to this unit in two thousand eleven when the US decided to start drawing down troops so by twenty eleven this unit was really humming? Doing the kind of missions that they were trained for so if you think of them In the US context they're somewhat equivalent to seal team six the Delta Force so they are a highly specialized allies unit that is trained to conduct missions with a lot of planning and a lot of intelligence against high value targets. It's and also to do hostage rescues and things of that nature so in two thousand eleven. That's the kind of work they were doing They come through the darkest days with the Iraq war and the surge against against al Qaeda and they had been so involved in those. US efforts that they were really considered one of the elite forces in the Middle East and so they were hoping to settle into really focus on sensitive missions and high value targets and and sort of conduct missions at the top level to to really really get the most for their effort. But what happened when the Isis emergency hit rock was. They were the last line of Defense as Iraqi military Harry crumbled and so they went from these specialized missions in this careful planning and training to street fighting. And so some of these. These soldiers who've been more than a decade alongside. US troops with elite training and had survived all through the Iraq war. Rav Sudden dying five ten time and car bombs and ideas tax Just as regular soldiers but there was really no one else to hold the line at that point who are they. Where are they drawn from? What's their population? They are Iraqi Shia for the most part which is the majority of the population in Iraq the initial. US Vision for the unit had been for it to be multi-sectarian multi-ethnic they have had a Kurdish component historically after two thousand eleven the US left behind a a very security minded government in Iraq and that government succeeded in pershing a lot of the Sunni members and the Kurdish members from this battalion. Like I did from the rest of the Iraqi security forces but I found that even despite this maintained the US vision for Iraq more than any other force which was as a inclusive multi-sectarian a multi-ethnic country so they tended to be predominantly Shia but they believe inclusiveness and they believe that their mission was to protect all Iraqis as and that really did make them unique as a force at the time of the Isis emergency. And when you say the Isis emergency when are we talking about I'm talking about in twenty fourteen the idea when the US left was that it would the local forces would keep the pressure on cue. I but they weren't really able to successfully do that because of corruption and the Iraqi military and security forces and because of this carrying some of the government and so what you saw was isis gradually making a comeback in Iraqi cities mostly in the shadows initially initially so they would conduct assassinations They would gather intelligence on their security forces as a way to intimidate them and coerce them and then with the conflict. Perfect across the border in Syria Ache you. I sent elements into that conflict to use it to gather strength and so in two thousand fourteen. AQHA elements which which became isis had. Already sort of taking control of some of their former strongholds in Iraq but really the big moment came in June of two thousand fourteen when I says Boomerang back across the border from Syria and took the Iraqi city of Mosul which is the suny capital of the country and this major city has population around the size of Phoenix. When they did that Isis I think was even surprised at how quickly the regular Iraqi military collapsed and the I talked to soldiers at the time? I was in Baghdad Right after it happened who admitted to tearing off their uniforms and just running even though they had the numbers even they had. US weapons and Isis. His all of a sudden was on the gates of Baghdad Right after Mosul fell. I flew to Baghdad from Istanbul where I lived just to give you a sense of what it was like then before Oregon plain I call the former Iraqi Basseterre to the US. And I said I'll be in Mosul in Baghdad tomorrow and hopefully I you know if you have any context there for me. I appreciate it. And he just said if it's still there And and there really was a sense that Baghdad could be next who he working for at the time I was a staff correspondent for Buzzfeed at the time based in this temple and when I got on the flight in Istanbul to go to Baghdad there was actually a news crew filming me because there I was the only person getting on the plane and I sat down on his three hundred something seat airline as the only passenger and had this sort of surreal experience. Where the flight attendant walked up to me and started giving the security demonstration after taking off and then I guess she found it ridiculous and she just laughed at me and walked away? So is this your first time in Baghdad. It was my first time back and actually you know for me. As a a young journalist who was really driven to cover war. I was inspired actually by the Iraq war which took place when I was just starting college and so for me to land in Baghdad and sort of see the panic and the chaos from this new conflict but also the signs all around the city of of the past one you know the security cordons the blast walls around even civilian neighborhoods. The real just tents walled awfully prison yard. Claustrophobia of the city was really moving to me. And I I remember Walking around the city knowing that there were just line stretched out from all the travel agencies agencies and I learned later that the only reason That Isis didn't advance all the way to Baghdad and who knows How far they could have gone was was because the Iraqi Special Operations forces and this battalion that I embedded with had abandoned their normal counterterrorism mission? And just fill out the lines as as front-line fighters and we're really just taking massive amounts of casualties in the process. And when did you meet them. I met them much later in two thousand sixteen so by that point I have been covering Isis and the war against Isis for more than two years and I viewed the signature battle for Isis territory and of the war really that the US had entered at that point as the battle for Mosul Though the place where Isis had shocked the world the place as where it had declared its territory as a caliphate which of course is Travesty for Muslims but the way they sought to portray themselves internationally and draw recruits and I was trying to find a way to cover it. That would put me really close to the fighting and I arrived in Baghdad. That fall weeks ahead the offensive and sought out the ICT. Because I received a tip that these were the soldiers that not just. We're going to play a key role in the battle but it would actually be the tip of the spear so they would you know. Be The first into Isis territory where they could just set the scene for me. This is now. You're you're back in Baghdad. It's a couple of weeks before the offensive offensive to take Mosul back. How did different from that for some you were there when that with that is Hispanic around you? There was a sense this time of momentum. Tim Tenuous. The city had been really devastated by Isis attacks and car bombs in so there was that sense of sort of Wariness and really like a depression that comes in the city. That's just under assault in any point. You civilians killed in a car bomb or something like that. But at the meantime there was the feeling that at least the signature battle is coming and you could feel that sort of momentum so this Tober of two thousand sixteen the US US presidential election is coming up and Isis. By this point had been committing terrorist attacks across Europe and inspired terrorist attacks in America and and populists were using that all western countries to sort of gather momentum themselves and to demonize Muslims more generally into demonize refugees and and it really felt like the world was sort of this breaking point. And maybe if the soldiers could stop Isis in the heart of its territory it could put an an end to this sort of upheaval. That was kind of reverberating out throughout the rest of the world and I was really surprised by the way. The soldiers spoke of the battle in those terms so essentially yeah like this is a battle for our neighborhoods. This is a battle for Iraq. This is not a war of choice for us. This has come to our homes and so they were there for that reason their own individual vigil reasons but they also said time and again you know we are the world front line against Isis. Embedding with them. I showed up in Baghdad with a photographer who had worked with them once before. And we really just started. I mean in like the journalistic fashion of forcing your way into a situation relation. Just hassling them calling them asking for coffee asking to meet and make our case. Why should bring us with them? You know the kind of embed bad that we wanted to do was different than the way Journalists include myself sometimes. Cover a battle where you go to what you consider to be a frontline but it's really Set back from the actual fighting. And it's like the nearest secure place that you can go where we want to do is actually in bed with them while they were fighting and so we were making a really big. Ask of the commander to say we want you to let us travel in your convoys into Mosul and we want you to put us in your Humvees as you are going and driving into Isis territory And and they didn't agree to it right away and were. They concerned that they'd have to protect you in that you'd be a hassle. They're concerned they have to protect you. They're also concerned that they don't have the space in their Humvees vs each humby has maximum for five people soldiers. Each of them has a job to do so to remove them and put into journalist. This is actually a risk to them. So what we did it. I would say hey. Just let us travel with you from Baghdad to the edge while you get ready And so when they actually opened open up their battle for Mosul we were in the first attacking column of of Humvees that pushed into Isis territory. Was this sense among those. ETF At that point it was the feeling towards Americans they have a very..

US Baghdad Iraq Mosul Isis Isis emergency Iraqi Special Operations Istanbul Delta Force Syria Middle East AQHA Rav Sudden Harry Europe
Special Operations Raid Said to Kill Senior Terrorist Leader in Syria

Red Eye Radio

01:18 min | 1 year ago

Special Operations Raid Said to Kill Senior Terrorist Leader in Syria

"Taught at one of the most wanted terrorists in the world ISIS leader Abu Bakar al Baghdadi is presumed dead after this U. S. special forces operations carried out a ground raid in Syria Baghdatis as a long history of terrorism in the Middle East before his rise in ISIS ABC Laurie Martinez has more on his history with the region what we know about Abu Bakr al Baghdadi was that he was always been involved in terror groups he was detained by the United States actually in the mid two thousands he was one of the many insurgents who was captured and held it in a Tory is camp called camp Buka in central Iraq he was held there for a couple years and then he was released there are partners it's guy news correspondent Marx stone in Beirut says all bugged adi stepped out of sight from the moment he took the reins and isis he is not a passive who appeared very much in fact his only public appearance ever has been at the beginning of the caliphate that he forms he appeared in the grand mosque in Mosul in northern Iraq to announce the formation of that kind of face that sits there and his movement has been restricted about Daddy apparently detonated his own suicide bomb vests that also killed two of his wives confirmed by counterterrorism official ABC news US officials are awaiting DNA analysis to confirm identification the White House didn't specify the topic just the president trump will deliver remarks Sunday morning at nine

Mosul President Trump ABC Official Camp Buka Syria Donald Trump White House Abu Bakar Al Baghdadi Beirut Marx Stone Iraq United States Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi Laurie Martinez Middle East
"mosul" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

29:19 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia. I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today as concerns rise about a resurgence of the Islamic state we get a I there wasn't anywhere for many of the people of muscle to go the refugee camps in Iraq were already full by the by the beginning of the battle there are already nearly a hundred refugee camps back an Abu Fahahd very calmly said can we please change the subject so th the civilians of Mosul or in a situation where they're living in you know tightly constrain muscle had to ISOS was never clear some peop- some some of some of the people of Mosul had been or were fighters with Isis as you say some of them the book have a great deal more allegiance to connection with Isis the new at the beginning of my reporting and this is an in some cases they had kids who had you know activities right in many cases they had kids particularly sons who had joined up with Isis because in addition to being a political revolution a religious movement it was also anyway a generational movement generational revolution it was There were many young men in Mosul who were extremely ashamed at how they're others had been treated and how to graded there how degraded and downtrodden their fathers had become and they didn't want that to happen to them that's part of the reason that they joined the movement so they're they're infinite gradations of allegiance the organization at none of which could really be very few which could be sussed out in the field as soldiers and intelligence officers were making their way through Mosul. See you found you know summary beatings and even executions very common of of you've suspected jihadis as the as you say the air strikes and artillery were Comprehensive extensive much of the West side of the city was absolutely destroyed and still still is largely in rubble the east side fared a little better but but many of the most beautiful colon and important parts of these sides such muscle university were destroyed as well and as the airstrikes went on and the artillery went on and particularly as the Iraqi military introduced its own air power in the form of Hind helicopters the city of Mosul became more and more wary understandably and and more and more wary of the Iraqi military's intentions they came to many of them decide that the military was no better than it had been a few years before and then it was out to kill them on mass did isis deliberately US civilians as shields absolutely AH liberally used civilians as as cannon fodder and shields and what's more it deliberately killed civilians as they tried to flee Mozell so for citizens who are in in a western Mozell who had hung on through all the warfare of previous ears and through isis and found themselves in neighborhoods where airstrikes and artillery barrages were coming in and they were surrounded by Isis fighters among long their neighborhoods what were their options what did they do good said that they weren't many the options were either stay or go and The West side of by by the time the fighting began on the west side of the city more camps had opened so there was more opportunity for the people of Mosul to leave the city and many of them did many thousands of them from the west side and and you could could you could you safely leave well So Isis did targeted dig target fleeing civilians and shelled them shot at them and snipe them by that point is is had decided apparently that anyone who dared leave the caliph it you know was an apostate so you you could leave you couldn't surly safely leave but you could certainly try to leave and on any given day in the fighting in the west side if you stood on a on a hill or on a on top of a building you would see these columns of hundreds and thousands of people marching walking out out of the ready but many many people in Mosul decided to stay for many different reasons but clearly the on the west side it was not safe to stay the west side was absolutely leveled and I have no doubt that thousands of civilians died in the fighting on the west side we'll never know how many but it was certainly in the thousands a weapon of choice for Isis fighters in Mozell with some and called the B. I. E. D. You want to explain this yes the V. B. I. E. D. or V bid is a vehicle borne improvised explosive device and it proved to be the most lethal and and fearful psychologically fearful weapon that Isis had it was as isis answer to the airstrikes these vehicles were suicide bombing vehicles that were that were kind of kamikazes on the ground They were car bombs essentially and Isis had experimented with this with these things in in Ramadi inflation other parts but they really perfected the technology in Mosul they were car bombs either sedans or trucks that were gutted and filled with explosive and then armor of one of another would be welded onto the exterior of the car and the driver would be essentially welded in so they would necessarily die and the Isis managed to stash hundreds of these things in garages and carports and other positions around the city and they proved to kill they ended up killing more Iraqi soldiers than probably any other weapon of Isis. The the way that I you use them was that it it also had a technological innovation that was the as far as I know was new to this war was isis had its own fleet of small owns commercial drones the kind of thing you could buy on the Internet at our or at a hobby shop and it it it used these drones to fly over Mosul and through the cameras at found where the Iraqi positions were where the Iraqi columns and convoys were and where their commend positions were and once they found the positions they would order a V. Bid deployed Something that was very nearby that could get to the position easily enough and this happened this happened hundreds of times over the course of the battle and sometimes isis would record the footage from the drum owns of the via bit attacks and uploaded online so you can still go online and see these attacks taking place you can see in Iraqi convoy Iraqi position and then you can see this car truck coming out of nowhere and exploding in the if you're watching Santa Cell phone you'll just see the the screen of of the phone go white as the the cloud from the V. Bid expands up towards the towards the drone camera. It's very very eerie sight listening to the interview fresh air's Davies recorded with James Marini author of the new book they will have to die now Mozell and the fall of the Caliphate after a break Verena will talk about embedding with Kurdish fighters in the fight against Isis and why the US withdrawal from northeastern Syria opens new opportunities for the Islamic state. Also Justin Chang will review the new film the Lighthouse starring Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson. I'm Terry Gross and this is fresh yeah support for this podcast and the following message come from the Walton Family Foundation where opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton fan only foundation dot Org you went with a group of Iraqi Kurdish armed forces the the purse mega when they were going to take some villages near Lucile from the Islamic state in preparation for the assault on Mosul. This is a pretty colorful description I have to say how were the peshmerga fighters these Kurdish fighters is different from traditional military units while they were much more welcoming than most military units they were to to me any other journalists who wanted to ride along or anyone who could in some way help them or just wanted to depict what was going on they yeah the so the Kurds until the last couple of weeks anyway really like Americans and are used to dealing with Americans and American journalists they've always been extremely welcoming and so they were happy to have as many journalists as as who wanted to come along with their columns in their convoys as they carried out this first part of the battle all which was to mop up Isis in the villages on on the eastern outskirts of Mosul so it took about two weeks and the the Kurds launched a pretty conventional campaign they started down the road towards Mosul from Iraqi Kurdistan and and just took village-by-village they just they just they just rocked up with their columns in their convoys and started shooting and just I whatever jihadis were left in the villages out of them and they were happy to have their happy to have journalists along for the ride and if you couldn't fit into one of their Humvees then they allowed you to bring your vehicle into their column it was It was a lot of fun to be honest it's SORTA described like when they were a bit like a volunteer fire department arrived people in some cases take taxes to the battlefront bring their gear and then at various moments in the assault they would stop for southeast to have cigarettes yeah kind of enjoy events of fire department is a good way of describing it one one Kurdish soldier described the Peshmerga to me as more an attitude than an army it's it's paramilitary it's really not a all that official many many members I have no training or they're training has been just in fighting they have any given operation they have crazy cortege of vehicles that can include the most recent and innovative humvees or vehicles from the Soviet era or even farther back and they have they have very little training and they're often quite reckless in their way almost as suicidal jihadis but they're also absolutely fearless so they consider it responsibility and also a pleasure to fight whom isis or the Iraqi military or whomever may come well it was obviously been a lot of attention since president trump in order the withdrawal of American troops from northeastern Syria leading The Kurds there who had been fighting Isis in Syria in vulnerable position state you know causing them to leave and seek alliance with the Assad regime have been you are with the Iraqi Kurds forces I don't know how much contact they had with the ones in Syria but I'm wondering what you might have heard about how they regard their situation they have a bit of contact the there there are many political factions and different fighting factions within the Kurdish ethnicity the only rated really describe it as a unified tendons as an ethnicity and particular language group but there are a lot of disagreements among various Kurdish political parties and factions and indeed there was a civil war in Iraqi Kurdistan in the nineteen nineties the one thing that all of them have been able to count on in one way or another is support bipartisan support from the United States at least in the last few decades and I can so I can tell you that the Iraqi Kurds although they live in a they live in a different country feel just as betrayed by trump by trump's decision as do Syrian Kurds and Turkish Kurds they see this as a as a general betrayal of the khurdish 'cause it's not it should be pointed out that this is not the first time they've felt betrayed by the West or by the United States that began in the wake of World War One when the Kurds were promised by the British and independent territory and the British did not deliver but it's the freshest and the most galling for the moment you mentioned that the Kurdish fighters were were brave even to the point of being reckless you spend a lotta time with the Iraqi counterterrorism service elite group and you said that a lot of their soldiers even senior commanders just had little use for protective vests elements or really even taking cover under fire at a tough in sometimes yeah what do you make of this well good question I'm I'm still not entirely sure what to make of it I think I think that their contempt for helmets and flak jackets and taking proper cover I think part of it had to do with Islam with their faith and this idea that there's that you have no hand in your fate that that God decides your fit think that was part of it I think there was a certain fatalism that has to do with his lawn but also had to do with the fact that they've lived in a country that was now had been found itself in war for the better part of two generations in one war another I think there was also a desire among the Iraqi troops especially the hardened troops the the counter terrorism special forces there was a desire to show the jihadis that they were perfect uncomfortable with death as well you know the famous jihadi expression is we love death more than you love life I think there was a certain desire among among the Iraqi this is to say no actually we're perfectly comfortable with that as well it was interesting that in your conversations with Iraqis they had opinions about America to share a lot of them what did you hear the so the the opinions were so complex for many reasons so Iraqis of course have every reason to dislike the United States we invaded and occupied their country and and did not gary off the occupation very well and Iraqis were perfectly aware that Isis had been a direct result of the American error Iraq And yet at the same time most Iraqis I spoke with and I should emphasize again the Iraqi men were talking about many of them in the military most Iraqis is broke with still had a great deal of respect for even reverence for America America had invaded unoccupied this was a cause for contempt but it was also cause for off and so in the minds of many Iraqis united America was second only to God in terms of its omnipotence omniscience they believed American Americans were capable of anything and you could understand where this idea came from and we of course had taken over the country and in many ways ruined it but in speaking to Iraqis and and getting their complex ideas is about.

Isis Mosul Terry Gross whyy Abu Fahahd Philadelphia Iraq Walton Family Foundation assault Verena Santa Cell Willem Dafoe Walton Justin Chang US Robert Pattinson Davies Syria James Marini
"mosul" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"We tend to think violent Islamic extremism is primarily a religious phenomenon of course that was the last thing on the minds of so many of the people that are involved in this conflict for even from within the Isis side. When you get down to the motivations that oftentimes ends up being simple as John four of in the future as well less that that type of political vacuum come into existence again but from two thousand four two thousand five we were talking about the same as shuster disenfranchisement of the Sunni minority and what that could pretend and that was fourteen fifteen years ago so we've been through two iterative Al Qaeda in Iraq and then isis accruing from the same 'cause I'm Michaela Fogel and this is the law fair podcast October twenty second two thousand nineteen in two thousand fourteen the precipitous fall of the ancient city of Mosul signaled the sudden rise to power of the Islamic state a group that would soon declare new Keller fate from muscles great mosque two years later Mosul served as one of the groups last major enclaves in Iraq and became the site of grinding brutal urban warfare as Iraqi forces sought to reclaim control block by block last week. l'affaire senior editor Scott Anderson sat down with two lists who have produced new works documenting the battle for Mosul veteran war correspondent James Greenie who is the author of the new book they will have to die now and former the CIA official. Dan Gabriel who recently directed the documentary film entitled Mosul They discussed the pivotal role city has played in recent Iraqi history and what the struggle over it may be able to tell us about the future of the country and the region it's the law fair podcast episode four hundred sixty three James Verani and Dan Gabriel on the battle for Mosul James Let me start with you tell us a little bit about your background in Iraq and what led you to write this book so my background in Iraq is Not Very extensive I I went to a rock in the summer of two thousand sixteen assignment for National Geographic magazine I went there at that time because it was the first time in a few years that journalists could go into what had the caliphate what had been Slavic territory and report on what had been going on there until recently at that point isis was in hasty retreat week back towards the northwest of the country and Mosul and the Syrian border and for the first time in a while journalists could go into Volusia in Ramadi the end secreted in places like this that had been the California until very recently talked to Iraqis about what life had been like under the counterfeit I went there in July twenty sixteen to begin reporting that story for National Geographic and as soon as I arrive it became clear that the battle for Mosul was imminently to begin and that was important because because everyone knew Iraqis and Americans and the World News that the battle for Mosul would be the battle of this war against Isis as Lisa at least as it was being fought in Iraq as opposed in Syria it would be the connective battle because muscle was by far isis largest holding it was the crown jewel of their of the caliphate five or six times the size of Rakai you know their self proclaimed capital in Syria So I stayed in order to cover the battle which everyone thought would take a few months it ended up taking about nine months so I ended up staying into may of the following year but that was the first time I'd ever gotten on son Gerard interesting and Dan I know you've got some background in Iraq as well from a very different sort of perspective and angle how did that lead you both to approach this project and frankly to find this incredible footage they used throughout Mosul that's right so our story starts just a few months after James arrived in October of two thousand sixteen in does last through the fall of the following summer of July twenty seventeen but you're yeah my my exposure to Mosul came as a c a counter-terrorism officer I was there for a short period of time two thousand four to two thousand five ahead tdy from Baghdad to work on a project there so you know really when I was in Mosul it was it was not the worst place in Iraq you know people would think back then flew Ramadi there was that's really where the action is was of course that that changed significantly we've also had a lot of people ask the question why did you decide to sort of tell the story of Isis around Mosul in addition to the reasons chains pointed out of course it's on the border but it's also very diverse city you know to tell the story of Isis in in Faluji primarily talking about a suny story But I think what we get into and then of course in James's book as well Mosul is a patchwork of the modern Middle East it's really a microcosm a metaphor if you will with all the different ethnicity ladies that are involved in the conflict against Isis and as we kind of tell the story united temporarily with the the foregone conclusion being most isis would be dude but of course what happens after that is the big question and the main character in most on the documentary is this Alley Mola the reporter who is engaged in this trek to kind of interview a high level Isis detainees meets these other characters along the way at least that's the implied of another maybe a little bit of a construction there how did you encounter Mr Malone and again engage with these different characters of this incredible bundle of footage and you use to weave the story together only Melissa journalists in Iraq that had worked extensively as a fixer James Talks about fixtures in his book as a fixer for are news organizations we grabbed them in twenty fifty and I believe it was a when we were doing the first season of a two season TV show for L. Harare which is part of the Italy's broadcasting network under the US Agency for Global Media and what they want us to do is put together a twelve episode series of about a half hour each focused on assist effector so at this is as a couple years before muscle came into play this point the US government had an interest in telling the story of people who have joined Isis for whatever the reason but had made the decision that we're going to get out of course that's the message that we wanted to reinforce to the target audience into convince them like you may have made a bad decision but there's way out of this so thirteen different episodes in the first season thirteen different people with different reasons for why they joined Isis the this is all film in Arabic on the Middle East Yes we had folks from Morocco couple from Yemen Syria Lebanon Iraq really all over the Middle East and of course they had thirteen different reasons why they get out and and how they get out so it really is intended to be instructive TV series interesting very interesting so James Dan mentioned the diversity of muzzle oh so is even in Iraq a country of immense diversity with lots of different pockets in cities environments it stands out as a very unique city you do an incredible job in your book digging into the history of Mosul and weaving it into this modern narrative about the events that you saw and leading up to the events that you saw describing your book can you give us a little bit of a sense of that now what is most you a makes it such an interesting focus for the story that brought it at the center of this conflict and uh about of its history is really led us to this present day scenario that you Delvin do yes well thank you for that compliment I did go to great lengths in the book explain to the reader the history of Mosul and as a journalist covering the battle of Mosul in two thousand sixteen hundred seventeen I guess you could say I got lucky if that's the word we warming US probably the wrong word in got lucky that it took place in Muslim because muzzle as you say has such a fascinating history. arguably the most historically fascinating city in the region it's one of the oldest cities that we know of we can trace its origins back five thousand years or more in Incheon Chimes Muslim was not known as most what was known as Niniveh which everyone will remember from their Sunday school classes the Bible a Niniveh was the capital of the Assyrian Empire or the Neo Assyrian Empire that sometimes known roundabout the first millennium the early portion of the first millennium BC at a time when the Assyrian empire was the largest empire archaeologists believe in the world stretching from The caucuses down to the Sudan and from Cyprus to the Persian empire an as it as the biggest empire in the world with what archaeologists believe was the largest city in World Niniveh as an empire it broadened people from all over the region and so its reputation for ethnic and religious diversity again then after the fall of the Assyrian Empire Niniveh became fell into fell into obscurity and then in the Islamic Period ah Mosul rose to prominence in the Bassett Empire and Bassett Empire which at the time was the the the center of Islamic the Islamic world invested in many ways the world was was renowned for its diversity that was why it was so successful because it allowed a not just Muslims but Christians and Jews and Zorro Astrakhan's and all manner of of schismatic send smaller religions to live and Muslims this was renowned for its ethnic and religious diversity even up until the late twentieth century you would find they're not just not just Arabs of I but I've heard and Persians and Turkoman and Shug and Z and many different religions and even very conservative sooner Muslims in muzzle were always very proud of the reputation for diversity the diversity started to diminish during the bath right and under Saddam Hussein and then of course when Isis came in in twenty fourteen the diversity diminished a lot Isis Austin Mosul was obviously strategic and a matter of prestige and situated near the Syrian orders and It was arrived a second or third largest city at the time by population but certainly Isis was also interested in attacking the diversity. of the city of Mosul they knew that it was full of of Christians among others and they wanted to do away with them we'll tell tell us a little bit more about that Isis kinda comes in control of Muslim two thousand fourteen and you describe pretty Abeille this kind of evolution fairly rapid revolution but a bit of Lucien in how they approached the population on a variety of fronts about the diversity front things like smoking things like that can you give us a little sense about you know the early days in an wear that began to wander in regards to isis approach to the diverse cosmopolitan city yeah so The thing member is that in Iraq at least isis was as much if not more a political movement as Buck Daddy and other leaders isis were making two Iraqis specifically to suny Iraqi's was the government of Norio Malecki the Eric and installed a prime minister is a Shia nationalist government that has taken Iraq away from its rightful leaders the Sunnis the the people who'd been ruling at since the since the Ba'ath Regime Noriaki government has taken the country away from you as soon as and we WE ISIS we're going to restore it to you and we're going to restore the truce Lon soon as Lomb to its rightful place of prominence in the region so and this political I'm intimacy as when I came in other cities it it did not Carry out the depredations that it would later become known for in Mosul it was not immediately doing public executions and forcing men to grow out their beards and cut their pants.

Mosul Iraq CIA Dan Gabriel Scott Anderson James Greenie John Michaela Fogel shuster Keller senior editor official fourteen fifteen years five thousand years twenty second nine months two years
"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

The Yak

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

"In rural <Speech_Female> areas eagerly <Speech_Female> await the reins <Speech_Female> to come every year <Speech_Female> iraq has <Speech_Female> a very very drawn <Speech_Female> climate and <Speech_Female> so the rains provided <Speech_Female> case also <Speech_Female> drinking water <Speech_Female> and are cross <Speech_Female> but it's <Speech_Female> met with mixed feelings <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> the voshel source <Speech_Female> of life <Speech_Female> is also killing people <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> floods kyri land mines <Speech_Female> and other <Speech_Female> devices to new <Speech_Female> places <Speech_Female> it makes this territory <Speech_Female> even <Speech_Female> more dangerous <Speech_Female> because <Speech_Female> areas <Speech_Female> that had already been <Speech_Female> deemed safe <Speech_Female> could suddenly <Speech_Female> have land mines appear <Speech_Female> of not <Speech_Female> it's this <Speech_Female> threat that never <Speech_Female> ends <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> rain <Speech_Female> heavy at the spacing <Speech_Female> makes it too dangerous <Speech_Female> but the day moniz <Speech_Female> to work and active <Speech_Female> minefields <Speech_Female> reducing the time <Speech_Female> the clearance what can <Speech_Female> be done <Silence> the massive <Speech_Female> areas of the cut <Speech_Female> us enraging have <Speech_Female> challenging terrain <Speech_Female> for the teams <Speech_Female> to work <Speech_Female> meaning that the machines <Speech_Female> unable to be used <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> d minus have to work <Speech_Female> slow on state <Speech_Female> slopes <Silence> it <Speech_Female> also snows in the <Speech_Female> mountains over the <Speech_Female> winter months making <Speech_Female> it impossible for clearance <Speech_Female> swept continue <Speech_Female> until it dries <Speech_Female> out <SpeakerChange> <Silence> and if that wasn't <Speech_Female> bad enough teams <Speech_Female> say extreme <Speech_Female> weather events and making <Speech_Female> the jokes even <Speech_Female> more difficult <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> we just <Speech_Female> came out of a longer <Speech_Female> than usual winter <Speech_Female> where we had substantial <Speech_Female> rainfall <Speech_Female> causing a lot of flooding <Speech_Female> pitchy <Speech_Female> kelly in the northern <Speech_Female> parts of iraq <Speech_Female> in the kurdistan <Speech_Female> region iraq <Speech_Female> where there is still <Speech_Female> a great deal of minefields <Speech_Female> an unexploded <Speech_Female> ordinance from <Speech_Female> previous complex <Speech_Female> the flooding <Speech_Female> caused landslides <Speech_Female> in some areas <Speech_Female> <Silence> which in some <Speech_Female> cases moved land <Speech_Female> mines away from <Speech_Female> minefields wellknown <Speech_Female> into local community <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> or uncovered flooding <Speech_Female> caused landslides <Speech_Female> in some areas <Speech_Female> <Silence> which in some <Speech_Female> cases moved land <Speech_Female> mines away from <Speech_Female> minefields wellknown <Speech_Female> into local community <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> or uncovered land mines <Speech_Music_Female> were buried deep <Speech_Music_Female> in the <Advertisement> ground <Speech_Music_Female> in the flooded <Speech_Music_Female> areas of the <Speech_Music_Female> planes <Speech_Music_Female> heavy rains <Speech_Music_Female> flooded improvise <Speech_Music_Female> minefields <Speech_Music_Female> washed away <Speech_Music_Female> bridges <Speech_Music_Female> and flooded roads <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> which meant <Speech_Music_Female> that teams are unable <Speech_Music_Female> to work on <Speech_Music_Female> all get access to side <Speech_Music_Female> until the flooding <Speech_Music_Female> receded <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> in this context <Speech_Music_Female> in which many <Speech_Female> people worried about <Speech_Female> the threat of violence <Speech_Female> many people <Speech_Music_Female> too scared <Speech_Music_Female> to return home <Speech_Music_Female> this <SpeakerChange> fear of land <Speech_Music_Female> mines and explosives <Speech_Music_Female> is still <Speech_Music_Female> felt by men women <Speech_Music_Female> and children even <Speech_Music_Female> decades after <Speech_Music_Female> they they implanted <Speech_Music_Female> and impacts <Speech_Music_Female> of stabilization <Speech_Female> and development <Speech_Music_Female> of community <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> so it's critical <Speech_Music_Female> that we keep <Speech_Music_Female> pushing the international <Speech_Music_Female> community to <Speech_Music_Female> commit and hold <Speech_Music_Female> conventions <Speech_Music_Female> like the mind ben tracy <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and the unknown lied <Speech_Music_Female> lied and on <Speech_Music_Female> established and <Speech_Music_Female> continuing <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> a total <SpeakerChange> of six <Speech_Music_Female> million iraqis <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> would displace <Advertisement> between <Speech_Music_Female> twenty <Advertisement> eleven <Speech_Music_Female> twenty <Advertisement> seventeen <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at <Speech_Music_Female> a third of <Advertisement> them have <Speech_Music_Female> still not pretend <Advertisement> harm <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> some <Speech_Music_Female> families have gone <Speech_Female> home unsettled <Speech_Female> in abandoned buildings <Speech_Female> train stations <Speech_Female> are even <Speech_Female> construction sites <Speech_Female> dalia <Speech_Female> is from ziti <Speech_Female> village and <Speech_Female> his family story <Speech_Female> is very gone <Speech_Female> home unsettled <Speech_Female> in abandoned buildings <Speech_Female> train stations <Speech_Female> are even <Speech_Female> construction sites <Speech_Female> dalia <Speech_Female> is from ziti <Speech_Female> village and <Speech_Female> his family story <Speech_Female> is very typical <Speech_Female> she <Speech_Female> has nine children <Speech_Music_Female> and boy <Speech_Music_Female> and her husband <Speech_Music_Female> conduit <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> not <Speech_Music_Female> that yeah <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> my name is <Advertisement> don <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> i <Speech_Female> have nine <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> ten s <Advertisement> did you get <Speech_Female> both <Advertisement> my <Speech_Female> daughters <Advertisement> and i <Speech_Female> told my <Speech_Female> show <Speech_Female> and we cannot <Speech_Female> santa <Speech_Female> or in the gym and <Speech_Female> in <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> five days <Speech_Music_Female> off

iraq moniz five days
"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

The Yak

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

"This because <Speech_Female> this <SpeakerChange> <Silence> there is some groups doing <Speech_Female> an incredible job <Speech_Female> of trying to <Speech_Female> address these mammoth <Speech_Female> almost <Speech_Female> impossible task <Speech_Female> cleaning <Speech_Female> up the millions <SpeakerChange> of unexploded <Speech_Female> devices <Speech_Female> planted over <Speech_Female> several decades <Speech_Female> of different woolsey <Speech_Music_Female> no <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> it's <Speech_Female> an extremely <Advertisement> dangerous <Speech_Female> job <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> my name <Speech_Female> is gabriel <Advertisement> bruschi <Speech_Female> and <Advertisement> i'm <Speech_Female> senior program officer <Speech_Female> for monday <Speech_Music_Female> advisory <Advertisement> group international <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> known as <Speech_Music_Female> back <Advertisement> based in <Speech_Music_Female> iraq <Advertisement> prior <Speech_Music_Female> to joining <Advertisement> mag <Speech_Music_Female> i hadn't really <Speech_Music_Female> considered mind action <Speech_Music_Female> is critical <Speech_Music_Female> to humanitarian pain relief <Speech_Music_Female> work <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> i had worked <Speech_Music_Female> on a number <Advertisement> of other <Speech_Music_Female> humanitarian <Advertisement> responses <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Music_Female> predominantly worked <Speech_Music_Female> in country <Speech_Music_Female> after natural <Speech_Music_Female> disasters <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> do <SpeakerChange> not <Speech_Female> joining i quickly <Speech_Female> realized that my <Speech_Female> action is absolutely <Speech_Music_Female> critical go <Speech_Music_Female> to humanitarian efforts <Speech_Music_Female> in conflict <Speech_Music_Female> defected areas <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> more often <Speech_Music_Female> than not <Advertisement> it <Speech_Music_Female> civilians <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> killed <Advertisement> or injured <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> conventional <Speech_Music_Female> then <SpeakerChange> lines were <Speech_Music_Female> planted and left <Speech_Music_Female> from complex price <Speech_Music_Female> the isis <Speech_Music_Female> on the <Speech_Music_Female> other hand i <Speech_Music_Female> designed device <Speech_Music_Female> it's a substantial <Speech_Female> impact <Speech_Female> making them sensitive <Speech_Female> enough to be triggered <Speech_Female> by a child <Speech_Female> but powerful <Speech_Female> enough to disable <Speech_Female> a tank <Speech_Female> isis manufactured <Speech_Female> devices <Speech_Female> on an industrial scale <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> made the different components <Speech_Female> in factories <Speech_Music_Female> which tipping found <Speech_Music_Female> in places like most <Speech_Female> the most <Speech_Female> is still victim operated <Speech_Female> city armed <Speech_Female> groups who planted <Speech_Female> them can be long <Speech_Female> gone <Speech_Female> but the device is still <Speech_Female> active and extremely <Speech_Female> dangerous <Speech_Female> the device <Speech_Female> is unprecedented <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> just because of the sheer <Speech_Female> volume we are finding <Speech_Female> them but <Speech_Female> also julie substantial <Speech_Female> amount of <Speech_Female> explosive chp <Speech_Female> age device <Speech_Female> and austin <Speech_Female> multiple ways for <Speech_Female> them to be treated <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> in motives families have <Speech_Female> returned home <Speech_Female> instead of pain booby <Speech_Female> trapped intentionally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and the tactics takes a shocking <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> imagine if <Speech_Female> opening the bathroom <Speech_Female> door or <Speech_Female> lifting a toilet <Speech_Female> say set off a bomb <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> picking up a copy <Speech_Female> of the kerr on <Speech_Female> trade and explosion <Speech_Female> these <Speech_Female> are real cases <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> that have been <Speech_Female> recorded <Silence> children children have <Speech_Female> even been injured <Speech_Female> while sitting off <Speech_Female> freebie traps <Speech_Female> in schools <Speech_Female> in the playground <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> one <Speech_Female> family member can <Speech_Female> stay home in total bond <Speech_Female> a village <Speech_Female> to the east of <Speech_Female> mosul after <Speech_Female> kurdish forces <Speech_Female> had retaken <Speech_Female> the area from office <Speech_Female> <Silence> sadly <Speech_Female> one of their family members <Speech_Female> set off an improvised <Speech_Female> landmine at the front <Speech_Female> door an <Speech_Female> instantly killed <Speech_Female> three of the family <Speech_Female> mendez <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> mac has a <Speech_Female> hundred and ten trying <Speech_Female> teams on the ground <Speech_Female> working in <Speech_Female> some of the most <Speech_Female> heavily mind areas <Speech_Female> of northern <Advertisement> look <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> estimate defensive <Speech_Female> land mines kabbah <Speech_Female> hundreds of columbus <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Music>

woolsey gabriel program officer iraq
"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

The Yak

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

"Group of us travel tossing <Speech_Female> sean camp <Speech_Female> which sits <Advertisement> outside <Speech_Female> marshall <Advertisement> so <Silence> it <Advertisement> was all my <Speech_Female> surreal <Advertisement> we were <Speech_Female> driving <Advertisement> along highway <Speech_Female> the leads <Advertisement> from <Speech_Female> someone normalcy <Speech_Female> of appeal <Speech_Female> towards the title <Speech_Female> of my <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> day some <Speech_Female> strange to think <Speech_Female> not long ago <Speech_Female> that french were <Speech_Female> out and <Speech_Female> about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> looking <Speech_Female> at it now if they <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> try <Speech_Female> people <SpeakerChange> who managed <Speech_Female> to escape mazel <Speech_Female> and surrounding areas <Speech_Female> that came under attack <Speech_Female> fled <Speech_Female> to camps my cousin <Speech_Female> shown <Speech_Female> today <Speech_Female> there are one <Speech_Female> point seven million <Speech_Female> iraqis peace <Speech_Female> who are displaced <Speech_Female> many of them <Speech_Female> living in camps <Speech_Female> just like this <Speech_Female> one some <Speech_Female> of them have tried <Speech_Female> to return heim <Speech_Female> but found <Speech_Female> it wasn't safe <Speech_Female> or realized <Speech_Female> there was nothing <Speech_Female> there for them anymore <Speech_Female> so they have retirement <Speech_Female> accounts <Speech_Female> one of <Speech_Female> the reasons <Speech_Female> unexploded ordinance <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> inland <Speech_Female> month iraq is listed <Speech_Female> in the world's <Speech_Female> top five most <Speech_Female> heavily mind <Speech_Female> countries <Speech_Female> juicy years <Speech_Female> and years of conflict <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> the recent bombardments <Speech_Female> of only <Speech_Female> made the situation <Speech_Female> even more dangerous <Speech_Female> civilians <Speech_Female> united <Speech_Female> nations estimated <Speech_Female> there <Speech_Female> are at least ten <Speech_Female> million mine's <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> every province in northern <Speech_Female> iraq affected <Speech_Female> civilians <Speech_Female> and often <Speech_Female> children <Speech_Female> are usually the ones <Speech_Female> maimed <Speech_Female> or killed <Speech_Female> by land mines <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> situation is so <Speech_Female> bad that unfortunately <Speech_Female> ice agents he's <Speech_Female> like well vision <Speech_Female> of working with <Speech_Female> mine action group to <Speech_Female> teach children <Speech_Female> how to avoid <Speech_Female> land mines <Speech_Female> an unexploded ordinance <Speech_Female> in iraq <Speech_Female> i met <Speech_Female> with the principal while <Speech_Female> i was visiting a school <Speech_Female> where unesco <Speech_Female> is funding a program <Speech_Female> to help children <Speech_Female> get back <Speech_Female> into education eucation <Speech_Female> we work with <Speech_Female> schools like these across <Speech_Female> northern iraq <Speech_Female> we use <Speech_Female> this as an opportunity <Speech_Female> to teach <Speech_Female> kids about <Speech_Female> the daily threats <Speech_Female> of mines <Speech_Female> so they could protect themselves <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> i hate this <Speech_Female> morning when <SpeakerChange> you're <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> can <Speech_Music_Female> you <Speech_Music_Female> tell me <Speech_Music_Female> why she said <Speech_Music_Female> it's important you <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> know <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> it's very <Speech_Female> important because <Speech_Female> most of the children <Speech_Female> in school offer most <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> places <Speech_Female> that were captured to boston <Speech_Female> let's do not clear <Speech_Music_Female> of explosive <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> bus it's very <Speech_Female> unfortunate stuff <Speech_Female> raise awareness <Speech_Music_Female> about explosive <Speech_Music_Female> we're <Speech_Music_Female> currently pitching <Speech_Music_Female> staff and students <Speech_Music_Female> and families returning <Speech_Music_Female> home <Speech_Music_Female> and i need to know <Speech_Music_Female> about the reef <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> many areas haven't <Speech_Female> yet been cleared by <Speech_Female> x but teams <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> above <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> hey <Speech_Music_Female> i'm wondering <Speech_Music_Female> she has a view of <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> how children <Speech_Music_Female> feel about the prospect <Speech_Music_Female> of going <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> i was expecting <Advertisement> <Speech_Female>

heim iraq
"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

The Yak

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

"Seventy <Speech_Music_Female> before doing <Speech_Music_Female> everything <Advertisement> else <Speech_Music_Female> his client <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> until the pico traffic <Speech_Music_Female> stone <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> this is a <SpeakerChange> country that's <Speech_Female> been so <Speech_Female> many gods of <Speech_Female> the past <Speech_Female> most disturbing to know <Speech_Female> about the recent <Speech_Female> conflicts lucky <Speech_Female> iraq war two <Speech_Female> thousand three tree wendy <Speech_Female> united states <Speech_Female> and allied forces <Speech_Female> including stralia <Speech_Female> decided <Speech_Female> to put food on the ground <Speech_Female> these <Speech_Female> trillion prime minister <Speech_Female> at the time <Speech_Female> john howard <Speech_Female> famously alleged <Speech_Female> berar <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> must not be allowed <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> weapons <Speech_Music_Male> of mass struck <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> border security <Speech_Male> and stability <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> iraq <Speech_Music_Male> must be <Speech_Music_Male> designed to <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> enhance <Speech_Female> mesa <Speech_Female> the former <Advertisement> british <Speech_Female> prime minister <Advertisement> tony <Speech_Female> blair <Advertisement> publicly <Speech_Female> announce <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> intelligence <Advertisement> assessments <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> made at the time <Speech_Music_Male> of during the war to <Speech_Male> adopt we're all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be <Speech_Music_Male> optimized turned out <Speech_Male> to be more <Speech_Male> of style protracted <Speech_Music_Male> on bloody <Speech_Music_Male> and we <Speech_Music_Male> mentioned <Speech_Music_Male> in <SpeakerChange> the chaos <Speech_Music_Female> of the conflict and <Speech_Female> the fed hostilities <Speech_Music_Female> intention and <Speech_Music_Female> we saw the rise <Speech_Music_Female> of awesome a <Speech_Music_Female> group that want it to <Speech_Music_Female> set up a society <Speech_Music_Female> is a fellow strict <Speech_Music_Female> interpretation <Speech_Female> of islam nickel <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> cities like <Speech_Female> mazel and surrounding <Speech_Female> areas in northern iraq <Speech_Music_Female> were heavily impacted <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> these images of auto <Speech_Music_Male> desperation threshing <Speech_Music_Male> asylum and he's running <Speech_Music_Male> out of food in hotel <Speech_Music_Male> and then colston staying <Speech_Music_Male> alive <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> these have said the militant <Speech_Music_Male> islamic state <Speech_Music_Male> fighters made more <Speech_Music_Male> gains today <SpeakerChange> writes <Speech_Male> this type of <Speech_Music_Male> lost <Advertisement> changes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this <Speech_Music_Male> organization <Advertisement> has <Speech_Music_Male> a history <Advertisement> of a dusting <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> what <Speech_Male> doctors academic <Speech_Male> some journalist <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> but the reality <Speech_Music_Female> is literally <Speech_Female> every decade <Speech_Female> since the great iraqi <Speech_Female> revolution <Speech_Music_Female> of nineteen twenty <Speech_Music_Female> has seen <Speech_Music_Female> conflict of some <Speech_Female> sort in this <Speech_Music_Female> country <Speech_Music_Female> that hasn't been <Speech_Female> a single generation <Speech_Music_Female> the pot <Speech_Music_Female> century that hasn't <Speech_Music_Female> been touched <Speech_Music_Female> by violence <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> who knows <Speech_Music_Female> if it would <Advertisement> be any different <Speech_Female> for this <Advertisement> generation <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music>

united states prime minister iraq john howard colston
"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

The Yak

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

"Enjoy <Speech_Female> or even playing music <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> sad <Speech_Female> sad <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> one of many <Speech_Music_Female> talents russia has <Speech_Music_Female> discovered <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> is rushing <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> seen <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> the other thing <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> i don't like it i <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> mean sean <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> i <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> mean <Speech_Female> i i'm <Speech_Female> glad <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> finally have <Speech_Female> you seen this <Speech_Female> you hire <Speech_Female> se <Speech_Music_Female> i think <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> that <Speech_Female> i <Speech_Female> think a lot of time <Speech_Female> in any other tesla <Speech_Female> i suck you <Speech_Female> be happy in my <Speech_Female> dream who's <Speech_Female> had been barely <Speech_Female> a week and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> i had <Speech_Female> when i joined <Speech_Female> and i <Advertisement> i think <Speech_Female> i got a <Speech_Male> sad sad <Speech_Male> when <Speech_Male> enjoy a national <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> campaign <Speech_Female> manager <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> when i'm doing treats <Speech_Female> i'm ready <Speech_Female> i'm busy <Speech_Female> i <Speech_Female> am jewelries my <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> uncle sam i'm a veteran <Speech_Male> someone <Advertisement> said <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i <Speech_Music_Male> want my <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> children using music <Speech_Female> to escape the hardest <Speech_Female> i've witnessed <Speech_Female> much of western <Speech_Female> module remains <Speech_Female> in ruins <Speech_Female> and the house <Speech_Female> which russia <Speech_Female> spent a lot happily <Speech_Female> growing up in <Speech_Female> still has damaged <Speech_Female> rules and a leaky <Speech_Female> ceiling and native <Speech_Female> repair <Silence> a family doesn't <Speech_Female> have enough money to <Speech_Female> fix a <SpeakerChange> united <Speech_Female> nations agencies <Speech_Female> as tonight up to <Speech_Female> ninety percent <Speech_Female> of historic city <Speech_Female> has been damaged <Speech_Female> and destroyed <Speech_Female> and satellite images <Speech_Female> in field surveys <Speech_Female> indicate eight <Speech_Female> million tons <Speech_Female> of debris <Speech_Female> scattered across the city <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> international <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> media critic documented <Speech_Female> the scale of <Speech_Female> destruction from aerial <Speech_Female> bombardment on <Speech_Female> ground tossing <Speech_Female> as defined science and <Speech_Female> michael unsalted <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> the battle is really <Speech_Music_Female> in a <Speech_Music_Male> lot of coercion planning <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> i am <SpeakerChange> confident <Speech_Music_Male> the justice i <Speech_Male> suppose been defeated in <Speech_Male> communities across iraq <Speech_Male> iso will <Speech_Male> be defeated in mosul <Speech_Male> is well <SpeakerChange> tens <Speech_Male> of thousands more <Speech_Female> still trapped behind <Speech_Female> enemy lines <Speech_Music_Female> reports 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russia ninety percent hundred year million tons
"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

The Yak

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Yak

"Welcome <Speech_Music_Male> back to the yak <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> from world vision <Speech_Music_Male> stralia <Speech_Music_Male> i make it in there <Speech_Music_Male> and today <Speech_Music_Male> we're going to myself <Speech_Music_Male> a city in <Speech_Music_Male> northern iraq <Speech_Music_Male> near the <Advertisement> syrian <Speech_Music_Male> border missouri <Speech_Music_Male> husband <Advertisement> a reputation <Speech_Music_Male> as one <Speech_Music_Male> of the most dangerous <Speech_Music_Male> cities in the world <Speech_Music_Male> violence <Speech_Music_Male> and bloodshed following <Speech_Music_Male> the city's captured <Speech_Music_Male> by the so called <Speech_Music_Male> islamic <Advertisement> state forces <Speech_Music_Male> in twenty <Advertisement> four <Speech_Music_Male> taint <Advertisement> the <Speech_Music_Male> three <Advertisement> occupation <Speech_Music_Male> reduced <Advertisement> much <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> trouble <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> two years <Advertisement> after <Speech_Music_Male> the city <Advertisement> was officially <Speech_Music_Male> declared <Advertisement> ray taken <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by government <Speech_Music_Male> forces <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> the question <Advertisement> remains <Speech_Music_Male> is it actually <Speech_Music_Male> safe <Speech_Music_Male> for people to return <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> i'm here <Speech_Music_Male> with brianna <Speech_Music_Male> piazza <Speech_Music_Male> for my sps journalists <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> will be a roving <Speech_Music_Male> reporter chris <Speech_Music_Male> produce to i story <Speech_Music_Male> bray <Speech_Music_Male> tell us about the current <Speech_Music_Male> situation <Speech_Music_Male> in missouri <Speech_Music_Male> thing <SpeakerChange> saying guess <Speech_Music_Female> so

brianna iraq reporter missouri two years
Likudnt: Israels political crisis

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:23 min | 1 year ago

Likudnt: Israels political crisis

"In Israel just last month. Benyamin Netanyahu was celebrating a strong showing by his Likud party in parliamentary elections. He had been forced to call an early poll as he faced a raft of corruption allegations, his victory seemed like a vote of confidence by the Israeli people. And he grinned ingredient cheering crowds on election night, but all has not gone smoothly since Israel has many political parties and mister Netanyahu has struggled to build the coalition he needs to form a government. He called publicly on one party leader. His former defense minister of eager Lieberman to join him. Let's through this of net, the victim liberal, unfortunately, until this moment, including tonight, I didn't manage to complete a victory Lieberman to avoid elections. But whoever looks at the reality that we need to be responsible and former government immediately those please failed. So a few minutes after midnight, the Israeli parliament, the Knesset voted to dissolve it. So for reports from Israel for the economist and recently wrote a book about mister Netanyahu. And this is just thirty days after it was sworn in seven weeks after Laos election in. This is unprecedented in his right. But it'd go history. And why it's been so difficult to, to build a coalition Netanyahu proclaimed victory, because his block of right wing, religious parties had a majority of five seats in the Knesset. So it seemed that he had one. However, to make that victory reality needed to get all those policies cooperating together in one coalition and one issue the issue of the draft of Sheva students, students in religious seminaries proved so prove so contentious that one of the parties demanded the law on this. We should be ready drafted the previous be passed as literally, without changing, a comma, while some of the religious parties in the coalition demanded major changes to the law, and the prime minister. Currently so prime minister, who was very eager to begin his fifth tablet, prime minister couldn't bridge those differences. So what happens now? So what should have happened last night at midnight was with Netanyahu deadline on the tiny allocated to him to form the coalition up sewing else you've received the opportunity to, to form a coalition by his Rayleigh low, but there was also, there's those close into never been used with specifies that dissolved the whole process of foreign governments stops and the country goes back to the polls, and that is the closet into Neo used and therefore in three and a half months Israel will be held another election. And meanwhile, mister Netanyahu is under investigation on corruption allegations. How will that then play out in the current absence of government and the potential for a different one was really Mr. Gatien's ready been wraps up, and the attorney general has tentatively decided to indict into now on bribery and fraud in through? In, in those three investigations Mosul efforts over the last few weeks when he should have been trying to solve this problem between his coalition partners was trying to get the parties to agree to vote on various pieces of legislation, which would grant him immunity from prosecution and would shield him from any intervention of the high court in that decision. That is now that has now been shelved those pieces of today's another go ahead. Certainly not until the election, and another government is formed, assuming wins the next election form that government. So he's lost very valuable time for him. And in that time the hearing. Harry's. It will proceed and there's a chance that before the attorney general decides to, to indict attending and to charge them in court for bribery, he, he won't have any relation in place. It to shield him has steadfastly denied the allegations ever since the investigations begun over three years ago. He said, there's nothing in them, but step after step it turned out that there is some serious evidence, which led to form investigation. But now he's instead of is standing up in court against he's trying to vade any kind of you say this situation is unprecedented. And, you know, everyone would have expected that mister Netanyahu could have formed, a government does the fact that he hasn't suggest that, perhaps his rivals smell blood and are positioning themselves for power. Well, certainly Evita Lumine the leader of small, nationalist secular, particle, Estrella bay, taint, Israel, our home, who demanded that. The law be. Passed. And that was the reason why there is no code Asian. He says he felt that he could challenge the two now. And see his calculation is that now is, is going down eventually and therefore, there's no reason for him to be a member. His coalition is ready staking out, new ground in the right wing for the in the post tenure era. So he's, he's the first major is right wing politician, Israel to openly challenge. It's in recent years, and they'll be others who will follow him, if there is this large group of parties. Why is Mr. LeBron Lieberman ended up as the king-maker here? Well, the there was nothing, you know, block of parties had a majority of five seats, those five seats, a walked LeBron's party without those five seats than the majority, and what about the peace process? Jared Kushner is is in the country with this US led plan in hand on solving is really Palestinian issues. But there's no government for. Him to talk to. Well, we've got used to the fact that the Trump administration delaying disposing the unveiling of its much way to peace plan. But now that finally have gone out to this piece for spiritedly workshop beret next month. I doubt that they'll delay once again due to the political turmoil in Israel. It's mainly anyway, for the Americans to get together with our bed regimes and work out some kind of economic offense not yet, the ethical stage of, of, of the Trump, and if we ever get to that stage, that stage will will probably be postponed due to these Rayleigh election. Right. And how do you think the, the election will go? Do you, do you think that mister Netanyahu will be able to form a coalition the next time around? It's wouldn't election two months ago. He didn't manage to take that victory and, and China into a function government, but he, he, he wouldn't the right wing religious, bodies one majority, which was not known large one, but it was pretty clear. And it's difficult to see the opposition overturning that this point. But we're in uncharted territory. Now we've never had a second election in the same year's election held just only five months after the previous one. And there's also this new rift within the right wing have a right wing party. Basically saying that Netanyahu, dreitzer, former government, he failed, and now we probably won't be sporting in the future. So there's a sort of shift in the political map in Israel, which which will have to wait and see how that pans out. Thank you very much for your time.

Benyamin Netanyahu Israel Mr. Lebron Lieberman Israeli Parliament Rayleigh Prime Minister Likud Party Bribery Attorney Laos Jared Kushner Sheva Mosul China Evita Lumine Harry Mr. Gatien United States Estrella Bay
The age-old quest for the color blue

Science Magazine Podcast

06:44 min | 1 year ago

The age-old quest for the color blue

"Up we have contributing correspondent Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's here to talk to us about the pursuit of blue. Hi kai. So how long have humans been on the hunt for a blue color? That's already whether the difficulty begins. I guess. Yeah. Pretty good evidence from a cave in South Africa, the Blombos cave that one hundred thousand years ago, humans already will making pigments so more like red ochre yellow ker in using charcoal for black. They will make pigments. But there's no evidence at all of any blue pigments than for a very very long time. That stays the same is some recent evidence of from from gravesite in Turkey that about nine thousand years ago. There was some burials of women children whether it had ground down as right, which is a blue mineral. And even when it's down. It's it's kind of a nice, blue pigment. They were very with this possibly was used for medics. We don't really know. But that's kind of the earliest evidence. We have of any Lukman. Why is blue so rare? Is there some physical property required to make something reflect the color blue, it's hard to achieve if you look in the plot world as a lot of different classes, pigments that we have. But there's only one class of pigments Dan to signs which can actually make blue. And even then it tends to be the complicated molecules that blue in that simply because in order for something to be blue it needs to absorb the rent. So the other part of the visible spectrum, basically and red light is of the visible spectrum. It's the lowest energy light. So in order for something to absorb the red. The kind of jumps that an electron makes which is how molecule usually absorbs collapse these jumps need to be very small jumps in order to absorb the right rather than the blue. So it's much easier for nature appears to make molecules that absolve blue instead of once that absorb Bredon appeal blue these molecules often have to have. A lot of consigned chains and little ecoregions until they really make a good blue. I mean, there is blue in nature. We got water we got sky, we got blueberries. But for some reason making a synthetic version making a dye or pigment is really difficult. What about blue butterflies? Those those have nice blue color several of the blues. You've mentioned now are ones that aren't really pigment. So if you take sky, it's you know, kind of scattered more than than red light. Which is why the sky his loop in Walter. It's interesting because Walter actually absorbs kind of in the red kind of to vibrate the water molecules vibrate with the energy of red light. But it's not a very strong effect. Which is why you only see the bluest as up of water, and then the butterflies like most animals, they also not producing any blue pigments, they have like tiny structures that reflect light in a way that most of the other colors cancelled. So. If you take something very famous example like Mosul butterfly if you do into the scales on its wings. It has these little structures, and they basically end up reflecting all of the light the Chines onto the onto the wing in a way that the other colors, just disappear. What you see is the blue. So basically, everything is not a payment or at tied that we see in everyday life. But if we want to reproduce, those colors, if we want to make painting or make something out of plastic. That's the right color blue. It's really difficult, exactly. And humans in the past. Usually they found these pigments by accident. Some of the earliest examples are indigo which is a dye made from plants, but actually the plot itself isn't extra blue. So it's a blue from nature, but it's only blue ones humans do some chemistry on people for a very long time wanted to try and make synthetic indigo. And it took the s chemical company many, many years in precedent. The amount of money to finally come up with synthetic indigo. So they spent more than eight million gold marks at the time, which was more than the company was even worth to finally come up with with the recipe for synthetic indigo which was then produced around the world in is still used today to color jeans. It does make me wonder what is wrong with the blues that we have. I mean, we have plenty of toys that are blue plastic. We have paints that are blue. What what are those things that are available now not doing right or not cheating? Right. Chart is just the festive nation with colors, right? I mean, there are so many different hues of blue. And if somebody comes up with a new one, it's just especially of the artists. So usually the first ones to use them at it's just fascinating to have, you know, one more shoop. But then the other thing is that a little the blues that use Sopher instance, ultra marine, which is basic ground down. That's right. The part of Lapsley. It was one of the one of the most expensive pigments ever made was just very rare, right? Because you need the semi precious stone Lasley to even able to do it later people came up with a way of making it synthetically. But then even this static version it takes her chemicals to make that end up polluting the environment. A lot of self dioxide is produced as site product while you do so that I mean, that's one reason this the environmental implications on the other one office. Toxicity. I mean, this quite a few loose kkob. Lou that on that on exactly healthy, and this is an ongoing. Search people are still looking for blue pigments, and dyes and new or you took a look at three different approaches that are in the works right now, let's start with the first blue seeking scientists that actually found a new blue. But on accident like most blues in history, so must super money on this is a solid state chemists than he worked for a while. And he made a lot of discoveries, but not really related to pigments at all. And then he started work at Oregon state university in values. Two thousand six and what he actually wanted to do was to find what's called a multi for roic, basic material at room temperature has certain magnetic properties also electrical properties in that would make really interesting for building a computer. And so he used manganese oxide. Trim oxide in indium oxide, and he combined these Anna turn up that the compound came up with didn't have any interesting properties. But it was incredibly blue and he remembered from his days to punt the people said Lewis actually kind of hard to make. So he just published it and the color that he created has just had this incredible life of being used in many many places than now. It's also being sold far too to us.

Walter Blombos Cave Turkey South Africa Bredon Oregon State University Kaikaku Lukman DAN Schmidt Mosul Anna Lewis Lapsley LOU One Hundred Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years
Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

13:10 min | 1 year ago

Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

"Syria. Islamic state is a state no longer earlier this week, the Jihadist group which at its peak controlled an area of Syria and Dirac lodge of Austria and imposed its brutal rule upon eight million. People was chased out of its last pocket of territory by goose a town on the frightens river near Syria's border with Iraq in losing its territory is Lennox state lost many of its fighters, but it didn't lose all of them. Thousands of the caliphates foot soldiers are presenting themselves and their families at refugee camps and presenting the countries from which many of them hailed with a considerable political legal and ethical pickle. Which is basically this. What is to be done with them? There have been some calls for an international tribunal. But it is surely impossible to put so many people on trial. They cannot simply be abandoned, and it would be a brave politician willing to bet their career or a society willing to bet it safety on these. Jihadists returning home as altogether reformed characters. This is the foreign desk. Hot is pre programmed to think of every defeats as a test in. There will never see anything in as permanent defeat because it has already pre-programmed into their minds mindset and into their psyche. If you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death sentence. The tendency that we have in western Europe amendment to say, it's not out problem. They left us. They took up arms against us. We want nothing to do with them is all very well by the peasant doesn't cease to exist. So I think it behoves the society which broken up to consider why has this Cussing taken on against us? And what should we be doing about that not with the individual concern? Sent only but also with society as a whole. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller today will be hearing from a former director of global counterterrorism at M I six and from the full member of al-qaeda to look at what can be done, and what should be done with defeated jihadis. But I for a view from the ground from Syria on joined by Jane, Arraf international correspondent with NPR. Jane, stop by asking you to set the scene forest where he speaking to us from exactly what have you been able to see over the past few days. Well, I am in a which is one of the cities in the sort of a ton of Mus Kurdish region of Syria. And this is also where some leadership the Kurdish leadership is these officials who are trying to persuade other countries that they should have an international tribunal here in this northeastern part of Syria and been able to go to a couple of the camps where they're holding foreign his wills Iraqi. And Syrian ISIS families, and I've also been able to speak to one of the foreign fighters. Those foreign fighters have been apprehended by Kurds and the US coalition the US led coalition in many cases, they've been in US detention in Syria detention centers, actually, run by the US, and now handed over back to Kurdish forces, do you have a sense of what kind of numbers we're talking about in terms of the ISIS fighters currently being held by the codes. And that's all of the Iraqi Syrian and foreign there are said to be about seven thousand of them. So that is mostly Syrian and Iraqi about a thousand of them eight hundred two thousand or said to be foreign fighters accused foreign fighters, we have to make clear that they haven't actually been tried or convicted yet, but they are suspected to be foreign fighters. So that's all the way up from eight hundred to about a thousand is the estimate you generally get from US military officials as wills occurred. In what sense you able to get a what kind of conditions that being held in? Well, compared to what they came from which was almost certain death as US air strikes in waters attacked the last bit of their territory. It's, you know, not bad the conditions of interviewing these fighters preclude either asking for getting detailed answers about how they're being held in where they're being held. But one of the ones that I interviewed he was a Canadian fighter had been held in solitary confinement for quite a while. He also said that he was having trouble getting medical care. Clearly was well enough to do an interview. But certainly medical care seems to be an issue, but having said that, you know, having covered this battle against ISIS the war against ISIS over the entire ISIS territory. It's much better than the fate that befell a lot of them which was basically being obliterated by air. Yikes. Mortars and in other cities, if we boil this entire story for the moment down to this one Canadian fighter. What sense were you able to get all of his views on gun to assume it was a he his views on now on the subject of the ideology. He joined up to fight fo did you get the sensitize east had much in the way of a rethink? Yeah. Pretty much all of them have. And this was really interesting because I found this as well. In the case of the women who were married to ISIS fighters. They have now been for several months at least in detention with either Kurds or Americans, this particular foreign fighter told me that you know, he'd had a lot of time to think, but not only that he'd had a lot of interactions with the Americans who interrogated him and with the people who are holding him and with the Kurds. He said, for instance, but one point the Americans had given him novels to read one of the women. I spoke with told me that she had. Been aware. And I'm not sure if this is true, but she said she hadn't been aware of that ISIS held slaves. You know, they took thousands of UCD's from the tiny ziti religious minority as slaves massacred, the men and took the women and girls as sex slaves. She said she'd never met one until one of them was brought to the detention center to talk to them. And she said, and that's when I realized it was true. It wasn't just rumors. What they did to these women. So yes, in many cases, certainly in the case of this Canadian fighter. I it seems to have had an impact another foreign woman who is married to ISIS fighters told me that she was happy that she wasn't sent straight back to her country. She was from the Netherlands, and she said had she been sent back. She would still have been radicalized. But as it was her views of changed a lot. She said in being held for months and months by the Kurds because the biggest question, I guess the overarching question that we're looking at in this episode is with the ideology. Of ISIS will survive the destruction of the caliphate that the whole selling point of Islam state, and there was a clue in the name was that it had conquered territory. It was building a nation. It was building a homeland. If it is seen to have filed in that central enterprise. Do you think it's still going to be able to recruit people who might be inclined towards jihad? Or is it you'll sense from talking to the people you just mentioned that they kind of starting to realize that they might have back to lose a well there are a couple of things here. One is that in terms of ISIS being able to recreate a territory the caliphate had held which ranged for seventy thousand square kilometres, roughly and encompassed major cities. No one really believes they'll be able to do that. Again. In part of the reason, it's very apparent in Iraq. For instance, the people of Mosul, which is the second biggest city in Iraq. At first, many of them will tell you. They welcomed. Isis five years ago when ISIS came in because they so hated the Iraqi government and security forces, and then they realized what ISIS actually was which was indescribably brutal. The also they will not make that mistake. Again. They know what ISIS is now they know the dangers. But having said that there is a real fear that there is another ISIS in the making because we're talking about roughly in the case of Iraq thirty thousand members of ISIS families. Now a lot of those are children. So let's leave aside the children because children are children. But if you take the adults in those families, the women, for instance, a lot of them do still believe in the ideology, there is nothing that has changed their minds since then as for the foreigners. You know, a story I hear over and over and talking particularly to these foreign women is I didn't know what I was getting into. I don't understand Syria. I married. The sky might boyfriend told me to come. So those ones seemed to have had an awakening. And those are certainly the ones that want you to know they've had an awakening the, you know, I think we also have to realize that there are lots of those people in detention in these camps who are not talking to us because they believe were infidels because they still believe in the ideology and in the coun- recently in L hall camp, which now has more than seventy thousand people in it in northeastern Syria, some of the people running the camp told me that there are new arrivals all the time. And it's those new arrivals who are the most still radicalized that they've been saying in some cases that the head of ISIS abo- becquerel daddy ordered them to come to the camp that they will stay in the camp. But then Baghdadi and ISIS will take them out of the camp. So there is no one who does not believe that ISIS is still a threat those ones who will. Speak to you. Then what do they want to happen now, especially the ones who have come from outside, Iraq and Syria have the old discovered. A sudden enthusiasm for democratic G prosise. Yes. Well. It depends where they come from. So there was a group of women. I met Dutch women they want to go back. And some of them said we understand we broke the law. We want to stand trial. But it's our children were worried about they wanted their children to be handed over to their relatives. In many cases. These are very small children toddlers, really young the others. It depends again depends entirely where they come from a I met quite a few women from eastern Europe. And there was a Chinese woman. They are all terrified of being sent back to their countries because they believe they would be executed not only that they're even afraid to contact their relatives because even by contacting their relatives their relatives would end up in jail. They say so the ones who come from western countries tend to want to be sent back there. But as you know, the problem is these countries don't want to take them. They don't want to take them mostly for two reasons. One is it's really not clear how much evidence would carry over. If they were to stand trial in their own countries. And then the other thing is they could actually pose a danger if they can't be put on trial. They can't be prosecuted for things they may have done here. Then they will have to let them go, and they will be free in their own countries. So it's a dilemma you mentioned that there is some enthusiasm among the Syrian Kurdish leadership for the idea of an international tribunal have they talked at all about what they see as the scope of that they can't realistically intend to put tens of thousands of people on trial on the they can't know and by its very nature and international tribunal would have to be set up by the international community. And there isn't a whole lot of appetite for that for one thing the Kurdish leadership here is not internationally recognised. That's a big deal. And then these things will take years and years. There has been a move to send some of these fighters in any case from countries that don't want the. Back to Iraq and Iraq can prosecute them. If they've also been in Iraq because a lot of these fighters did come from Iraq from Mosul the foreign fighters, even when they were driven out of Mosul, they came to Syria, so they could be prosecuted in Iraq. Now, the problem there is those are not transparent trials, they're not run, according to international standards, and in a lot of cases, they do end up with the death penalty. That's one thing that the Kurds keep saying if you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death

Iraq Syria Isis United States Mosul Iraqi Syrian Europe Syria. Dirac Austria NPR Iraqi Government Al-Qaeda Jane UCD Andrew Miller Netherlands Eastern Europe L Hall
Tigris River, Iraq And Mosul discussed on KNX Programming

KNX Programming

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Tigris River, Iraq And Mosul discussed on KNX Programming

"Tigris river at least seventy seven people were killed when an overloaded ferry carrying families on an outing sank in the Tigris river in Mosul in northern Iraq officials say most of the victims were women and children who could not swim. They say the ferry had been loaded to several times its capacity and high water levels in the river are to blame

Tigris River Iraq Mosul
Iran's Rouhani in Iraq for 'historic' visit to offset US sanctions

Pacifica Evening News

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Iran's Rouhani in Iraq for 'historic' visit to offset US sanctions

"Orion, president Hassan Rohani was in Baghdad today making his first official visit to the nation that Tehran wants fought a bloody war against and later back in the battle with the Islamic state group since Rohani's election in two thousand thirteen Iraq has relied on Iranian paramilitary support to fight ISIS following the militant groups capture of the Iraqi city of Mosul and other territory in both Iraq and Syria now with the militants facing a final territorial defeat in the Syrian village of boggles. Iran is looking for Iraq's continued support as it faces a maximum pressure campaign by President Trump after his decision to withdraw America from Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers. Simon marks. Sports. Iranian. President asandra Hani is making his first ever trip during his tenure as the country's leader to Baghdad. His meeting with the Iraqi President bomb. Sally will focus on both trade relations and US sanctions on Iran. The two issues deeply intertwined because Iraq is not guaranteed continuing exemption from US sanctions and later this month. The Trump administration must make that decision following Washington's withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal. It's an opportunity for Iran to show. It's not in fact analyst Bob McMahon with a New York-based Council on foreign relations says the Iraqis want to maintain access to Iranian oil supplies. These are sanctions that especially you're going after Iran's energy sector. Iraq relies heavily on that sector. They would like to continue to purchase a running gas at least for another year, they've talked openly about going around the US dollar denominated transactions in some other way that would allow them to do trade that would not come under some sort of financial restrictions have been imposed by. In these snapback sanctions. There's lots of things that countries do trade and already it would like to trade more in agriculture, for example, this is the highest level. Visit these two countries since President Trump come recently that the US would like to keep its forces in Iraq, quote, unquote. See what's going on in Iran next door that intervention by President Trump worried many Iraqis who rejects the idea that the country should be used as a US listening post in the

Iraq Iran President Trump United States President Asandra Hani Baghdad Tehran Hassan Rohani Simon Marks Mosul Syria Bob Mcmahon America Sally Official New York-Based Council Washington Analyst
To Curb Taliban, Afghan President Replaces Security Chiefs

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

To Curb Taliban, Afghan President Replaces Security Chiefs

"Herself to her role, and the people of Japan would sincerity the empress said he was relieved that his rain ending without Japan. Having been again being engaged in a war. Hundreds of Hindu hardliners have blocked a path leading to a well-known temple in southern India to stop a group of women from reaching the hilltop shrine. The temple has become a major battleground between Hindu radicals and gender activists since the Indian Supreme Court in a landmark ruling overturned a longstanding ban on women of childbearing age from visiting the shrine BBC news. This is from our own correspondent here on the BBC World Service. I'm PASCAL harsher. Hello and welcome to the program that takes you to places others. Don't reach in this edition. We visit the Somali town where pirates once flaunted their ill-gotten bling. We also follow a dramatic story of one woman's escape from violence in Cameroon with little granddaughter into and we meet a man helping to keep a dying language alive. I I to Hungary. I don't know what's happening to my country. A young Hungarian woman told me recently, it's crazy what the government is doing. It. Seems that many Hungarians from right to left are alarmed at the policies, the Prime Minister Viktor Orban, and his feeders party of pushing through he had already increased his power to controversial extent. As far as the e u is concerned and more recently, a new Bill, which almost doubles, the hours of overtime, an employer can demand from their staff sparked demonstrations across Hungary from Budapest, Nick, THORP examines. How this crisis came to be two bronze lions flank the steps of the Hungarian parliament. They're proud forms appearing and disappearing through the billowing red white and green smoke from the protesters flares peg tyre on the steps between them stand. The riot police in full dress uniform tear gas canisters of the ready like Roman centurions. Arranged for a family photograph. It's an image which would have given the famous Hungarian architect Imre style. The mastermind of the parliament building and champion of symbolism. Pause for thought were the lines flanked by police protecting Hungarian sovereignty from the mob as the carefully scripted government. Messages would have us believe or were the lions blessing the people as they tried to retake. They're building from corrupt power hungry, mafia as the messages circling on the leaflets in the crowd suggest the roots of the protests live far away in another country with a lot of problems lines Britain at least half a million young skilled Hungarians who've left their homeland in recent years, mostly for Britain, they left for good economic reasons a minimum hourly wage four times higher than in Hungary, many others now leaving for political reasons to according to agency which finds jobs for them and interviews them beforehand. They say they've had enough of Prime Minister Viktor Auburn his feet as party and their eight year rule, the four million also Hungarian employees left behind a being asked to work longer and longer hours to cope with the ensuing labor shortage on the twelfth of December the government pushed a law through parliament, which would increase the ceiling on annual overtime hours from two hundred fifty two four hundred Hungarian jewelry work the equivalent of thirty one days overtime a year. The new law adds another nineteen to that a total of fifty extra days a year, meaning employers could demand a six day working week German car giants like Audi Mercedes and the new kid on the block BMW a drawn here by the fact that Hungarian labor is cheaper than robots and the tax breaks unfavorable exchange rates as they pay their workers in Hungarian foreign and so they caused for euros. But the social consequences of overwork. Wherever it takes place on dia, Hungary, has one of the lowest life expectancies in the EU who actually asked for the new overtime law, not necessarily the Germans Karoi. Judge. A trade union leader told me, though, they would certainly have been pleased by it more likely the owners of the many medium and small enterprises in the ruling party's empire. He suggested the vote in favor of the law should have sailed through parliament powered by these strong feeders majority instead opposition MP's, ambushed it blowing whistles and sirens. An occupying the stairs to stop the speaker reaching his pulpit. One politician. Ben Saito die broadcast the whole four hour drama live on Facebook. There were two point four million views Prime Minister Viktor Orban comes across as a weak and powerless figure in the videos alerted to. What was happening by toward is livestream. The protesters gathered in front of the building and the standoff began. For several months after his landslide reelection in April. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban seemed to have the wind in his sales. But in just the last two weeks because of the protests, the wind direction has changed and blowing the smoke in the prime minister's is as well. As those of the riot police the new law this proven deeply unpopular opposed by eighty three percent of those consulted by one polling agency. Even before the protests began last Sunday, they marched on the state television station, which they denounced as a factory of lies when opposition MP's were prevented. From reaching the live studio to read out their demands, the event was also rich in historical symbolism in one thousand nine hundred eighty six the Hungarian uprising against the communist regime began when protesters were prevented from reading demands on Hungarian radio in the past week protests, civil said being organized in towns across the country and March is held to. Local media which now under government control back at the parliament, building the lines lookout on a snowy landscape on tourists Christmas decorations and policemen mildly festive in their red hats and on protest his happy Christmas. Happy Christmas John the crowd as though Christmas too is a match that they just have to win. Nick, stop our next. Stop is a town that became famous for all the wrong reasons, I'll in Somalia's semi autonomous region of Puntland was thrown to the center of global attention. When an American flag chip was captured by pirates operating from the town that was nine years ago. Now when I'll was known as the hub of Somali piracy, the pirates and their riches have largely gone now imprisoned dead or moved on to karma waters. But what has become of I'll and soy has been. Into safer self. Boat approaches the town of a I can't help. But notice the beautiful landscape. It time is trip of white Sunday beach is dotted with a mixture of modern buildings in traditional mix. Shift shelters behind. It is a dramatic Gordon Brown cliff possibly hundreds of meters, high it breaks to the left to reveal the distant horizon Puntland imagine how beautiful the setting this would be to shoot a movie instability in this country is the obvious deterrent. But I have really been immortalised on film, captain Phillips the Hollywood blockbuster. Starring Tom Hanks is based on the true story of an American captain Richard Phillips in two thousand nine he will sailing from Oman in the Middle East to Mamba Kenya. When his ship was captured by four heavily armed Somali pirates on skiffs, led by Abdul say the forced the American. Onto one of their boats and tried to take him ashore dramatic risk emission followed involving a US navy destroyer and seal commandos, captain Phillips will saved Mosa arrested and the other pirates killed I think of that film. They arriving Abdulah Busey's hometown, not knowing what to expect but locals tell me the little drummer here. These days the threat of piracy has declined thanks in part to the UN Security Council's decision ten years ago to allow ships to enter Somali territorial waters at the time pirates like Mosul parading with impunity the tuck ships almost every day and often return to I to try and blend into the community donors paid in brunson's flowed freely here as huge sums were paid to secure the release of ships and their crew the pirates lead lodge in. By the residents. Tell me just as they did it see the pirates terrorized people here to the locals soon grew to resent this treatment, the pirates don't come here anymore. A police chief Mohammad diarrhea SUV tells me proudly EMMY legal boats would be brought here by PM PF and rewarding with them. He PM PF is the Puntland maritime police force which has been expanding with help from the European Union. It's now the biggest marine police force in Somalia with eight hundred recruits some of them took up strategic positions around the town ahead of our rival holding rifles and tearing away from the sea into the vast country, insecurity and land is still a major problem. The Al Qaeda linked. Al Shabaab militants are active to the south local leader of these Lennox state group holds an enclave to the north, and there were fears some. Pirates may simply be lying low. But there is growing optimism in. By a group of women wash and sliced fresh fish on the beach before laying them on a mesh the local authorities king to read I of its association with piracy the women want to build businesses to process and sell their fish won't tourist to come one man tells me the persona much to see and learn from the springs that drain into the ocean to this twitching natural beauty of the land. Not to mention is on history. Overlooking the ocean is a historic fort built by Mohammed Abdullah Hassan. The charismatic religious and cultural chief who led a twenty year resistance against British and colonial rulers his religious zeal and brutal tactics in battle on him. The nickname the mud Mola. He continues to inspire some of the most ruthless

Hungary Prime Minister Viktor Orban Prime Minister Government Somalia Puntland MP European Union Prime Minister Viktor Auburn Captain Phillips Nick Bbc World Service Indian Supreme Court Japan India BBC Hilltop Shrine Cameroon
Isis returns to its insurgent roots

FT News

11:04 min | 1 year ago

Isis returns to its insurgent roots

"ISIS is returning to its insurgent roots having been driven out of almost all the territory it once controlled in Iraq and Syria four years after ISIS controlled as much as a third of Iraq declared a caliphate. It is retrenched, but it's still the power to carry out kidnappings killings and bombings. Khloe? Cornish took to Andrew England about the continuing threat posed by the group to stability in the region. In two thousand fourteen ISIS notes the blitz across Iraq and Syria. And at one point I think they control about third of Iraq and major cities in both countries. What's been happening in the last couple of years since the caliphate will the self declared caliphate has been defeated all the situation being in terms of how they've been pushed back from their strongholds. Rockford. It'd be Iraqi government declared a military victory over I his about this time. I should having won back control of major urban areas. Which I is it invaded include the northern city of Mosul Iraq's second largest city. So that was a fight that nasty three and number players involved. That's the fighters from the Iraqi army which had initially kinda crumbled in two thousand fourteen faced with the ISIS insurgency, you have Kurdish vices mcken fun region. You also had low of shin initial groups who had formed pretty much in response to the ISIS threats that was facing Europe. It was big big movement to mobilize additional fighters to protect the country. And a lot of those groups actually have a radian bucking. So all of these people working not always very well together. There was also west and involvement as well. Intensive ashtrays on ISIS targets in Iraq. So that's how that fight with paying out. And then in Syria, the situation is actually more complicated because the fight against ISIS is just one really the much larger civil war. So in Syria, ISIS territory was concentrated in the north east of the country on the big cities rocker and data which probably will be familiar to people. Now, you will probably see the social glasses destination of those cities under the weight of US leda strikes. So in Syria, ISIS is in fighting on the one hand Russian-backed pro regime Syrian forces with Iranian involvement and on the other hand US backed Syrian rebels. So it's actually been facing kind of both sides of the civil war and Russia and their Resor fell from ISIS control this year amid much lodge. Hush by the feeling of as well, so retake areas in the south the country. So there was basically a big effort by local and international forces to push them back in both countries. What do we know about what remains in terms of the ISIS fighters? Isis supporters across these two companies. At one point in August, the US apartment defense was saying there about three thousand ISIS fighters in this pocket in Syria, the this territory they control, but it's very important to be cautious about them. The I think it's very hard for us to know, exactly. How many fighters they're all lest and how many schools is they have across Iraq and Syria. But we do know where I this is holed up in Iraq. They've got we think they is in the hammering mountains, which a very very Thakin offense mountains kinda the middle of a rock, and they don't say tax from that. And then they will they will have more bases a more positions in northerner as well. And there's continuing worry about sleeper cells of ISIS, fighters and other parts of the country as well. You mentioned the being pushed out of the major cities they controlled in the major church they controlled house they adopted the way the carrying out attacks. Because they do continue to pose a threat as we've mentioned. Yeah. Absolutely. I just thought it at a terrorist insurgency and then gained these huge swathes of territory. Very frightening. Modern two thousand fourteen and what they've done is returned to the insurgent route that they came from much smaller terror attacks people just disappeared into the desert rose and trying to hold her Trie. So that seems to be the strategy now is to continue to destabilize these areas with smaller hit and run attacks, but still deadly unfortunately for civilians and officials who have against targeted in Iraq. What impact is that heaven? I mean, obviously in Iraq this chiefs ways the county Sedikh control, which has to be rebuilt about reconstruction. The need to get people who were forced out of the homes back and these areas which always felt very marginalized slightly by bike dad and was a new government in Baghdad. What impact is it having? Terms of Iraq and Iraq's ability to build on the security gains. And then in Syria where we're seeing the civil war is winding down as prison. Bouchara sats voices have reclaimed control of most of the country and get mentioning just how much progress hasn't Nate unsecurity interactions on his was holding touchy. Yes, they all these kinds of attacks. But the Iraqi security forces constellation is vice is happening execution type outweigh. However, you know, is people continue to feel threatened by ISIS attacks that really undermines any kind of official assets to restore stability in the sense of security as well in these places. I think it called me stress. Just how dangerous life can still feel. I think in face it might be better than before. But if I this is coming to your village and killed the most important tests and in that village issue the local chief, which is confident analyst of seen them doing. That contributes to a sense of instability in Syria. This is the of most active fighting still in Syria to try and expel ISIS from the last pockets territory, and so you have continual battle casualties that. But of the overall civil War, I suppose, the American involvement there is the most important thing because America's said it's in Syria in order to ensure the enduring defeat of ISIS, and so obviously the longer that they have to fight. I enjoy the longer they're gonna be there they north. They started to link that crisis in Syria to Iranian presence as well. And they want to be honest to see Iranian forces in Iranian proxy forces also being expelled from Syria. But the continuing bustle against I means America continues to have military presence into it as well. At one point when they controlled large areas in Syrian Iraqi Lee had oil resources that smuggling results the customs, they had taxes, etc. How they survive today. Does this indicate that perhaps they still have certain areas where they still have support. What do we know about what sustaining them? I guess it's important to stress how wealthy ISIS was at one point. It had opened up by volts that had huge oil revenues, and they invested some of that money into companies anything for money exchanges car dealership, and I think it's pretty hard for the authorities actually pinpoint which companies they beat in order to to function or stop them from operating. So what we understand believe that they get revenues from these companies, they also can stop and extort trucks on roads, and that kind of thing, so certainly they've knees are much much diminished. They are much much week before the nab were, but they do still have revenue. Streams coming in one of the notable things about twenty fourteen was her the Iraqi security forces, which the Americans have spent billions of dollars rebuilding of the invasion in two thousand and free melted away when they were faced with the fruit of ISIS, how it quits to the Iraqi forces. Forces to continue maintaining the offensive against ISIS and prevent a resurgence. I mean that would seem to be one of the critical things going forward. I think we'd have to say that the Iraqi forces are stronger than they were full. However, the US department defense expect to general recall, I said, I've how the fight against ISIS going. Deep highlight socks. They didn't think Americans would be able to leave Iraq anytime soon intensive needing to keep providing support to the Iraqi security forces one of the things that diplomats stress here as well, which they sometimes feel like they're not being heard back in their home capitals. Is that I it is not done thing. He's quite far off didn't thing in the and in that regard is going to need to be continuing the just ical and probably material support full voltage contracting. Is it not an easy thing to do counterinsurgency is in some ways. Much harder execute than ground offensive in love wage. You know, you don't know coming from. It's a difficult thing to do. And certainly the Americans in fact that the Iraqis are going to need help with it for the foreseeable featuring ever since the US invasion in two thousand and free ousted Saddam Hussein the have been sectarian shoes and publicity extremism in a country, which is now run by the Shia majority, people would say that's helped fuel the extremism that ISIS has been able to tap into. Do you think that those issues have been tackled have been dealt with? And how important will that be going forward when the new government in Baghdad looks to rebuild and reconstruct areas that came under ISIS control? I mean, exactly as you say they'd been real continuity in fans is a long-standing trending towards extreme in amongst some communities in Iraq sent doesn't three hundred before is well and the government now needs to do. It can to restore service days and its authority in some of these areas happen just so badly damaged by war. But we're also neglected before the ISIS insurgency and before people decided to join you can see. So, you know, it was just politics and conflicts, very localized in Iraq. But you can see there was a broader trend towards any extremes. And I think actually that has been a swing by though. I mean, I was just so brutal. That polling suggested the obscene. He's actually will let in favor of more hardline version of is not not the people. So I did. So in some senses, they lost support that says to me in a country where there have been real kind of weaponization and sectarian identity. This is not a problem. That's going to go away without tackling some of the courses.

Isis Iraq Syria United States Iraqi Government Iraqi Army Baghdad Mosul Khloe Rockford Cornish Europe Russia Thakin Nate Unsecurity Andrew England Saddam Hussein
Life begins to return to normal in parts of Mosul

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Life begins to return to normal in parts of Mosul

"Is beginning to return to normal on the east side of Mosul Iraq's second largest city. But it's a different story on the west side. Turn Clemens reports. Sections of west muzzle remain in ruin many Iraqis claim they will never return to their homes after suffering under ISIS teleconference in Baghdad. Army Colonel Jonathan Byron spoke about the progress and eastbound Zoll in Mozell worthy. Bertel rule of ISIS denied many of the basic right of an education. Now, thousands of students are returning to recently opened schools. Businesses are reopening where rubble wants to stood and over four million displaced Iraqis returned to their homes of origin. I'm John Clemens

John Clemens Colonel Jonathan Byron Baghdad Iraq Mosul Army Mozell
Jacob DeGrom of New York Mets wins NL Cy Young Award

SportsRadio 94WIP Nights and Weekends

07:43 min | 2 years ago

Jacob DeGrom of New York Mets wins NL Cy Young Award

"The Cy Young award winner. Anyone who debated or thought other than that doesn't understand baseball or follow it closely or not he got twenty nine of the thirty first place votes. Max Scherzer got one. And of course, degrom got that voters second place votes. Scherzer's got all twenty nine other second place votes. So they kind of ran away from the field. Aaron Nola the Phillies. More power to 'em had a phenomenal season. Good for Aaron got twenty seven. Of the thirty third place votes. She got one fourth two fourth place votes and one fifth place while was far ahead of Kyle Freeland who finished fourth in the Cy Young bounding but good for Jacob degrom. He wins the NL and the winner in the American League was Pike's. Now took it over Justin Burland race a lot. Closer new American League snout got seventeen first place votes. Berliner got thirteen. So is actually pretty close. But I will tell you why both Blake's now and Jacob degrom won their respective Cy youngs. Three letters e r. A for all the turnover in baseball and the over analytics of baseball and the new stats they have for baseball. The key stat in pitching is still earned run average who on the AL crown for ERA this year that would be breaks now who won the earned run crowned in the National League. And it wasn't close. Jacob degrom that why those two guys are deci young. So I was glad see kudos to the voters voted in these and have different guys vote for different awards and the like, so I give credit to those who voted for those two pitchers because they were bad their best pitchers in their league. This year they deserve to win. They both rightfully get their Cy youngs. Why because they had the best earned run averages any American League. Now, I think it was maybe somewhat telling the Phillies made a move. They changed their pitching coach. I actually thought recruits did a pretty good job this year the last couple of years under peak mechanic, and I wasn't a big fan of his pitching coach. I thought the police should have made a move there prior to they never did delay let mechanic go, and then they put a whole new staff together and elevated recruits on gig Kappler staff and a broaden Chris young who hadn't been doing scouting work for the Astros his first year as a pitching coach. He was the assistant pitching coach here in Philadelphia. And I guess he opened some is and impressed some people and they wanted to do something to change his coaching staff. Some many decided would be at the pitching coach position. So they let go and Chris young will be the Phillies pitching coach for this upcoming year. I don't quite get it. I don't understand it. I don't think Kratz Cranach was the biggest problem this year. Although I did go back and check the Phillies numbers again. Tonight. And I had forgotten how mediocre they were on the pitching side. This side of the guy who finished in third place in the Cy Young Aaron Nola the league ERA this year. Average dead average that's detrimental. That's not great. If your average you gotta be above average. If you want to have any kind of a winning season the league average for earned run average this year. Was four point zero two in the National League here. The Philly pitchers that had ER as above. Are under four point zero to that Curtis who I I always liked Curtis. And I don't quite understand why they didn't give him a chance this past year. He's a lefty us top one lefties, and I thought he should have been given a better chance. He was only in seven games Ziara was sub to at one eighty six do Brera Mosul. Be part of the bullpen again. This year. Aaron Nola initiate who. I know is the IRA ended up at two two point five nine, but I'm tired, and I don't I don't care about knee shack anymore. He's got issues. He's not tough. He doesn't want the ball. He was great at home for long stretches this season. But he was also injured. He's blatantly overpaid going into this year. His ERA says decent year, my eyes. Tell me not really so Arana was solid at two seven three. He'll be back again this year cer- Anthony to ninety five he may be closer feed. Not he's going to be a key component near Penn. Avalon who came over in the trade didn't pitch a whole hell of a lot five and two thirds innings. But at least he did keep his ERA onto four Tommy hunter who I didn't think cat a good year. But his ERA was under four at three point eight zero. Didn't get as many strikeouts. He doesn't walk is a game. Crazy doesn't walk a ton. But I'll give them enough credit that he got it under four and Aaron Morgan at three eight three and Jake Arrieta three nine six so Ariana which just below just above average this year just above. And by the way, I expected a lot more but better than the rest of the pictures. Davis four one five not good enough. Zach f one four thirty six not good enough. Delo Santos who dominated and AAA got a couple of shots in the big leagues. Including a couple of starts. Four seven four. Not good enough. Nick Vada four seven seven not good enough Vinnie Velazquez, four eighty five not good enough. Jake Thompson who they moved on from Hector Narus actors Hecht is the kind of pitcher is gonna get manages wired. Gabe Kaplan is going to get fired because act the narrows, they're probably it'd be a couple of other contributing reason. But Hector narrates will be part of it five ten, and I know he got hot at the end of the year and actually gave him some good outings in September. You wanna make captain Ariza? Key component your pen next year, you go there. I'd rather not. And so on and so forth down to the Jared. I'd coughs in the world and the mine hall. We Milner at a world. Just not good enough to Phillies don't have enough pitching. And nobody's talking about the Phillies upgrading their pitching during this off season. It's all about Harper and Machado, and if not are Machado, we only get one. What are the other moves going to be they need upgrade the pitching? And just making Chris young. They're pitching coach isn't going to be enough for my money. So have you wanna get on on the Phillies Aaron Nola congrat- vision? Third in the Cy Young had a hell of a season wanted a better starting seasons. We've seen in a while. You gotta go back to Lee and holiday and hamels in the light. We're good couple of removes for years removed from having a to ace and affiliates. Did have a ace in Aaron Nola this year didn't quite get the Cy Young, but he did finish third which he should get props for eight eight seven to nine ninety four ninety four Steve from the Poconos checks in. Hey, steve. Joanie? How are you doing match? Really good to talk to you, my pledge, you what's on your mind tonight. Garissa? I just want to say

Phillies Aaron Nola Chris Young American League Cy Youngs Cy Young Baseball Jacob Degrom National League Max Scherzer Aaron Aaron Morgan Kyle Freeland Justin Burland Philadelphia Kratz Cranach Curtis Gabe Kaplan Tommy Hunter Hector Narus
2 US Navy SEALs Charged in War Crime Probe

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

2 US Navy SEALs Charged in War Crime Probe

"Two navy seals are facing charges in a war crimes case, here's USA's. Chris Barnes with details. Special operations chief Edward Gallagher allegedly stabbed a detainee to death in Iraq last year, posing for a picture next to the man's body later Lieutenant Jacob Portia is suspected of covering up the incident the naval criminal investigative service reports the Gallagher is also accused of shooting two civilians in separate in. Incidents in Mosul. Iraq Gallagher was arrested last month in the Brig at Miramar while Portier is facing a dereliction of duty charge

Edward Gallagher Lieutenant Jacob Portia Chris Barnes Iraq Portier USA Miramar Mosul
BBC, Erez Border and China discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

BBC, Erez Border and China discussed on Morning Edition

"An, estimated two million Muslims have. Gathered in mecca in Saudi Arabia for the start of the annual hajj pilgrimage the Saudi authorities have expanded and modernized the facilities, with new features like smartphone apps for medical help and Japanese made saving parts

BBC Erez Border China Roy Moore Human Rights Watch Iraqi Government Saudi Arabia Kerala Rene Descartes Brazilian Government Jerry Smith Julian Genta Mosul Mecca Gaza Israel New Zealand Ninety Million Dollars
Italy bridge was vulnerable before collapse, experts say

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:16 min | 2 years ago

Italy bridge was vulnerable before collapse, experts say

"Dozens of people died yesterday in a bridge. Collapse in Genoa raising questions about the safety of Italy's infrastructure. The Morandi bridge was half a century old and it's maintenance costs were so high that some experts had suggested it should be demolished and replaced transport minister, Daniele Tony Nelly said those responsible for the disaster would pay, but in a case like this who should be held accountable and what are the ramifications for the country, Georgia Orlando as a political journalist in Rome, Georgia? How is this being viewed in the moment in Italy as as a tragedy or scandal? Good morning. Well, very good. Question war. It seems to be a tragedy is now turning into political debate. And fortunately, a, we know that all sold the main sources from president Matra to the prime minister. Also motto Savini, Dana. Now are speaking, of course there are with the victims and the families of the victims, but now they're speaking about the necessity of finding those who are responsible. Now it's very unclear who are the responsible for what happened. Of course, everyone knows especially in the community in the general community, local resident's association and groups that are schools. These bridge balls posing a mate. Joe threat to the people knew that saints the late nineties. It has been on the maintainance all the way through because the time it was contained was conceived to between a nine hundred sixty three ninety six seven, of course, even more on the himself. The engineer knew that this bridge wouldn't have lasted long. It's always the problem, isn't it in the aftermath of an event disaster like this, that the, you know, straight away instead of looking soberly. People look at a two is to blame. Now. The have been some on the opposition side in in Italy have been rebuking the transport minister for saying that people would have to be held responsible have to pay for this saying, you know, he's he's playing politics. When in as as a matter of fact, sober reflection investigation is what's needed. Yeah, indeed, it's very interesting how the end Feis stall in particularly as come under criticism. We know that back at the beginning of two thousand was to create an alternative route to the Moran. The bridge, not only of course to help manage the Mosul way net the traffic around the area, but also to try and prevent these preach from being used by heavy vehicles. Of course, as I was saying, it was conceived in the sixties and the traffic patterns changed over the years that time the women. So many have vehicles using this bridge and you can only imagine being the only connection, but only between two thousand general, but also between easily and France. You can only imagine how many people hundreds of thousands of maturity of communities where

Morandi Bridge Italy Genoa Daniele Tony Nelly Georgia London Prime Minister President Matra Dana Rome JOE Engineer Mosul Moran France
Judge urges U.S. to focus on reuniting deported parents with children

Dark Secret Place

10:26 min | 2 years ago

Judge urges U.S. to focus on reuniting deported parents with children

"Radio station If I am forty more stimulating talk is the dark secret replace Brian suits in here on till eleven o'clock, or new hours by. The way eight pm to eleven so please enjoy, coming up in, the next break a naval mystery the mystery of the missing, man March of. Nineteen forty two a man overboard mystery that has not been. Sold to this day drone wars the first commercially available drones that were. Weaponized happened, in Syria and Iraq and they they happen because the men of ISIS who don't have an air force did have money. And had access to European markets and. For that matter markets in Turkey and so commercial drones usually under about two hundred dollars were purchased in Turkey off the off the market Just, in toy stores or whatever in Turkey brought into Syria and then the the simple, engineering matter of adapting the usual HD camera hookup underneath the drone to do something as. Simple as release a grenade was actually fairly simple if you if you don't know how this works I've met a couple of drones with HD, cameras on them or. With mounts where you can mount a little gopro, camera on them, and the drone communicates by direct wifi to your to an, app on your. Smartphone where you can use the gopro camera or the built. In camera as a sort of a virtual piloting cockpit where you can. Put the, camera forward and you can fly the drone around as if you're sitting there on the drone but you're looking at the. App on your phone is actually a. Lot of fun and that's how they do those drawn races like in Balboa park and things like that Anyway some of these drones can carry You know up to Up to two and a, half or three pounds and some of. The really significant ones the ones that are used for actual filmmaking or commercial production can can wield up to. Seven or eight pounds and so what was done by ISIS in Syria was a simple matter of replacing the, camera mount, underneath with With some sort of mechanical release or in many cases leaving the camera and using that as guidance system and then, including a mechanical release because as you. Recall nothing happened in ISIS world unless they had video of it and so starting about five years ago you began seeing these pretty amazingly, cinematic HD drone shots of a drone undetected at about a thousand feet coming over a Syrian army position or an Iraqi army position and then it would lower in place it, would lower a couple of hundred feet. And when it seemed to be stable and the the cameras seemed fixed over one particular area like a bunch. Of fuel or munitions or whatever the the drawn would drop a adapted forty millimeter grenade that had a thin For instance like tissue paper role for a tail fin something. Really really crude but it oriented and. Stabilize the projectile in flight so it would generally fly straight down and it would blow up on impact and they did this for hundreds, of times before they finally got a success they finally got a spectacular success in the form of exploding Syrian ammo dump and It looked like they had mastered drone warfare and so they were immediately copied they. Were copied in Yemen by the who sees they were copied by. ISIS in Iraq They were copied by ISIS inspired terrorists and, Libya but the guys in Syria. Were the originators of it and really the masters of the craft so some of them Began putting stories up on YouTube or other other sort of dark, web or even, slightly light regular web read it and fortune. Started putting how to videos on how to modify common battlefield munitions like forty millimeter grenades into. An, aerial drop impact weapon and Furthermore how to modify commercially available drone something that could get off van Masan and shipped to Turkey or whatever into a killing machine now the the range of these drones generally is not really more than a mile that goes more than a. Mile than it's going off GPS at which, point you have to, know the precise location of where the bad guy is and then you you drop the munition. Well so this was Successful as a propaganda play. In Syria but really not much more it was an annoyance as the Iraqi army overran Mosul about a. Year ago, the guys. There in in, Mosul the ISIS guys they had several years to prepare for this they had an arsenal of hundreds of a cheap little drones the ones that you get, for less, than eighty bucks at target or you can get them on Alibaba Amazon and they had nothing but time to modify them and, also to teach, their man how to utilize them so the. Iraqis had a lot of men wounded a few even killed but it was really more of. An annoyance and anything else but it did produce some pretty spectacular video of for ISIS you got this video of Iraqi soldiers running around after the first one hit or when they heard overhead so anyway fast forward now in Israel the HAMAs terrorists have been using kites and, it cetera too Start. Forest fires have been using drones but these rarely authorities have, not been releasing this to. The media well the jig is up because now the Egyptians are seizing huge. Shipments of cheap drones at the HAMAs get Gaza, crossing point and so now Gaza have guys. In basements doing nothing but making drone bombs so the drone, is now the asymmetric weapon of the little guy the next step, of course is somebody in the US is, going to do this you know it because it's all over the web is easy to do and someone. Else's already redoing it so anyway that's your drone warfare update it's cheap. Is it effective it's goal is to terrorize so is it, effective yes it is is going to win a war no. All right when we come back in naval mystery from nineteen forty two the dark secret place continues right. After this, Brian in. Here to midnight, KFI AM six forty more stimulating talk Michael should pay with News Firefighters working on a brush fire that broke out this afternoon in fallbrook near the Riverside County. Line it has grown to at least two hundred twenty five. Acres it was first reported at about three ten this. Afternoon Cal fire, says roughly one hundred homes off Sandia creek drive are being a. Vacuum, waited the fires forward progress has apparently been. Stopped at this. Point a fire in Idyllwild is now said to be twenty nine percent contained thirteen thousand acres have. Burned five homes have been lost to the, flames and the man charged with starting the fire near Idyllwild and eight others has been charged with more than a dozen counts of. Arson he pleaded not guilty yesterday is being held on bail of more than three million. Dollars the man was arrested Wednesday afternoon shortly after the Cranston fire started fire burning near reading in chasta county has grown to eighty three thousand. Acres it's five percent contained five people have been. Killed five hundred and fifty homes and buildings have been. Destroyed a fire shelter in Shasta College has reached full capacity as well the evacuation centers housing five hundred people GM of the colleges fill with. Cots and American Red Cross volunteers are providing food water and. Medical and mental health services Alex stone says more evacuation. Orders may be, coming as the fire still growing about thirty eight thousand people are. Evacuated, and that number could continue to rise the. Fire is heading. South there are a number of communities that could be evacuated as the flames had that way three. Other shelters are still taking back you lease, federal judge has praised and panned the Trump administration for its efforts to return children to their illegal immigrant parents who were separated at. The border a judge in San Diego said yesterday the government gets credit for reunifying eighteen. Hundred kids with moms dads or sponsors but also says the administration needs to do a better job at reuniting more than four hundred children who. Are still separated because their parents were deported more. Deportations are on hold as the judge considers an ACL, you challenge more than thirty People. May have been killed after a bus carrying tourists plunged into a gorge in western India. Times of India, says, the bus carrying members of an agricultural university fell about five hundred feet after skidding off a mountain pass rescue teams are reporting that one. Passenger survived by, jumping out a window as the buffs fell traffic from your helpful socal. Honda traffic center crashed in, the mid city area on the ten. That's right it's going to. Be on the ten east at Vermont avenue crash now blocking the middle lane traffic is. Going to be jammed all the way. Over to national boulevard if you're traveling in the lesion park area the one ten southbound side from stadium way to sunset the right lane is shut down. For the end of the dodgers game, traffic's gonna be slow back to academy road in industry sixty east from fairway, drive to brag canyon the two right lanes going to be shut down for Catherine's work until seven AM traffic slows back to new gal street some good news for you in.

Isis Syria Turkey Iraqi Army Brian Iraq Hamas Idyllwild India Mosul Balboa Park Youtube Honda United States Dodgers Cranston Yemen
Afghan bomber kills 21, mostly Taliban celebrating truce

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:18 min | 2 years ago

Afghan bomber kills 21, mostly Taliban celebrating truce

"On your recco smart speaker just say hey alexa play wbz newsradio on iheart radio at least twenty people are dead dozens more injured after a suicide blast in eastern afghanistan abc's julia macfarlane reports the attack came during a ceasefire between afghan forces and the taliban government has made me to extend the ceasefire with the taliban following a three day truce over the islamic festival of adolf fitter president ashraf ghani made the announcement calling for the taliban to respond in kind after a suicide bomber attacked a celebration between soldiers and militants observing the truce in any province no one has claimed responsibility for the attack u n special envoy in academy award winning actress angelina jolie visiting west mosul in iraq today it's been less than a year since the city's liberation from the islamic state group jody speaking about the devastation this is the worst devastation i've seen in all my years with unhcr these people have lost everything and the trauma loss that they've suffered is unparalleled retrieve comes on the second day he'd outfitter the holiday that comes at the end of the holy month of ramadan wbz news time.

Julia Macfarlane Taliban Government Taliban President Trump West Mosul Jody Afghanistan Ashraf Ghani Iraq Unhcr Three Day
Iraq holds its first parliamentary election since IS defeat

BBC Newshour

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Iraq holds its first parliamentary election since IS defeat

"This is bob with newshour from the bbc world service iraq goes to the polls on saturday it's a country that has been smashed by successive wars since the nineteen eighties sectarian wars between shia and sunni muslims culminated in the rise of the jihadists of these i'm estate group who had defeated last year many iraqis are hoping that these elections will be a turning point that iraq can rally and reunite after the trauma of islamic state but sectarian tensions could be found again and the us and iran are deeply involved in iraq and the tension between them could affect iraq's precarious peace how middle east editor jerry bohan has been to mosul iraq's second city on the center of the fight against these logic state group.

Iraq United States Jerry Bohan BBC Iran Editor Mosul
"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

War Stories w/ Oliver North

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

"And fluky isis has been telling these refugees that if they come to this berm that the kurds would fill the credit for the first people cancer their trembling and and hugged him it was awesome and we said get on your phones and tell your friends no one's going to kill you got plenty of food water and medicine and they start coming second thought so they've still got communications inside most over here we're all no less than ten miles away and they're telling the family members i won't be safe if her since the fight to free mozell wrote over here begin in midoctober thousands of refugees have fled to get away from the fighting not nearly as many as people expected and that's because isis is holding them to use as human shields those that do make it end up here along this sperm and what you're seeing here's gathered are the refugees fled over the last twelve hours trying to find some kind of secure in the midst of no water no food and fleeing the torture of what was in mosul in hillis exclusive footage obtained by fox news isis fighters are caught infiltrating was refugees trying to flee you're engaged by peshmerga soldiers and police meetig music as you see it's literally trench warfare fresh merka and police approach adel devices fighter in the trench suddenly another one lying in wait blows himself up it's an all too common isis tactic water water isis fight for every inch of ground and kills anyone they can as the person murder try to beat them in our defeating them of completely defeated every isis element you need food we have yet people are running away from mozell and running away from isis as so when they come here we try to give them any kind of help can food medicine water anything and pray.

mosul murder mozell hillis twelve hours
"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

War Stories w/ Oliver North

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

"The true yes two thousand also of uh jihadist isis jihadist came not in a blitzkrieg likely invasion of france very fast very more bile in that vacuum describe what happens with the iraqi army that we train sensitive from two thousand eight two thousand eleven and we will continue to advise insist and all of a sudden were gone what happened to that army they felt that if they would fall if there are prisoners taken prisoners by isis that'd be beheaded they'll be kill in nobody sitting would give them a hideout or the place to go and hide so they just started to run away in late june 2014 mozell fell to isis and hell on earth begin for every man woman and child in the city their choice submit or be butchered on friday july force 2014 during ramadan prayers at moses great mosque abu bucked are all big dottie shadowy leader of isis appeared in a wellproduced video and proclaimed himself to be kale of of the islamic state one of them why did l baghdadi pick the great mosque in mosul to deliver his caliphate speech mozell to them was to become the actual legal capital of the caliphat now they called it rucker but eventually they wanted a city that is close to back that they took over that territory but still this administration stood by and did nothing it wasn't intel really august of 2014 they started reluctantly conducting military operations but then it was these pinprick strikes barely going after their fielded forces command control their ability to resource and finance their operation and allow them to continue to bring in foreign fighters train innovative was take my territory terrorising kill individuals and then export their terror to europe and around the globe unfortunately the vacuum which ices.

france iraqi army isis mosul rucker moses great mosque abu intel europe
"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

War Stories w/ Oliver North

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

"In 2014 an isis army stormed across the syrian border recaptured most the second largest city and must obtain me now the jihadis brutal reign of terror is finally headed for extinction i'm oliver north and this is war stories we'll before the fight to liberate woolsey began in midoctober 2016 military experts warned this could be a very bloody affair while it certainly burnett earn a whole lot more now a war stories team was once again on the front lines of what may well be a last major battle against isis in iraq he if these images of motion before and after isis it's easy to forget the promise this city once represented to a free iraq including arab muslims bulled sunni and shia kurds christians and jews 80s it's being described as the most complex military operation since saddam hussein was toppled in two thousand three by uslead coalition this time iraqi special forces are leading the fight now centered uncontrol of mosul once a vibrant city of more than one point five million people in northwestern iraq let's committed five thousand iraqi military police are now engaged in bloody housetohouse fighting against suicide uil isis jihadis this is bourbon warfare in closequarter combat among hundreds of thousands of hostage civilians being used as human shields isis as updates game with born ideas and other technologies and have brought brutal casualties but they've they're fighting hard right now as we speak congresswoman martha mcsally served twenty six years in the us air force retiring as a colonel.

woolsey midoctober iraq saddam hussein mosul us oliver north burnett martha mcsally twenty six years
"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

War Stories w/ Oliver North

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on War Stories w/ Oliver North

"In when this podcast is over ask yourself as i have do the kurdish people the largest ethnic population on earth without a homeland deserve to have a country called kurdistan we report you decide if you're hiring you know that quality hires keep your business moving forward but you also know it can take a lotta time to find the right candidate for the right job with ziprecruiter you can post your job and over a hundred of the webs leading job boards with just one click so you can rest easy knowing your job is being seen by the right candidates then zip recruiter puts its smart matching technology to work actively notifying qualified candidates about your job within minutes of posting so you receive the best possible matches no wonder eighty percent of employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality kennedy through the site in just one day ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire find out today why ziprecruiter has been used by growing businesses of all sizes and industries to find the most qualified job candidates with immediate results and right now my listeners can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to ziprecruiter dot com slash strive that's ziprecruiter dot com slash strive one more time get it for free go to ziprecruiter dot com slash strive on war stories urban warfare rages against isis in mosul iraq we can't is that there is sort of style at the isis and say as a fight mozell going but city held hostage item two would've to forget this woman's can we us the fears fish oil prices in the trenches we have been the most affect the force on the ground to stop done through the new trump administration see a unified iraq this is an administration that is facing four kids worth that's coming up on war stories.

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"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The islamic state in raka and mosul and absolutely convinced that the united states has to play a role in yemen at least yemen a country that is on the verge of famine the world health organisation just updates estimate of pot possible cholera cases to a million where one of the region's wealthiest countries is engaged in a fight against the region's poorest country i you know we could get into the details of how the iranians were there as well it's owners but that arose oh really in yemen should be to extricate the saudis from this miss adventure in yemen that we certainly have a compelling case to make when we assist and use our own firepower to destroy the islamic state in in russia in most so but at the same time we should also understand that pardon me putting warheads on foreheads as my friends in the pentagon might say is not the solution to this problem that there is a logical political ideological struggle that needs to be waged in the arab and muslim world i'm not sure what role the united states has to play in that so it's not pulling back it's not retrenching it's not isolationism its understanding what's important to us and using the resources that we have available to effect change it those places that we can do but forging democracy in the middle east at the end of a tank or through all kinds of you know trying to convince arab leaders that they should reform themselves out of power because it's a great deal for them seems to me nuts things that aren't going to get its very were anyway i'm one of the chapters in your book is entitled um what is it getting on the middle east right near gonna area getting.

raka united states yemen russia pentagon mosul