35 Burst results for "Mosul"

Tiffany Smiley: Reflecting on Her Husband's Trauma

The Dan Bongino Show

01:55 min | Last month

Tiffany Smiley: Reflecting on Her Husband's Trauma

"How that changed not only your own life trajectory but also your husband Yeah Yes at 23 years old I resigned from my nursing job in Washington state and I took a one way flight out to Walter Reed army medical center where I didn't know if I was going to meet my husband dead or alive And when I walked into his trauma care unit I had student loan debt I had a car payment I didn't have anyone standing outside the door saying let's take care of that student loan for you And here's the pathway and everything's going to be okay Scotty had tubes coming out of every orphan of his body He was in a coma One thing that was certain was that the suicide bomber that he was negotiating with in service to our country in Mosul Iraq had detonated his car and the shrapnel from that detonation obliterated both of Scotty's eyes so he would be forever blind Thank God I was a nurse and I wasn't intimidated by the medical system but it was really my first interaction with sort of that larger government bureaucratic system where you are just a number And I stood up I refused to sign the army paperwork They had never had someone tell them no But I believed in this wild crazy idea that my husband could make a miraculous recovery I knew I could help him do that And that he could still serve And took on the DoD Gotti went on and became the first line to active duty officer to ever serve our country And we served for over a decade with Scotty completely blind and once he was well I knew I had to go back and make it right for everyone else So I took on VA reform and people said don't waste your time Tiffany But I knew it was the right thing to do And we were able to work on meaningful reforms that directly helped injured veterans and their families So it was the best waste of time that I ever spent but truly in that fight just realized you know we have so much more to fight for and I'm a mom of three young boys and me and Scotty want to leave them in America that's worth giving their eyesight for

Scotty Walter Reed Army Medical Cente Mosul Dod Gotti Coma Washington Iraq Army Tiffany America
If You Don't Get Angry, Something's Wrong With You

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:19 min | 2 months ago

If You Don't Get Angry, Something's Wrong With You

"But the reason I'm telling people this and I'm taking your time, John, is because Mario morelo spoke. A lot of people don't know who he is. Ladies and gentlemen, there are just a tiny handful of people like Mario Morello. I've never seen anyone bolder more in tune with what God is saying. I don't say that lightly. And what he talked about, you just got me thinking, John. The level of evil that is manifesting itself in the United States of America right now. When you hear about the government going after an organization like Christians engage dot org and saying, well, we're going to take away your tax exempt status. This is evil. And if you don't get angry at this, something's wrong with you. You're trying to pretend it's not happening. And by the way, that is about the most anodyne little thing you could possibly mention, but I just thought when Mario marlos spoke, he spoke about some of the genuinely wicked things done and there are people in the church convinced that somehow the Christian thing to do is to be quiet or to be nice. I mean, if somebody mutilates your children, are you not going to fight? Are you not going to stand? Are you not going to do? There are things happening that, you know, apart from the literal mutilation of children because of the transgender madness, if you don't speak up, if you don't get angry and say, I have an obligation to fight for what is right and true, the idea that I can't be political. You are absolutely hiding from reality. And I just want to be really blunt folks. God's going to judge us when we are silent in the face of evil. God calls us to speak. And not only will God judge you, I will judge you. I will be in the gulag for a couple of years before they finally come and get you. And when you show up, I will laugh at you. I will judge you. That's the most important thing. I mean, I tell you, forgive me, John, but you know, when you tell me that, that the IRS or whoever is trying to bother Christians engaged. It's another good reason to go to Christians engaged dot org, folks. Because we have to stand with those who are being persecuted and vilified, attacked in any event. Well, John. Well, I've got a piece at the stream that relates to this. And it's an unusual title. Is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians? Is the Trump movement like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians? Like Syria's Kurds and indispensable ally for Christians. For Christians. Okay, let me guess. Yes. Yes. So I tell the story of two very similar Christian communities in very similar circumstances with tragically different outcomes. The Christians of Iraq had and the Christians of Syria as circa 2001 on September 11th, 2001. They were in very similar situations. They were dependent on the goodwill of secular Arab dictators. Saddam Hussein Bashir. The U.S. fights this pointless war in Iraq based on weapons of mass destruction that never existed. Our regime our occupation does not protect the Christians. The Muslims are infuriated that the American crusaders are in their countries. So they started attacking the local Christians who are hapless helpless scapegoats. They had all been disarmed by the government. Saddam Hussein, like a good tyrant, had gun control. America being good liberals, we kept gun control laws in Iraq. The Islamists like other criminals don't obey gun control laws. So they got lots of guns. The Christians of Iraq, obeyed the law, counted on the government to protect them, were slaughtered. Three fourths of the Christians in Iraq who had been there since the apostles, the churches have been there since the second century. Three fourths of Iraq's Christians were killed or driven into exile. And if you want to help them go to Iraqi Christian relief organization, they really do need your help. It's tragic because they were disarmed. They were helpless in the face of ISIS. When ISIS marched in the city of Mosul, which had 1.6 million people and tens of thousands of Christians. Like a hundred guys from ISIS took over a city of more than a million people because they'd all been disarmed by the government. Hundred guys took over a terrorized the city of 1.6 million people burned all the churches, drove all the Christians out, raped the women set up rape camps where they traded them. Horrendous tragic outcome. That is what happens when Christians trust a secular government that doesn't like them to protect them. And the secular government here in America clearly likes us less and less with each passing week. So as I've written and I've got a book on this coming out on this called God and guns versus the government, the more hostile the government becomes, the more important our gun rights become. Now let me tell the story of Syria. In Syria, do you remember the Arab Spring went to democracy was going to come to the Arab world? Well, how did that work out? Joey walked out. We have to go to a break here, but I just have to remind my audience just so that they're tracking with the conversation. The lunacy of the Arab Spring, the lunacy that the idea that democracy could break out in a place like that. The naivete of the people who put forward that narrative. And then we saw it collapse and they never bothered to say, oh, oh yeah, we were wrong about that. When we come back talking to John for the rest of the hour and more, don't go away. Well, I for one second, I've got an alarm going off. I got to turn it off. Is the government the best mechanism for fighting poverty? Are there any real life examples of communities successfully combating addiction and homelessness today? How can we best deliver hope to our nation, those questions get answered September 23rd on Salem now dot com in an inspiring new motion picture from kingstone studios based on a true story in no vacancy a demoted journalist finds her cynicism slowly transformed as she befriends a recovering addict while working a story about a church struggling to purchase a motel for homeless families, no vacancy, starring dean Cain, TC stallings and Sean young is based on the true story of first baptist Leesburg, Florida, and a real location the Samaritan inn. Move your viewers are saying movies like this bring purpose to the big screen, well produced and the acting is tops, enough can not be said about how incredible this true story is.

Syria Iraq Mario Morelo Mario Morello John Mario Marlos U.S. Saddam Hussein Bashir Iraqi Christian Relief Organiz IRS Saddam Hussein Mosul Joey Kingstone Studios Tc Stallings Salem Dean Cain Sean Young Samaritan Inn Leesburg
Real Madrid beats Liverpool 1-0 for 14th European Cup title

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Real Madrid beats Liverpool 1-0 for 14th European Cup title

"Real Madrid has earned its record extending 14th Champions League title by defeating Liverpool one nil Vinicius junior applied a close range finish in the 59th minute from frederico Valverde's drive across the face of the goal Securing a win that gave him Madrid coach Carl Ancelotti a record fourth European Cup title Real Madrid also claimed the Spanish league crowned the season Sadio Mané and Mosul were stymied on goal scoring attempts by Thibaut Courtois as Liverpool fell two goals short of a treble just a week after losing the Premier League title by one point to Manchester City I'm Dave

Madrid Frederico Valverde Carl Ancelotti Champions League Liverpool Spanish League Sadio Mané European Cup Thibaut Courtois Mosul Premier League Manchester City Dave
"mosul" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

01:45 min | 6 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on ESPN FC

"He's done it again. Mosala still Salah. Take your hat off to Mosul. That's majestic. Already into time on top and bur finds going through and can he finish it here. Stephen berkley. Wins it. A Scottish stop. There's in it goes. The Christiana Ronaldo. He's in. This is a big moment. He's pushing. Great. Sends an incredibly. A comeback. Dancing into the area. Welcome to the English Premier League to bundling awards ceremony. Now here are your hosts and rue gundling and JJ devani. Oh. Yes. From the beautiful caught offside ballroom Andrew gundling and Jay J davani, what's up, brother?.

Mosala Stephen berkley Christiana Ronaldo Salah Mosul English Premier League rue gundling JJ devani Andrew gundling Jay J davani
"mosul" Discussed on Caught Offside

Caught Offside

01:45 min | 6 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on Caught Offside

"He's done it again. Mosala still Salah. Take your hat off to Mosul. That's majestic. Already into time on top and bur finds going through and can he finish it here. Stephen berkley. Wins it. A Scottish stop. There's in it goes. The Christiana Ronaldo. He's in. This is a big moment. He's pushing. Great. Sends an incredibly. A comeback. Dancing into the area. Welcome to the English Premier League to bundling awards ceremony. Now here are your hosts and rue gundling and JJ devani. Oh. Yes. From the beautiful caught offside ballroom Andrew gundling and Jay J davani, what's up, brother?.

Mosala Stephen berkley Christiana Ronaldo Salah Mosul English Premier League rue gundling JJ devani Andrew gundling Jay J davani
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 9 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're extremely concerned about the potential for trafficking and other exploitative measures and so working within the context of the existing infrastructure and the authorities that provide guidance and support and protection for this population Anybody ready to step up and help should do so through those mechanisms That's Chris scope the executive vice president of project hope which serves mental health and other needs for Ukrainian refugees in Poland and elsewhere around the world It has to be said Crisco thanks so much for joining us Thank you for having me Coming up tomorrow on morning edition as President Biden heads to Europe for a NATO summit this week in Russia continues to bomb Ukrainian cities pressure is building on the NATO military alliance to do more Tune in tomorrow to hear that story Just ask your smart speaker to play NPR or your local station by name You're listening to NPR news Nearly 5 years after the fall of ISIS the Iraqi city of Mosul is still recovering from that militant group's brutal occupation and the battle to oust it And as Mosul rebuilds the change is visible around the city colorful murals are popping up on what were once bullet scarred walls and PRS Jason Bobby and has this report After ISIS took control of Mosul in 2014 women weren't allowed to show their faces in public They had to wear black veils with just slits for their eyes and long black robes Women could be whipped for violations of the dress code Now women's faces are all over the city in bold colorful portraits Russell achmed painted two of them Not something wrong when the women show her beauty The 20 year old is standing in front of a 15 foot tall mural of a woman with jet black hair and a dramatic swish of eyeshadow in the portrait the woman's chin juts up slightly exuding confidence maybe even defiance When the ISIS come the women cover her body or her face that strong because the women should live her life The mural that achmed is standing in front of is on a long wall where ISIS used to post its strict morality rules and the punishments for breaking them Now the wall is covered in bright portraits most are of women including the celebrated Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid who passed away in 2016 Under ISIS rule people in Mosul weren't allowed to have satellite television or listen to western music They certainly wouldn't have been permitted to paint a mural featuring Billie Eilish and Ariana Grande This is Ariana Ariana.

Mosul President Biden NATO military alliance NPR Jason Bobby Russell achmed Poland NATO Chris Russia Europe achmed ISIS Zaha Hadid Billie Eilish Ariana Grande Ariana Ariana
"mosul" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Our eyes to female soldiers. Right so i went back. I rushed back to my tent. And show all my things. Madonna bag and a trash bags and then i said okay. I hope to make it in twenty minutes. I don't think i can make it in two minutes. And i will need a gate or gator is just like a golf cart and god send me the second miracle and a soldier showed up with a gator and said i can help you on my tears over reeling in my eyes and i said oh my god. You're so. I put all my duffel bags at metro. The trust bags feel good. My things in the gator and then he drove me to the helipad. I it made it in twenty minutes. I've found sent michael there waiting for me. Who gave me a ride. A black hawk ride piloted blackhawk taking me to back that in route to mosul and the third one third miracle. Thank you for this opportunity. They should america's back. My miracle was seeing the first soldier wearing a hundred first combat badge off the handle. I it really really tore my heart. So i haunt two months at. I need a ride to mozell and he admitted the list. It was shooting up. That was going to pick up a tank engine in our way and finally i landed on mosul and my commander told me. He was very surprised because he said he got out. Never make it and he said it's impossible to come here. And i told him it's impossible and he said it will take america to come here and i told him that slot exactly what happened. That's i'll a great story now. Somebody like me who doesn't understand military operations or how our military works is going to be very confused and i am very confused by this. I can't understand how you can be assigned to be some or someplace and the army doesn't have a plan to get you there at that to me is. Does that happen often. Because it doesn't sound like it makes sense at all or your aunt basically on your own to get where they assign you to be the first year it was. That's that's that's bizarre in my in my view. It's just like that's not the way we assume it works. If you're if you're not in the military you think they have you know transport for everybody who is supposed to be where this supposed to be a plan for all stop That's an enlightenment in in my view. Something i did not realize happen now. I'm assuming you were shot at and had to shoot back in and that kind of stuff right and jump into the pack axles to way for somebody who has never been in a war zone. Talk to me about And i don't wanna it's definitely gonna cause you any traumatic memories or anything like that. I don't wanna. I don't wanna call it that but just if you can give me some understanding because i would think you'd be filled with beer. Twenty four seven and how to overcome that you still have to. You still have to live your life. You still have to eat sleep. You know all the things that we do but almost in the state of constant fear am i wrong. You're not wrong you're right Everything is the same exempt that we were in a hostile environment and constantly constantly. Worry about what is going to happen next because anything can happen at war we were sleeping at you. It could be Attack by the terrorists over the enemy and there was a time. I was already in in. Mosul is the northern iraq with my unit right and now we constantly hear every night. Assure sh- an rpg every night an rpg the same time on it lands from the same location. Can you believe that. I was what's going on. Why can't we get this bad guys in hitting rpg's at ours and doing at the same time every night. You would think you'd have a plan. That's okay tomorrow night. We're going to wait for them in my and the general the commanding general said. We're lucky that they can get it right. you know. We just pray that they can never get it right so always like beyond you know. Ibm understandings every night. The same time and You know ha you know how it made us like You get to win a place to take cover. Of course every single line in the. Us up to befriend ba- guide that whatever happens will ever digs. The rumble. Slater on can find our bodies easily. You know and can take it home. Mom that was really difficult. Houma god yeah of course and and the whole time you're thinking about your son at home and you don't want him to get a flag because you know that's that's not really a fair compensation or or you know any kind of understand what somebody they. They want their loved one back. They're not wanna flag back and that's always gotta to be on your mind. The question is where do you find the fortitude to get through the day because just imagining it. The human body. The human mind is not made to deal with that kind of stress and in high stress. Twenty four seven. You need a break from that. So where do you find the fortitude to get through your day in all matt. Thanks for that question again. I brought my bible with me. I read the bible every single night. And also i- occupied myself while others are on break in all always was riding my journal. I was studying because Moments is really hard i would. I wanted to stay out of trouble. So busy. You know reading my journals brain to god that everything will be all right and i always call. My son. Always miss him. I called my dad. My mom everything is still right. You know they're always. They're always happy to hear from me. During those time. Actually there was a one day that my mom's birthday right so i sent her flowers. My mother-in-law i sent her flowers in now. The lady on the other and of line asked me.

mosul america Madonna golf michael Mosul army Houma iraq Slater Ibm matt
"mosul" Discussed on Amazing FBA

Amazing FBA

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on Amazing FBA

"Whatever i'll take some this. What does this tell us about anything to do with ecommerce. Jason mosul thoughts. A couple of hot takes. I'll just share my first one. And that is. I was amazed. By the fact that twitter became the thing instantly and all of us went to twitter everyone including facebook to announce it they were down twitter even like troll them by saying hello everyone and the only thing that the whole experience was for me real quick was just the means that flowed in. We're just priceless hilarious. And i think. I had the most fun and laugh the most yesterday as the jokes and hilarity ensued on twitter. And so for me honestly. It wasn't a mortal wound in any way in terms of our marketing efforts. But i had a blast on twitter. Just read everybody's jokes and it just made me realize i guess the point was maybe. There's a reason alternates exist. And the you need to be not on a single source of communication to or social media tool for such a time as that to use the biblical phrase but yeah. That was my first. My first thought was twitter. was awesome. Excellent jason you noticed. Book was down right because i think that's a question that a lot of people aren't really thinking about is like honestly i didn't notice right now. This was a rare day. I do spend more time on facebook. Should this was a day where i was out. I was doing it for things. I did check the facebook app a couple times. It wasn't voting. But i thought it was like okay. It's not loading. Maybe like i need to restart the app. Maybe like sometimes. If i'm on wifi near a business that it will try to that wifi. And it's not loading so i turn off wifi load. I thought well maybe like you know the five g. around here isn't that good and i forgot about. I didn't care like like nothing. I was doing was depended on facebook specifically so then. When i heard it was like out for like six hours or something. I didn't notice. And i only did on the app. I didn't go computers. I didn't notice a facebook dot. com was.

twitter Jason mosul facebook jason
"mosul" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

14:36 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

"Have to move away from dia culture to be able to hear hear that to hear what our body how our bodies guide us. I really love the you made that distinction because something that that I think about a lot of and i talked to my clients about when when they kind of get to that point for intuitive eating or mindful eating around that thought process i think about educating them on how to i mary what my body's desires are with what my body's needs are and then how do i learn to listen to what my body is saying and i think that's a lot of what you're talking about and sometimes my body is saying. Yeah i'd like to eat a doughnut. You know and that's okay and other towns body saying no. I'd really like eat. This hugh this big delicious salad from someplace or whatever it is and i really liked the you make that distinction that it actually is eating whatever you want whenever you want. But the thing that's different is learning how to shut out the clutter in the in the mind and all that that chatter. That's going on that's trying to dictate how we should and shouldn't be eating. Yeah definitely will also add that. I think that when people say you know monthly just about eating whatever you want whenever you wanted or people who say who who aren't practicing mindful eating and they're like i ready eat whatever i want whenever i want it very often. They're not tuned talking about being truly tuned into their bodies. So when we're stuck in diet culture we tend to think that what we want is whenever we're not allowed to have so when we are like following diet plan and then we kind of go off the rails. We were eating whatever we want. But really what we're eating is just like whatever's not allowed on the diet like all those foods categorizes quote unquote bad And that's not necessarily what you even want. But when we're stuck in that back and forth with dieting and restricting around food and labelling food as good or better you know permissible or off limits. Were eating just based on that dichotomy And it's hard to tell what you want when you're stuck in that paradigm so. I think that you know i hear diet. Culture is kind of like the chatter when he said like how to out the chatter. Dikhil i think of as the chatter that that constant like sense of judgment around food criticism about what we're eating in our body Constant fear that. We're not doing it right. They were not good enough. The shame the you know all of that stuff and so isolated in the book a little bit like this like so. We have a what i call like an internal Gps like a navigation system kind of hard wired into our bodies. And that's our bodies very sophisticated highly evolved way of telling us what to eat. Went to eat how much all of that good stuff like. We have that guidance inside. And what happens if you imagine being like in the car listening to your gps system You can imagine a situation where maybe the. Gps has turned down. The volume is turned down low. And you're like blasting really loud music you know really loud over it so you can't hear what the gps telling you. It doesn't mean the gps isn't there trying to guide you. It just means you can't hear it and that's a little bit about how i think about how diet culture gets in the way because diet cultures like that really loud music that you're blasting so when we can learn to just turn down the volume on the music and actually here the navigation system it's guiding us clearly and i think you know Mindfulness is one of the most powerful tools we have to be able to both like turn down the volume on diet culture in turn up the value on our body is internal navigation and i think a huge part of this too is that not only is a love your analogy not only is the music too loud is the diet culture music too loud right but the music is also telling you. Don't listen to the gps system because it will lead you astray right. This is another like road. Bumper obstacle that people run into when they're trying to learn a more neutral approach to food in a non-judgmental approach to food. They're like wait a minute. But i have either been told or basically absorbed right or been conditioned to leave. I can't trust the signals of my body. Because if i do they're going to lead me astray right and when we think of a stray it means i'm going to be super unhealthy and i'm just gonna eat all of the no foods right because when you're in the face of restriction your body like doesn't like those rules right so it's always gonna try and rebel against that and say like. Oh you told me. I can't eat ice cream. i want now. all. I'm going to think about his ice cream right. So then you think and this can be a reality for some people but not everybody but you think that when you turn down that music where we peel back those rules that all you're ever going to want to eat is ice cream. Which when you finally get to the place of unconditional permission to eat all foods. You're not going to want to eat ice cream all day every day because when you can start start to finally listen to those internal signals your body's going to tell you hey eating ice cream all day every day doesn't feel very great and then you're naturally going to start to crave other things but you can't get to that point until you finally turn that music down exactly and i think that that's one of the most common concerns that i hear when people are starting to go away from dieting and embrace more mindful approach food that they're like well. I'm just gonna sit on the couch. You need ice cream all day. And you know i i totally understand that fear and i think we have many of us have really want history of feeling out of control certain foods because we've been restricting them even in the research we look at you know how they kind of induced like addictive like behaviors in the rats setting. It's by restricting. Their access to the food so in the same thing happens to us when we're restricting when we feel that we're not you know we have to eat it now or never or have all of this kind of baggage around certain foods like of course he feels totally out of control around them but when we can work to turn down the volume on that narrative and the food is just food and really trust that. It's always there. We can always have it and how much of it. Whenever we wanted we start to be able to discern a little bit more like. When do we actually want it and How much do we want at each time. Where we know like i could. I could have this morning noon and night. Do i want it morning noon the night or maybe just want it morning and night or maybe you know so raval to kind of Get a little more information that's balanced and and more tuned to our body. But i think if i can say you know i i like to say. There's no mistakes and mindful eating but one of the most you know other places. I really see people You know kind of giving throwing in the towel too early in this process is that people start to lessen the restrictions around food and you they say ice cream for example is a food. That's you know. has a lot of conflict around it for for someone So they say okay. I can have ice cream. Whatever i wanted and maybe like that first day they eat a whole pint of ice cream or ice cream. They're like they come back in there. Like i can't believe you told me to like go. Buy all this ice cream. I eat it all the first day. What's wrong with you see can't do this. I can't be trusted. I'm going back on weight watchers. And like they're you know abandoned chef and like again. That's your body's really natural response to just kind of reacclimating from prolonged periods of restriction. But when you can stay with it and say okay greet. You had to finds of ice cream. Go back to the store. This have often recommend my clients. Keep the food in the house with them and like i'm like we'll go back to the store. Get two more pints maybe at four pines and see what happens and keep brief restocking. And i've never worked with someone where they consisted where they stuck with it and consistently were just eating ice cream all the time. It's ever happened everyone fears. It's going to happen but eventually start to say okay. Like i get it the ice creams there. I can have it whenever i wanted and like actually lake. I'm really not in the mood for ice cream right now. So i'm going out something else like it's hard to believe when you're on the other side with mosul do get that point but what a beautiful way of kind of having them reestablish trust with their body and being able to tune into what that looks like one of the things that we've noticed a lot of as me and dana both have a chronic. Health condition is that a lot of times. People don't feel like it's accessible to them. This idea like oh now. All foods aren't available to me because i have x. y. and z. Chronic health condition or like in. Dana's casey both have silly disease. You actually talk about this really directly in your book which is so great because a lot of people don't talk about mindful eating with conical conditions So we really love that. In fact in you even quoted mindful eating with a chronic. Health condition isn't much different than any other mindful eating. Your body provides value in for me valuable information that can guide your eating. I'd love for you to talk more about mindful eating and chronic health conditions and actually kind of showing people that it is really accessible. Yeah so you know i. I think that it's all about making choices. Mindful eating is all about allowing ourselves. You know to have choices around. Who and just because we can choose any food we want. It doesn't mean that we have to eat every single food. That's available to us. So as we start to learn about mindful eating. We often start to recognize their certain foods that make my body feel good there certain foods. That just don't agree with me. There's foods that i like that. I don't like. And i think that when someone has a chronic health condition their bodies just talking to them sometimes loud way when something isn't sitting right so you know for example if the of silly z. Is like most often. If you eat something with gluten in it like your body's going to let you know really loud and clear that like that doesn't feel good and that doesn't mean that certain foods are restricted are limits or like. You can't eat them but you can make choices around weather like it's whether you wanna eat it or not knowing that like i'm gonna eat this it's gonna make me feel terrible Is it. Am i willing to do that like do. I want to make that choice. So i think it's just about gathering information about your body and making choices Whether you know this is why. Say it's not. I think we all do that It's just a little bit more intensified when you have a chronic condition. Yeah it's really interesting because if we took this out of context right if someone was coming from the diet mentality. They're like wait. That just looks like another elimination diets. Like no because you can't get to this point of mindful eating with chronic health conditions until you learn how to disassociate from diet culture. Turn that loud music down and give yourself unconditional permission to eat all foods right like if you took this piece of advice and you still in the diet culture mindset. It does look exactly the same right. It's okay. I have see lack disease. I don't eat gluten. That's a rule right whereas now it's like i can eat gluten if i want to. Is it a good idea. Absolutely not right. But i'm an adult and i can make decisions and i'm always allowed to eat if i want to but i know from personal experience that my body hates it when i eat gluten and it feels horrible for like not only days. We're talking like weeks up to long term ramifications of like months right. So i personally don't want to have to deal with that. So is it a rule. No but it's a guideline that i choose to follow because it doesn't feel good and you don't have to have ceac disease to have that kind of reaction to a food. Either right. this can be with. Diabetes is one of the examples that you've given your book right if you have diabetes or prediabetes or anything like that and you notice that when you eat foods that are higher in sugar or anything like that that you get this hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia so high blood sugar and than low blood. Sugar in it feels awful. Maybe let's figure out a way that you don't feel awful. Does that mean you can't ever eat those foods. No absolutely not. You can always eat them but then you can work with a licensed practitioner. Who specializes in non diet. Nutrition mindful eating with chronic health conditions in a neutral nutrition. Way right like a non wait centric way and then you can figure out how to manage that on your own with out making it a rule of okay. I can only have this much. Carbohydrates or this much sugar every day because this is a diet culture rule that we're following. Yeah exactly and i think that oftentimes you might end up coming to the same ways in terms of your preferred style of eating that you know would be coming from like a rule of like i have seen so i can't eat gluten but the internal process is very different and the psychological ramifications are very different because it's coming from a place of caring for yourself and from self compassion versus this like i'm not allowed to which we tend to resist and fight back against I also you know. I'll make a plug for people who have chronic health conditions or you know think have strong feelings about foods that their body can or can't tolerate but i i do highly recommend working with a non diet dietitian because Especially when we're recovering from eating disorders or in the midst of eating disorder or just really intensely caught diet culture. The stress around eating certain foods can make our body have a reaction that doesn't feel good and often. That's not so much to do with the with the food itself as much as just the way that we're thinking about food so i sometimes hear people say well. My body can't eat this man. It's pretty restrictive diet. And as they heal their relationship with food and often work with a dietitian. sometimes they're able to realize well. Actually i can eat that. It was just my. I fear around evening. That was making my stomach. Feel so upset.

raval mosul dana Dana casey diabetes hypoglycemia
"mosul" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on CarCast

"November rosemont illinois. Yeah we all right. It's supposedly supposedly the muscle car show to go if you're going to go to one that's pretty much it muscle car corvette nationals is this. This is the world's largest all indoor car. Now i think that's it. Yeah mc a c. n. mosul car and corvette Yeah rosemont illinois. Nice so the car is going to be out there. I know you've got a lot on your schedule. We talk shows filming. Marcus will be babysit. Yeah he's going to have island. Make it out there certainly much love to you know that car is never really been in for this. Show the size of the show and the importance of the show. And it'd being the first time it's being shown to the public in the very long time. I wish i could either sorts schedule. So marcus breaking it. looks fantastic. If you guys wanna hear it as well check out that youtube channel and you guys us here. It's a monster. It's a monster. I've curious because you know you drove a few times years ago you'd drag race the down the airstrip a couple of times and i will at some point. The engine broke. So i kind of wonder when you drove it. How strong was it when you were able to drive. Now that it's done and rebuild and done right and fired and ready to run. I get it i mean. It's it's it's tempting to to get out there and stretch its legs on the property over there but also want to risk given how much time and money has been put in right here front and center. I will stay as a fact. That car will be driven down the tar got enough vehicles to do that. Do not need to replicate the blow up of the law man. Okay well we're gonna we're gonna have to cut things little short. We've got some back to back Shows here in the studio on the one thing. I just want to touch on real quick. I let me let me hit gyco whether you guys own your home or render home..

rosemont illinois mosul Marcus marcus youtube
"mosul" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Alright, Here we go Hand in Mosul live You know the date September 11th 2021 Don't quit 20 years to the day of one of the most tragic events in America, I cannot go into any greater detail. Then what might go And his show did it was very touching. Very moving. Very Spencer. Very What's the word? I'm searching for? Profound? No, no, no, There's nothing about Michael. That's profound, particularly but, uh, attaching I'll give him touching, heartfelt. No, I It's a It's a synonym for extensive. What I'm saying. Is he He went into. He covered every angle, every aspect, and there's a word that I could use. But for lack of the word, uh, coming to mind, Let's say extensive and so You know, we, uh he did. And I wanted to thank him. You mentioned the poem that I posted Uh, entitled Twin Towers. That I wanted to Put out on what is a special, You know not. I don't know if special is the right word, but certainly what is, uh, You know, uh, Hallmark as far as marking, you know, 20 years. 20 years of anything. Our maybe read that before we go to break since he mentioned it had not planned on it. I don't know how reading a poem translates, uh across the airwaves, but you know, we can give it a shot written By the way from the perspective Of someone that was in the towers. So, uh, I Cory Song. Uh, Beautifully sad. Poignant touching. From the perspective of the Children that lost fathers, But so it'll be a be a nice bookend as it is written from the perspective of father. And you'll get that in the first. Couple of lines when he's you know, you just get it. You'll get He's leaving a voicemail and he says I have to go. My plane is here. I can see it coming. Uh, towards the window. But anyway before that, uh and then the other shows Roger J. P. I mean, there's so many shows on the bone, you know, have rightfully, um memorialize this anniversary so I'm going to do an hour. Uh where we, You know, you know, trying to laugh a little bit. Uh, And You know, And then I am Mike going to be Memorex, as you say, And you're too young to remember memory access alive or is it Memorex? Uh, will be in a best of second hour. Because I have to get ready for the movie premiere tomorrow. And I have One of my stars coming in, Uh, Carl Rami, who's gonna be performing at six o'clock of six o'clock show or at side splitters? I think Mark probably see counter because, uh, Robert Kelly is out there this weekend as well. I think he got there Thursday. And is there at least through tonight? Or maybe Sunday. Spence. Uh, you got me, You know, as well as I'd hang on, you know? Yeah. You know, it's like they if if if I wouldn't want to go they definitely can call call upside to check size was kind of like calm, but I would imagine that I might see him on the way out of the door. Going to go up, probably in check out Carl's show. Since he's coming into town for the premiere, which is tomorrow, by the way. Is the last day you have to hear me on their promoting my film, which you guys have been harassing me. Uh dare I say haranguing me. Every now and again. Harassing is not the, uh, not a strong enough word. Uh, like, like, arraign, you know, Do you know what they do? You know what Harang means, Spencer? I don't think I've ever heard that word. You have never heard the name her name. You have never heard Arang. Also, by the way, Yes, Robert Kelly is on tonight tonight. Okay? Not doing that Sunday show. Alright. Harang is a lengthy and aggressive speech. So in other words, it's not just somebody saying, Hey, man, When can we see the movie? It's like, Dude, Does that movie ever going to be released by blah, blah, blah, blah. Yes, it is finally. Finally Going to see the light of day. Tomorrow. Side splitters new room. Grove City. Now. Karaki playing Grove City. The groves in Wesley Chapel. There was a there was a Grove City in in Columbus, Ohio. Where I was for about a decade, and so what? I say the groves. It's It's the first thing that comes to mind, by the way, uh, huge upset in college football as the Buckeyes fall to what I believe is an unranked team. The Oregon Ducks. And even if they're ranked if you lose to a team named after ducks, you said you said, Val your head and walk off the field real slow. You never know. This could be the start of a new dynasty. Remember, without doubt even was that I thought you were about to do a duck Dynasty. O remember? Remember when Appalachian beat Michigan? That's my album, Artur. Uh, they knew you was Appalachian. They have a have a great football program now, so all you need is that Win the convince You know what maybe we can hold on. Hold on. Hold on. Hold on. Hold on. You have a what You have. What team now? Oh, I know you You may have an improved football team, but I don't know that in any circles. People are referring to the Appalachian. What are they? The Mountaineers? I don't know that anybody is talking. I don't know that there's a conversation during the college football season where someone says those Appalachian mountaineers are great team. Hey, in our conference in the Sun Belt conference the what conferences that he felt that sounds made up. That's house completely. Maybe it's just because you're not from there. Okay? Give me another team in the Sun Belt conference. Exactly. I followed my team. Nobody else You have to follow the teams that they play. You can't just You can't follow your team in a vacuum in a while, OK, Sun Belt conference. Get out of here. Nice try, Spencer. I should have known. Any team called. The Mountaineers was made of whatever it's not made up. Give me one more team in the sun Belt conference. Fine. Let me not without googling they give no I'm going to. I'm going to give you every single one of them. Really don't want you to appreciate I'd rather you. You're funny man. And I, uh and I and I appreciate that. I appreciate you. Yes, And thank you, Brad at but man 13. Yeah, it is. Friday. The 10th. There was the Friday the 10th through tonight. September left that, Robert. Uh Robert Kelly is out there. I might have to Stay and see him. Comprehensive alien virus. Patient zero coming through with the word I was looking for when I ended up settling on extensive, comprehensive is exactly the word that I wanted to describe Mike goals. Uh, coverage. Of the events from 9 11, I he is right and He is right in the respect..

Carl Rami Robert Kelly Thursday Michael Brad September 11th 2021 Spencer 20 years tonight America Roger J. P. tomorrow Robert Mark Columbus, Ohio Friday September Mike Buckeyes Wesley Chapel
"mosul" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on NPR News Now

"I'm louise schiavone. New orleans is in the dark as hurricane ida bears down on the city. Louisiana utility company enter g announced one hour ago. They'd suffered catastrophic damage to their transmission system amid torrential rain pounding winds well over half a million people in the state of lost power and while the drama is profound for people in their own homes. Those who do not have homes are facing an even greater crisis. Aubrey you haas of member station. Wwf reports on housed residents have been flocking into shelters. The new orleans mission is one of several shelters in the city. Taking in the une housed. They were at capacity sunday afternoon with more than two hundred twenty people. The city wants to be the last resort. Well we're getting to last resort tied. That's the mission operations director. john proctor. He says the city has an emergency shelter but with high wind speeds. It's becoming increasingly difficult to get people there. Meanwhile he's worried about those who are still outside. Prayerfully hoping that everybody's safe now like just the nature of this area. I'm sure that there's gonna be some strikers. Says he's praying. Anyone who needs shelter seeks quickly for npr news. I'm upper you. Haas new orleans among the hardest hit areas gulf coast petrochemical sites and major ports. President biden has signed emergency declarations for louisiana and mississippi also of tremendous concerned the potential for kovic spread especially since the state is facing resurgence of cases in britain corona virus infections have reached a new high. Vicki barker has more from london. Covered nineteen cases in england are now at twenty six times. The levels seen this time last year and scientists warned that increase could accelerate at schools and universities reopen. That's putting pressure on british health authorities to lower the age of vaccine eligibility to twelve and to approve booster shots for the elderly and vulnerable vicki barker in london. French president emmanuel macron visited mozell today during a two day visit to iraq. Npr's eleanor beardsley reports. That macron attended in iraqi summit that was meant to bring stability to the region. Mackall believes iraq has a big role to play an easing tensions between iran and the arab world but the summit was by events in afghanistan. During an interview. Maximal said french forces in afghanistan had done the best they could. I'm brought out more than twenty eight hundred people. even though thousands remained. He said france like its allies. Head cooperated with the taliban to do so but that did not mean france would recognize their government for that micron said the taliban had to meet several conditions such as not making pacts with terrorists and respecting the rights of women. Eleanor beardsley. npr news. Paris this is npr news. In washington a spacex shipment of ants avocados and a human sized robotic arm is on its way to the international space station after launching from kennedy space center this morning from member station w. m. f. e. in orlando brendan byrne reports spacex sixes cargo dragon capsules packed with about forty eight hundred pounds of supplies for the seven person station. Crew and hardware support science experiments on the iss. The equipment will help support science investigations happening on board looking at things like bone growth plant behavior and health of the station. Astronauts the capsule launched from the florida space coast on a falcon nine rocket after weather delayed. Liftoff for twenty four hours. The dragon capsule should arrive at the station. monday morning. We'll dock automatically to the orbiting lab. The capsule will spend about a month at the station before returning to earth slashing down off the coast of florida for npr news. I'm brendan bird in orlando. It said to be the most expensive golf club ever sold tiger woods backup. Putter from his spectacular. Two thousand two season has been sold at auction for roughly three hundred ninety. Three thousand dollars golden age. Golf auction says the scotty cameron putter was made exclusively for woods. While he won five tournaments including the masters in the us open in that year he did not use this particular putter and competition. He did use it for practice and experimentation. The auction house says the putter woods has used for the majority of his victories. Still in his possession would be worth literally millions at auction recapping. Our top story new orleans in the dark as hurricane ida bears down. I'm louise schiavone. Npr news washington..

npr news louise schiavone hurricane ida President biden Vicki barker vicki barker john proctor emmanuel macron mozell eleanor beardsley macron Mackall haas Aubrey Wwf Eleanor beardsley New orleans Louisiana taliban afghanistan
Christians Are Being Persecuted and Driven out of the Middle East

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Christians Are Being Persecuted and Driven out of the Middle East

"Talk to us about the situation in the middle east the flip side of the global war on terror that really isn't adequately discussed either. What has happened in syria. In in other parts of the middle east like iraq in the last twenty years since september the eleventh at the tarnow the twentieth century across the middle east we had approximately twenty plus percent christians that were living in various pockets. Lebanon has right now per capita the largest christian community but you had him living in iraq. You had him living in syria In turkey and whatnot well as we progress through the twentieth century with the various wars and the uptake. In some of these terror groups christians began to leave and larger numbers Since the war in syria for example in two thousand eleven when it started there were three million christians living inside syria. Today we have less than two hundred fifty thousand take iraq for example in mosul. You have the tomb of jonah. The prophet joan on you have to of the minor prophets name. All of a planes is well known in the bible. So these are all old jewish and christian lands and Christians are being driven out Left and right not only by sunni radicals but also by shiite radicals why because iran wants controlled. They want that fertile crescent. Go an open door from modern day. Iran in through iraq syria all the way out lebanon. So in this in this divide you've got a sunni shia clashes and and and in these clashes. Not only. are they fighting each other. But they're also pushing the christians out. The christians always take the brunt of everything

Syria Middle East Iraq Lebanon Turkey Mosul Jonah Joan Iran
"mosul" Discussed on Borne the Battle

Borne the Battle

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on Borne the Battle

"Our traditions our spirituality extract out the purchased values those into your daily life by training equally. Part of that comment was. I fell in love with the right person. My wife pat mosul here by a sometimes you got to man. You talk about stuff like that met her. I probably would have taken my life in suicide while so should there be a purpose to live so in total. How many years did you serve in the marine corps. I took a three reserve. Commission says active duty three years. Okay that probably saved my life. When i walked off the track august twelfth. I think it was augsburg. Germany said you. American record walked out the tracking until patricia. I'll never be world class again. It's too hard competing hypoglycemic borderline diabetic. I'll continue to compete but never world class level that it's hard to stay at the top at a level like that different you know for a sustained period of time for anybody except that led me to Retold that has a young lakota man. My tribe gave warrior status. Gave me my lakota name..

pat mosul marine corps augsburg patricia Germany
"mosul" Discussed on Feliz Dia Novo

Feliz Dia Novo

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on Feliz Dia Novo

"He's valley and say i secret. Sugar pepper flavia. Moderniser forty flavio. Silver forbath that. I'll do kiki well-made bone gratitude lil lucille but genesis. Thirty asked us fada is going to succeed is of udhampur publica yarn. When is our sonos. Main almo- main to sell as she lied about a company. They're all he had been cut down swiss busily dodgy. Jv sees romance e cordially dodgy. Some that are just fabulous. Gordo's entre to he boomerstransitions so his comerc- is here noise. Always our bodies the key big city them based on receive this older she dodges keystone beneficiary. Does this year so archie east edge. Ability is a as far. Just i'm really dodgy. Sociably hickel suggests bulldoze frac e cigarettes east angles as throughout jere put almond bomb. God's nas through brazil masoom footage bug of mental problem. But i can't deal for the faster. Fico fast legisla so same represented supported this conflict. Berge park over. That's what you through system get facility daddy but go cigarettes. Full your fast suze for athena. Dc michael sociale into stop your mind. The way i got those consecutive fully faster gene for vinci honest jetting sell out the detainees g poltical. Both away was to this. Atoll quotes asked cooking thing you could save or is it a coke a few key in a little bit. Few eating facing distributor us to look up sick with us. Mosul now singled say mosul now so papua's equal flabby elite pg persona which to put to eat. The guy game usually got usually winter. I've been some boys. You noticia fence outlet five ten thousand others nice who yet. Ntsc tho-those licensed thumbs losing. Think those ideas you fussy leon sally..

Silver forbath lil lucille Sociably hickel flavio kiki legisla Berge park Gordo michael sociale jere Fico brazil Mosul mosul papua leon sally
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get tough. Hard on you expect Was there any discussion after he was killed about your policy on changing people's voices see, like We? We don't We don't force things on people. And we know people when when they took the risk and used to call the station. They were proud of doing it. They felt they were delivering the hardship they are going through with their real voices. Did you think you got any change in your callers after what happened to see more any more or less colors? Like all the statistics I got, we start receiving more calls from Mosul. It was a very big deal like Seymour, one colour of Al Ghad radio. And people start telling like we are all Seymour. So if they they killed once you more we have thousands of whom who are still in Mosul and who are still capable Actually, Mohammed says. Every time things got harder, scarier, more violent. The number of callers would increase. Oh, statistics of 15. Most of the text messages was and they're very tough situations. We used to get more cold when their walls fighting and people didn't just want to talk about dash and death and devastation they wanted to talk about. Music and art life. Topics. People are interested in.

Mohammed Seymour 15 Al Ghad thousands Mosul one colour
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Different program, called The Ashram is an Islamic World. Havana But saying Dash R. But the program asked listeners to call in to discuss seriously the religious and philosophical justifications used by dash because by then most of the scholars Where is scared to even address these problems? There was one caller to the show who stood out. We had a caller. Who used to have a different story. And yes, you can listen to. He used to call the radio station and he was different. He had a great sense of humor. Try to make fun of dash many times In many occasions. He was one of the people who refused us of changing his voice in real time, he said. Many times. Many of my family members asked me to stop calling the station just for my security, but I refuse to mascot some big This is him. Seymour. If you listen closely, you can hear him say the words. Telephone and radio. You We only have Roger Seymour had not left his house since Mosul fell to dash. So imagine a person who who didn't left his house for two years because he was afraid from dash. One time he called the station and we were asking the people a question. What do you think think that people will need after being liberated? He came up with a very different answer. He said Mosul will need a sanitizer a sanitizer to clean the streets from what was left from dash. And the presenter loved and some callers called after that, and you know they were laughing too. What? We didn't know that dash. We're recording in real time recording that call. Seymour called all the time until he didn't Mohammed didn't hear from him for a week and then two weeks and.

Roger Seymour Mohammed Seymour two years two weeks Mosul one one caller Islamic a week Havana One The Ashram
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This reason, we came up with a different program called Dash Free Museum in Islamic World Havana but saying dash are buttons. The program asked listeners to call in to discuss seriously the religious and philosophical justifications used by dash because by then most of the scholars Where is scared to even address these problems? There was one caller to the show who stood out. We had a caller. Who used to have a different story. And we are committed to do. He used to call the registration and he was different. He had a great sense of humor. Try to make fun of dash many times In many occasions. He was one of the people who refused us of changing his voice in real time, he said. Many times. Many of my family members asked me to stop calling the station just for my security, but I refuse must get some that this is him. Seymour. If you listen closely, you can hear him say the words. Telephone and radio you got on your life. Seymour had not left his house since Mosul fell to dash. So imagine a person who who didn't left his house for two years because he was afraid from dash. One time he called the station and we were asking the people a question. What do you think think that people will need after being liberated? He came up with a very different answer, He said Mosul will need a sanitizer a sanitizer to claim the streets. From what was left from dash and the presenter loved and some callers called after that, you know they were laughing too. What? We didn't know that dash. We're recording. In real time recording that call Seymour called all the time until he didn't Mohammed didn't hear from him for a week and.

Seymour Mohammed two years Mosul one caller Islamic World Havana One time one of the people a week Dash Free Museum
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Outrageous station could have a punishment, which reads a death penalty. Um So a single call on outrageous station. It's taken so seriously because we know it was a tremendous amount of risk. The color took in order to reach us. Even just tuning into the station was dangerous. Of course, Dash don't want the people to listen to the station and sometimes in their checkpoints. They will force a driver to turn on. If the radio to see what was the last Radio channel. They've been listening to And what would happen if people were caught listening to your station? So I I don't know exactly what Dash will do to the people, but we know people will be very careful to try to avoid that from happening. They didn't allow to have to sell for people to sell radios in Mosul. Dash dedicated to transmitter to jamming the stations, radio frequencies. And then the frequency war started. Mohammed set up a new transmitter solely to jam dashes broadcasts. And then he moved his own station up and down the diet. But because we were reaching in an abnormal time to a city that's not even under the Iraqi government, so we had some kind of freedom. Because we were the only radio.

Mosul Mohammed Dash Iraqi government single call
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up with a different program called the National Museum in Islam in Havana. But saying dash are buttons. The program asked listeners to call in to discuss seriously the religious and philosophical justifications used by dash because by then most of the scholars Where is scared to even address these problems? There was one caller to the show who stood out. We had a caller. Who used to have a different story. And also, finally until he used to call the radio station and he was different. He had a great sense of humor. Try to make fun of dash many times In many occasions. He was one of the people who refused us of changing his voice in real time, he said. Many times. Many of my family members asked me to stop calling the station just for my security, but I refuse to mascots and that this is him. Seymour. If you listen closely, you can hear him. Say the words. Telephone and radio. You We only have around your Roger. Seymour had not left his house since Mosul fell to dash. So imagine a person who who didn't left his house for two years because he was afraid from dash. One time he called the station and we were asking the people a question. What do you think think that people will need after being liberated? He came up with a very different answer. He said Mosul will need a sanitizer a sanitizer to clean the streets from what was left from dash. And the presenter loved and some callers called after that, and you know they were laughing too. What? We didn't know that dash. We're recording in real time recording that call. Seymour called all the time until he didn't Mohammed didn't hear from him for a week and then two weeks.

Seymour Mohammed two years two weeks Havana Mosul Roger one one caller National Museum in Islam a week One time people
Giants’ Gregory Santos Suspended 80 Games for Performance-Enhancing Drug Use

Chip Franklin

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Giants’ Gregory Santos Suspended 80 Games for Performance-Enhancing Drug Use

"San Francisco Giants pitcher Gregory Santo suspended for 80 games without pay under Major League baseball's drug program following a positive test for stanozolol. Mosul All is a synthetic steroid derived from testosterone that has anabolic and androgenic properties. 21 year old Santos will lose about half of his salary. It pays for plays for both the Giants and the Triple A river Cats.

Gregory Santo Giants Major League San Francisco Mosul Baseball Santos
Pope Francis condemns ISIS terrorism in Iraq visit

Doug Stephan

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Pope Francis condemns ISIS terrorism in Iraq visit

"A large open air mass camp Pope Francis's historic trip to Iraq calling for peace and unity in Mosul. It's where I will back around back, Daddy declared the caliphate of Isis and he threatened We will occupy Rome. But instead on an historic day Rome the pope came to Mosul on the pilgrimage of peace. The ruins of four churches occupied by Isis. He made an urgent plea for coexistence, praying for the souls of the thousands and thousands killed in the city, ABC Easy and Panel

Pope Francis Mosul Rome Iraq Daddy ABC
Pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

Ric Edelman

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

"If their work is subpar. Pope Francis concluded his historic visit to Iraq with a message of hope, forgiveness and rebuilding during an open Air mass in Erbil. Pope Francis calling for harmonious co existence from Mosul, the Iraqi city tourney asunder by the Islamic state's violent fanaticism framed by the ruins of four churches destroyed by Isis. The pope lamented the thousands of Muslims, Christians and Yazidis killed by extremists. Standing on a red stage but dressed all in white, the symbolic color of purity and benevolence, the pope said. Fraternity is more durable than frat, Rasyid

Pope Francis Erbil Mosul Iraq Pope Rasyid
Where IS ruled, pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Where IS ruled, pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

"Francis concluded his historic visit to Iraq with a message of hope, forgiveness and rebuilding during an open Air mass in Erbil. Pope Francis calling for harmonious co existence from Mosul, the Iraqi city tourney asunder by the Islamic state's violent fanaticism framed by the ruins of four churches destroyed by Isis. The pope lamented the thousands of Muslims, Christians and Yazidis killed by extremists. Standing on a red stage but dressed all in white, the symbolic color of purity and benevolence, the pope said. Fraternity is more durable than fracture aside, Hope more powerful than hatred.

Pope Francis Erbil Francis Mosul Iraq Pope
Pope's risky Iraq trip aims to boost Christians

The World and Everything In It

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Pope's risky Iraq trip aims to boost Christians

"Iraq is preparing for a first ever papal visit at the end of the week. Despite security and pandemic concerns pope francis will arrive on friday and stay for four days. He called the trip important for encouraging the country's christian communities among the oldest in the world. Louis raphael sako heads. The chaldean catholic church christians who encouraged to positive to stay here and also to build the trust with their neighbors. The pope will visit several major cities including baghdad erbil and mosul officials in the nivea planes a working to find an air venue for him to hold mass because the area does not have a cathedral or stadium large enough. Many of the country's churches remain in ruins after isis attacks. That's this week's wall tour. I'm when ezio he carry in abuja. Nigeria

Pope Francis Louis Raphael Sako Chaldean Catholic Church Iraq Mosul Baghdad Ezio Abuja Nigeria
"mosul" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Okay, so we're gonna talk about that later on in the show is how to build a defense game plan. So you know what? Jack? Most shows would stop right there. Mosul's that say, You know what if we did just that we have Dunmore than our listening audience could possibly want from a financial show? Somebody stop me. Don't you dare stop me because on this show, do we stop right there? No, we don't. We boldly go where No financial show has gone before and therefore at about 10 till we will have our estate tip of the week And that's the part of the show. We talk about how to pass on to your greedy, unwashed undeserving ares the fruits of your labor. And that's called a state planning. And this week we're going to talk about, you know, a pretty basic thing, but one that I think is probably the most common mistake that people make. And that is we're gonna talk about reviewing your beneficiary designations. Okay, So what I'm talking about there is on your IRAs and your 41 case and all And you will even you know, Beneficiary designations is something that you should visit and I'm gonna tell a story that will, I think illustrate the importance of that very Dramatically. So we'll have that for you at about 10 tails. So we have a fantastic show. I hope you'll stay tuned for the entire program. I gotta tell you something quick, though I'm bachelor ring it right now. My wife eyes off with my youngest daughter, who fortunately has a job and she starts her new career and s O Mom is helping her move into her apartment. And you know where it is. Washington, D C Yes, in the middle of all the stuff that's going on in Washington. Right now, That's where they're headed, and s so they're going to be there on Monday, getting her moved in. She has an apartment with two other girls. I should say women on de so she's starting off her career. And, you know, we kind of told her we'd rather she didn't with the pandemic and all the You know the stuff that's going on in Washington right now, and she's like, no, I want to start my life. It's time I'm going. So Mom is going to get her moved in. In the meantime, I have to feed the stupid cats. And I'm a dog person. But we've got old cats. So we got ear infections. We've got thyroid pills. We gotta give him got to put it in their food. And oh, my gosh. And and then the litter box. Don't even get me started with the litter box. So Oh, my gosh. I would rather I don't know. But anyway, that's what it is. So let's talk about my fearless forecast. And so I'll just say it right now. But the fearless forecast for this year is 35,000 on the Dow on by the reason for that is, I think that with the vaccine with the stimulus package, we're gonna have an economy on steroids. And I've been talking about this and previous shows. So you know you can listen to the those for my logic behind all of that. But this year FEARLESS forecast Dow 35,000 of my fearless forecast is basically the highest point for the year. It's not the year ending value. It's the highest point for the year. Now. Last year, my fearless forecast was 31,000 on the Dow. And of course it hit 30,600. So I was 400 points off in 2019. I did not have a fearless forecast. I just didn't decide doesn't didn't do one Latin in 2019. But in 2018 my fearless forecast was for the Dow to be a 26,500. And it actually hit that my fearless forecast in 2017 was 25,000 and it hit 24,800 on de so now in 2016. I missed big. I saw a bear market that year and I saw the Dow hitting 11,500 didn't and made 16,000 in 2015. I saw the Dow with 19,000. It hit 18,300 s O close and in 2014. I said the Dow would hit 18,000 and and the last day of the year it hit the 18,000 and in 2013 I said 16,000, and it did that so out of the last seven years, my fearless forecast was pretty accurate except for one year. On. So this year 35,000 on the Dow. So what does that mean to you? Well, I see a lot of opportunity, but at the same time there is a lot of risk. You know, The market has had a tremendous run here over the last three months, and so it is possible we could have a correction. Certainly. I also am concerned about the fact that we could see stimulus, not work. The pandemic turned for the worst. You know who knows what could happen and so, therefore having a defensive strategy to protect you, you know, growth with protection is what we believe you should have. And so are investing. Protect strategy actually told us to sell in November of 2007 and to protect against everything that happened in 2000 and eight on with the markets, the S and P And all of that, And those that follow our advice didn't experience that kind of those kind of losses. So if you're over 50 if you are retired or retiring soon now is the time to sit down and develop your plan. And I'd like to encourage you to go to our website. It's our P O a calm.

Dow Washington The market Mosul Jack Dunmore thyroid pills
Vatican: Pope to visit Iraq in March, pandemic permitting

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Vatican: Pope to visit Iraq in March, pandemic permitting

"The Vatican says pope Francis will make a pilgrimage to Iraq in March pandemic conditions permitting that's unspoken Matteo Brunei has announced Francis will make the March five to eight visit with stops in Baghdad on the plains of a link to the memory of Abraham the biblical patriarch as well as to the cities of Irbil on Mosul Brunei says the troops schedule will take into consideration the yvolution of the worldwide health emergency that could be nineteen pandemic has created it to be the first trip abroad for the eighty three year old pontiff since November twenty nineteen when he visited Thailand and Japan I'm Charles the last month

Pope Francis Brunei Irbil Matteo Vatican Iraq Francis Baghdad Mosul Abraham Thailand Japan Charles
National Native American Veterans Memorial opens in Washington, DC

Morning Edition

03:46 min | 2 years ago

National Native American Veterans Memorial opens in Washington, DC

"Opens today on the National Mall in Washington, D C. It's the Native American Veterans Memorial. Native Americans have served in the armed forces in high numbers for more than a century. This is the first memorial to honor that service. Here's NPR's Quil Lawrence. The memorial is simple. A steel circle elevated over carved stone drum. It sits in the shade of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Kevin Go over, is a member of the Pawnee Nation and the museum's director. It's an article of faith in Indian country that Native American serve at a greater rate than basically any other group. So we wish for this to be a sacred place, not just for Native America. But for all Americans. The opening ceremony went virtual because of the pandemic. But here are a few of the people go over hopes will one day attend and sanctify the site. My name is Marcel Grande La Bull. And I'm from the two kettle ban of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. You know? I'm 101 years old. No in 1940 for Marcela Lobo was a surgical nurse at an Army hospital during the battle of the Bulge Well, In December. I believe it was 1/16 of December. The Germans overtook the American soldiers. They wondered about putting in a hospital so close to the front lines, but they did. So we were there in leisure. And we had both funds night and day. At the time of the breaks through the growth of the bulge. Lobo says her own community always honored her military service. Now the memorial in Washington means the whole country conduce this same to be AH, thought like it was a great honor. My ancestors were warriors. I'm related to rein in the face who fought in the battle of the little big horn or greasy grass that they called it. My father was a Spanish American war veteran. My brother oldest brother was a veteran all down the line. But some native vets aren't as aware of their own family service. Yeah, my name is Colonel Wayne Don don has served 27 years in the army, including Bosnia and Afghanistan. You know, for a lot of years, I thought I was a first generation military person came to find out is both of my grandfather and uncles. And served in a territorial guard during World War two. That was an emotional discovery for dawn and a complicated one not just native Americans, but on the other minority groups, ultimately that they chose to serve to represent their people. And also to serve a country that this, you know, sometimes. Didn't have AH would've proved to be their best interests in mind, but they're still still did it, He says. Now that the country is wrestling with questions about racial justice, he hopes the memorial can play a part. Army vet Allan Ho feels the same. He's native Hawaiian saw combat in Vietnam. Then his two sons served after 9 11, his oldest son. Nine. No. Ho was killed in Iraq and he wass Credible young man. He was an officer, platoon leader, and he was killed in 25 in Mosul, Iraq. His younger brother's the staff sergeant. His name is Locke or And the meaning for a knock or is a warrior who is brave and courageous. Those are the stories of service and sacrifice. He wants Americans to hear it. The new memorial for native visitors, Ho wants it to be a validation and an inspiration. And then perhaps, who knows? Maybe some young Native son who experiences that memorial for this first time, we'll be in 50 years from now he'll be that the president of the United States who knows Quil Lawrence NPR news

Native American Veterans Memor Quil Lawrence Smithsonian National Museum Kevin Go Pawnee Nation Marcel Grande La Bull Marcela Lobo National Mall Native America Cheyenne River Washington Army Hospital Colonel Wayne Don Don NPR Lobo Allan Ho Army
Mumm Napa Brut Prestige Review

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:16 min | 2 years ago

Mumm Napa Brut Prestige Review

"It's David again from cheap wine by the.com. The other wine review that we put on the cheap wine fiber.com website and I noticed lately though. I'm kind of going upscale. Everything is Bordeaux or Napa or Rushing River and well, I kind of did that again? Let me grab the bottle and see what we got here. It's it's not expensive. But it it's Mom Napa Brut Prestige and sparkling wine from Champagne house in France, but they've been in Napa since the seventies so it's fifty years. It's been a long time. It's half half 45% Chardonnay 45% Pinot Noir and the rest is a little bit of a mix of you know, greed. It's just you know, Greenfield a green show your same thing. And what was the other one, you know, what a you know, what is the the hidden grape & in Champaign? It's in all the champagne. You don't know it. So there you go, and it's from Napa and it's one of the kind of weird things because this is a Napa sparkling wine and not a French champagne. Normally when you drink Snapple why that's oh it's Napa except when champagne and then it's oh, it's Napa off cuz it's not you. Hey, we're gonna go get into that because I think that's wrong. So what we have here is like I said, it's a little bit of a dead. Grapes that are approved of champagne right here is a couple of other groups really get used aren't here but it's got the main ones they use 45 different growers in Nampa all day from parts for the line and that's really typical. They make champagne. I know one of the leading Champagnes, you know, the uses a hundred different Growers to Champaign most champagne house and then champagne don't really have much Vineyard Holdings. They they contract long-term contracts for all other groups. And you know, that's how they do it. That's how they're doing it. That's how I am doing it here. I know it's like they've been the emphasis 1970 and they've been in Champaign since like 1827 or something. So these are people know what they're doing. They brought them know how to California even though like most of the American sparkling wine bubbly houses the schramsberg Gloria Ferrer Iron Horse are Sonoma. I guess there's some up in age, you know, they bring their expertise to Napa and this is a year and half second fermentation year and half the first fermentation is in mosul stainless steel and then they put some of it in French Oak barrels to give it that kind of thing going that they blend in. I mean the other surprise champagne house all Out their style ahm how Styles there's the first fermentation for the most part was where all the tricks are. There's just there the little bit of folk a little bit of stainless steel and all the other things had picked their drapes and all that are all in there. So you're getting a real bump style especially after fifty years and now but I mean, they they've come to get their own state of Mississippi cuz in my hand here, I mean, they probably get me a maid came with the French style. They probably created some Napa style go along with it. And here's what I have to say. Very expensive champagnes are Sublime. They're just crazy of every you ever get to drink it. But which I do every once awhile, you know, sometimes our ten years in bottle. I mean and they're so the spinach ten years needs in the bottle and they have all these exotic production techniques and these things are crazy expensive and just crazy delicious, but they're regular ones are kind of reachable this thing. I found out I think Seventeen or eighteen dollars Napa Brut Prestige Brutus, not too sweet. You are not miss out from Champagne. I mean in a blind tasting most people unless there's champagne had know these things. Most people wouldn't know the difference and this is Anna like half the price unless off. I mean, they'll be cheaper come December when all the champagne zor sa land they'd probably make after sales but you know regular time $18 for what is an excellent choice. It's delicious. It's balance is pretty good at this you wouldn't know the difference. So just because it doesn't have champagne or label has Napa who how bad could it be that has Napa on the label.

Napa Mom Napa Brut Prestige Champaign Rushing River David France Mississippi Anna California Vineyard Holdings French Oak Sonoma Mosul
Minorities under attack as PM pushes 'tolerant' Pakistan

Hugh Hewitt

00:09 sec | 2 years ago

Minorities under attack as PM pushes 'tolerant' Pakistan

"On a tough month for religious minorities in Pakistan. Latest incident to Christian gunned down because he rented in Mosul neighborhood in northwest the shower.

Pakistan Mosul
Special Operations Raid Said to Kill Senior Terrorist Leader in Syria

Red Eye Radio

01:18 min | 3 years ago

Special Operations Raid Said to Kill Senior Terrorist Leader in Syria

"Taught at one of the most wanted terrorists in the world ISIS leader Abu Bakar al Baghdadi is presumed dead after this U. S. special forces operations carried out a ground raid in Syria Baghdatis as a long history of terrorism in the Middle East before his rise in ISIS ABC Laurie Martinez has more on his history with the region what we know about Abu Bakr al Baghdadi was that he was always been involved in terror groups he was detained by the United States actually in the mid two thousands he was one of the many insurgents who was captured and held it in a Tory is camp called camp Buka in central Iraq he was held there for a couple years and then he was released there are partners it's guy news correspondent Marx stone in Beirut says all bugged adi stepped out of sight from the moment he took the reins and isis he is not a passive who appeared very much in fact his only public appearance ever has been at the beginning of the caliphate that he forms he appeared in the grand mosque in Mosul in northern Iraq to announce the formation of that kind of face that sits there and his movement has been restricted about Daddy apparently detonated his own suicide bomb vests that also killed two of his wives confirmed by counterterrorism official ABC news US officials are awaiting DNA analysis to confirm identification the White House didn't specify the topic just the president trump will deliver remarks Sunday morning at nine

Mosul President Trump ABC Official Camp Buka Syria Donald Trump White House Abu Bakar Al Baghdadi Beirut Marx Stone Iraq United States Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi Laurie Martinez Middle East
Likudnt: Israels political crisis

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:23 min | 3 years ago

Likudnt: Israels political crisis

"In Israel just last month. Benyamin Netanyahu was celebrating a strong showing by his Likud party in parliamentary elections. He had been forced to call an early poll as he faced a raft of corruption allegations, his victory seemed like a vote of confidence by the Israeli people. And he grinned ingredient cheering crowds on election night, but all has not gone smoothly since Israel has many political parties and mister Netanyahu has struggled to build the coalition he needs to form a government. He called publicly on one party leader. His former defense minister of eager Lieberman to join him. Let's through this of net, the victim liberal, unfortunately, until this moment, including tonight, I didn't manage to complete a victory Lieberman to avoid elections. But whoever looks at the reality that we need to be responsible and former government immediately those please failed. So a few minutes after midnight, the Israeli parliament, the Knesset voted to dissolve it. So for reports from Israel for the economist and recently wrote a book about mister Netanyahu. And this is just thirty days after it was sworn in seven weeks after Laos election in. This is unprecedented in his right. But it'd go history. And why it's been so difficult to, to build a coalition Netanyahu proclaimed victory, because his block of right wing, religious parties had a majority of five seats in the Knesset. So it seemed that he had one. However, to make that victory reality needed to get all those policies cooperating together in one coalition and one issue the issue of the draft of Sheva students, students in religious seminaries proved so prove so contentious that one of the parties demanded the law on this. We should be ready drafted the previous be passed as literally, without changing, a comma, while some of the religious parties in the coalition demanded major changes to the law, and the prime minister. Currently so prime minister, who was very eager to begin his fifth tablet, prime minister couldn't bridge those differences. So what happens now? So what should have happened last night at midnight was with Netanyahu deadline on the tiny allocated to him to form the coalition up sewing else you've received the opportunity to, to form a coalition by his Rayleigh low, but there was also, there's those close into never been used with specifies that dissolved the whole process of foreign governments stops and the country goes back to the polls, and that is the closet into Neo used and therefore in three and a half months Israel will be held another election. And meanwhile, mister Netanyahu is under investigation on corruption allegations. How will that then play out in the current absence of government and the potential for a different one was really Mr. Gatien's ready been wraps up, and the attorney general has tentatively decided to indict into now on bribery and fraud in through? In, in those three investigations Mosul efforts over the last few weeks when he should have been trying to solve this problem between his coalition partners was trying to get the parties to agree to vote on various pieces of legislation, which would grant him immunity from prosecution and would shield him from any intervention of the high court in that decision. That is now that has now been shelved those pieces of today's another go ahead. Certainly not until the election, and another government is formed, assuming wins the next election form that government. So he's lost very valuable time for him. And in that time the hearing. Harry's. It will proceed and there's a chance that before the attorney general decides to, to indict attending and to charge them in court for bribery, he, he won't have any relation in place. It to shield him has steadfastly denied the allegations ever since the investigations begun over three years ago. He said, there's nothing in them, but step after step it turned out that there is some serious evidence, which led to form investigation. But now he's instead of is standing up in court against he's trying to vade any kind of you say this situation is unprecedented. And, you know, everyone would have expected that mister Netanyahu could have formed, a government does the fact that he hasn't suggest that, perhaps his rivals smell blood and are positioning themselves for power. Well, certainly Evita Lumine the leader of small, nationalist secular, particle, Estrella bay, taint, Israel, our home, who demanded that. The law be. Passed. And that was the reason why there is no code Asian. He says he felt that he could challenge the two now. And see his calculation is that now is, is going down eventually and therefore, there's no reason for him to be a member. His coalition is ready staking out, new ground in the right wing for the in the post tenure era. So he's, he's the first major is right wing politician, Israel to openly challenge. It's in recent years, and they'll be others who will follow him, if there is this large group of parties. Why is Mr. LeBron Lieberman ended up as the king-maker here? Well, the there was nothing, you know, block of parties had a majority of five seats, those five seats, a walked LeBron's party without those five seats than the majority, and what about the peace process? Jared Kushner is is in the country with this US led plan in hand on solving is really Palestinian issues. But there's no government for. Him to talk to. Well, we've got used to the fact that the Trump administration delaying disposing the unveiling of its much way to peace plan. But now that finally have gone out to this piece for spiritedly workshop beret next month. I doubt that they'll delay once again due to the political turmoil in Israel. It's mainly anyway, for the Americans to get together with our bed regimes and work out some kind of economic offense not yet, the ethical stage of, of, of the Trump, and if we ever get to that stage, that stage will will probably be postponed due to these Rayleigh election. Right. And how do you think the, the election will go? Do you, do you think that mister Netanyahu will be able to form a coalition the next time around? It's wouldn't election two months ago. He didn't manage to take that victory and, and China into a function government, but he, he, he wouldn't the right wing religious, bodies one majority, which was not known large one, but it was pretty clear. And it's difficult to see the opposition overturning that this point. But we're in uncharted territory. Now we've never had a second election in the same year's election held just only five months after the previous one. And there's also this new rift within the right wing have a right wing party. Basically saying that Netanyahu, dreitzer, former government, he failed, and now we probably won't be sporting in the future. So there's a sort of shift in the political map in Israel, which which will have to wait and see how that pans out. Thank you very much for your time.

Benyamin Netanyahu Israel Mr. Lebron Lieberman Israeli Parliament Rayleigh Prime Minister Likud Party Bribery Attorney Laos Jared Kushner Sheva Mosul China Evita Lumine Harry Mr. Gatien United States Estrella Bay
The age-old quest for the color blue

Science Magazine Podcast

06:44 min | 3 years ago

The age-old quest for the color blue

"Up we have contributing correspondent Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's here to talk to us about the pursuit of blue. Hi kai. So how long have humans been on the hunt for a blue color? That's already whether the difficulty begins. I guess. Yeah. Pretty good evidence from a cave in South Africa, the Blombos cave that one hundred thousand years ago, humans already will making pigments so more like red ochre yellow ker in using charcoal for black. They will make pigments. But there's no evidence at all of any blue pigments than for a very very long time. That stays the same is some recent evidence of from from gravesite in Turkey that about nine thousand years ago. There was some burials of women children whether it had ground down as right, which is a blue mineral. And even when it's down. It's it's kind of a nice, blue pigment. They were very with this possibly was used for medics. We don't really know. But that's kind of the earliest evidence. We have of any Lukman. Why is blue so rare? Is there some physical property required to make something reflect the color blue, it's hard to achieve if you look in the plot world as a lot of different classes, pigments that we have. But there's only one class of pigments Dan to signs which can actually make blue. And even then it tends to be the complicated molecules that blue in that simply because in order for something to be blue it needs to absorb the rent. So the other part of the visible spectrum, basically and red light is of the visible spectrum. It's the lowest energy light. So in order for something to absorb the red. The kind of jumps that an electron makes which is how molecule usually absorbs collapse these jumps need to be very small jumps in order to absorb the right rather than the blue. So it's much easier for nature appears to make molecules that absolve blue instead of once that absorb Bredon appeal blue these molecules often have to have. A lot of consigned chains and little ecoregions until they really make a good blue. I mean, there is blue in nature. We got water we got sky, we got blueberries. But for some reason making a synthetic version making a dye or pigment is really difficult. What about blue butterflies? Those those have nice blue color several of the blues. You've mentioned now are ones that aren't really pigment. So if you take sky, it's you know, kind of scattered more than than red light. Which is why the sky his loop in Walter. It's interesting because Walter actually absorbs kind of in the red kind of to vibrate the water molecules vibrate with the energy of red light. But it's not a very strong effect. Which is why you only see the bluest as up of water, and then the butterflies like most animals, they also not producing any blue pigments, they have like tiny structures that reflect light in a way that most of the other colors cancelled. So. If you take something very famous example like Mosul butterfly if you do into the scales on its wings. It has these little structures, and they basically end up reflecting all of the light the Chines onto the onto the wing in a way that the other colors, just disappear. What you see is the blue. So basically, everything is not a payment or at tied that we see in everyday life. But if we want to reproduce, those colors, if we want to make painting or make something out of plastic. That's the right color blue. It's really difficult, exactly. And humans in the past. Usually they found these pigments by accident. Some of the earliest examples are indigo which is a dye made from plants, but actually the plot itself isn't extra blue. So it's a blue from nature, but it's only blue ones humans do some chemistry on people for a very long time wanted to try and make synthetic indigo. And it took the s chemical company many, many years in precedent. The amount of money to finally come up with synthetic indigo. So they spent more than eight million gold marks at the time, which was more than the company was even worth to finally come up with with the recipe for synthetic indigo which was then produced around the world in is still used today to color jeans. It does make me wonder what is wrong with the blues that we have. I mean, we have plenty of toys that are blue plastic. We have paints that are blue. What what are those things that are available now not doing right or not cheating? Right. Chart is just the festive nation with colors, right? I mean, there are so many different hues of blue. And if somebody comes up with a new one, it's just especially of the artists. So usually the first ones to use them at it's just fascinating to have, you know, one more shoop. But then the other thing is that a little the blues that use Sopher instance, ultra marine, which is basic ground down. That's right. The part of Lapsley. It was one of the one of the most expensive pigments ever made was just very rare, right? Because you need the semi precious stone Lasley to even able to do it later people came up with a way of making it synthetically. But then even this static version it takes her chemicals to make that end up polluting the environment. A lot of self dioxide is produced as site product while you do so that I mean, that's one reason this the environmental implications on the other one office. Toxicity. I mean, this quite a few loose kkob. Lou that on that on exactly healthy, and this is an ongoing. Search people are still looking for blue pigments, and dyes and new or you took a look at three different approaches that are in the works right now, let's start with the first blue seeking scientists that actually found a new blue. But on accident like most blues in history, so must super money on this is a solid state chemists than he worked for a while. And he made a lot of discoveries, but not really related to pigments at all. And then he started work at Oregon state university in values. Two thousand six and what he actually wanted to do was to find what's called a multi for roic, basic material at room temperature has certain magnetic properties also electrical properties in that would make really interesting for building a computer. And so he used manganese oxide. Trim oxide in indium oxide, and he combined these Anna turn up that the compound came up with didn't have any interesting properties. But it was incredibly blue and he remembered from his days to punt the people said Lewis actually kind of hard to make. So he just published it and the color that he created has just had this incredible life of being used in many many places than now. It's also being sold far too to us.

Walter Blombos Cave Turkey South Africa Bredon Oregon State University Kaikaku Lukman DAN Schmidt Mosul Anna Lewis Lapsley LOU One Hundred Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years
Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

13:10 min | 3 years ago

Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

"Syria. Islamic state is a state no longer earlier this week, the Jihadist group which at its peak controlled an area of Syria and Dirac lodge of Austria and imposed its brutal rule upon eight million. People was chased out of its last pocket of territory by goose a town on the frightens river near Syria's border with Iraq in losing its territory is Lennox state lost many of its fighters, but it didn't lose all of them. Thousands of the caliphates foot soldiers are presenting themselves and their families at refugee camps and presenting the countries from which many of them hailed with a considerable political legal and ethical pickle. Which is basically this. What is to be done with them? There have been some calls for an international tribunal. But it is surely impossible to put so many people on trial. They cannot simply be abandoned, and it would be a brave politician willing to bet their career or a society willing to bet it safety on these. Jihadists returning home as altogether reformed characters. This is the foreign desk. Hot is pre programmed to think of every defeats as a test in. There will never see anything in as permanent defeat because it has already pre-programmed into their minds mindset and into their psyche. If you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death sentence. The tendency that we have in western Europe amendment to say, it's not out problem. They left us. They took up arms against us. We want nothing to do with them is all very well by the peasant doesn't cease to exist. So I think it behoves the society which broken up to consider why has this Cussing taken on against us? And what should we be doing about that not with the individual concern? Sent only but also with society as a whole. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller today will be hearing from a former director of global counterterrorism at M I six and from the full member of al-qaeda to look at what can be done, and what should be done with defeated jihadis. But I for a view from the ground from Syria on joined by Jane, Arraf international correspondent with NPR. Jane, stop by asking you to set the scene forest where he speaking to us from exactly what have you been able to see over the past few days. Well, I am in a which is one of the cities in the sort of a ton of Mus Kurdish region of Syria. And this is also where some leadership the Kurdish leadership is these officials who are trying to persuade other countries that they should have an international tribunal here in this northeastern part of Syria and been able to go to a couple of the camps where they're holding foreign his wills Iraqi. And Syrian ISIS families, and I've also been able to speak to one of the foreign fighters. Those foreign fighters have been apprehended by Kurds and the US coalition the US led coalition in many cases, they've been in US detention in Syria detention centers, actually, run by the US, and now handed over back to Kurdish forces, do you have a sense of what kind of numbers we're talking about in terms of the ISIS fighters currently being held by the codes. And that's all of the Iraqi Syrian and foreign there are said to be about seven thousand of them. So that is mostly Syrian and Iraqi about a thousand of them eight hundred two thousand or said to be foreign fighters accused foreign fighters, we have to make clear that they haven't actually been tried or convicted yet, but they are suspected to be foreign fighters. So that's all the way up from eight hundred to about a thousand is the estimate you generally get from US military officials as wills occurred. In what sense you able to get a what kind of conditions that being held in? Well, compared to what they came from which was almost certain death as US air strikes in waters attacked the last bit of their territory. It's, you know, not bad the conditions of interviewing these fighters preclude either asking for getting detailed answers about how they're being held in where they're being held. But one of the ones that I interviewed he was a Canadian fighter had been held in solitary confinement for quite a while. He also said that he was having trouble getting medical care. Clearly was well enough to do an interview. But certainly medical care seems to be an issue, but having said that, you know, having covered this battle against ISIS the war against ISIS over the entire ISIS territory. It's much better than the fate that befell a lot of them which was basically being obliterated by air. Yikes. Mortars and in other cities, if we boil this entire story for the moment down to this one Canadian fighter. What sense were you able to get all of his views on gun to assume it was a he his views on now on the subject of the ideology. He joined up to fight fo did you get the sensitize east had much in the way of a rethink? Yeah. Pretty much all of them have. And this was really interesting because I found this as well. In the case of the women who were married to ISIS fighters. They have now been for several months at least in detention with either Kurds or Americans, this particular foreign fighter told me that you know, he'd had a lot of time to think, but not only that he'd had a lot of interactions with the Americans who interrogated him and with the people who are holding him and with the Kurds. He said, for instance, but one point the Americans had given him novels to read one of the women. I spoke with told me that she had. Been aware. And I'm not sure if this is true, but she said she hadn't been aware of that ISIS held slaves. You know, they took thousands of UCD's from the tiny ziti religious minority as slaves massacred, the men and took the women and girls as sex slaves. She said she'd never met one until one of them was brought to the detention center to talk to them. And she said, and that's when I realized it was true. It wasn't just rumors. What they did to these women. So yes, in many cases, certainly in the case of this Canadian fighter. I it seems to have had an impact another foreign woman who is married to ISIS fighters told me that she was happy that she wasn't sent straight back to her country. She was from the Netherlands, and she said had she been sent back. She would still have been radicalized. But as it was her views of changed a lot. She said in being held for months and months by the Kurds because the biggest question, I guess the overarching question that we're looking at in this episode is with the ideology. Of ISIS will survive the destruction of the caliphate that the whole selling point of Islam state, and there was a clue in the name was that it had conquered territory. It was building a nation. It was building a homeland. If it is seen to have filed in that central enterprise. Do you think it's still going to be able to recruit people who might be inclined towards jihad? Or is it you'll sense from talking to the people you just mentioned that they kind of starting to realize that they might have back to lose a well there are a couple of things here. One is that in terms of ISIS being able to recreate a territory the caliphate had held which ranged for seventy thousand square kilometres, roughly and encompassed major cities. No one really believes they'll be able to do that. Again. In part of the reason, it's very apparent in Iraq. For instance, the people of Mosul, which is the second biggest city in Iraq. At first, many of them will tell you. They welcomed. Isis five years ago when ISIS came in because they so hated the Iraqi government and security forces, and then they realized what ISIS actually was which was indescribably brutal. The also they will not make that mistake. Again. They know what ISIS is now they know the dangers. But having said that there is a real fear that there is another ISIS in the making because we're talking about roughly in the case of Iraq thirty thousand members of ISIS families. Now a lot of those are children. So let's leave aside the children because children are children. But if you take the adults in those families, the women, for instance, a lot of them do still believe in the ideology, there is nothing that has changed their minds since then as for the foreigners. You know, a story I hear over and over and talking particularly to these foreign women is I didn't know what I was getting into. I don't understand Syria. I married. The sky might boyfriend told me to come. So those ones seemed to have had an awakening. And those are certainly the ones that want you to know they've had an awakening the, you know, I think we also have to realize that there are lots of those people in detention in these camps who are not talking to us because they believe were infidels because they still believe in the ideology and in the coun- recently in L hall camp, which now has more than seventy thousand people in it in northeastern Syria, some of the people running the camp told me that there are new arrivals all the time. And it's those new arrivals who are the most still radicalized that they've been saying in some cases that the head of ISIS abo- becquerel daddy ordered them to come to the camp that they will stay in the camp. But then Baghdadi and ISIS will take them out of the camp. So there is no one who does not believe that ISIS is still a threat those ones who will. Speak to you. Then what do they want to happen now, especially the ones who have come from outside, Iraq and Syria have the old discovered. A sudden enthusiasm for democratic G prosise. Yes. Well. It depends where they come from. So there was a group of women. I met Dutch women they want to go back. And some of them said we understand we broke the law. We want to stand trial. But it's our children were worried about they wanted their children to be handed over to their relatives. In many cases. These are very small children toddlers, really young the others. It depends again depends entirely where they come from a I met quite a few women from eastern Europe. And there was a Chinese woman. They are all terrified of being sent back to their countries because they believe they would be executed not only that they're even afraid to contact their relatives because even by contacting their relatives their relatives would end up in jail. They say so the ones who come from western countries tend to want to be sent back there. But as you know, the problem is these countries don't want to take them. They don't want to take them mostly for two reasons. One is it's really not clear how much evidence would carry over. If they were to stand trial in their own countries. And then the other thing is they could actually pose a danger if they can't be put on trial. They can't be prosecuted for things they may have done here. Then they will have to let them go, and they will be free in their own countries. So it's a dilemma you mentioned that there is some enthusiasm among the Syrian Kurdish leadership for the idea of an international tribunal have they talked at all about what they see as the scope of that they can't realistically intend to put tens of thousands of people on trial on the they can't know and by its very nature and international tribunal would have to be set up by the international community. And there isn't a whole lot of appetite for that for one thing the Kurdish leadership here is not internationally recognised. That's a big deal. And then these things will take years and years. There has been a move to send some of these fighters in any case from countries that don't want the. Back to Iraq and Iraq can prosecute them. If they've also been in Iraq because a lot of these fighters did come from Iraq from Mosul the foreign fighters, even when they were driven out of Mosul, they came to Syria, so they could be prosecuted in Iraq. Now, the problem there is those are not transparent trials, they're not run, according to international standards, and in a lot of cases, they do end up with the death penalty. That's one thing that the Kurds keep saying if you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death

Iraq Syria Isis United States Mosul Iraqi Syrian Europe Syria. Dirac Austria NPR Iraqi Government Al-Qaeda Jane UCD Andrew Miller Netherlands Eastern Europe L Hall
Iran's Rouhani in Iraq for 'historic' visit to offset US sanctions

Pacifica Evening News

02:13 min | 4 years ago

Iran's Rouhani in Iraq for 'historic' visit to offset US sanctions

"Orion, president Hassan Rohani was in Baghdad today making his first official visit to the nation that Tehran wants fought a bloody war against and later back in the battle with the Islamic state group since Rohani's election in two thousand thirteen Iraq has relied on Iranian paramilitary support to fight ISIS following the militant groups capture of the Iraqi city of Mosul and other territory in both Iraq and Syria now with the militants facing a final territorial defeat in the Syrian village of boggles. Iran is looking for Iraq's continued support as it faces a maximum pressure campaign by President Trump after his decision to withdraw America from Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers. Simon marks. Sports. Iranian. President asandra Hani is making his first ever trip during his tenure as the country's leader to Baghdad. His meeting with the Iraqi President bomb. Sally will focus on both trade relations and US sanctions on Iran. The two issues deeply intertwined because Iraq is not guaranteed continuing exemption from US sanctions and later this month. The Trump administration must make that decision following Washington's withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal. It's an opportunity for Iran to show. It's not in fact analyst Bob McMahon with a New York-based Council on foreign relations says the Iraqis want to maintain access to Iranian oil supplies. These are sanctions that especially you're going after Iran's energy sector. Iraq relies heavily on that sector. They would like to continue to purchase a running gas at least for another year, they've talked openly about going around the US dollar denominated transactions in some other way that would allow them to do trade that would not come under some sort of financial restrictions have been imposed by. In these snapback sanctions. There's lots of things that countries do trade and already it would like to trade more in agriculture, for example, this is the highest level. Visit these two countries since President Trump come recently that the US would like to keep its forces in Iraq, quote, unquote. See what's going on in Iran next door that intervention by President Trump worried many Iraqis who rejects the idea that the country should be used as a US listening post in the

Iraq Iran President Trump United States President Asandra Hani Baghdad Tehran Hassan Rohani Simon Marks Mosul Syria Bob Mcmahon America Sally Official New York-Based Council Washington Analyst