35 Burst results for "Mosul"

Christians Are Being Persecuted and Driven out of the Middle East

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Christians Are Being Persecuted and Driven out of the Middle East

"Talk to us about the situation in the middle east the flip side of the global war on terror that really isn't adequately discussed either. What has happened in syria. In in other parts of the middle east like iraq in the last twenty years since september the eleventh at the tarnow the twentieth century across the middle east we had approximately twenty plus percent christians that were living in various pockets. Lebanon has right now per capita the largest christian community but you had him living in iraq. You had him living in syria In turkey and whatnot well as we progress through the twentieth century with the various wars and the uptake. In some of these terror groups christians began to leave and larger numbers Since the war in syria for example in two thousand eleven when it started there were three million christians living inside syria. Today we have less than two hundred fifty thousand take iraq for example in mosul. You have the tomb of jonah. The prophet joan on you have to of the minor prophets name. All of a planes is well known in the bible. So these are all old jewish and christian lands and Christians are being driven out Left and right not only by sunni radicals but also by shiite radicals why because iran wants controlled. They want that fertile crescent. Go an open door from modern day. Iran in through iraq syria all the way out lebanon. So in this in this divide you've got a sunni shia clashes and and and in these clashes. Not only. are they fighting each other. But they're also pushing the christians out. The christians always take the brunt of everything

Syria Middle East Iraq Lebanon Turkey Mosul Jonah Joan Iran
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:36 min | 3 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Get tough. Hard on you expect Was there any discussion after he was killed about your policy on changing people's voices see, like We? We don't We don't force things on people. And we know people when when they took the risk and used to call the station. They were proud of doing it. They felt they were delivering the hardship they are going through with their real voices. Did you think you got any change in your callers after what happened to see more any more or less colors? Like all the statistics I got, we start receiving more calls from Mosul. It was a very big deal like Seymour, one colour of Al Ghad radio. And people start telling like we are all Seymour. So if they they killed once you more we have thousands of whom who are still in Mosul and who are still capable Actually, Mohammed says. Every time things got harder, scarier, more violent. The number of callers would increase. Oh, statistics of 15. Most of the text messages was and they're very tough situations. We used to get more cold when their walls fighting and people didn't just want to talk about dash and death and devastation they wanted to talk about. Music and art life. Topics. People are interested in.

Mohammed Seymour 15 Al Ghad thousands Mosul one colour
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Different program, called The Ashram is an Islamic World. Havana But saying Dash R. But the program asked listeners to call in to discuss seriously the religious and philosophical justifications used by dash because by then most of the scholars Where is scared to even address these problems? There was one caller to the show who stood out. We had a caller. Who used to have a different story. And yes, you can listen to. He used to call the radio station and he was different. He had a great sense of humor. Try to make fun of dash many times In many occasions. He was one of the people who refused us of changing his voice in real time, he said. Many times. Many of my family members asked me to stop calling the station just for my security, but I refuse to mascot some big This is him. Seymour. If you listen closely, you can hear him say the words. Telephone and radio. You We only have Roger Seymour had not left his house since Mosul fell to dash. So imagine a person who who didn't left his house for two years because he was afraid from dash. One time he called the station and we were asking the people a question. What do you think think that people will need after being liberated? He came up with a very different answer. He said Mosul will need a sanitizer a sanitizer to clean the streets from what was left from dash. And the presenter loved and some callers called after that, and you know they were laughing too. What? We didn't know that dash. We're recording in real time recording that call. Seymour called all the time until he didn't Mohammed didn't hear from him for a week and then two weeks and.

Roger Seymour Mohammed Seymour two years two weeks Mosul one one caller Islamic a week Havana One The Ashram
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 3 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up with a different program called the National Museum in Islam in Havana. But saying dash are buttons. The program asked listeners to call in to discuss seriously the religious and philosophical justifications used by dash because by then most of the scholars Where is scared to even address these problems? There was one caller to the show who stood out. We had a caller. Who used to have a different story. And also, finally until he used to call the radio station and he was different. He had a great sense of humor. Try to make fun of dash many times In many occasions. He was one of the people who refused us of changing his voice in real time, he said. Many times. Many of my family members asked me to stop calling the station just for my security, but I refuse to mascots and that this is him. Seymour. If you listen closely, you can hear him. Say the words. Telephone and radio. You We only have around your Roger. Seymour had not left his house since Mosul fell to dash. So imagine a person who who didn't left his house for two years because he was afraid from dash. One time he called the station and we were asking the people a question. What do you think think that people will need after being liberated? He came up with a very different answer. He said Mosul will need a sanitizer a sanitizer to clean the streets from what was left from dash. And the presenter loved and some callers called after that, and you know they were laughing too. What? We didn't know that dash. We're recording in real time recording that call. Seymour called all the time until he didn't Mohammed didn't hear from him for a week and then two weeks.

Seymour Mohammed two years two weeks Havana Mosul Roger one one caller National Museum in Islam a week One time people
Giants’ Gregory Santos Suspended 80 Games for Performance-Enhancing Drug Use

Chip Franklin

00:24 sec | 3 months ago

Giants’ Gregory Santos Suspended 80 Games for Performance-Enhancing Drug Use

"San Francisco Giants pitcher Gregory Santo suspended for 80 games without pay under Major League baseball's drug program following a positive test for stanozolol. Mosul All is a synthetic steroid derived from testosterone that has anabolic and androgenic properties. 21 year old Santos will lose about half of his salary. It pays for plays for both the Giants and the Triple A river Cats.

Gregory Santo Giants Major League San Francisco Mosul Baseball Santos
Pope Francis condemns ISIS terrorism in Iraq visit

Doug Stephan

00:33 sec | 8 months ago

Pope Francis condemns ISIS terrorism in Iraq visit

"A large open air mass camp Pope Francis's historic trip to Iraq calling for peace and unity in Mosul. It's where I will back around back, Daddy declared the caliphate of Isis and he threatened We will occupy Rome. But instead on an historic day Rome the pope came to Mosul on the pilgrimage of peace. The ruins of four churches occupied by Isis. He made an urgent plea for coexistence, praying for the souls of the thousands and thousands killed in the city, ABC Easy and Panel

Pope Francis Mosul Rome Iraq Daddy ABC
Pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

Ric Edelman

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

Pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

"If their work is subpar. Pope Francis concluded his historic visit to Iraq with a message of hope, forgiveness and rebuilding during an open Air mass in Erbil. Pope Francis calling for harmonious co existence from Mosul, the Iraqi city tourney asunder by the Islamic state's violent fanaticism framed by the ruins of four churches destroyed by Isis. The pope lamented the thousands of Muslims, Christians and Yazidis killed by extremists. Standing on a red stage but dressed all in white, the symbolic color of purity and benevolence, the pope said. Fraternity is more durable than frat, Rasyid

Pope Francis Erbil Mosul Iraq Pope Rasyid
Where IS ruled, pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

Where IS ruled, pope calls on Christians to forgive, rebuild

"Francis concluded his historic visit to Iraq with a message of hope, forgiveness and rebuilding during an open Air mass in Erbil. Pope Francis calling for harmonious co existence from Mosul, the Iraqi city tourney asunder by the Islamic state's violent fanaticism framed by the ruins of four churches destroyed by Isis. The pope lamented the thousands of Muslims, Christians and Yazidis killed by extremists. Standing on a red stage but dressed all in white, the symbolic color of purity and benevolence, the pope said. Fraternity is more durable than fracture aside, Hope more powerful than hatred.

Pope Francis Erbil Francis Mosul Iraq Pope
Pope's risky Iraq trip aims to boost Christians

The World and Everything In It

01:00 min | 8 months ago

Pope's risky Iraq trip aims to boost Christians

"Iraq is preparing for a first ever papal visit at the end of the week. Despite security and pandemic concerns pope francis will arrive on friday and stay for four days. He called the trip important for encouraging the country's christian communities among the oldest in the world. Louis raphael sako heads. The chaldean catholic church christians who encouraged to positive to stay here and also to build the trust with their neighbors. The pope will visit several major cities including baghdad erbil and mosul officials in the nivea planes a working to find an air venue for him to hold mass because the area does not have a cathedral or stadium large enough. Many of the country's churches remain in ruins after isis attacks. That's this week's wall tour. I'm when ezio he carry in abuja. Nigeria

Pope Francis Louis Raphael Sako Chaldean Catholic Church Iraq Mosul Baghdad Ezio Abuja Nigeria
"mosul" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:20 min | 10 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Okay, so we're gonna talk about that later on in the show is how to build a defense game plan. So you know what? Jack? Most shows would stop right there. Mosul's that say, You know what if we did just that we have Dunmore than our listening audience could possibly want from a financial show? Somebody stop me. Don't you dare stop me because on this show, do we stop right there? No, we don't. We boldly go where No financial show has gone before and therefore at about 10 till we will have our estate tip of the week And that's the part of the show. We talk about how to pass on to your greedy, unwashed undeserving ares the fruits of your labor. And that's called a state planning. And this week we're going to talk about, you know, a pretty basic thing, but one that I think is probably the most common mistake that people make. And that is we're gonna talk about reviewing your beneficiary designations. Okay, So what I'm talking about there is on your IRAs and your 41 case and all And you will even you know, Beneficiary designations is something that you should visit and I'm gonna tell a story that will, I think illustrate the importance of that very Dramatically. So we'll have that for you at about 10 tails. So we have a fantastic show. I hope you'll stay tuned for the entire program. I gotta tell you something quick, though I'm bachelor ring it right now. My wife eyes off with my youngest daughter, who fortunately has a job and she starts her new career and s O Mom is helping her move into her apartment. And you know where it is. Washington, D C Yes, in the middle of all the stuff that's going on in Washington. Right now, That's where they're headed, and s so they're going to be there on Monday, getting her moved in. She has an apartment with two other girls. I should say women on de so she's starting off her career. And, you know, we kind of told her we'd rather she didn't with the pandemic and all the You know the stuff that's going on in Washington right now, and she's like, no, I want to start my life. It's time I'm going. So Mom is going to get her moved in. In the meantime, I have to feed the stupid cats. And I'm a dog person. But we've got old cats. So we got ear infections. We've got thyroid pills. We gotta give him got to put it in their food. And oh, my gosh. And and then the litter box. Don't even get me started with the litter box. So Oh, my gosh. I would rather I don't know. But anyway, that's what it is. So let's talk about my fearless forecast. And so I'll just say it right now. But the fearless forecast for this year is 35,000 on the Dow on by the reason for that is, I think that with the vaccine with the stimulus package, we're gonna have an economy on steroids. And I've been talking about this and previous shows. So you know you can listen to the those for my logic behind all of that. But this year FEARLESS forecast Dow 35,000 of my fearless forecast is basically the highest point for the year. It's not the year ending value. It's the highest point for the year. Now. Last year, my fearless forecast was 31,000 on the Dow. And of course it hit 30,600. So I was 400 points off in 2019. I did not have a fearless forecast. I just didn't decide doesn't didn't do one Latin in 2019. But in 2018 my fearless forecast was for the Dow to be a 26,500. And it actually hit that my fearless forecast in 2017 was 25,000 and it hit 24,800 on de so now in 2016. I missed big. I saw a bear market that year and I saw the Dow hitting 11,500 didn't and made 16,000 in 2015. I saw the Dow with 19,000. It hit 18,300 s O close and in 2014. I said the Dow would hit 18,000 and and the last day of the year it hit the 18,000 and in 2013 I said 16,000, and it did that so out of the last seven years, my fearless forecast was pretty accurate except for one year. On. So this year 35,000 on the Dow. So what does that mean to you? Well, I see a lot of opportunity, but at the same time there is a lot of risk. You know, The market has had a tremendous run here over the last three months, and so it is possible we could have a correction. Certainly. I also am concerned about the fact that we could see stimulus, not work. The pandemic turned for the worst. You know who knows what could happen and so, therefore having a defensive strategy to protect you, you know, growth with protection is what we believe you should have. And so are investing. Protect strategy actually told us to sell in November of 2007 and to protect against everything that happened in 2000 and eight on with the markets, the S and P And all of that, And those that follow our advice didn't experience that kind of those kind of losses. So if you're over 50 if you are retired or retiring soon now is the time to sit down and develop your plan. And I'd like to encourage you to go to our website. It's our P O a calm.

Dow Washington The market Mosul Jack Dunmore thyroid pills
Vatican: Pope to visit Iraq in March, pandemic permitting

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Vatican: Pope to visit Iraq in March, pandemic permitting

"The Vatican says pope Francis will make a pilgrimage to Iraq in March pandemic conditions permitting that's unspoken Matteo Brunei has announced Francis will make the March five to eight visit with stops in Baghdad on the plains of a link to the memory of Abraham the biblical patriarch as well as to the cities of Irbil on Mosul Brunei says the troops schedule will take into consideration the yvolution of the worldwide health emergency that could be nineteen pandemic has created it to be the first trip abroad for the eighty three year old pontiff since November twenty nineteen when he visited Thailand and Japan I'm Charles the last month

Pope Francis Brunei Irbil Matteo Vatican Iraq Francis Baghdad Mosul Abraham Thailand Japan Charles
"mosul" Discussed on Insureblocks

Insureblocks

04:08 min | 11 months ago

"mosul" Discussed on Insureblocks

"I am happy to send my day to in reality you would rely on. A third party will determine we expect these these funds two officers but is this program is an algorithm. I'm comfortable sending my day to and if the answer is yes then you do so because you quite right here. Why could upload all coach switches computer that they can't see i could wreak absolute have Killing and i know it's kind of Perhaps similar to those you know The iphone eight to secure a platform. We know the quality as you can be done but still within within an apple environment. And then as soon as i came on you had jailbreakers which can came an unlock. The phone is there some Relevance to confidential computing in that example. Yet perfect example. Say you right at the hotel them iphones. they like. they actually use the same time. the the implementations of confidential computing techniques in iphones and i suspect most enjoyed funds as well and the underway as as all technology. It's penalty if the first iteration of it. How books is is one. As they discovered they get fixed apples being on that journey as have the funds. We walk intel. sgx is technology. We depend on an famously It had it had various programs. Describe it in it over. Previous which kind of inevitable with a new technology and progressive progressively discovered fixed patch. That's how technology gets better mosul. But but back to the iphone example. You quite right. Because you know when i was giving the example about of you control the computer. If you own it it you can do what you like. But the iphone is a perfect example of why that's not true. You can install apps you can do things but you can't change the operating system you know you unless you're very lucky these days you can't jailbreak. Because guess what..

apple mosul
National Native American Veterans Memorial opens in Washington, DC

Morning Edition

03:46 min | 1 year ago

National Native American Veterans Memorial opens in Washington, DC

"Opens today on the National Mall in Washington, D C. It's the Native American Veterans Memorial. Native Americans have served in the armed forces in high numbers for more than a century. This is the first memorial to honor that service. Here's NPR's Quil Lawrence. The memorial is simple. A steel circle elevated over carved stone drum. It sits in the shade of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Kevin Go over, is a member of the Pawnee Nation and the museum's director. It's an article of faith in Indian country that Native American serve at a greater rate than basically any other group. So we wish for this to be a sacred place, not just for Native America. But for all Americans. The opening ceremony went virtual because of the pandemic. But here are a few of the people go over hopes will one day attend and sanctify the site. My name is Marcel Grande La Bull. And I'm from the two kettle ban of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. You know? I'm 101 years old. No in 1940 for Marcela Lobo was a surgical nurse at an Army hospital during the battle of the Bulge Well, In December. I believe it was 1/16 of December. The Germans overtook the American soldiers. They wondered about putting in a hospital so close to the front lines, but they did. So we were there in leisure. And we had both funds night and day. At the time of the breaks through the growth of the bulge. Lobo says her own community always honored her military service. Now the memorial in Washington means the whole country conduce this same to be AH, thought like it was a great honor. My ancestors were warriors. I'm related to rein in the face who fought in the battle of the little big horn or greasy grass that they called it. My father was a Spanish American war veteran. My brother oldest brother was a veteran all down the line. But some native vets aren't as aware of their own family service. Yeah, my name is Colonel Wayne Don don has served 27 years in the army, including Bosnia and Afghanistan. You know, for a lot of years, I thought I was a first generation military person came to find out is both of my grandfather and uncles. And served in a territorial guard during World War two. That was an emotional discovery for dawn and a complicated one not just native Americans, but on the other minority groups, ultimately that they chose to serve to represent their people. And also to serve a country that this, you know, sometimes. Didn't have AH would've proved to be their best interests in mind, but they're still still did it, He says. Now that the country is wrestling with questions about racial justice, he hopes the memorial can play a part. Army vet Allan Ho feels the same. He's native Hawaiian saw combat in Vietnam. Then his two sons served after 9 11, his oldest son. Nine. No. Ho was killed in Iraq and he wass Credible young man. He was an officer, platoon leader, and he was killed in 25 in Mosul, Iraq. His younger brother's the staff sergeant. His name is Locke or And the meaning for a knock or is a warrior who is brave and courageous. Those are the stories of service and sacrifice. He wants Americans to hear it. The new memorial for native visitors, Ho wants it to be a validation and an inspiration. And then perhaps, who knows? Maybe some young Native son who experiences that memorial for this first time, we'll be in 50 years from now he'll be that the president of the United States who knows Quil Lawrence NPR news

Native American Veterans Memor Quil Lawrence Smithsonian National Museum Kevin Go Pawnee Nation Marcel Grande La Bull Marcela Lobo National Mall Native America Cheyenne River Washington Army Hospital Colonel Wayne Don Don NPR Lobo Allan Ho Army
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is an Iraqi state TV interview with the wounded Isis fighter at the center of the Gallagher trial. He's lying on the ground and his head is thrown back, He says. He's 17 years old. He's wearing a black tank top and he's so thin. His arms were like sticks. There's a bloody bandage around his leg. He sedated but lucid. He says he joined Isis because they praised says his father beat him to try to prevent him from joining Iraqi forces handed him over to Navy seal medics to treat him shortly after he was dead, there's breaking news. There's a verdict now in the trial of a Navy seal accused of murder in the stabbing of an Isis detainee I want. Eddie Gallagher was acquitted in the military trial after one of his men confessed to killing The prisoner himself. Then President Trump Pardon Gallagher of his soul conviction of posing with a dead body. The Navy seal who said he killed him, was under immunity and walked free. Amid months and months of coverage of the trial. The Iraqi teenager at the center of it was almost never talked to vote. His name never released. The military has kept court records sealed. There's no autopsy done because his body was left there and then dumped in a mass grave with other Isis dead After searching for him in Mosul, we finally tracked his name down through Iraqi security sources. It's salad Jamal Abdullah and in small town about 30 miles south of Mosul. We found his family Dulles father, Jamal Abdel Nasser, was an Iraqi intelligence officer and Saddam Hussein is time. Career that included a posting at the Iraqi Embassy in Malaysia. Now he works in a small grocery.

President Trump Pardon Gallagh Iraqi Embassy Saddam Hussein Navy Jamal Abdel Nasser Isis Jamal Abdullah Mosul Dulles murder Malaysia officer
Mumm Napa Brut Prestige Review

The CheapWineFinder Podcast

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Mumm Napa Brut Prestige Review

"It's David again from cheap wine by the.com. The other wine review that we put on the cheap wine fiber.com website and I noticed lately though. I'm kind of going upscale. Everything is Bordeaux or Napa or Rushing River and well, I kind of did that again? Let me grab the bottle and see what we got here. It's it's not expensive. But it it's Mom Napa Brut Prestige and sparkling wine from Champagne house in France, but they've been in Napa since the seventies so it's fifty years. It's been a long time. It's half half 45% Chardonnay 45% Pinot Noir and the rest is a little bit of a mix of you know, greed. It's just you know, Greenfield a green show your same thing. And what was the other one, you know, what a you know, what is the the hidden grape & in Champaign? It's in all the champagne. You don't know it. So there you go, and it's from Napa and it's one of the kind of weird things because this is a Napa sparkling wine and not a French champagne. Normally when you drink Snapple why that's oh it's Napa except when champagne and then it's oh, it's Napa off cuz it's not you. Hey, we're gonna go get into that because I think that's wrong. So what we have here is like I said, it's a little bit of a dead. Grapes that are approved of champagne right here is a couple of other groups really get used aren't here but it's got the main ones they use 45 different growers in Nampa all day from parts for the line and that's really typical. They make champagne. I know one of the leading Champagnes, you know, the uses a hundred different Growers to Champaign most champagne house and then champagne don't really have much Vineyard Holdings. They they contract long-term contracts for all other groups. And you know, that's how they do it. That's how they're doing it. That's how I am doing it here. I know it's like they've been the emphasis 1970 and they've been in Champaign since like 1827 or something. So these are people know what they're doing. They brought them know how to California even though like most of the American sparkling wine bubbly houses the schramsberg Gloria Ferrer Iron Horse are Sonoma. I guess there's some up in age, you know, they bring their expertise to Napa and this is a year and half second fermentation year and half the first fermentation is in mosul stainless steel and then they put some of it in French Oak barrels to give it that kind of thing going that they blend in. I mean the other surprise champagne house all Out their style ahm how Styles there's the first fermentation for the most part was where all the tricks are. There's just there the little bit of folk a little bit of stainless steel and all the other things had picked their drapes and all that are all in there. So you're getting a real bump style especially after fifty years and now but I mean, they they've come to get their own state of Mississippi cuz in my hand here, I mean, they probably get me a maid came with the French style. They probably created some Napa style go along with it. And here's what I have to say. Very expensive champagnes are Sublime. They're just crazy of every you ever get to drink it. But which I do every once awhile, you know, sometimes our ten years in bottle. I mean and they're so the spinach ten years needs in the bottle and they have all these exotic production techniques and these things are crazy expensive and just crazy delicious, but they're regular ones are kind of reachable this thing. I found out I think Seventeen or eighteen dollars Napa Brut Prestige Brutus, not too sweet. You are not miss out from Champagne. I mean in a blind tasting most people unless there's champagne had know these things. Most people wouldn't know the difference and this is Anna like half the price unless off. I mean, they'll be cheaper come December when all the champagne zor sa land they'd probably make after sales but you know regular time $18 for what is an excellent choice. It's delicious. It's balance is pretty good at this you wouldn't know the difference. So just because it doesn't have champagne or label has Napa who how bad could it be that has Napa on the label.

Napa Mom Napa Brut Prestige Champaign Rushing River David France Mississippi Anna California Vineyard Holdings French Oak Sonoma Mosul
"mosul" Discussed on Pig & Whistle - Tales from Azeroth

Pig & Whistle - Tales from Azeroth

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on Pig & Whistle - Tales from Azeroth

"Then not invisible. They all that you just go to open your more. Look for them in a bit tougher in the crowd of shit pretty much but again there's so many different categories that you can go into with people with while there's so many subsections as so many big solve points that you can make about each type of person that it would take so long to go over the mobile. These are kind of the bigger ones. So you've the annoying people. The complete opposite of friendly people. The gangster dispel the smaller kinda just smaller than the big ones. Three big ones. The ppp off pay so they kind of deserve the road so of fourth place medal. You know just stick on their chest you know where pride. Congratulations want something in their life. These gang spellers. But today i've allow plans in terms of grubbing the cost and i do want to about how you could help without so we've salibi picking mosul patriots on and it can be very tough to sort of combine money nowadays anything that you have spare the you would like to contribute and help grow. The pocar step would be greatly appreciated. Now i will not deny the puck. 'cause they will always be there for your entertainment no matter what you do not have to pay a penny to listen to these podcasts. There if you happen to go that extra mile there will be some benefit with regard to extra podcast hints and tips swans and things many perks towards that helping out process and it will allow me to grow the podcast and you know bring together. A community is what i'm hoping to do in the near future of minded people who play house you can solve meet these over friendly and friendly people within the game get to know each other and just have fun playing the game. The sun many people have loved. I love myself but again it would be just be greatly appreciated if anything could be said. The patron link is www dot patriots dot com forward slash pig and west..

mosul
"mosul" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on KTOK

"They'll do the Knicks check. It's called, and so all the paperwork is illegal. Everything's perfectly not trying to get around the law or anything, and that may help you find it. But you mentioned Mossberg. Mossberg makes really nice home defense shotguns, and they're not terribly expensive. A Mossberg pump. Eyes a great choice. They last forever. The one thing I'm going to suggest this may sound Unnecessary at first. But when you get this Please try to find a class somewhere that there's a specific shotgun defensive class because there are Ways to use things you could do is go like ours asked the question. Do you know if you should be moving into the house with your barrel, up or down? One's much better than the other. Most people have no idea. Let me just tell you why. If you if you go around a corner with your Mosul up If there's somebody on the other side, all the afternoons grabbed the gun grabbed the barrel of the gun. You can't bring that barrel down to point at him to shoot him. Does that make sense? Yes, Okay. But if you have the gun low going around corners If somebody's around the corner and grabs the barrel of the gun, you could drop down to 1 may and shoot them in the kneecap, which generally gets their attention to make someone let go. I know, And it's that kind of thing. Where you thinking? Well, I never thought of that. That's why we go to these classes because we work with these firearms trainers who do nothing but think of those kind of things. They work with the stuff. I think you're on a pretty good track. See if you can find a good pump Shotgun if it's not a Mossberg, somebody else's private 18 inch barrel. With a set of.

Mossberg Knicks Mosul
Minorities under attack as PM pushes 'tolerant' Pakistan

Hugh Hewitt

00:09 sec | 1 year ago

Minorities under attack as PM pushes 'tolerant' Pakistan

"On a tough month for religious minorities in Pakistan. Latest incident to Christian gunned down because he rented in Mosul neighborhood in northwest the shower.

Pakistan Mosul
Discipline and Determination

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

07:24 min | 1 year ago

Discipline and Determination

"First of all let me just say thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us. I certainly do appreciate it. Thank you for having me. I appreciate you having that the second thing I like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that. Many feel free to go all the way back to when Benny I started all as you can start more current day. Tell us about yourself born and raised in Detroit. Michigan will actually outside Detroit. You know a couple of years from places to Middle School. And Grosse Pointe Mosul elementaries who rose point in moved out the Southfield and went to Detroit Country Day high school where I played three sports basketball for a ranch ride one to eight inches and buy raw and one in track championship. Long Jumper graduated from there might style ship offers to play for Bond College and chose to go to Michigan State University. Where but there for five years by four years leading receiver on in junior and senior there on the Rose Bowl in twenty thirteen one of the best teams initials state history when we went thirteen one. Nedley to seminated professionally. That did not get drafted. I'm currently wanted to my season in the NFL won the Super Bowl and Denver in two thousand sixteen play my first four years in Denver for the last two years. I've played in New York last as Peyton Manning. The plane would be lamenting though nine and author. And you know that's just a little bit about me. I am a brother team. Want rather than two. I have two parents and step mom so I had a great people around me and I've been able to do things in my life with the help is a family friend fantastic. I don't even know where to start. We're GONNA take a quick left turn and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do now for you? I'm going to say outside of football. I enjoy things. I enjoy travelling. Recently you know taking a couple of trips to Mexico I would agrees go to. La Lived in New York to travel. Highlights been time with family and friends love being around my friends and you know guys that I played with friendships that I've grown throughout the year. I do enjoy reading. That's why also why I wrote a book enjoy learning from April. I and I really movie out will love data. What's your favorite movie right? Now I would say green book. I really like an movie of all time. You know you got any denzel movie really this one. The greatest actors of all time so American gangster within her faith a thousand disgrace got it so talk a little bit about your journey because a lot of times when people think about athletes we all understand how hard it is and how you have to be disciplined and Yadda Yadda Yadda talk a little bit. About what it takes to be successful not just athletically but in general you gotta work hard wood. I'd like to tell people is that success doesn't happen in a day. It happens every single day. When you say you have to be disciplined after that the right at the set goals that you really want to achieve like a new one to be a professional athlete. I didn't know if it was going to be for baller basketball but every single day like I was working towards that and our talented anybody out there. Yes be disciplined is very important but being persistent stand persisted toward your goal like Adobe Wall Time It took me twenty two years and come a pro athlete. Isn't that something happened overnight or happened. After a couple years at Michigan state not had been working for this pretty much. Whole Life. Now always consciously gone toward something but once. I started at Age Fourteen. Fifteen years old like all right. I WANNA be a professional athlete. I'm working towards that every single day. So success doesn't happen in a day. It happened every single day goal. Said you gotTA break in long-term goals down to your short term goals and your short term goals in T- long-term wills data. Thanks this so talk a little bit about your book. Why a book reflection reflection of where I met in my life and that things that I've been able to accomplish as a team as an individual and also the people that have been arrived around so great players and I've learned a lot of grey base of why not share those things with the world. Does I know with certain books have done for me in my life. And that's why I wrote one and why not inspired me. So that's why I'm so when people pick up and read it. What are they gonNA take away from it? This is like a self help. Books like self actualize books. And they're going to realize that they have all the power in everything that they have that they want to achieve their goals or dreams right inside a woman. They'll just Meyer Goldberg from a semis stories. But some of the people that I have in the book like my brother or Draymond Green Dr Quiz demarcus ware also has some fringe were entrepreneurs or in the book as well because connected. One person in the world is Allie. I want them to also learn from friends who still have the same doubts fears and insecurities still were able to overcome those things. There are ups and downs in life if you really want something. You're going to have to stay precision discipline and go after it. And that's what I just want be learning. I want people to take away from it. Give us some insight on one of the time because I know I'm in a season and in time in my life where I have had the thought. Okay I want to give up. I don't WanNa to do this anymore. What about you have you ever had a time in your life or in your career where you wanted to give up? You wanted to quit. But you didn't and help US UNDERSTAND. What made you continue on? I don't think I ever wanted to give quit. I would always tell myself dot to give up or quit in. Ireland will just know that. I would have a lot of regrets if I did give up to quit so I don't think I've had very cut moments like man. I don't WanNa feel this pain or I don't WanNa feel dizzy or fear a life. I've always told myself like you're going to regret this. If you don't go back out there or try so I don't ever want to give up but I just like everybody else. I've had my fears. That's an insecurities but I'll always tell myself. You gotta go for the asked. You knew each yourself up. If you don't get it was was one of your biggest failures if you describe it that way personally. I don't consider anything that I don't achieve as a failure but talk a little bit about some of those moments for you. What was the biggest moment in your life where he thought? Wow Man that Dingo will. I have moments like this every year but the first time. I've really felt a big failures. Probably my Richard Junior year at Michigan State. That'd be twenty twelve and I dropped. Touchdown passes on a big nationally televised game on ABC. And now that was the first time where you know they gain was really on my shoulders. I mean only happened in the first quarter. But you know you know. Lose game first quarter but I like that play could have made by different game. That was the first time night. They'll those fears and insecurities all that nervousness said. That's when I really got into understanding the mind. How strong the MY IDEAS? I can care of your mind. How IMPORTANT MODEL

Detroit Michigan State Basketball New York Michigan Denver Country Day High School Michigan State University Grosse Pointe Mosul Benny Middle School Bond College Peyton Manning Southfield NFL ABC Denzel Mexico
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The government paid about one third of those costs but that's dried up to the economic crisis and donations are down to Mosul there are eighty children in residence a gym for daily treatments classrooms and accommodate child size wheelchair doctors to levy says the center could close without additional funding it's a battle against time and and they want to go on and and I don't know how the Romans and donations can't keep up the nation can keep up because people would not the next anymore if you don't have money the home rates of the names in Lebanon it's the most vulnerable that are likely to pay the price Deborah Amos NPR news Beirut on a small farm an old truck worked hard so begins the old truck a story about a trustee pickup truck that works alongside a family on a farm after many years of service it grows tired and sits rusting in the weeks until the family's young daughter grows up and decides to bring it back to life it's written and illustrated by brothers chart and Jerome Pumphrey we do think we get along yeah there were actually four of us four brothers and we all do things together but termini whatever reason from a pretty young age of just correct in sports creatively together so it's been pretty great it's actually pretty cool we both live in the same neighborhood actually so John's about five minutes away from me and we sort of set up a studio at his house to work on this so we really do it early from his house I mean we do have disagreements with we were brothers and we don't see eye to eye on everything but for the most part when working on the book we both do both roles and it's kind of like just one person that's kind of the connection that we have we've been asking authors and illustrators how they work together or separately to bring stories to life this isn't the brothers first book together they wrote a story called creepy things are scaring me when they were teenagers but it is the first time that there illustrating a book together and they decided to do it in a unique way we used stamps to create the illustrations in the book when it was all said and done we made just over two hundred fifty stamps I was really good for collaborating you know sitting side by side we can cut out the material together or I can make a stamp Jack can create the print from it you know things like trees there's a tree on probably every spread in the book everyone of those trees had have its own stamp every time the barn appeared I was a stamp there's tractors in the in the book that was made the stamps so it was a lot of stamps and we set these roles for ourselves you know we wouldn't use the same stamp on the same spread multiple times so we had two or three trees on us brand we have to make a new stamp for every single tree on that spread in those stamps you know they had dozens and dozens of tiny little leaves on them pretty intricate but we do it just to take that care with it make sure that each spread was unique and special you know now the thing about it though a lot of rules we you can also tell in our worked as a very limited color palette they will what a colors were using eight colors and you know it's it's very easy to introduce new colors are introduced complexity but we kept resetting yeah let's just keep this simple yeah one thing in this book that a lot of people recognize right away is the trunk it's in the same place on every spread you get some pretty coal page trying to fax when you do that and it also sort of reinforce this idea that we're seeing in the world and all the changes in the world with this truck sort of be in a constant and I don't know when did we land on on doing that though I think that was definitely drums act yeah yeah I think pretty early on that's another one of these roles we were like if we could tell the story without moving the strap throughout the whole book can be pretty pretty impressive I think by doing that we were reinforcing the idea the truck being a permanent part of life on the farm and in the girl's life the little girl who grows up to run the farm and restores the old truck to its former glory was based on the women who raised Jerome and chart three we had all these women and our lives growing up my mom at grandmother's both work for the post office they put up with a lot of nonsense you know they were you know black women work in a place that is dominated by males so they were open up with a lot and one thing that relates to the farmer great grandmother she's picked cotton and she worked a long time picking cotton that making a lot of money just so she could buy her own farm they really showed us what it was like to persist in and they had some great Tom and really they can do anything they wanted to do our family actually still owns the property in Louisiana with that she bought you know she said never sell that property gets she picked a lot of cash to pay for that so we're going to have that in the family for you know the rest of our lives when her accomplishments were important to her I respect that and would like to accomplish some things in my life that I can look back on being for the crown of this sort of S. through the generations a spirit of hard work and determination sticking to it once you decide to do something overcoming the odds to make it happen it's something that we learned growing up and it's something I hope to pass on my kids that was Jared and drum Pumphrey talking about their book the old truck you're listening to weekend edition from NPR news it's KQED public radio at six thirty five nations I eat is a stand up comic with cerebral palsy.

Mosul
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And sometimes they have to use tricks with isis one day I shot the video which is one of the guys is using his own hat on a stick to throw the ISIS snipers fires to note from where that taxes guys shooting at them they didn't want to use even one bullet how did the men cope with the stress and the danger as this assault on most sold their home city went on for months and months the older stressful specially when the night was coming so going up and he told me how sick I was crying the whole night remembering his family so that when the suffering inside the city of Mosul and he couldn't reach them and said there was one of the tougher fighters were their families ultimately liberated yes their families who liberated Sigur himself personally delivered his own family and the mother collapsed cigarettes wife collapse they didn't expect that cigar will come into the house and Sigur was as first time meeting his son so it was an emotional moment it told me I was never are expecting this I was expecting the old my family will be taken by the Islamic state and they get killed because I am fighting them ultimately these forces helped re claim of Mosul and take back the city from ISIS but that was not the end of the fight for them what happened next so almost all the Iraqi troops they went home they went back to their bases but this is not the end for these guys for the swat team because they are the special forces of the local police so they still chase sleeper cells ISIS groups and they just go one rates and look for other ISIS.

assault Mosul Sigur
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This one from Mosul Iraq thank you Jane thank you you're listening to All Things Considered a tentative deal that eases trade restrictions with China it seems like right news for farmers they've been pummeled by the trade war but some farmers are concerned about the new agreement as Frank Morris of member station Casey you are reports they worry that ag exports will suffer for years and history back set up the case is gas station in sweet springs Missouri has a table unofficially reserved for farmers priests for the corn and soybeans these men grow our rice last couple days I've been out but they had took a nose dive before that so we need to make that back former time crisis is prices for grain and hogs fell hard when China imposed retaliatory tariffs in the summer of two thousand eighteen many farmers lost money last year all prices have man does but with the market facilitation alone it was it's all right market facilitation payments that's the official name for the money the trump administration gave farmers to compensate for trade losses about sixteen billion dollars in trade aid kept many farmers from losing money this year the first like John vocals Meyer don't like it I would cantons rather have a market than to have somebody give me a few dollars Kay and then brag about meantime vocals Mrs grain prices are still much lower than they were before the trade war started savings for instance were trading above ten dollars a bushel back then today there just over nine it looks good but you know we've been in this roller coaster situation now of for quite some time so as I don't think you can basically take this news to the bank Scott with an agricultural economist at the university of Illinois agrees the details are sketchy everyone's just trying to nail down exactly what has been agreed to US negotiators say that China's promised to buy at least forty billion dollars with a bag products each year that would be billions more than China has ever purchased one says this sixteen billion dollar jump in sales would be great for farmers if it actually materialize meantime he says this tentative days when agreement is at least a step in the right direction things could have gotten worse and so we for the time being have avoided that it was just this de escalation may come too late to avoid long term damage to the trading relationship from the beginning that has been a nightmare scenario is history suggests that once you break an important relationship trade wise like this it is very difficult to fully recover your market share he's talking about the history of the Russian grain embargo when the United States abruptly stopped with sales to Russia the price of wheat tank instead low for years like just about every farmer of a certain age John vocals more clearly remembers the floor dropping out in a way he still living it for decades on we can raise reach to be profitable here because of what happened but I'm afraid that's exactly what is going to happen with what is going on today so farmers welcomed the idea of easing hostilities with China but as to what happens if and when the U. S. and China actually sign off on the deal I think it's a whole lot more complicated print your news I'm Frank Morris in Kansas city you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news next time on the world Greek authorities plan to close overcrowded refugee camps on its Mediterranean islands by next year they'll have moved tens of thousands of people to the mainland to smaller more controlled camps they brought all these people there it is not to come it's not if you can't accept present.

Jane Mosul
"mosul" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on KCRW

"This one from Mosul Iraq thank you Jane thank you you're listening to All Things Considered this is Anthony burns open the curtain on LA theatre for KCRW a couple of years ago the curious incident of the dog in the night time was a big play my big I needed a Broadway production it won Tony awards it went on a national tour you know big play but here's the thing it's not really a big play in a Broadway sense it's a really beautiful small play that found its bigness at its core it's a wonderful ensemble play where a small group of actors not only play a bunch of roles they make the whole world this is the magic of the production at the green way court ninety nine seat theater the rediscover the heart of the play in an intimate setting the curious incident of the dog in the night time is a mystery that swirls around Christopher a fifteen year old boy who's probably somewhere on the autism spectrum we experience the play through his senses which is part of what gives the show its power and unique charm the please mystery seems simple at first that dog from the title is found dead murdered our protagonist Christopher is mistakenly accused of the crime in after he's vindicated he makes it his mission to solve this curious incident like any good who done it following the clues just leads to bigger questions structurally the mystery of the dog's death fuels most of act one until the deeper mysteries of family history takeover act to the Greenlee court production succeeds brilliantly with Christopher and the first mystery in a small space the immediacy of Christopher's overloaded senses become all the more present we experience viscerally what being in an overwhelming and mystifying world feels like and that initial dramatic engine of who killed the dog Dr says through act one we're thinks feel a little less sure footed are when the play a shift gears from a solvable crime who killed the Pat to the more unknowable or on certain questions what makes a family or who do we love and at what cost what starts as a simple story through the eyes of a boy becomes a more complicated family drama that's part of what helped the plays unique voice find those big productions without giving too much away the second half the play is about watching a broken family trying heal itself we see this story in little snippets but we need those tiny details to do a lot of heavy lifting the here where the emotional payoff comes from for all the magic of the green way courts production these little details don't pack the punch they need to win don't ground the second half of the story but if you missed the curious incident of the dog in the night time this is a great chance to see a big play in an intimate space the curious incident of the dog in the night time place at the green way court theatre in Hollywood through December twenty ninth for info on the show and to subscribe to the weekly case here W. theater newsletter check out KCRW dot com slash theater this is Anthony burns opening the curtain on LA theatre for KCRW.

Jane Mosul
Special Operations Raid Said to Kill Senior Terrorist Leader in Syria

Red Eye Radio

01:18 min | 2 years ago

Special Operations Raid Said to Kill Senior Terrorist Leader in Syria

"Taught at one of the most wanted terrorists in the world ISIS leader Abu Bakar al Baghdadi is presumed dead after this U. S. special forces operations carried out a ground raid in Syria Baghdatis as a long history of terrorism in the Middle East before his rise in ISIS ABC Laurie Martinez has more on his history with the region what we know about Abu Bakr al Baghdadi was that he was always been involved in terror groups he was detained by the United States actually in the mid two thousands he was one of the many insurgents who was captured and held it in a Tory is camp called camp Buka in central Iraq he was held there for a couple years and then he was released there are partners it's guy news correspondent Marx stone in Beirut says all bugged adi stepped out of sight from the moment he took the reins and isis he is not a passive who appeared very much in fact his only public appearance ever has been at the beginning of the caliphate that he forms he appeared in the grand mosque in Mosul in northern Iraq to announce the formation of that kind of face that sits there and his movement has been restricted about Daddy apparently detonated his own suicide bomb vests that also killed two of his wives confirmed by counterterrorism official ABC news US officials are awaiting DNA analysis to confirm identification the White House didn't specify the topic just the president trump will deliver remarks Sunday morning at nine

Mosul President Trump ABC Official Camp Buka Syria Donald Trump White House Abu Bakar Al Baghdadi Beirut Marx Stone Iraq United States Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi Laurie Martinez Middle East
"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me Rebecca has be and today we get back to two thousand and fourteen to the occupation of Mosul in northern Iraq by the Islamic state group or isis they recorded their reign of terror in propaganda films broadcast on the internet but one historian living in Mosul was posting a counter narrative in a bottle online. isis is a grouping of some of the world's most violent. so extreme they've been disowned by al Qaeda. bloody chaos in Iraq large swathe of territory or the militants grip with that black flags flying long convoys of Islamic state fighters swept across northern Iraq with terrifying speed heavily armed and also the merciless they took Iraq's second city Mosul in less than a week claiming a radical Salafist theology the Islamic state group or I. S. wanted to impose strict religious nor for locals who already experienced years of conflict this was a new terra nothing was as bad as always we were living in this fear everyday you have to take sides you have to decide whether you are with them or against them and what do you decide I decided to stand against mama Hamid was teaching history at the university of Mosul when I. S. took over the militants termed the university into a military base and converted the chemistry labs into bomb factories they banned all education other than their own extremist agenda they wanted to go back to the Middle Ages these people when they came to the city that doesn't come just with weapons no they thought that they are the only people who con hold them not if and that the only people who can tell the story I was a story on this what concerned me like fifty you know in not Hyundai lacking the model on July the fourth from the pulpits of the majestic honoring mosque I. S. leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi proclaimed a new ultra conservative state across the Middle East a caliphate his statement was broadcast all over the world. you know a lot of. because who is this guy to claim that he's a cave live in our city who was he the Islamic state group had weaponized that twisted ideology and them all decided to launch a counterattack most of all it was.

Rebecca Mosul Iraq I. S. Hyundai Abu Bakr al Baghdadi Middle East mama Hamid university of Mosul
"mosul" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Very important. I believe is the film Mosul and unhealed wound on the psyche of a nation of the director of that film. Daniel Gabriel joins us now a former CIA officer. Thank you for joining us. Larry. Thanks for having me. Are you? I'm well, thank you. Tell me about the film this, I think, especially on this day where we're recognizing the incredible achievement of the d day invasion. There's so much that happened in, in warfare over the last twenty years in the war on terror that I don't think really people know enough about. Sure will look at you think you're right on it just as more is extremely important to the World War, Two generation, you know, one thing, I've found is Mosul as an emotional, and personal connection to, to our vets in Iraq and Afghanistan. And the reason is because going back to two thousand three two thousand four all the way up through really this year, mostly, it's been a place would constantly have to return to time and time again to deal with the fame problems veterans that up met, of course, screening film across the country. One thing that they've expressed to me is how infuriating it was to see ISIS takeover the city, the second-largest in all of Iraq in two thousand fourteen. Yeah. Yeah, I remember I was broadcasting the day that it appeared Mosul had fallen to ISIS, and I took calls from nothing but Iraq war veterans who were so angry knowing, literally, their brothers in arms who, who shed blood lost limbs or lost their lives in. In that bloody fight to take that city. And how important it was in that fight. And then to see frankly, I think because then you, you correct me if you disagree because of our lack of leadership there we allowed ISIS to come in and take back everything we had one. That's correct me to secure the status of forces agreement, and we, we left an all the sacrifice was for not incidentally, looking at June ten five years ago today. That's pretty much the date that we look at when we say what they did most actually fall to ISIS. So we're pretty much on the five year anniversary this week. You know what's interesting to me about this in our guest is Dan, Gabriel is a former CIA counter-terrorism officer, and he's directed and produced this film muscle to documentary. Right. You interview people who were there. I. Right. A lot of journalists and a lot of pundits, who who you know act like they know so much more than anyone else about the status of the Middle East. And they talk about most when they talk about ISIS and the fight in Iraq always from strategic and power perspectives. But the religion aspect is hardly ever talked about it. Seems to be and you tell me what your story tells us here, what the movie says it seems that the religious aspects is pretty paramount and telling the story, it is absolutely an insole is the personal aspect. I think that's why the film is, is destined to be as as we as we see it is having you religion component in the second component is essential team. This film, the most was really distorted the last battle of the Iraq war in what we see is the disparate tribes sects, within the Iraqi society coming together to defeat ISIS, I'm talking to the Sunni, the Shia Kurds disease. The Christian of all have all joined forces with this one objective. An open way. They're successful, July twenty seventeen. When the city is a false finally back into Iraqi and. You can get information about the movie at.

ISIS Iraq Daniel Gabriel Mosul CIA officer Middle East director Larry Afghanistan Dan ten five years twenty years five year
"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I told the women if he doesn't come by evening. I'm going to go and hide. Get a half Yanyan by the puck Jabbar in the official returned and convinced her, it was safe to commode. She didn't know that it would ever happen. Maybe yes, maybe, maybe they can maybe not ISIS whipped into denies home region of singer in twenty four teen intent on wiping out. Use eighties, they killed hundreds of people in slave thousands of others deny had quit school after seventh grade because of health problems at age nineteen just before I came in. She was working in community radio. Cinder mountain radio denied song requests, read the new hosted a food program to people. She worked with her scattered now Iraq, Germany, and the US and cinder. They're still mass graves being uncovered more than two thousand eighties, taken captive or still missing. And there are dozens of women and children believed to be still in hiding in a whole camp. Tonight, doesn't want to talk a lot about what happened after she was captured she was held and guest houses for ISIS fighters in Mosul, and then in Syria by divis- sometimes with other girls sometimes alone by myself in a room, there weren't many ISIS coming to the room. Dating, just the men who owned the name bitty nab legislated, that good. Then my Negga beating they've dining. I see him Jim spoken to her family for four years, when she called to tell them, she was free. Ebi Q. My father was crying very sad to see him cry. Like other is from singer. They're living in a camp. For displaced people in Iraq tonight, still has her hair covered compulsory addresses. But something young eighties. Don't do I ask if she thinks she'll keep it that way? Maybe. But now I am. So tired tired to make decisions about what she'll do with your future. She'll have two days, maybe even weeks for the border to open between Syria and Iraq. And then she wants to rest and spend time with your family, then she'll think about the future. She thought she might never have Jane Arraf, NPR news in northeastern Syria. This is NPR news. And this is WNYC. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. Seven nineteen coming up on morning edition for those who already have a long commute keeping yourself, entertain on a delayed train can be difficult to SRI. I used to say, how'd you go because the reactions the same thing as going the exact same vote on this stupid train with paying three hundred dollars a month. And when I going anywhere one nj transit rider on how he found peace despite delays coming up this hour. WNYC is supported by Mount Sinai, health system, whose physicians can be found in more than four hundred community locations throughout the New York metropolitan area. More information is available at Mount Sinai dot org..

Iraq Syria NPR WNYC Mount Sinai Cinder mountain ISIS Richard Hake Jabbar official Jane Arraf Mosul Jim New York US Germany three hundred dollars four years two days
Likudnt: Israels political crisis

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:23 min | 2 years ago

Likudnt: Israels political crisis

"In Israel just last month. Benyamin Netanyahu was celebrating a strong showing by his Likud party in parliamentary elections. He had been forced to call an early poll as he faced a raft of corruption allegations, his victory seemed like a vote of confidence by the Israeli people. And he grinned ingredient cheering crowds on election night, but all has not gone smoothly since Israel has many political parties and mister Netanyahu has struggled to build the coalition he needs to form a government. He called publicly on one party leader. His former defense minister of eager Lieberman to join him. Let's through this of net, the victim liberal, unfortunately, until this moment, including tonight, I didn't manage to complete a victory Lieberman to avoid elections. But whoever looks at the reality that we need to be responsible and former government immediately those please failed. So a few minutes after midnight, the Israeli parliament, the Knesset voted to dissolve it. So for reports from Israel for the economist and recently wrote a book about mister Netanyahu. And this is just thirty days after it was sworn in seven weeks after Laos election in. This is unprecedented in his right. But it'd go history. And why it's been so difficult to, to build a coalition Netanyahu proclaimed victory, because his block of right wing, religious parties had a majority of five seats in the Knesset. So it seemed that he had one. However, to make that victory reality needed to get all those policies cooperating together in one coalition and one issue the issue of the draft of Sheva students, students in religious seminaries proved so prove so contentious that one of the parties demanded the law on this. We should be ready drafted the previous be passed as literally, without changing, a comma, while some of the religious parties in the coalition demanded major changes to the law, and the prime minister. Currently so prime minister, who was very eager to begin his fifth tablet, prime minister couldn't bridge those differences. So what happens now? So what should have happened last night at midnight was with Netanyahu deadline on the tiny allocated to him to form the coalition up sewing else you've received the opportunity to, to form a coalition by his Rayleigh low, but there was also, there's those close into never been used with specifies that dissolved the whole process of foreign governments stops and the country goes back to the polls, and that is the closet into Neo used and therefore in three and a half months Israel will be held another election. And meanwhile, mister Netanyahu is under investigation on corruption allegations. How will that then play out in the current absence of government and the potential for a different one was really Mr. Gatien's ready been wraps up, and the attorney general has tentatively decided to indict into now on bribery and fraud in through? In, in those three investigations Mosul efforts over the last few weeks when he should have been trying to solve this problem between his coalition partners was trying to get the parties to agree to vote on various pieces of legislation, which would grant him immunity from prosecution and would shield him from any intervention of the high court in that decision. That is now that has now been shelved those pieces of today's another go ahead. Certainly not until the election, and another government is formed, assuming wins the next election form that government. So he's lost very valuable time for him. And in that time the hearing. Harry's. It will proceed and there's a chance that before the attorney general decides to, to indict attending and to charge them in court for bribery, he, he won't have any relation in place. It to shield him has steadfastly denied the allegations ever since the investigations begun over three years ago. He said, there's nothing in them, but step after step it turned out that there is some serious evidence, which led to form investigation. But now he's instead of is standing up in court against he's trying to vade any kind of you say this situation is unprecedented. And, you know, everyone would have expected that mister Netanyahu could have formed, a government does the fact that he hasn't suggest that, perhaps his rivals smell blood and are positioning themselves for power. Well, certainly Evita Lumine the leader of small, nationalist secular, particle, Estrella bay, taint, Israel, our home, who demanded that. The law be. Passed. And that was the reason why there is no code Asian. He says he felt that he could challenge the two now. And see his calculation is that now is, is going down eventually and therefore, there's no reason for him to be a member. His coalition is ready staking out, new ground in the right wing for the in the post tenure era. So he's, he's the first major is right wing politician, Israel to openly challenge. It's in recent years, and they'll be others who will follow him, if there is this large group of parties. Why is Mr. LeBron Lieberman ended up as the king-maker here? Well, the there was nothing, you know, block of parties had a majority of five seats, those five seats, a walked LeBron's party without those five seats than the majority, and what about the peace process? Jared Kushner is is in the country with this US led plan in hand on solving is really Palestinian issues. But there's no government for. Him to talk to. Well, we've got used to the fact that the Trump administration delaying disposing the unveiling of its much way to peace plan. But now that finally have gone out to this piece for spiritedly workshop beret next month. I doubt that they'll delay once again due to the political turmoil in Israel. It's mainly anyway, for the Americans to get together with our bed regimes and work out some kind of economic offense not yet, the ethical stage of, of, of the Trump, and if we ever get to that stage, that stage will will probably be postponed due to these Rayleigh election. Right. And how do you think the, the election will go? Do you, do you think that mister Netanyahu will be able to form a coalition the next time around? It's wouldn't election two months ago. He didn't manage to take that victory and, and China into a function government, but he, he, he wouldn't the right wing religious, bodies one majority, which was not known large one, but it was pretty clear. And it's difficult to see the opposition overturning that this point. But we're in uncharted territory. Now we've never had a second election in the same year's election held just only five months after the previous one. And there's also this new rift within the right wing have a right wing party. Basically saying that Netanyahu, dreitzer, former government, he failed, and now we probably won't be sporting in the future. So there's a sort of shift in the political map in Israel, which which will have to wait and see how that pans out. Thank you very much for your time.

Benyamin Netanyahu Israel Mr. Lebron Lieberman Israeli Parliament Rayleigh Prime Minister Likud Party Bribery Attorney Laos Jared Kushner Sheva Mosul China Evita Lumine Harry Mr. Gatien United States Estrella Bay
The age-old quest for the color blue

Science Magazine Podcast

06:44 min | 2 years ago

The age-old quest for the color blue

"Up we have contributing correspondent Kaikaku for Schmidt. He's here to talk to us about the pursuit of blue. Hi kai. So how long have humans been on the hunt for a blue color? That's already whether the difficulty begins. I guess. Yeah. Pretty good evidence from a cave in South Africa, the Blombos cave that one hundred thousand years ago, humans already will making pigments so more like red ochre yellow ker in using charcoal for black. They will make pigments. But there's no evidence at all of any blue pigments than for a very very long time. That stays the same is some recent evidence of from from gravesite in Turkey that about nine thousand years ago. There was some burials of women children whether it had ground down as right, which is a blue mineral. And even when it's down. It's it's kind of a nice, blue pigment. They were very with this possibly was used for medics. We don't really know. But that's kind of the earliest evidence. We have of any Lukman. Why is blue so rare? Is there some physical property required to make something reflect the color blue, it's hard to achieve if you look in the plot world as a lot of different classes, pigments that we have. But there's only one class of pigments Dan to signs which can actually make blue. And even then it tends to be the complicated molecules that blue in that simply because in order for something to be blue it needs to absorb the rent. So the other part of the visible spectrum, basically and red light is of the visible spectrum. It's the lowest energy light. So in order for something to absorb the red. The kind of jumps that an electron makes which is how molecule usually absorbs collapse these jumps need to be very small jumps in order to absorb the right rather than the blue. So it's much easier for nature appears to make molecules that absolve blue instead of once that absorb Bredon appeal blue these molecules often have to have. A lot of consigned chains and little ecoregions until they really make a good blue. I mean, there is blue in nature. We got water we got sky, we got blueberries. But for some reason making a synthetic version making a dye or pigment is really difficult. What about blue butterflies? Those those have nice blue color several of the blues. You've mentioned now are ones that aren't really pigment. So if you take sky, it's you know, kind of scattered more than than red light. Which is why the sky his loop in Walter. It's interesting because Walter actually absorbs kind of in the red kind of to vibrate the water molecules vibrate with the energy of red light. But it's not a very strong effect. Which is why you only see the bluest as up of water, and then the butterflies like most animals, they also not producing any blue pigments, they have like tiny structures that reflect light in a way that most of the other colors cancelled. So. If you take something very famous example like Mosul butterfly if you do into the scales on its wings. It has these little structures, and they basically end up reflecting all of the light the Chines onto the onto the wing in a way that the other colors, just disappear. What you see is the blue. So basically, everything is not a payment or at tied that we see in everyday life. But if we want to reproduce, those colors, if we want to make painting or make something out of plastic. That's the right color blue. It's really difficult, exactly. And humans in the past. Usually they found these pigments by accident. Some of the earliest examples are indigo which is a dye made from plants, but actually the plot itself isn't extra blue. So it's a blue from nature, but it's only blue ones humans do some chemistry on people for a very long time wanted to try and make synthetic indigo. And it took the s chemical company many, many years in precedent. The amount of money to finally come up with synthetic indigo. So they spent more than eight million gold marks at the time, which was more than the company was even worth to finally come up with with the recipe for synthetic indigo which was then produced around the world in is still used today to color jeans. It does make me wonder what is wrong with the blues that we have. I mean, we have plenty of toys that are blue plastic. We have paints that are blue. What what are those things that are available now not doing right or not cheating? Right. Chart is just the festive nation with colors, right? I mean, there are so many different hues of blue. And if somebody comes up with a new one, it's just especially of the artists. So usually the first ones to use them at it's just fascinating to have, you know, one more shoop. But then the other thing is that a little the blues that use Sopher instance, ultra marine, which is basic ground down. That's right. The part of Lapsley. It was one of the one of the most expensive pigments ever made was just very rare, right? Because you need the semi precious stone Lasley to even able to do it later people came up with a way of making it synthetically. But then even this static version it takes her chemicals to make that end up polluting the environment. A lot of self dioxide is produced as site product while you do so that I mean, that's one reason this the environmental implications on the other one office. Toxicity. I mean, this quite a few loose kkob. Lou that on that on exactly healthy, and this is an ongoing. Search people are still looking for blue pigments, and dyes and new or you took a look at three different approaches that are in the works right now, let's start with the first blue seeking scientists that actually found a new blue. But on accident like most blues in history, so must super money on this is a solid state chemists than he worked for a while. And he made a lot of discoveries, but not really related to pigments at all. And then he started work at Oregon state university in values. Two thousand six and what he actually wanted to do was to find what's called a multi for roic, basic material at room temperature has certain magnetic properties also electrical properties in that would make really interesting for building a computer. And so he used manganese oxide. Trim oxide in indium oxide, and he combined these Anna turn up that the compound came up with didn't have any interesting properties. But it was incredibly blue and he remembered from his days to punt the people said Lewis actually kind of hard to make. So he just published it and the color that he created has just had this incredible life of being used in many many places than now. It's also being sold far too to us.

Walter Blombos Cave Turkey South Africa Bredon Oregon State University Kaikaku Lukman DAN Schmidt Mosul Anna Lewis Lapsley LOU One Hundred Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years
"mosul" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on CarCast

"The risk of me vomiting by not talking about Mosul. Tars enough. Yeah. Every five minutes. How many about the new NFL? The new NS X are. Well, yeah. So there's a couple of things there's NS axe and new Audi r eight and Audi r eight is the word out on that is going on believable. Look this. Yeah. What's your about to say comes through? So the Audi r eight is coming to an end as a current supercar. And the next version of the Audi r eight is going to be an electric supercar. That's what we're we're hearing. I don't know if if it's gonna be all electric or not. But I think it is. And what's going to be interesting? It's going to be based off of the Porsche Taicang platform. Which were were already hearing is is gonna be pretty amazing. We've seen it up at Monterey last year. We're starting to see auto shows, and we got the talk to one of the guys working on that project at Monterey last year. And it's going to be pretty bad ass. And I'm interested to see what outy comes up with as an all Trich supercar. I like the idea of electric -ation in the performance world. I understand what we're doing as far as fuel efficiency and cleaner emissions and things like that. But I like that it's used to increase performance. There's so much torque off the line with with the electric Motors. That were we see a car companies like accurate and ex and McLaren p one where they're using the electric Motors to get that thing going quickly possible off the line. And then has the engine kick in for its increased performance, you know, top speed, and whatever and that combinations in on a turbo car. It's fantastic. Because now you can use electric Motors to fill in wherever there's turbo lag. So you can can really which is really you're right. It's it's like now you can size the turbos up to make more of your mid range and top end power and use the electric Motors to fill in that low end and anywhere..

electric Motors Audi Monterey Mosul Porsche NFL Trich McLaren five minutes
Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

13:10 min | 2 years ago

Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

"Syria. Islamic state is a state no longer earlier this week, the Jihadist group which at its peak controlled an area of Syria and Dirac lodge of Austria and imposed its brutal rule upon eight million. People was chased out of its last pocket of territory by goose a town on the frightens river near Syria's border with Iraq in losing its territory is Lennox state lost many of its fighters, but it didn't lose all of them. Thousands of the caliphates foot soldiers are presenting themselves and their families at refugee camps and presenting the countries from which many of them hailed with a considerable political legal and ethical pickle. Which is basically this. What is to be done with them? There have been some calls for an international tribunal. But it is surely impossible to put so many people on trial. They cannot simply be abandoned, and it would be a brave politician willing to bet their career or a society willing to bet it safety on these. Jihadists returning home as altogether reformed characters. This is the foreign desk. Hot is pre programmed to think of every defeats as a test in. There will never see anything in as permanent defeat because it has already pre-programmed into their minds mindset and into their psyche. If you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death sentence. The tendency that we have in western Europe amendment to say, it's not out problem. They left us. They took up arms against us. We want nothing to do with them is all very well by the peasant doesn't cease to exist. So I think it behoves the society which broken up to consider why has this Cussing taken on against us? And what should we be doing about that not with the individual concern? Sent only but also with society as a whole. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller today will be hearing from a former director of global counterterrorism at M I six and from the full member of al-qaeda to look at what can be done, and what should be done with defeated jihadis. But I for a view from the ground from Syria on joined by Jane, Arraf international correspondent with NPR. Jane, stop by asking you to set the scene forest where he speaking to us from exactly what have you been able to see over the past few days. Well, I am in a which is one of the cities in the sort of a ton of Mus Kurdish region of Syria. And this is also where some leadership the Kurdish leadership is these officials who are trying to persuade other countries that they should have an international tribunal here in this northeastern part of Syria and been able to go to a couple of the camps where they're holding foreign his wills Iraqi. And Syrian ISIS families, and I've also been able to speak to one of the foreign fighters. Those foreign fighters have been apprehended by Kurds and the US coalition the US led coalition in many cases, they've been in US detention in Syria detention centers, actually, run by the US, and now handed over back to Kurdish forces, do you have a sense of what kind of numbers we're talking about in terms of the ISIS fighters currently being held by the codes. And that's all of the Iraqi Syrian and foreign there are said to be about seven thousand of them. So that is mostly Syrian and Iraqi about a thousand of them eight hundred two thousand or said to be foreign fighters accused foreign fighters, we have to make clear that they haven't actually been tried or convicted yet, but they are suspected to be foreign fighters. So that's all the way up from eight hundred to about a thousand is the estimate you generally get from US military officials as wills occurred. In what sense you able to get a what kind of conditions that being held in? Well, compared to what they came from which was almost certain death as US air strikes in waters attacked the last bit of their territory. It's, you know, not bad the conditions of interviewing these fighters preclude either asking for getting detailed answers about how they're being held in where they're being held. But one of the ones that I interviewed he was a Canadian fighter had been held in solitary confinement for quite a while. He also said that he was having trouble getting medical care. Clearly was well enough to do an interview. But certainly medical care seems to be an issue, but having said that, you know, having covered this battle against ISIS the war against ISIS over the entire ISIS territory. It's much better than the fate that befell a lot of them which was basically being obliterated by air. Yikes. Mortars and in other cities, if we boil this entire story for the moment down to this one Canadian fighter. What sense were you able to get all of his views on gun to assume it was a he his views on now on the subject of the ideology. He joined up to fight fo did you get the sensitize east had much in the way of a rethink? Yeah. Pretty much all of them have. And this was really interesting because I found this as well. In the case of the women who were married to ISIS fighters. They have now been for several months at least in detention with either Kurds or Americans, this particular foreign fighter told me that you know, he'd had a lot of time to think, but not only that he'd had a lot of interactions with the Americans who interrogated him and with the people who are holding him and with the Kurds. He said, for instance, but one point the Americans had given him novels to read one of the women. I spoke with told me that she had. Been aware. And I'm not sure if this is true, but she said she hadn't been aware of that ISIS held slaves. You know, they took thousands of UCD's from the tiny ziti religious minority as slaves massacred, the men and took the women and girls as sex slaves. She said she'd never met one until one of them was brought to the detention center to talk to them. And she said, and that's when I realized it was true. It wasn't just rumors. What they did to these women. So yes, in many cases, certainly in the case of this Canadian fighter. I it seems to have had an impact another foreign woman who is married to ISIS fighters told me that she was happy that she wasn't sent straight back to her country. She was from the Netherlands, and she said had she been sent back. She would still have been radicalized. But as it was her views of changed a lot. She said in being held for months and months by the Kurds because the biggest question, I guess the overarching question that we're looking at in this episode is with the ideology. Of ISIS will survive the destruction of the caliphate that the whole selling point of Islam state, and there was a clue in the name was that it had conquered territory. It was building a nation. It was building a homeland. If it is seen to have filed in that central enterprise. Do you think it's still going to be able to recruit people who might be inclined towards jihad? Or is it you'll sense from talking to the people you just mentioned that they kind of starting to realize that they might have back to lose a well there are a couple of things here. One is that in terms of ISIS being able to recreate a territory the caliphate had held which ranged for seventy thousand square kilometres, roughly and encompassed major cities. No one really believes they'll be able to do that. Again. In part of the reason, it's very apparent in Iraq. For instance, the people of Mosul, which is the second biggest city in Iraq. At first, many of them will tell you. They welcomed. Isis five years ago when ISIS came in because they so hated the Iraqi government and security forces, and then they realized what ISIS actually was which was indescribably brutal. The also they will not make that mistake. Again. They know what ISIS is now they know the dangers. But having said that there is a real fear that there is another ISIS in the making because we're talking about roughly in the case of Iraq thirty thousand members of ISIS families. Now a lot of those are children. So let's leave aside the children because children are children. But if you take the adults in those families, the women, for instance, a lot of them do still believe in the ideology, there is nothing that has changed their minds since then as for the foreigners. You know, a story I hear over and over and talking particularly to these foreign women is I didn't know what I was getting into. I don't understand Syria. I married. The sky might boyfriend told me to come. So those ones seemed to have had an awakening. And those are certainly the ones that want you to know they've had an awakening the, you know, I think we also have to realize that there are lots of those people in detention in these camps who are not talking to us because they believe were infidels because they still believe in the ideology and in the coun- recently in L hall camp, which now has more than seventy thousand people in it in northeastern Syria, some of the people running the camp told me that there are new arrivals all the time. And it's those new arrivals who are the most still radicalized that they've been saying in some cases that the head of ISIS abo- becquerel daddy ordered them to come to the camp that they will stay in the camp. But then Baghdadi and ISIS will take them out of the camp. So there is no one who does not believe that ISIS is still a threat those ones who will. Speak to you. Then what do they want to happen now, especially the ones who have come from outside, Iraq and Syria have the old discovered. A sudden enthusiasm for democratic G prosise. Yes. Well. It depends where they come from. So there was a group of women. I met Dutch women they want to go back. And some of them said we understand we broke the law. We want to stand trial. But it's our children were worried about they wanted their children to be handed over to their relatives. In many cases. These are very small children toddlers, really young the others. It depends again depends entirely where they come from a I met quite a few women from eastern Europe. And there was a Chinese woman. They are all terrified of being sent back to their countries because they believe they would be executed not only that they're even afraid to contact their relatives because even by contacting their relatives their relatives would end up in jail. They say so the ones who come from western countries tend to want to be sent back there. But as you know, the problem is these countries don't want to take them. They don't want to take them mostly for two reasons. One is it's really not clear how much evidence would carry over. If they were to stand trial in their own countries. And then the other thing is they could actually pose a danger if they can't be put on trial. They can't be prosecuted for things they may have done here. Then they will have to let them go, and they will be free in their own countries. So it's a dilemma you mentioned that there is some enthusiasm among the Syrian Kurdish leadership for the idea of an international tribunal have they talked at all about what they see as the scope of that they can't realistically intend to put tens of thousands of people on trial on the they can't know and by its very nature and international tribunal would have to be set up by the international community. And there isn't a whole lot of appetite for that for one thing the Kurdish leadership here is not internationally recognised. That's a big deal. And then these things will take years and years. There has been a move to send some of these fighters in any case from countries that don't want the. Back to Iraq and Iraq can prosecute them. If they've also been in Iraq because a lot of these fighters did come from Iraq from Mosul the foreign fighters, even when they were driven out of Mosul, they came to Syria, so they could be prosecuted in Iraq. Now, the problem there is those are not transparent trials, they're not run, according to international standards, and in a lot of cases, they do end up with the death penalty. That's one thing that the Kurds keep saying if you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death

Iraq Syria Isis United States Mosul Iraqi Syrian Europe Syria. Dirac Austria NPR Iraqi Government Al-Qaeda Jane UCD Andrew Miller Netherlands Eastern Europe L Hall
Iran's Rouhani in Iraq for 'historic' visit to offset US sanctions

Pacifica Evening News

02:13 min | 2 years ago

Iran's Rouhani in Iraq for 'historic' visit to offset US sanctions

"Orion, president Hassan Rohani was in Baghdad today making his first official visit to the nation that Tehran wants fought a bloody war against and later back in the battle with the Islamic state group since Rohani's election in two thousand thirteen Iraq has relied on Iranian paramilitary support to fight ISIS following the militant groups capture of the Iraqi city of Mosul and other territory in both Iraq and Syria now with the militants facing a final territorial defeat in the Syrian village of boggles. Iran is looking for Iraq's continued support as it faces a maximum pressure campaign by President Trump after his decision to withdraw America from Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers. Simon marks. Sports. Iranian. President asandra Hani is making his first ever trip during his tenure as the country's leader to Baghdad. His meeting with the Iraqi President bomb. Sally will focus on both trade relations and US sanctions on Iran. The two issues deeply intertwined because Iraq is not guaranteed continuing exemption from US sanctions and later this month. The Trump administration must make that decision following Washington's withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal. It's an opportunity for Iran to show. It's not in fact analyst Bob McMahon with a New York-based Council on foreign relations says the Iraqis want to maintain access to Iranian oil supplies. These are sanctions that especially you're going after Iran's energy sector. Iraq relies heavily on that sector. They would like to continue to purchase a running gas at least for another year, they've talked openly about going around the US dollar denominated transactions in some other way that would allow them to do trade that would not come under some sort of financial restrictions have been imposed by. In these snapback sanctions. There's lots of things that countries do trade and already it would like to trade more in agriculture, for example, this is the highest level. Visit these two countries since President Trump come recently that the US would like to keep its forces in Iraq, quote, unquote. See what's going on in Iran next door that intervention by President Trump worried many Iraqis who rejects the idea that the country should be used as a US listening post in the

Iraq Iran President Trump United States President Asandra Hani Baghdad Tehran Hassan Rohani Simon Marks Mosul Syria Bob Mcmahon America Sally Official New York-Based Council Washington Analyst
"mosul" Discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"mosul" Discussed on Minority Korner

"So once you cleared those sort of pallets and plates we can start to now investigate. Well, how am I going to go about my goals, or what's what's important to me? Or how many building this next year for myself? I'm in a lot of it comes down to like we were talking about earlier is letting letting go. And I let's see letting your confidence takeover for you. Yeah. And so two again thought dance that comes with dancing with fear so learning to dance with it. It's not going anywhere problems aren't going anywhere stresses and warrior, not coming anywhere sufferings aren't going anywhere. But it's like how we choose to navigate and dance with that. I like that because everything the meaning that we give to things like things are always happening. But reassign the meaning to that is true. Yeah. And so for you know, helpful thing for me is like, okay. Even if it's a person or it's a thing. What what am I here to learn from this a lot of times, it will be like, oh, I keep a attracting a certain die into my life. Life will keep giving you the same lesson unless you'll learn it because who's the common denominator you. It's me. Who's always here at this relationship has me, you know. And so it's like, okay. This isn't the I need to either let go of and then of course, there's a point where it's like this person is toxic and dangerous for you. Right. And but if it's a repeating thing, then there's something to sort of look at something new break a pattern literally my next word. It's like like lunatic. Making. That's insanity. Repetition. How I changing without changing it. And that's actually I think we're lunatic recovered from is I going trying to haul. Oh, well, that's not the same as insanity. But lunatic is I think it was idea that I they're trying to go to the lunar to the moon. Well, retire there. But put down their puts out a way to take is a reality. You're okay to that actually means that you're scientists. Scientists thank you. I think outside the box. Okay. The last thing I wanted to touch on. And this is the thing that has been really helpful for me in terms of like for focusing all of by goals, and especially dealing with like fear and nerves is organizing. So there are six human needs. And we all have different needs than we usually have two leading ones and and pooping. Yeah. By so be Mosul needs, and this is actually structure what it is that we do we go out. And we do something that we go out for a goal or why certain goals don't give a builder why we don't go for certain dreams with things like that. Because it's just sort of what we're valid valuing or even dealing with relationships, and there's a pluses and minuses to all these different categories. So just good to take a step back and examine which ones are sort of leading. And which ones do I want to sort of increase in or or whatnot? And there's difference in order for people on how they use them. And when you can tell that's what someone's need is going to be like, okay. That's what they're going for right now. Insurance. Navigate your relationship with them. Yeah. So the first human need is what certainty since we did you really need to value children. Or like, you know, there's certain things that give us certainty of like, you know, watching a certain TV show watching a movie that you've already seen before people live law and order because it's the same Shane. Yeah. Same patterns. So there's a certain thing that gives us confidence for some people. They don't have certainty makes them just like, it makes sense makes them crazy. It's like when you are stepping downstairs, and then you do the last air, and you think it's their thought there in unveiling, no. But then here's the other reverse of that is that some for some people there, Hugh their greatest human need. And and again, we all need varying degrees of these gains, people are different uncertainty. So that person steps off in there like that. And And lakers. just like sometimes like, I I don't relate to that person. Some people they love uncertainty slash variety..

Mosul Hugh lakers. Shane
To Curb Taliban, Afghan President Replaces Security Chiefs

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

To Curb Taliban, Afghan President Replaces Security Chiefs

"Herself to her role, and the people of Japan would sincerity the empress said he was relieved that his rain ending without Japan. Having been again being engaged in a war. Hundreds of Hindu hardliners have blocked a path leading to a well-known temple in southern India to stop a group of women from reaching the hilltop shrine. The temple has become a major battleground between Hindu radicals and gender activists since the Indian Supreme Court in a landmark ruling overturned a longstanding ban on women of childbearing age from visiting the shrine BBC news. This is from our own correspondent here on the BBC World Service. I'm PASCAL harsher. Hello and welcome to the program that takes you to places others. Don't reach in this edition. We visit the Somali town where pirates once flaunted their ill-gotten bling. We also follow a dramatic story of one woman's escape from violence in Cameroon with little granddaughter into and we meet a man helping to keep a dying language alive. I I to Hungary. I don't know what's happening to my country. A young Hungarian woman told me recently, it's crazy what the government is doing. It. Seems that many Hungarians from right to left are alarmed at the policies, the Prime Minister Viktor Orban, and his feeders party of pushing through he had already increased his power to controversial extent. As far as the e u is concerned and more recently, a new Bill, which almost doubles, the hours of overtime, an employer can demand from their staff sparked demonstrations across Hungary from Budapest, Nick, THORP examines. How this crisis came to be two bronze lions flank the steps of the Hungarian parliament. They're proud forms appearing and disappearing through the billowing red white and green smoke from the protesters flares peg tyre on the steps between them stand. The riot police in full dress uniform tear gas canisters of the ready like Roman centurions. Arranged for a family photograph. It's an image which would have given the famous Hungarian architect Imre style. The mastermind of the parliament building and champion of symbolism. Pause for thought were the lines flanked by police protecting Hungarian sovereignty from the mob as the carefully scripted government. Messages would have us believe or were the lions blessing the people as they tried to retake. They're building from corrupt power hungry, mafia as the messages circling on the leaflets in the crowd suggest the roots of the protests live far away in another country with a lot of problems lines Britain at least half a million young skilled Hungarians who've left their homeland in recent years, mostly for Britain, they left for good economic reasons a minimum hourly wage four times higher than in Hungary, many others now leaving for political reasons to according to agency which finds jobs for them and interviews them beforehand. They say they've had enough of Prime Minister Viktor Auburn his feet as party and their eight year rule, the four million also Hungarian employees left behind a being asked to work longer and longer hours to cope with the ensuing labor shortage on the twelfth of December the government pushed a law through parliament, which would increase the ceiling on annual overtime hours from two hundred fifty two four hundred Hungarian jewelry work the equivalent of thirty one days overtime a year. The new law adds another nineteen to that a total of fifty extra days a year, meaning employers could demand a six day working week German car giants like Audi Mercedes and the new kid on the block BMW a drawn here by the fact that Hungarian labor is cheaper than robots and the tax breaks unfavorable exchange rates as they pay their workers in Hungarian foreign and so they caused for euros. But the social consequences of overwork. Wherever it takes place on dia, Hungary, has one of the lowest life expectancies in the EU who actually asked for the new overtime law, not necessarily the Germans Karoi. Judge. A trade union leader told me, though, they would certainly have been pleased by it more likely the owners of the many medium and small enterprises in the ruling party's empire. He suggested the vote in favor of the law should have sailed through parliament powered by these strong feeders majority instead opposition MP's, ambushed it blowing whistles and sirens. An occupying the stairs to stop the speaker reaching his pulpit. One politician. Ben Saito die broadcast the whole four hour drama live on Facebook. There were two point four million views Prime Minister Viktor Orban comes across as a weak and powerless figure in the videos alerted to. What was happening by toward is livestream. The protesters gathered in front of the building and the standoff began. For several months after his landslide reelection in April. Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban seemed to have the wind in his sales. But in just the last two weeks because of the protests, the wind direction has changed and blowing the smoke in the prime minister's is as well. As those of the riot police the new law this proven deeply unpopular opposed by eighty three percent of those consulted by one polling agency. Even before the protests began last Sunday, they marched on the state television station, which they denounced as a factory of lies when opposition MP's were prevented. From reaching the live studio to read out their demands, the event was also rich in historical symbolism in one thousand nine hundred eighty six the Hungarian uprising against the communist regime began when protesters were prevented from reading demands on Hungarian radio in the past week protests, civil said being organized in towns across the country and March is held to. Local media which now under government control back at the parliament, building the lines lookout on a snowy landscape on tourists Christmas decorations and policemen mildly festive in their red hats and on protest his happy Christmas. Happy Christmas John the crowd as though Christmas too is a match that they just have to win. Nick, stop our next. Stop is a town that became famous for all the wrong reasons, I'll in Somalia's semi autonomous region of Puntland was thrown to the center of global attention. When an American flag chip was captured by pirates operating from the town that was nine years ago. Now when I'll was known as the hub of Somali piracy, the pirates and their riches have largely gone now imprisoned dead or moved on to karma waters. But what has become of I'll and soy has been. Into safer self. Boat approaches the town of a I can't help. But notice the beautiful landscape. It time is trip of white Sunday beach is dotted with a mixture of modern buildings in traditional mix. Shift shelters behind. It is a dramatic Gordon Brown cliff possibly hundreds of meters, high it breaks to the left to reveal the distant horizon Puntland imagine how beautiful the setting this would be to shoot a movie instability in this country is the obvious deterrent. But I have really been immortalised on film, captain Phillips the Hollywood blockbuster. Starring Tom Hanks is based on the true story of an American captain Richard Phillips in two thousand nine he will sailing from Oman in the Middle East to Mamba Kenya. When his ship was captured by four heavily armed Somali pirates on skiffs, led by Abdul say the forced the American. Onto one of their boats and tried to take him ashore dramatic risk emission followed involving a US navy destroyer and seal commandos, captain Phillips will saved Mosa arrested and the other pirates killed I think of that film. They arriving Abdulah Busey's hometown, not knowing what to expect but locals tell me the little drummer here. These days the threat of piracy has declined thanks in part to the UN Security Council's decision ten years ago to allow ships to enter Somali territorial waters at the time pirates like Mosul parading with impunity the tuck ships almost every day and often return to I to try and blend into the community donors paid in brunson's flowed freely here as huge sums were paid to secure the release of ships and their crew the pirates lead lodge in. By the residents. Tell me just as they did it see the pirates terrorized people here to the locals soon grew to resent this treatment, the pirates don't come here anymore. A police chief Mohammad diarrhea SUV tells me proudly EMMY legal boats would be brought here by PM PF and rewarding with them. He PM PF is the Puntland maritime police force which has been expanding with help from the European Union. It's now the biggest marine police force in Somalia with eight hundred recruits some of them took up strategic positions around the town ahead of our rival holding rifles and tearing away from the sea into the vast country, insecurity and land is still a major problem. The Al Qaeda linked. Al Shabaab militants are active to the south local leader of these Lennox state group holds an enclave to the north, and there were fears some. Pirates may simply be lying low. But there is growing optimism in. By a group of women wash and sliced fresh fish on the beach before laying them on a mesh the local authorities king to read I of its association with piracy the women want to build businesses to process and sell their fish won't tourist to come one man tells me the persona much to see and learn from the springs that drain into the ocean to this twitching natural beauty of the land. Not to mention is on history. Overlooking the ocean is a historic fort built by Mohammed Abdullah Hassan. The charismatic religious and cultural chief who led a twenty year resistance against British and colonial rulers his religious zeal and brutal tactics in battle on him. The nickname the mud Mola. He continues to inspire some of the most ruthless

Hungary Prime Minister Viktor Orban Prime Minister Government Somalia Puntland MP European Union Prime Minister Viktor Auburn Captain Phillips Nick Bbc World Service Indian Supreme Court Japan India BBC Hilltop Shrine Cameroon
Isis returns to its insurgent roots

FT News

11:04 min | 3 years ago

Isis returns to its insurgent roots

"ISIS is returning to its insurgent roots having been driven out of almost all the territory it once controlled in Iraq and Syria four years after ISIS controlled as much as a third of Iraq declared a caliphate. It is retrenched, but it's still the power to carry out kidnappings killings and bombings. Khloe? Cornish took to Andrew England about the continuing threat posed by the group to stability in the region. In two thousand fourteen ISIS notes the blitz across Iraq and Syria. And at one point I think they control about third of Iraq and major cities in both countries. What's been happening in the last couple of years since the caliphate will the self declared caliphate has been defeated all the situation being in terms of how they've been pushed back from their strongholds. Rockford. It'd be Iraqi government declared a military victory over I his about this time. I should having won back control of major urban areas. Which I is it invaded include the northern city of Mosul Iraq's second largest city. So that was a fight that nasty three and number players involved. That's the fighters from the Iraqi army which had initially kinda crumbled in two thousand fourteen faced with the ISIS insurgency, you have Kurdish vices mcken fun region. You also had low of shin initial groups who had formed pretty much in response to the ISIS threats that was facing Europe. It was big big movement to mobilize additional fighters to protect the country. And a lot of those groups actually have a radian bucking. So all of these people working not always very well together. There was also west and involvement as well. Intensive ashtrays on ISIS targets in Iraq. So that's how that fight with paying out. And then in Syria, the situation is actually more complicated because the fight against ISIS is just one really the much larger civil war. So in Syria, ISIS territory was concentrated in the north east of the country on the big cities rocker and data which probably will be familiar to people. Now, you will probably see the social glasses destination of those cities under the weight of US leda strikes. So in Syria, ISIS is in fighting on the one hand Russian-backed pro regime Syrian forces with Iranian involvement and on the other hand US backed Syrian rebels. So it's actually been facing kind of both sides of the civil war and Russia and their Resor fell from ISIS control this year amid much lodge. Hush by the feeling of as well, so retake areas in the south the country. So there was basically a big effort by local and international forces to push them back in both countries. What do we know about what remains in terms of the ISIS fighters? Isis supporters across these two companies. At one point in August, the US apartment defense was saying there about three thousand ISIS fighters in this pocket in Syria, the this territory they control, but it's very important to be cautious about them. The I think it's very hard for us to know, exactly. How many fighters they're all lest and how many schools is they have across Iraq and Syria. But we do know where I this is holed up in Iraq. They've got we think they is in the hammering mountains, which a very very Thakin offense mountains kinda the middle of a rock, and they don't say tax from that. And then they will they will have more bases a more positions in northerner as well. And there's continuing worry about sleeper cells of ISIS, fighters and other parts of the country as well. You mentioned the being pushed out of the major cities they controlled in the major church they controlled house they adopted the way the carrying out attacks. Because they do continue to pose a threat as we've mentioned. Yeah. Absolutely. I just thought it at a terrorist insurgency and then gained these huge swathes of territory. Very frightening. Modern two thousand fourteen and what they've done is returned to the insurgent route that they came from much smaller terror attacks people just disappeared into the desert rose and trying to hold her Trie. So that seems to be the strategy now is to continue to destabilize these areas with smaller hit and run attacks, but still deadly unfortunately for civilians and officials who have against targeted in Iraq. What impact is that heaven? I mean, obviously in Iraq this chiefs ways the county Sedikh control, which has to be rebuilt about reconstruction. The need to get people who were forced out of the homes back and these areas which always felt very marginalized slightly by bike dad and was a new government in Baghdad. What impact is it having? Terms of Iraq and Iraq's ability to build on the security gains. And then in Syria where we're seeing the civil war is winding down as prison. Bouchara sats voices have reclaimed control of most of the country and get mentioning just how much progress hasn't Nate unsecurity interactions on his was holding touchy. Yes, they all these kinds of attacks. But the Iraqi security forces constellation is vice is happening execution type outweigh. However, you know, is people continue to feel threatened by ISIS attacks that really undermines any kind of official assets to restore stability in the sense of security as well in these places. I think it called me stress. Just how dangerous life can still feel. I think in face it might be better than before. But if I this is coming to your village and killed the most important tests and in that village issue the local chief, which is confident analyst of seen them doing. That contributes to a sense of instability in Syria. This is the of most active fighting still in Syria to try and expel ISIS from the last pockets territory, and so you have continual battle casualties that. But of the overall civil War, I suppose, the American involvement there is the most important thing because America's said it's in Syria in order to ensure the enduring defeat of ISIS, and so obviously the longer that they have to fight. I enjoy the longer they're gonna be there they north. They started to link that crisis in Syria to Iranian presence as well. And they want to be honest to see Iranian forces in Iranian proxy forces also being expelled from Syria. But the continuing bustle against I means America continues to have military presence into it as well. At one point when they controlled large areas in Syrian Iraqi Lee had oil resources that smuggling results the customs, they had taxes, etc. How they survive today. Does this indicate that perhaps they still have certain areas where they still have support. What do we know about what sustaining them? I guess it's important to stress how wealthy ISIS was at one point. It had opened up by volts that had huge oil revenues, and they invested some of that money into companies anything for money exchanges car dealership, and I think it's pretty hard for the authorities actually pinpoint which companies they beat in order to to function or stop them from operating. So what we understand believe that they get revenues from these companies, they also can stop and extort trucks on roads, and that kind of thing, so certainly they've knees are much much diminished. They are much much week before the nab were, but they do still have revenue. Streams coming in one of the notable things about twenty fourteen was her the Iraqi security forces, which the Americans have spent billions of dollars rebuilding of the invasion in two thousand and free melted away when they were faced with the fruit of ISIS, how it quits to the Iraqi forces. Forces to continue maintaining the offensive against ISIS and prevent a resurgence. I mean that would seem to be one of the critical things going forward. I think we'd have to say that the Iraqi forces are stronger than they were full. However, the US department defense expect to general recall, I said, I've how the fight against ISIS going. Deep highlight socks. They didn't think Americans would be able to leave Iraq anytime soon intensive needing to keep providing support to the Iraqi security forces one of the things that diplomats stress here as well, which they sometimes feel like they're not being heard back in their home capitals. Is that I it is not done thing. He's quite far off didn't thing in the and in that regard is going to need to be continuing the just ical and probably material support full voltage contracting. Is it not an easy thing to do counterinsurgency is in some ways. Much harder execute than ground offensive in love wage. You know, you don't know coming from. It's a difficult thing to do. And certainly the Americans in fact that the Iraqis are going to need help with it for the foreseeable featuring ever since the US invasion in two thousand and free ousted Saddam Hussein the have been sectarian shoes and publicity extremism in a country, which is now run by the Shia majority, people would say that's helped fuel the extremism that ISIS has been able to tap into. Do you think that those issues have been tackled have been dealt with? And how important will that be going forward when the new government in Baghdad looks to rebuild and reconstruct areas that came under ISIS control? I mean, exactly as you say they'd been real continuity in fans is a long-standing trending towards extreme in amongst some communities in Iraq sent doesn't three hundred before is well and the government now needs to do. It can to restore service days and its authority in some of these areas happen just so badly damaged by war. But we're also neglected before the ISIS insurgency and before people decided to join you can see. So, you know, it was just politics and conflicts, very localized in Iraq. But you can see there was a broader trend towards any extremes. And I think actually that has been a swing by though. I mean, I was just so brutal. That polling suggested the obscene. He's actually will let in favor of more hardline version of is not not the people. So I did. So in some senses, they lost support that says to me in a country where there have been real kind of weaponization and sectarian identity. This is not a problem. That's going to go away without tackling some of the courses.

Isis Iraq Syria United States Iraqi Government Iraqi Army Baghdad Mosul Khloe Rockford Cornish Europe Russia Thakin Nate Unsecurity Andrew England Saddam Hussein