17 Burst results for "Moss Kanter"

"moss kanter" Discussed on Markedsføring fra sofakroken

Markedsføring fra sofakroken

04:26 min | 10 months ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Markedsføring fra sofakroken

"The ida of it moss kanter so mad at harvard in thinking in some stuff you don't ask is he. Anchorman bidding on chewed on lucy. He's to be known skull. Fan rose for be young and we could so could you check net with certain lucky flavored Things is comedy death. Not just laugh i. I sure you doesn't have their own collaborative initiatives also somewhat by dunk Elated your booklet in lame new york team nickname vying for north mississippi. Thought inspire me and also done you a are you know and football ebbing komo on boarded any influence airport example knows ta and ts would be eliciting. It needs to gordon. I'm like from the smart than concert on. Nothing's makeup pistons. Lead john In the end zone pushed Per banding on the non and do not present at the ice you've been is not you know you're in for the thing so we'll more of malta Much those den then. Deputy denied the on skipped bravi scored against the element. The young who was on my right for div yankel olivieri in signing on cements not they add accountability and dump communists leather boot or not. I day on boston. Forty refuting i landed in a snuck on social. Some arnaz loon. I'll give you some better than they would put off the of Nah fled Stabber or altered in receipt Focus is not that he had Are is so. they'll snuck miss. They let a bad and paul is skin. T law bring ended the address Jury is the whom this year. This song hustler cobas. Might we stand up. The scored ahead for net. Thought he will meant the party scored. We've lost in now. Dan thaw it done there. I doesn't have to be shall not thinking who. Don't try if force the las n andy yet. Some i'd apple unbeaten data. And you'll see it sent cutting sake. Wasn't he team so surprised that In envisioning future inspire me. ethanol snappy be note artist. here's our dads so he had hat and that was our to walk. Omer de las gov monday. This is crucial behind the tune into now look at lloyd was on processing all davis the not Teams nat played fool if mental social operates a b the associated equipment. Tell us why did we not. Two years. it'll mouse of it would be get. Cement was on more of the not before. Go now. About north net and spitting food for to avoid it can't be not offset the data.

moss kanter north mississippi bravi yankel olivieri harvard pistons gordon malta football new york john boston Omer de las paul Dan andy apple lloyd davis
"moss kanter" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on M&A Science

"Channel doesn't work. Now you speak to the art of experience and I appreciate that the 305 forget either request for Marco if you share the hbr article that you referred to in the beginning. Yes. So this is managing yourself as human zoom out and buy Rosabeth Moss Kanter. This is in the March 2011 issue dead. And I love that article because it's like you have to be like two sided like one eyeball on what I need to accomplish this week month now for the p&l and then the other eye has to be on my 17g. What am I learning towards? Where is this Marathon ending up working close to the hours. So last question I have for you guys is what's the craziest thing? You see that emanates hours. You gotta be wrong. Okay, so I was just telling this to kiss and and Rima the other day and individual plays also on this on this session and walk ins we were negotiating and a couple of years now and then we got into the negotiation the other party had brought in like very strong and hostage negotiators right season professionally trained hostage negotiators and integrators who capture all these bad guys have like integrated into the table and we would like dead. Dealing with here. Right but we went to the rigor of that was eye-opening and that deal didn't go through and then we had all kinds of repercussions thoughts on why this company was talking to those individuals and why they came at oh my god, let's point that territory because this was sort of everything about that was a little bit shady and I'm glad we got out and not got interrogated and weren't Acosta just weren't taking hostages interrogations of every day. How about you Reba? Oh my gosh. I wish we had more time in a couple hours our hands or maybe a line or something. But this experience was in Boston and I say that way for a reason and that's all I'm going to say and it was a massage in Boston and it was a demolition business office and we had this pig and we put a lot of lipstick on this pig and you know, we meet several pitches and finally we got some people that you know took the bite so this guy comes in and he was laid first of all wage. Me nervous and like walking around peeking Through the Windows. When's he going to drive in once he driving how many people so I'm in the conference room and I'm looking out and I see this may balk black beautiful my gosh beautiful beautiful car. This man steps out. He is, you know balding and he's maybe like six foot seven and he's big he's huge and he's got a full length mink coat on and it's got jeans and boots and he's wearing pinky rings and he's with a guy and this guy and this is a middle of winter. This guy has on a wife beater and he's off jeans on and I'm like, what is this? And then there's two Escalades behind them would like to spin our Wheels going and I don't know. I'm just a little village girl from Lake Mary in society events see this. It was just unbelievable. It was pretty crazy. And then we sat through the whole reading where this guy kept saying you think you gotta do the deal on my okay? Our what money you gotta do the deal. It was it was one of them difficult deals I've ever done in my life, but it closed and we sold the business and I'm glad it's my past but what an experience cuz I don't think I would have thought those individuals in my normal daily life in suburban Chicago land never happened. Yeah, right. I was like Wow mujhe video like no video the phones away like it was exciting the heart going a little but yeah, it was good though. They're called actually guys took anything in all the action used as time well, because covid-19 demedim a natural event that will be taken out of ebitda moving forward. So just you know, enjoy and do something fruitful. We will move Beyond this time compassion help your friends. There's a lot of people who need help and use the network to log. Exactly be good and be well, thank you. Great. Great guys, I appreciate it. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thanks so much for listening to this episode of m&a science. If you want to stay up-to-date on the podcast and all things m&a science, including our events. Make sure you sign up for our Weekly Newsletter packed Ami science.com m&a teams that use proven techniques deliver better outcomes agile. M&a is a science-based framework that focuses on a responsiveness adaptability and continuous improvements. You can view the whole book online for free at M A and if you're still using Excel trackers and old-school virtual data rooms that charge per page what a rip-off I highly recommend taking a look at deal room deal room is designed for collaboration with internal and external feeds off. Adeel room. To learn more you will also find lots of free resources templates ebooks guides. Thank you again for listening to emanate science. See you next time..

Marco Boston Moss Kanter hbr Rima Reba Lake Mary Acosta M A Chicago
"moss kanter" Discussed on M&A Science

M&A Science

10:04 min | 1 year ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on M&A Science

"Manager, that's a very viable path. It goes to the customers close to the product and save the deal also, so I would say be you and I'll just give a personal example. I actually took a job that had a job description that was two sentences and you know, I laugh at them because gosh, you know, that's that's crazy. But what I did end up doing is looking at the description and saying to myself, oh my gosh. This is a blank mandate. I can totally do this thing. I don't even know what the thing is, but I know I can do it. I have young children. I tell my kids and I tell my family members and young people just being you, you know, take a risk. There's never a right time to do the right thing. She just do what you need to do and take the opportunity and I think there are opportunities that are found in the market. I think there are rules that are available in the market that sometimes many people. Smith's because it wasn't written in the right way. It was positioned in the right away. So I would look for opportunities that are unique that give you a unique perspective because that's at the end is what I'm going to create the value differentiation and you so, you know you and your little different have a lot of fun because that's that's okay. I think it actually created for a very differentiated advantage in the market. What about sourcing if I wanted to get away from just asking my friends my circle and just internal thoughts are as another resource, but just out about looking around what resources would you recommend looking into? So I'm come from University of Chicago and back to have the Davis Center for leadership and strategy and they put on some interesting things. Like for instance. Once they have like a ballet dancer and they have the head of FBI in Chicago Bulls. About leadership and what it takes and one of the things I learned from that experience is that interesting people seek other interesting people and so I think having conversations and find venues where people are looking to find something different something intriguing and really selling that proposition. I think people get really excited by it. And I know I've been able to get some wonderful people through that those kinds of experiences and it really just bore out of you know, what do you do what's going on? You know, what's real is yeah, you know what, you know, what would you do on a Thursday, you know, so on and so forth. So those are the kinds of things I think that lead you to the conversations that gets you to an understanding of an individual and I think that's what you have to get to. Yeah. This is hard work right off totally agree with that. I think you need to also look in the unconventional places like Remus. We are not looking the conventional places red and the ability to spot Talent is that, you know, can this guy or gal? I identify Trends wage? They comfortable with uncertainty and ambiguity or tourists enough and they move as the deal requires, right and oh my gosh, so I have to I have to like interrupt you and just a second thoughts so important because this is Sookie deal individual is the case driver of the organization and not a lot of people understand that but Beauty on a point. That was a very bright in my head, but obviously didn't come out. But yeah, you're absolutely right you are the person has friends on or that's the number one race horse of the CEO and you have to drive that deal is nobody else is going to write everyone else is usual p&l. And yeah, I'm following a process and turning out twelve widgets a week always good. So yeah, totally agree. I get excited about that hundred people who do very well if you give them volumes of data to analyze they would powerfully job in two days. It's like so yep. Some job in two hours, right? And exactly that's yes right people like to talk about all we need this analysis. We need best data. We need that data and I'm like in ten minutes, you know, whether a deal makes sense or not, right? Because the way that you exactly structure it in the financial model would just the exact assumptions. It's probably not how it's going to come out at the end. The sausage is a little different at the end of the machine than what you put at the beginning it just that's inherent in the process. And then once you've done enough Selena deals with experience, you can say okay this type of deals. I need to judge just got Outta. Right channel doesn't work. Now you speak to the art of experience and I appreciate that the 305 forget either request for Marco if you share the hbr article that you referred to in the beginning. Yes. So this is managing yourself as human zoom out and buy Rosabeth Moss Kanter. This is in the March 2011 issue dead. And I love that article because it's like you have to be like two sided like one eyeball on what I need to accomplish this week this month now for the p&l and then the other eye has to be on my 17g. What am I learning towards? Where is this Marathon ending up working close to the hours. So last question I have for you guys is what's the craziest thing? You see that emanates hours. You gotta be wrong. Okay, so I was just telling this to kiss and and Rima the other day and individual plays also on this on this session and walk ins we were negotiating and a couple of years now and then we got into the negotiation the other party had brought in like very strong and hostage negotiators right season professionally trained hostage negotiators and integrators who capture all these bad guys have like integrated into the table and we would like dead. Dealing with here. Right but we went to the rigor of that was eye-opening and that deal didn't go through and then we had all kinds of repercussions thoughts on why this company was talking to those individuals and why they came at oh my god, let's point that territory because this was sort of everything about that was a little bit shady and I'm glad we got out and not got interrogated and weren't Acosta just weren't taking hostages interrogations of every day. How about you Reba? Oh my gosh. I wish we had more time in a couple hours in our hands or maybe a line or something. But this experience was in Boston and I say that way for a reason and that's all I'm going to say and it was a massage in Boston and it was a demolition business office and we had this pig and we put a lot of lipstick on this pig and you know, we meet several pitches and finally we got some people that you know took the bite so this guy comes in and he was laid first of all wage. Me nervous and like walking around peeking Through the Windows. When's he going to drive in once he driving how many people so I'm in the conference room and I'm looking out and I see this may balk black beautiful my gosh beautiful beautiful car. This man steps out. He is, you know balding and he's maybe like six foot seven and he's big he's huge and he's got a full length mink coat on and it's got jeans and boots and he's wearing pinky rings and he's with a guy and this guy and this is a middle of winter. This guy has on a wife beater and he's off jeans on and I'm like, what is this? And then there's two Escalades behind them would like to spin our Wheels going and I don't know. I'm just a little village girl from Lake Mary in society events see this. It was just unbelievable. It was pretty crazy. And then we sat through the whole reading where this guy kept saying you think you gotta do the deal on my okay? Our what money you gotta do the deal. It was it was one of them was difficult deals I've ever done in my life, but it closed and we sold the business and I'm glad it's my past but what an experience cuz I don't think I would have thought those individuals in my normal daily life in suburban Chicago land never happened. Yeah, right. I was like Wow mujhe video like no no no video the phones away like it was exciting the heart going a little but yeah, it was good though. They're called actually guys took anything in all the action used as time well, because covid-19 demedim a natural event that will be taken out of ebitda moving forward. So just you know, enjoy and do something fruitful. We will move Beyond this time compassion help your friends. There's a lot of people who need help and use the network to log. Exactly be good and be well, thank you. Great. Great guys, I appreciate it. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thanks so much for listening to this episode of m&a science. If you want to stay up-to-date on the podcast and all things m&a science, including our events. Make sure you sign up for our Weekly Newsletter packed Ami science.com m&a teams that use proven techniques deliver better outcomes agile. M&a is a science-based framework that focuses on a responsiveness adaptability and continuous improvements. You can view the whole book online for free at M A and if you're still using Excel trackers and old-school virtual data rooms that charge per page what a rip-off I highly recommend taking a look at deal room deal room is designed for collaboration with internal and external feeds off. Adeel room. To learn more you will also find lots of free resources templates ebooks guides. Thank you again for listening to emanate science. See you next time..

University of Chicago Boston Selena FBI Smith CEO Moss Kanter Chicago Bulls Rima Lake Mary Davis Center M A Sookie Reba Marco Chicago hbr Acosta
"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

"So you can get it at local independent bookstores. You can get it at Amazon and all the other online booksellers I think good reads all. It's also in audio book. I sat in a studio for seventeen hours to record the audio book. All by myself And yes thank you and I was trying to do it accurately so I wouldn't have to. Reduce Seventeen hours is a lot and it's also In an e book and so we hope the end. It's by the way English. Language is not only in the US through my regular publisher. There's also worldwide English publication of the UK in English and we have so far were still selling translation rights and so far. There's three is kind of a porky list. We have Thai Russian and Vietnamese Zun soon. That takes awhile. Translation takes awhile. I don't have those I have. I have Polish or to have some others but I don't have any of those three yet. Yeah well we're just starting so I'm sure that if by March when people are listening or watching there will be a lot more so look for it in your local language to perfect so everybody I have a question for all of you who are out there and not fortunate enough to be right here with me through the through the wire with Roosevelt and that is now what what are you GonNa do. What are you gonNA take as a result of this? Where we started was that we are healthier and happier and more effective when we are taking action. And that's where I always end. This podcast is what are you going to do? As a result of this great stories. Great inspiration big ideas. Yes what action will you take as result? Maybe You there's something specific that you got from this that I want you to not just sort of modern meditate or think about but to take action. I Know Roosevelt. You would agree with me on that so my challenge to all of us to take action on what you heard today. Do something to make a difference for the world for your community for your team for yourself and if you do that then our time we'll have been well well worth so rosa. Thank you so much for being here was such a pleasure very much my pleasure and so before we go everybody it. We'd love for you to join in the conversation. Updates on what we're doing you have a hand in how we build and continue to evolve. And innovate this podcast. And you can do that by joining our facebook or linked groups very simple remarkable podcast dot com slash facebook or remarkable PODCASTS DOT COM forward. Slash Lincoln. Pretty simple and man if you if you like what you've heard or read hope that you give feedback there but you can also of course rate the podcast. Your feedback will make a difference. We appreciate it or as best. We appreciate you and everybody. I'll be back again next week with another episode of the remarkable leadership podcast..

Roosevelt facebook Amazon US UK publisher Lincoln
"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

14:39 min | 1 year ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

"It and what gets us through it and is the ability to persist and or pivot in change direction. A little bit with new circumstances but we persist in part because of the power of the idea the vision the sense of purpose is one because if you believe in it you can't really just drop it. The second is all the people you ask for. Help Your Coalition. Your partners your allies. So you've asked them for help even if it's just a little bit are you going to go back to them and say sorry. It's too hard I give up and so that keeps you going and And if you keep going the arts are you will find a way around the obstacles if give up by definition. It's a failure at that moment and so I found people who do give up prematurely way too rigid. They're too naive they Don't even another try. I mean I I mentioned Jeff bezos founder of Amazon. When the richest people the world may be the richest and they were going to build a second headquarters in Queens New York New York City and there was a little pushback from the community and all of a sudden. They're gone all that work at gone into it and he gave up In Oh that's not a model of leadership so I think one of the things is I think about cantor's by the way I love it. I think that's one of the tasks all of us should take his name a law if yourself but that's leadership right there so but but one thing that I love about it and then listening to you and in reading this. This section of the book is the the thing coming to me is perspective right like if we have if we have that bigger. Id If we have that purpose of things that you talked about but if we can just allow ourselves to step back it always is messy at all. It may be challenging in that moment but if we can if we can help step back and if we I I love your point about if we built this coalition They're they're not only providing support they're providing little peer pressure as well like pretty hard to go back to them but I think the other thing is they can help you provide provide you with perspective and as leaders in any of our work. It's part of our job to provide perspective or teams to see what they can't see when they're in the middle of it right. I think perspective is really truly important one piece of perspective which I would like to see US teach more managers is to get over yourself. Think about the task. Think about the goal. Think about the purpose. Think about the people you're serving whether it's customers whether it's your coworkers whether it's your community think about them and get over yourself. That's one nets perspective. The other is flexibility. Don't get too wedded to exactly how you're doing it because if you're doing something new and different you can't always know in advance. Exactly what will work a willing to operate by trial and error a little? Improvisation Keith the goal but change the tactics exactly so we are talking with Roosevelt Moss. Kanter the author of the brand new book think outside the building how advanced leaders can change the world one smart innovation at time and so I wanNA know that word innovation because this book in many ways is about change and innovation. I mean that's I mean if I had to like say what's the book about. I mean inside of this idea of having ideas about how do we innovate to make the world a bigger place. Better places gotta look outside of our building to do that so if we're thinking about innovation and change there's a couple of ideas couple of chapters really couple of the ideas in the book that I'd like you to talk about for a couple of minutes one of those is just and I think that you've already challenged us all with this even with the purpose of the book but it's it's the need for us as leaders to be to think big so commit. Just talk about that for a minute. So have a dream. I mean why settle small one of the things I love to say is it takes as much time and energy to dream small as to dream big so you might as well dream big and then hold onto the dream. Don't sell it out too easily so I have a a story of Brazilian. Journalists a fabulous fabulous person was doing so much for his community who decided that he wanted to create use digital tools to level social divide. So again this one guy in now has fifty or many more million users in Brazil in cities and the dream was so important to him and that everything about the website stayed with that dream and he felt he really could make a difference for his country so when a fund associated with George Soros came along and wanted to buy into. He actually turned it down now. That will seem odd to people who are watching. Us or listening to us. He turned it down because he said they wanted to talk money. Want it to talk dreams. No DREAMS NO DEAL. That is if you're investors or your partners or your project team co workers don't share the vision and the dream they're gonNa let you down because they'll start taking it in directions at Duluth that and dreams by definition. Take a long time to come true. They don't come true overnight. I mean I have other people in the book that have been added. You know a number of years. They're starting to get traction now. They're building things that got a former president trader. Joe's is building a new model for getting food retail model for inner cities for places that don't have food and he's also solving an environmental problem because we waste a lot of food. That's perfectly good perfectly nutritious in the US. At least and he's using that to create these stores where they have a lot of overstocks and surplus at really low prices and people come in and buy. I got avocados for nineteen cents an avocado that may not translate it every country world but it was fantastic deal but they were kinda right. You had to use them right away. But he's feeding people with dignity. They bought they come in and they buy their feeding nutritious food to their family. He's Solving an environmental problem of of food waste greenhouse gases from food waste wasted food and it took him three four five years before he had his first story had the idea. But it took a while to put all the pieces together and entrepreneurs often know that if it's a digital venture like my friend in Brazil you sometimes can do it in days But if it's something that requires a lot of change it's GonNa take a while so you don't have a dream and a sense of purpose and the big enough that you really feel. You're making a difference. You let it go. That's why by the way. Many of the people are listening or watching. Might not identify with the big dream in their workplace because so many workplaces are so boring. They're not engaging and you don't feel you're doing anything to make a real difference and I think what people can do in. That case is that they can find co workers and get together to share a dream like doing something that they can do together. That's going to improve their community so One more of the big ideas from the book that I also love is in. Here's how you frame it. I believe it's the title of a chapter but I'm not looking at it at this moment. Is Revisiting the past to see the future and so talk about that just for a couple of minutes so you know you have to tell a compelling story about change to get anybody to follow you because any new idea. There are so many things that people can say retried it before and it didn't work or they question your motives even of they used to be your best friend suddenly. You're asking them to change. So you have to have a compelling story and why should people believe you that it's really possible so sometimes you have to go back and find a thread in the past that shows that the president is not inevitable and you can create a better future? That's really important. I tell of stories of that of companies that have changed their idea of the past. Cbs which is a large. While I was GONNA say drugstore chain in the US but they went back to their roots. Yeah but they went back to their roots and realized that it started out some ways in the health business and so they recast their history to say we've always been concerned about health. And then they started doing some really dramatic things like taking tobacco out of the stores and putting clinics. You now can get your healthcare from a clinic in a CBS there. I have a lot of stories about that. The city of Milwaukee a rust belt city was seen at the place that the beer that made Milwaukee famous etc manufacturing city but they went back and they recast that they realized that. We're really all about water that beer and what they manufactured heights and bows is all about water and they may themselves the water city and for each of us. Personally in a we tell stories about ourselves About how it has to be this way because that's what I did in the past and so it looked like you can't change anything in the future. Will I say. Go back and read this at that past and find something that you're missing that you did spectacularly and make back your story look at what I did and what I could do and what we could do together awesome so it's pretty obvious to anyone who is listening to us that you're passionate about your work. Which is of course fantastic. I can't think of a person that I've had on. This had the opportunity to have this conversation with that. Isn't that's not true and yet there's more to you than just the work so I'm curious something with something that you do for fun so a lot of what I do for fun right now at this moment is the work so I'm having fun. I'm on a book tour. I've had many People that I know well who have given great party so far one was at Sesame Street on organization you talk about in the book and I tweeted myself with elmo the Mufid was cookie monster So so I have fun because I care about the message and others so I love people. I mean a lot of what I consider. Fun is to be with people and many people in the book I got to know well. This isn't dispassionate. Arm's length research. These are real people that I knew some famous like the former mayor of New Orleans or Mike Bloomberg. Some not so famous. That's all on of what I do is people and people and places. I really loved nature so all the climate change things resonate with me. I love trees and now that we know the trees make us healthy looking.

US president Your Coalition Jeff bezos Milwaukee Amazon New Orleans CBS New York City cantor founder George Soros Kanter Queens New York Cbs Mike Bloomberg nets Keith
"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

14:39 min | 1 year ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

"That's the competition And Brandeis and was a fellow at Harvard Law School Simultaneously Holding the Guggenheim Fellowship. Her PhD is from the University of Michigan. And while I'm from Michigan I will not hold that against her. I am so glad to have you Rosa. Thank you for being here this plank. You it's my pleasure and about those honorary degrees you have to like. Commencement Allot gift. I'm sorry you have to like Commencement Alive. Unsure obscene those bright young faces eager to greet the world so happy to be out of school. Yeah that's I have had. We've had the Great Fortune. Made a lot of having alone folks on the show In in all sorts of all sorts of things four star generals and lots of other folks. folks that you know. I know well and but I don't think that anyone has twenty four honorary degrees. So I'm just GonNa leave that alone and say so when you started out in your career. You didn't think you'd end up with twenty books and twenty four honorary doctorates. I'm guessing so my question is sort of tell us just a little bit about sort of the path. I may not have assumed I get there but I was hoping because not so much the specific numbers but because my goal was fought leadership. That's a form of leadership. Now I also have actually led teams created initiatives led benchers so leadership from many angles but thought leadership is important. Ideas moves world and You don't have necessarily at the largest amount of money if you have big ideas and so one of the points. I make an outside. The building is that many people have accomplished berry big things because of besides of their idea not the size of the resort the resources they came with so I always wanted to have big ideas and truly make a difference. That was always. That was always my goal. That's that's awesome so this is the twentieth book and so I would just start here. Talk about the book and say so. You're nineteen books in what leads you to write a book that you're calling. Think outside the building like what's the driver for this? What was your purpose writing this particular? My this is a this is a message. This is more than a book a mission and it's a mission because I see the problems in the world. I see how many people are upset about the problems whether it's climate change gun. Violence Homelessness Racial Disparities Gender Disparities Education short falls health issues so many problems and I get tired of people winding is early on in the book. I I was at too many dinner. Parties accompanied by fine wines W. H. I. N. E. S. My editor toned down on much of the pond reduced. And because I wanted people to stop whining and start doing because one thing that I knew personally and that I had discovered an seen in my research and other research is that the happiest people are the people who are active and who were tackling the most difficult problems and you get depressed by the problems. But they don't because they're taking action and any action is better than none. So I wanted to stimulate people to action and I wanted to find the ways that we could do something. It actually would move the needle on those problems. That also skills would be useful in your job your company your startup your community but especially useful if you were gonNA solve a big problem and we're talking about both of those things because everyone who's watching listening to US consuming this and joining us. The you know they may or may not be thinking about a big problem in the ways that you the kinds that you just described and yet one of the things I love about the book is that so much of it does apply to us in all of the work that we do not just in that mission that you have a of of solving the big problems and helping US attack big problems. So use the phrase. It's the title of the book and it's sort of the metaphor that you used throughout the book idea of getting outside of the building. Talk about what you mean by that. I mean we can probably guess but we have you here. So why should we guess? What do you mean by that? And and why is that? Why is that particular strategy so important so first of all by the way you said couple sentences back that most people aren't thinking about those big problems they may not be thinking about them specifically because it's in their job description but they're thinking about them because it it's a random every day we can't escape from it? I mean right now at the moment we're talking launch week. China is now closed travelers because of a virus that isn't contained within warders. Think about that for a moment. Not that everybody who's watching is going to go to China. But you may have some people watching from China and epidemics now. Don't stop at borders. They get on an airplane and travel with you Diseases so you can't escape it. Refugees come to your neighborhood. Climate Change affects you of your on the coast sea level rise but if you're inland and you were counting on Great. Fresh fish and the fish stocks are depleted. It affects everybody. So that's one of my premises too and the question is that we just passive and wait till some grand guru fixes it or is there something that can be done and when I mentioned getting on an airplane and taking the disease from China say to the US? That's outside the building. I mean you see if that's outside any one corporation anyone. Hospital say health isn't the hospital. Health is the entire environment healthy airy breezed. Health is the travel connections and other communication connections between people. Health is nutrition So we often make the mistake of thinking all the action is just inside the building and also buildings are establishments there the conventional way of doing things and if we want change and look at some of those problems that we've been around a long time they haven't been solved yet. Education for example in the United States education has an education reform has been on the agenda forever since I was born yet. It isn't necessarily better because people try to do it. The same old way so think outside the building is to encourage just be creative think beyond conventional wisdom and proposing new solution and sometimes that little new solution that you start in your neighborhood wherever it is. I have one in Kansas City that I kind of like. I have others around the US. I have one in Brazil. can sometimes then grow other people pick up on the idea you grow your idea and suddenly like Red Thunberg. The seventeen year old Swedish climate activists. You have a worldwide movement sometimes not every not every time of course but we never know we never know when we start where it will go your whole point is we gotta take action and back to my point. When I said to your point I mean I agree with you when I said we may not be thinking about it. That may not be why you came here. You may have come or may listen to me regularly thinking about your work specifically but I all I was trying to say is man. What weather your focus in? This moment is taking action on one of these big things or whether you're focuses on being a more effective leader with your team. The ideas that we're going to share in the ideas in this book are are completely valid. So the book is I. I can't sit in the way. The book is stories It's examples stories. You've already been sharing some of those kinds of things with this year and we certainly can't tell all the stories besides we want to buy the book Thank the building but I wanNA get some of your messages at least a few of them and I'm GonNa try and do it. Maybe in some different and maybe even innovative way right. So I'm I think I'm going to no one that you interview is GonNa ask you about what I'm about to ask you. I don't think it's on page one hundred and eighty three the. It's a single line that I love and I just would like you to talk about it because I think it's super important. The line is this small asks of many people can be powerful. Because I think that's a message at all of us as leaders regardless of what our mission is regardless of where we're headed? Think that's something we've forget. Can you just talk about that a little bit less so first of all? You're working on something big. Let's say and You know we can still talk about working just getting active doing something doing anything. So you're working on something and you know that you don't have all the resources you need yourself Now do you go to one big source your boss? A foundation venture capitalist or in the beginning. It may be hard to find one angel one big source. What can be powerful is finding if you can't find one big source finding five sources that are smaller and going and just ask 'em a little bit. It's very hard to say. Yes to really big request. It takes a long time. You have to have all the power points in order but if you're making a modest request and it's within that person's power to do it you can get them on your side and so then you ask lots of people things in their domain and soon you have what you need to get started and the other thing I love Yes yes yes yes and yes and the other thing I love about. This is when we think we need to make the big ask and I'll just speak for me like and that's not only may not work. It's like you try. Hit the home run the first time. But it's like it's really easy to procrastinate on that but it's really easy to start taking action with a small ask that I'm GonNa ask this person talk to this person at dinner. I'm going to have this conversation of ear and so it gets us right where you started with which is to start to turn action which I believe in big ideas I keep saying big ideas size of your idea but you start one step at a time. One ask at a time and gradually I tell a great story of somebody concerned about climate change. Just one guy who's actually starting to make a difference in how we think about the oceans and the oceans are so critical to the climate and there's no financing mechanism for oceans. They're not there's no sovereignty. I mean there's the oceans are little few hundred hundred miles out from borders. So He's getting action on this by just going to lots and lots of meetings and he's not only only making a small he's also offering to help and if you offer to help first before you asked. You often have people on your side. So that's another good in your career in your job less than you can take from my book absolutely so so. I guess when you've written and been as as much as successful as you you can actually met name something after yourself and you can call it canters law which I love and so I'm going to tell people what it is and I'd like us to talk about that because I think again. It is critical. You talk about mastering miserable. Middle's it's the subtitle of chapters and here's Kanter's law and then I want you to riff on talk about that here. It is everything can look like a failure in the middle and I think everyone who's listening in or watching can say he been there but let's talk about that and let's talk about how your advice for how we don't get stuck there or stymied there right so first of all. Yes name a law after self. Just do it for fun. I mean I did it before anybody would necessarily take it seriously. I would always say when I told an audience. I call it Panthers Law. I said you may not but that's what I'm doing. It's the same thing you establish something over a long period of time just by putting a stake in the ground well that everything look like a failure in the middle so starting anything has a lot of excitement. You haven't inspiring vision or you're ready to get going and then you hit the inevitable. Roadblocks of metals You hit something that you didn't know is there. Because you've never been down the road before like your about to get a new building built or you're doing a reconstruction of your house and you discover. There was a toxic waste dump in the area. That would stop everything. But you have people on your side who supported you but they keep changing. They don't have the same stake in it. You do so people move on. They died I have one guy Who has a fantastic new venture? A lawyer he was a lawyer and he has venture selling solar lighting in Africa which is doing fabulous things but I when they imported the solar salts. They didn't work and does he. Send them back to China. Does he get a Danish engineer than the next thing that happens. They get that straightened out. Is he discovers him Veselin. Because they're people hire their relatives or not always the most responsible. Then there's an e Bala outbreak I mean. This will make the rest of us feel that our lives are in pretty good shape. I mean he had so much go wrong and what got.

US China Michigan University of Michigan Great Fortune Middle Harvard Law School Brandeis Africa Fresh fish Guggenheim Fellowship editor Panthers Veselin engineer Red Thunberg Kansas City Brazil.
"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

"As leaders we are in the change business if you had the chance to listen to a legend talk about innovation and Change. Would that be of use to you? It would be and you're in the right place. That's what we're doing today right here on this episode of the remarkable.

"moss kanter" Discussed on The Marie Forleo Podcast

The Marie Forleo Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on The Marie Forleo Podcast

"The. Okay. It's Marie Forleo. And this is the podcast version of our word winning show. Marie TV. Now, the video version has some useful and entertaining visuals. So if you want to check that out go to Marie Forleo dot com forward slash Marie TV, real find this and hundreds of other episodes. Thanks so much for listening. Hey, it's marine for Leo. And you are watching Marie TV the place to be to create a business in life, you love and this whole thing. Jig CUNY to stay you. And I as in cues, let's do this. Today's question comes from D. And she writes, hi, Marie. I'm a follower from India since I was a young girl. I wanted to start my own business travel the world and make a name for myself and more today at three one I've achieved most of that. So my question is what do you do after your dreams? Come true. How do I get the same drive and passion I had when I was twenty four before. I achieved all my goals. Ten realized my dreams d this is a fantastic question. Something so many of us can relate to we set some goals. We achieved them, and then we look around and say is this all there is you may know this already, but it certainly bears repeating we human beings need more than just a cheating. Our goals to be happy. We need to constantly challenge. Ourselves we need to learn and. Grow, and we need to contribute to others. But here's the most important thing that we need. We need a compelling vision for our future as Rosa Beth moss Kanter said, and yes, it's a tweet will. A vision is not just a picture of what could be it's an appeal to our better selves, a call to become something more. I'd love to ask you d what's your long-term vision? What kind of things do you want experience in your life over the next five ten twenty or thirty years? What kind of things do you want to do in this world? How do you want to make an impact is it through your family's at through some creative endeavor? Is there some problem that you wanna see solved or try this one on for size? Imagine yourself far far far into the future on your deathbed because yes, some day were all going to be there describe the kind of life you want to look back on what do you wanna do with your life? How will you've spent the decades that you've been here on the surf these questions can help stimulate your imagination and reignite your dreams because I believe that each of us has a deep inner hunger for something more, and that every single one of us is here for a reason. Now d- I don't know if you. I believe in God some higher creative force or the universe. But if you're open to it. I would also suggest asking for guidance and be open to receiving it. I'm born and raised Catholic girl in my twenties. I remember journaling into God, particularly when I felt stuck and I would say you gave me gifts. I'm here to use them. God show me the way and speaking of the early twenties don't discount hormones as a possible factor for all that passion, you had at twenty four the same thing that makes you wanna go out dancing all night and do other things all night. Brings a lot of passion to everything else you're into now. I'm not saying you can't recapture that feeling, but you gotta admit we all have a little bit of an extra helping hand when we're young. It's kind of like hamburger helper except as made a hormones. Hey. I like that. That's my eighty year. Q. D let us know how it goes. Now, I would love to hear from you. Have you ever reached all of your goals and had a is this all there is moment? What did you do to get reinspired? And even if you haven't I believe all of us need, a bigger vision for our future. And I would love to hear yours as always the best stuff happens after the episode over at Marie folio dot com. So go there and leave a comment now, did you like this video if so subscribe and share it with your friends, and if you want even more great resources to create a business in life that you love plus some personal insights for me that not only talk about any male. Get your buns over to Marie Forleo dot com and sign up for Email updates stay on your game and keep going for your dreams the world needs that special gift that only you have. Thank you so much for watching. And I'll catch you next time on Marie TV.

Marie TV. Marie Forleo Marie Jig CUNY Rosa Beth moss Kanter India thirty years eighty year
"moss kanter" Discussed on Tilted: A Lean In Podcast

Tilted: A Lean In Podcast

12:00 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Tilted: A Lean In Podcast

"And I walked into this conference center, and there's probably two hundred and fifty people there, and I was only woman, and I thought to myself that's not right. I mean for this sort of sentiment of being the only thirty years ago is one thing, but to have been the only woman leader in this conference three or four years ago. I felt I felt appalled. I am thrilled to be sitting down today with Marianne Cooper in Lorraine e e two of my co authors on women in the workplace are big study every year in our fantastic partner. Nicky Waller from the Wall Street Journal Marianna sociologist at VM-ware's women's leadership innovation lab at Stanford University and was a lead researcher on the book, lean in Marianne thrilled to have you. It's good to be here. Lorraina senior partner at McKinsey and company and leads the organization's diversity inclusion efforts globally. It's wonderful to be here, and Nikki is editor for live journalism and special coverage at the Wall Street Journal, so she overseas everything the journal does live and is our point person on women in the workplace and has been an amazing partner. So happy to have you. Thanks for having me. So Marianne to kick things off walks through our findings on onlys. So what we learned is that about twenty five percent of employees Corp. In America are the only or one of the only in the room. Meaning the only woman the only person of color in their room. So this both reflects the under representation of these groups and corporate America, but also sets in motion a whole set of negative dynamics. This is research that was pioneered by Rosa Beth moss Kanter, she's a professor at Harvard Business School, and she wrote a book in nineteen seventy seven called men and women of the corporation, which was enough Naga fee of fortune five hundred company and one thing she talks about in her book is the experiences of twenty women. They were in a sales group of three hundred people and these women were scattered across fourteen offices. There's only twenty of them in nineteen seventy seven and she analyzed her experiences. And what she described is that this whole tokenism dynamic place where women weren't seen as individuals that they are they were seen as Representative of all women. And with this happened a few negative things start to her one is that they're highly visible. One woman in a sea of man stands out. She draws a larger share. Really stands out same as when there's only one block person room all white people or any other scenario, we can create where you are the only one you draw larger share of attention, and what then happens is because of that heightened visibility your performance become scrutinized, everything you say do can be put under a microscope, and while you are just an individual person, your individual success or failure can become Representative of your larger group, which means me as an individual woman. My successor performance becomes a litmus test for what women as a group are capable of which raises the stakes on any kind of performance. So that's why we we see only feeling a lot of pressure to perform on guard, and like they're left out the other dynamic that occurs. Is it leads to greater stereotyping? So when there's a team and five of them are women the variation. Among those five women helps to counter generalizations about women. But when there's only one woman, she's a stand standing for all women that actually primes gender stereotypes. So there's greater pressure to conform to expectations traditional feminine expectations. So when a woman only is in that situation, she's expected to conform. And then when she steps outside those gender lines. She gets a lot of pushback. So all that together means it's much worse experience. When you're the the only or one of the only in the room, and that's exactly what our research fines, and how many women are only. One in five women are only forty percent of women in senior roles women in technical roles. Forty five percent of women of color. Thirty five percent of men of color. Seventy six percent of lesbians and seventy percent of Gaiman Llerena. Can you walk through a little bit about what we learned in? While you think it matters short. Let me start with maybe a story a very personal story. So I'm a woman, obviously, also Chinese I'm a woman of color in the United States. There are many times I will walk into a room that has a power dynamic in. And I will be the only one to deliver that your strategy is wrong that you need to change. The course of your portfolio. Investments really hard topics, and it is hard to be the only one it's an incredible experience of both performance pressure at the same time as well as a sense of isolation and people will describe it differently. And what's really interesting is in our data. We give data and facts to something that women experience all the time. The the story that the journal published on this phenomenon had when I first read of the first time my jaw dropped. I mean, what some of these women who are incredibly accomplished women were saying, you know, one thing was it's like, they don't even see you on the one hand, you are so conspicuous because you're the only person who is like you at the table and the other hand people talk right over you. You know, we have someone who was the former presently American Bar Association who was a lawyer for forty years and still regularly gets mistaken for a defendant in the courtrooms that she goes into or juror or stewardess at one point or another. So there's also that there is this assumption that you are not the person that your qualifications determine that you are. And then also when you go kind of off campus. Right. I mean, at least in a meeting. Everybody knows what they're supposed to be doing. And they know what their roles are. And then, you know, the worse has talked to us about go to the company picnic or some dinner and is actually even worse, but people go right back to their social biases. And we have one woman that we talked to you in store marketing director who found herself at a dinner with twelve other male colleagues, and they spend a lot of time talking about labor, and their wives and labor, and what was like the first days of having kids, and she was not asked a question until finally she said, yeah, you know, it was amazing. My child just walked out of my woman, thirty seconds, and that kind of shut it down. But you really have to have that moxie. If you're the only player at the table, I think the concept. Of being invisible invisible. At the same time is really well said, Nikki the one thing that I think is really important for people to realize it also has an impact on how you can perform. So give you an example years ago. I had co-founded ad tech startup. My co founder was a man wonderful, man. And we were on San hill road pitching. And I would do the main presentation I did the dog and pony show. And then we all sat down, and there was a section and after about three or four pitches we were walking out on the sidewalk, and he said to me Rachel, you really let me down like you're not speaking up enough in the post pitch QNA. And I need you to be pulling your weight, and I had a moment of clarity. Where I said to him just watch the next time that we do the pitch like watch. What happens we do it? We get out on the sidewalk, and he says, oh my God. They don't ask you any questions. I can't believe you talk as much as you do. It was completely reframed for him. But it was an issue of performance like he actually thought. I was leading him down and not doing enough when he realized how hard I was working to speak up in contribute to the conversation. Like, his whole sense of my performance change. And I think that's a really big piece here is that organizations need to realize we're not at all saying getting one woman on the team is in a good thing. I mean, we want women at the tables were decisions are made. We want women at the tables where important discussions are being held. But if it's only one woman, she feels isolated and she feels on guard. It's so much harder for her to be her best self into really contribute. It's also interesting how male allies can help. I love that example, because it happens all the time not just in Silicon Valley. But what oftentimes male leaders ask is. What can I do? And they're thinking do I need to change my entire maternity or paternity leave policy, and yes, you should take a look at that. But there are smaller things you can do every single day. You are in a meeting most likely with a single woman multiple times a day make. I'm sure she's heard I was in a meeting and all these guys were talking over. They were so enthusiastic couldn't get an word in edgewise. And finally, one of the senior folks in the room said Lorraine, I think you've been trying to get in there. What's your point view on this and just helped shift the conversation back to me? So I do think there are things that men can do to help in these moments where only are are in the spotlight and having a harder time. Let's talk a little bit about what does the data say. Or what is the data point to in terms of what it looks like day to day to be an only I think one interesting thing is that there is a penalty for companies when women or people of color experience being an only which is they're less likely to feel happy and satisfied in their organization, and they're less likely to stay and if we tie that back to our overall research that says that only two percent of women leave the workforce to take care of their families. That means that when a woman decides to leave she's not leaving to go home. She's leaving to go to your competitor. That's a great point. We also looked at. What are called microaggressions these every day slights or everyday discrimination that women face, and we know only are much more likely to experience these everyday slights Marianne. Can you talk a little bit about like what that looks like microaggressions are behaviors action statements that demean insult and exclude people from underrepresented groups, and it can range from a smaller slight like somebody talking over somebody else. Too much more hostile explicit actions. Like derogatory comments, but the intent of these actions and behaviors whether intentional or unintentional is that it communicates underrepresented groups often that they're less competent, and that they don't belong and their repeated and regular they happen all the time in team meetings often every day, it can even happen for people, and they add up and over time with this means is that people are dealing with feeling devalued overlooked, and they're they pay a price for that both emotionally and professionally it's exhausting taxing for them on a day to day. Basis. So we know that men are only two what does that experience? Look like. So then portent thing understand about the experience of being the only one is it's not just about low numbers. It's about the intersection between low numbers and low status. And other words, the reason why people are having these worst experiences not just because they're the only one, but they're the only one of a lower status group. So for example, research has shown that when white men are tokens, it's not so bad actually, a colleague of mine Christine Williams at UT in Austin, did this groundbreaking steady of white men who work in nursing a woman dominated occupation. And what she found is that because of gendered expectations that men are more competent and often better at leadership. They were writing what she called the glass. Escalator people made the assumption and made the mistaken assumption that they were doctors. So they benefited from that my other colleague Edina Harvey Wingfield at university of Washington in Saint Louis studied black men working in nursing. Saying they didn't get to ride that glass escalator instead of being mistaken for doctors. They were mistaken as janitors so they had a much more negative experience. And we're seen as less skilled unless competent women counterparts. So when low numbers interact with low status, that's when you get the negative experience of being an only. I'm

Marianne Cooper Nikki Wall Street Journal America partner Representative senior partner McKinsey employees Corp Stanford University United States Nicky Waller American Bar Association Rosa Beth moss Kanter Christine Williams Rachel Harvard Business School researcher university of Washington editor
"moss kanter" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

"Get people to learn how to learn not just to learn stuff if you get my meaning they have to be agile in order to kind of live in this world and that means that these higher order skills of things purposes part of that you know understanding what the big frame is what's the big y behind this asking big questions but also being able to sort of recognize that i have bias when i'm observing what's going on in the world and that i may need to test those filter the information differently so these these skills have become a lot more expansive and a lot less based on sort of linear analytic skills and they become much more about integrated sort of self regulated learning skills to quote my colleague viviane being in the west coast talks about self regulated learning i think this is a really important part that holds all this together and other piece that's really critical to them is is is having the social skills to navigate this territory with other people because they're doing it together with other with others and then also create a skills being able to imagine different possibilities and refrain things and combined things that normally aren't combined which is where as you know a lot of innovation comes from so all of a sudden what we've seen shift in it feels like all of a sudden it's really been probably the last twenty years but it's really all of us it feels that we've shifted to this world where mid level leaders that is leaders at the center of your organization are literally and figuratively at the center of the organization they're at the center of everything that's going on and they're having to pivot back and forth quite a bit so you said a lot right there and there's one thing i'd love to double click into which all of which i found fascinating and i'm a huge fan of doctor main she does a lot of work with us here actually at salesforce around biases in bias in data all kinds of things so super super fascinating but but i would say that one thing you said in there is is these kind of center managers are to me they're almost the storytellers of what the purpose is in so i wanna really double click into this conversation we had during bullish bearish around kind of purpose trump's dragging you very clarify clear on that but purposes kind of almost the new prophet right it's driving people to feel like they're part of something larger than themselves and that really galvanizes motivates people to bring their bestself everyday not that people don't want to do that i'm talking about actually making that happen yes yes so right so purpose is incredibly important in galvanizing people because it is touching on a much higher order way of thinking it's actually tapping into that need that we have to understand why we're doing what we're doing to understood to give it meaning to give it contextualisation one of the things we know you know in this has been written about an awful lot lately roosevelt moss kanter writes about this quite a bit the idea that leaders are essentially makers of meaning because if we can make meaning what we're getting we're getting people engaged in something bigger than themselves and by doing so we're getting discretionary effort we're getting meaning and we're getting self actualization in the in the workplace it's also something that's inherently a lot more stable than things like initiatives or strategies which are having to change awful lot but you can anchor on purpose and it can stay relatively enduring in stable for long words of time and it's also very clarifying for people so it's this kind of anchoring affect and this meaning affect that it has that i think has always been there but we're now realizing plays a larger part in counteracting some of the volatility and complexity that we're having to grapple with in motto positions and so how do you how would you record so you know within the.

twenty years
"moss kanter" Discussed on Famous Failures

Famous Failures

06:51 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Famous Failures

"I was the third ranked one legged woman in the United States. I'm thinking if I just stay standing, I can win the gold. So I get in the starting gate, the race, official counts down three, two one go. I get to where I could see the finish line and I think I made it, and that's when I hit the ice and I fell. Through another episode of famous failure is where I interview the world's most interesting people about the failures they've had in their lives and what they learned from that. I'm your host. I was on her role before I introduced today's guests. I have a request from you. The podcast is fairly new, so I would really appreciate your help and spreading the word. You can do that in one of three ways. You can tell your friends about the podcast. You can subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform that you're listening on, or you can leave a review on itunes or Google play. In addition, if you'd like to keep in touch with me and say, Hello to me, you can subscribe to my weekly newsletter, the weekly contrarian at has thousands of subscribers and readers call it. The one email I look forward to each week every Thursday. You'll get a list of tools, articles, books, and other gems that challenged conventional wisdom and change the way that you look at the world. You can sign up for that by go. To my website was on all com or texting. My first name Ozan OC A N two three, four, five, three, four, five. And if you sign up now, you'll also get a free book called the contrarian handbook, eight principles for innovating your thinking. Again, you can get that right now on the go by texting osy A N two three, four, five, three, four, five or heading over to my website Ozan model dot com. This week's guest on famous failures is Bonnie. Saint John bunny is in Olympic medalist. Bestselling author, highly sought after keynote speaker and a leadership consultant. Despite having her right leg amputated at age, five bunny became the first African American ever to win medals in the Winter Olympic competition. She took home a silver and two bronze medals at the nineteen eighty four winter Paralympics in Austria. President Clinton appointed her as director for human capital issues on the White House, National Economic Council. And NBC nightly news selected Bonnie as one of the five most inspiring women in America Bonnie travels. The globe. These days is a highly sought after keynote speaker, fortune five hundred business consultants, television and radio personality. And business owner. She is currently the CEO of the blue circle leadership institutes where she leaves international live and virtual leadership programs on top of everything else that she does. Bonnie is also the best selling author of seven books per most. Recent book is Mike resilience. Minor shifts for major boosts in focus, dry and energy. I highly recommend the book. You can find out more about the book and get yourself a copy at micro resilience dot com. In our interview, recover quite a bit of territory. I was really blown away by this interview by how open and transparent Bonnie was with her failures in addition to giving. Really actionable practical strategies that you can implement right away to move forward when you fall down. I hope you enjoy the conversation as much as I did without further ado, I give you Bonnie Saint John, Bonnie, welcome to the show. Thank you. This is such a great topic. I love this topic. Thank you so much for making the time. I've been really looking forward to this conversation for several weeks now, you're so amazing on so many levels, personal lead ache in and professional. You've got so many accomplishments, but what about failures? What have been some of the most valuable failures that you've had in your life? Well, I think this is such an important top at because kids today see so much on social media, and they see everybody positioning their lives as perfect, and it's just not that way. So when I speak to all kinds of groups, sometimes I'll show a slide of all my failures, but the failure I most famous for is falling down at the Olympics, and I was the third ranked one legged woman in the United States. Dates when I got on the team and I was glad to make it because they only took three one leg women on the team. So I just barely made it. Nobody expects you to beat your teammates, nevermind anyone else. Right. So I just went thinking, I'm going to raise, I get to represent the United States of America. I was so excited, but in the first run of the slalom race, I went down the first run and when the times riposted I had the number one time in the world. So it was a complete upset. I had trained over summer on a glacier with two legged skiers. I had just outworked a lot of the competition, but it was an upset and I was so excited, but you have to do a second run in order to get the medal. So I went back to the top waiting my turn and I heard other women going ahead of me where crashing. So on the second run there was this dangerous icy spot. I'm thinking, you know, heroin, Sierra, I don't have to do anything crazy if I just stay standing. I can win the gold. So I get in the starting gate, the race, official counts down three, two one go. I'm hitting the red and blue poles. I get to where I could see the finish line and I think I made it, and that's when I hit the ice and I. I'll never one of the world and I'm sitting on my rear end in the snow. My mind wanted to give up to think, you know, oh no, I got a face my sponsors. You know how disappointing, but my physical training was always to finish. So before I could think about it, my body got up got over the finish line when the dust cleared. I was still in third place. I won a bronze medal. You know, I thought gave over. I thought I lost, but I got up quickly got over the finish line and still won the bronze medal. Now I, you know, I went on, I won another bronze in giant slalom. Seventh in the downhill a silver medal for overall performance. You couldn't win the overall performance. If you hadn't finished all the races, you know. So we so important that I'd finish that race when I didn't feel like it. You know, thinking about it later, the woman who won the gold medal in that race, I was the better skier that her in the first run when nothing wrong. I was the best slalom skier in the world. In the second run, it wasn't that she didn't bowl. She also fell. So how did she beat me? He only beat me by getting up faster. She was the quicker getting. Rapper. So that has been such an when you say, what is your most valuable failure that has been such an important lesson to me of. It's not just that you fell down. It's how fast did you get up even in the midst of top competition, our ability to get up and get up faster makes such a difference. And so I have shared that failure over it over and over with so many people. Rosa moss Kanter from the Harvard Business School says, resilience is the meta skill. You know, that ability to get up faster is the key skill going forward experience I think gave rise to a quote of yours. Oh,

Bonnie Saint John United States official gold medal John bunny NBC President Clinton blue circle White House Rosa moss Kanter Harvard Business School business owner Paralympics consultant heroin CEO Mike itunes Google
"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are moving on interim number two in today's chronicles of federal budgeting is hard infrastructure the trump administration's longawaited plan to fix overhaul or otherwise repair everything from waterways to highways to commercial space infrastructure it came out today about which couple of things first of all despite what you might be seeing and hearing it is not a trillion and a half dollar government plan it's two hundred billion in federal seed money that the white house is offering hoping others will pony up which gets us to point over to where is the rest of that money gonna come from marketplace's serie manish wars on that one on the face of it the president's plan has a math problem how to turn two hundred billion dollars into 15 torelli in dollars it flipped the current kind of funding paradigm on its head michael sargent is a policy analyst for transportation and infrastructure at the rightleaning heritage foundation normally he says the federal government would cover half to eighty percent of large infrastructure projects is this program would cover a maximum of twenty percent it favours projects that can find other sources of revenue and it basically says two states you figure it out for fame kinda magical thinking that would have the president say we'll build a wall in another country will pay for it rose beth moss kanter is a professor at harvard business school and advised hillary clinton on infrastructure she says state's can't afford it so they are likely to look at the two places that they've already been looking told and again after scott greenberg is executive editor of pews state line twenty six states have raised their gas taxes in the past four years many states are now creating new toll road asking states to raise more money is an ironic twist says brookings aaron klein he says the recently passed tax bill eliminates the state and local tax deduction which makes any new taxes particularly unpalatable it also raises the cost of municipal bonds at the same time new industry.

president michael sargent policy analyst rightleaning heritage foundati federal government beth moss kanter professor harvard business school hillary clinton scott greenberg executive editor aaron klein two hundred billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent four years
"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are moving on interim number two in today's chronicles of federal budgeting is hard infrastructure the trump administration's longawaited plan to fix overhaul or otherwise repair everything from waterways to highways to commercial space infrastructure it came out today about which couple of things first of all despite what you might be seeing and hearing it is not a trillion and a half dollar government plan it's two hundred billion in federal seed money that the white house is offering hoping others will pony up which gets us to point over to where is the rest of that money gonna come from marketplace's serie manish wars on that one on the face of it the president's plan has a math problem how to turn two hundred billion dollars into 15 torelli in dollars it flipped the current kind of funding paradigm on its head michael sargent is a policy analyst for transportation and infrastructure at the rightleaning heritage foundation normally he says the federal government would cover half to eighty percent of large infrastructure projects is this program would cover a maximum of twenty percent it favours projects that can find other sources of revenue and it basically says two states you figure it out for fame kinda magical thinking that would have the president say we'll build a wall in another country will pay for it rose beth moss kanter is a professor at harvard business school and advised hillary clinton on infrastructure she says state's can't afford it so they are likely to look at the two places that they've already been looking told and again after scott greenberg is executive editor of pews state line twenty six states have raised their gas taxes in the past four years many states are now creating new toll road asking states to raise more money is an ironic twist says brookings aaron klein he says the recently passed tax bill eliminates the state and local tax deduction which makes any new taxes particularly unpalatable it also raises the cost of municipal bonds at the same time new industry.

president michael sargent policy analyst rightleaning heritage foundati federal government beth moss kanter professor harvard business school hillary clinton scott greenberg executive editor aaron klein two hundred billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent four years
"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are moving on interim number two in today's chronicles of federal budgeting is hard infrastructure the trump administration's longawaited plan to fix overhaul or otherwise repair everything from waterways to highways to commercial space infrastructure it came out today about which couple of things first of all despite what you might be seeing and hearing it is not a trillion and a half dollar government plan it's two hundred billion in federal seed money that the white house is offering hoping others will pony up which gets us to point over to where is the rest of that money gonna come from marketplace's serie manish wars on that one on the face of it the president's plan has a math problem how to turn two hundred billion dollars into 15 torelli in dollars it flipped the current kind of funding paradigm on its head michael sargent is a policy analyst for transportation and infrastructure at the rightleaning heritage foundation normally he says the federal government would cover half to eighty percent of large infrastructure projects is this program would cover a maximum of twenty percent it favours projects that can find other sources of revenue and it basically says two states you figure it out for fame kinda magical thinking that would have the president say we'll build a wall in another country will pay for it rose beth moss kanter is a professor at harvard business school and advised hillary clinton on infrastructure she says state's can't afford it so they are likely to look at the two places that they've already been looking told and again after scott greenberg is executive editor of pews state line twenty six states have raised their gas taxes in the past four years many states are now creating new toll road asking states to raise more money is an ironic twist says brookings aaron klein he says the recently passed tax bill eliminates the state and local tax deduction which makes any new taxes particularly unpalatable it also raises the cost of municipal bonds at the same time new industry.

president michael sargent policy analyst rightleaning heritage foundati federal government beth moss kanter professor harvard business school hillary clinton scott greenberg executive editor aaron klein two hundred billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent four years
"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are moving on interim number two in today's chronicles of federal budgeting is hard infrastructure the trump administration's longawaited plan to fix overhaul or otherwise repair everything from waterways to highways to commercial space infrastructure it came out today about which couple of things first of all despite what you might be seeing and hearing it is not a trillion and a half dollar government plan it's two hundred billion in federal seed money that the white house is offering hoping others will pony up which gets us to point over to where is the rest of that money gonna come from marketplace's serie manish wars on that one on the face of it the president's plan has a math problem how to turn two hundred billion dollars into 15 torelli in dollars it flipped the current kind of funding paradigm on its head michael sargent is a policy analyst for transportation and infrastructure at the rightleaning heritage foundation normally he says the federal government would cover half to eighty percent of large infrastructure projects is this program would cover a maximum of twenty percent it favours projects that can find other sources of revenue and it basically says two states you figure it out for fame kinda magical thinking that would have the president say we'll build a wall in another country will pay for it rose beth moss kanter is a professor at harvard business school and advised hillary clinton on infrastructure she says state's can't afford it so they are likely to look at the two places that they've already been looking told and again after scott greenberg is executive editor of pews state line twenty six states have raised their gas taxes in the past four years many states are now creating new toll road asking states to raise more money is an ironic twist says brookings aaron klein he says the recently passed tax bill eliminates the state and local tax deduction which makes any new taxes particularly unpalatable it also raises the cost of municipal bonds at the same time new industry.

president michael sargent policy analyst rightleaning heritage foundati federal government beth moss kanter professor harvard business school hillary clinton scott greenberg executive editor aaron klein two hundred billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent four years
"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are moving on interim number two in today's chronicles of federal budgeting is hard infrastructure the trump administration's longawaited plan to fix overhaul or otherwise repair everything from waterways to highways to commercial space infrastructure it came out today about which couple of things first of all despite what you might be seeing and hearing it is not a trillion and a half dollar government plan it's two hundred billion in federal seed money that the white house is offering hoping others will pony up which gets us to point over to where is the rest of that money gonna come from marketplace's serie manish wars on that one on the face of it the president's plan has a math problem how to turn two hundred billion dollars into 15 torelli in dollars it flipped the current kind of funding paradigm on its head michael sargent is a policy analyst for transportation and infrastructure at the rightleaning heritage foundation normally he says the federal government would cover half to eighty percent of large infrastructure projects is this program would cover a maximum of twenty percent it favours projects that can find other sources of revenue and it basically says two states you figure it out for fame kinda magical thinking that would have the president say we'll build a wall in another country will pay for it rose beth moss kanter is a professor at harvard business school and advised hillary clinton on infrastructure she says state's can't afford it so they are likely to look at the two places that they've already been looking told and again after scott greenberg is executive editor of pews state line twenty six states have raised their gas taxes in the past four years many states are now creating new toll road asking states to raise more money is an ironic twist says brookings aaron klein he says the recently passed tax bill eliminates the state and local tax deduction which makes any new taxes particularly unpalatable it also raises the cost of municipal bonds at the same time new industry.

president michael sargent policy analyst rightleaning heritage foundati federal government beth moss kanter professor harvard business school hillary clinton scott greenberg executive editor aaron klein two hundred billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent four years
"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"moss kanter" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Are moving on interim number two in today's chronicles of federal budgeting is hard infrastructure the trump administration's longawaited plan to fix overhaul or otherwise repair everything from waterways to highways to commercial space infrastructure it came out today about which couple of things first of all despite what you might be seeing and hearing it is not a trillion and a half dollar government plan it's two hundred billion in federal seed money that the white house is offering hoping others will pony up which gets us to point over to where is the rest of that money gonna come from marketplace's serie manish wars on that one on the face of it the president's plan has a math problem how to turn two hundred billion dollars into 15 torelli in dollars it flipped the current kind of funding paradigm on its head michael sargent is a policy analyst for transportation and infrastructure at the rightleaning heritage foundation normally he says the federal government would cover half to eighty percent of large infrastructure projects is this program would cover a maximum of twenty percent it favours projects that can find other sources of revenue and it basically says two states you figure it out for fame kinda magical thinking that would have the president say we'll build a wall in another country will pay for it rose beth moss kanter is a professor at harvard business school and advised hillary clinton on infrastructure she says state's can't afford it so they are likely to look at the two places that they've already been looking told and again after scott greenberg is executive editor of pews state line twenty six states have raised their gas taxes in the past four years many states are now creating new toll road asking states to raise more money is an ironic twist says brookings aaron klein he says the recently passed tax bill eliminates the state and local tax deduction which makes any new taxes particularly unpalatable it also raises the cost of municipal bonds at the same time new industry.

president michael sargent policy analyst rightleaning heritage foundati federal government beth moss kanter professor harvard business school hillary clinton scott greenberg executive editor aaron klein two hundred billion dollars eighty percent twenty percent four years