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Best of 2019: George Adamski Pt. 2

Extraterrestrial

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

Best of 2019: George Adamski Pt. 2

"George Danski bounced in his seat as the car rumbled down in desert rove he was sandwiched between two who aliens one from Saturn. The other from Mars. The aliens had told George they were taking him to see his friend from Venus but they had left the lights of the city behind nearly two hours ago and in the fifteen minutes. They'd been driving on the narrow dirt road. George hadn't seen any sign of civilization nation as the car crested over a hill George noticed a glowing object in the distance as they got closer he could make out the objects objects distinct saucer like shape. He recognized it as the ship belonging to his Venetian friend. The car came to a stop about fifty defeat from the flying saucer. The pollution came out to greet them. He beckoned for George to come aboard. George couldn't believe his luck doc he was actually going to see the inside of a flying saucer. The aliens smiled is George took in his surroundings with childlike wonder under they asked him to take a seat on a bench in the middle of the saucers large circular cockpit. They told George they had another surprise for him in in store they weren't just showing him the inside of their ship. They we're going to take him into outer space. Are we alone. Have we been alone. Will we be alone. Stories of avian visitation have been engrained in human history alien. Life may not be confirmed by our obsession with it can't be ignored. Ah Welcome to extraterrestrial on the PODCAST network. I'm Tim and I'm bill. Every Tuesday we visit the marvelous and strange stories about our encounters with with beings from another world. We're aware that some of these tales may seem completely unbelievable. Others may seem all too real but these stories shed light on human nature human beliefs and human psychology and each story has garnered hundreds if not millions of true believers news. And for that reason. We think they're worth exploring. Welcome to our second episode on George Adamski who birthed the alien contact t- he movement when he claimed to have met Venetian alien on November twentieth. Nineteen fifty-three last week. We described. How Georgia's obsession with obtaining -taining the perfect photo of a UFO supposedly lead to something far greater an actual face to face meeting with a being he claimed named was an alien from Venus? This alleged encounter chronicled in George's nineteen fifty-three book the flying saucers have landed. Which also oh included detailed photos of the aliens flying saucer propelled him to worldwide fame and placed him at the forefront of the UFO world? But not everyone who heard. His story was ready to believe it this week. We'll explore the fallout from Georgia's book. We'll his reputation. Survive have the intense scrutiny of government authorities and UFO skeptics. Or will he be proven to be nothing. More than a glory seeking impostor in the fall of nineteen fifty. Three Georgia Danski was the biggest is name in the UFO world. Eventually word of Georgia's incredible story caught the attention of Edward J ruffled the head of project. Blue Book the. US government's official Task Force for studying the UFO phenomenon. Ruffled was already aware of George. George had sent many of his previous previous. UFO photos to the project. Blue Book offices but analysis proved inconclusive. When rebelled heard about Georgia's meeting with Venetian Shen Alien? He decided to investigate the matter himself. He was skeptical of Georgia's story but the uproar was causing merited closer observation. Listen ripple describe meeting George in his nineteen fifty-six book the report on unidentified flying objects sometime in nineteen fifty three deep rumble traveled incognito to the small hamburger stand where George worked in the shadow of the Grand Observatory on the summit of Southern California's. Mount Halla Mar.. The rebelled was surprised to see how crowded the hamburger stand was. He knew word had spread of Georgia's incredible story but he couldn't believe how many people had come to hear it for themselves but if Georgia's fame had gone to his head he didn't show it. He bustled around the hamburger. Stand as if it was any any other day serving customers and cleaning tables finally George settled onto a stool in the middle of the room and began to tell his story. Despite his scepticism Ruppel found himself drawn. In by Georgia's homespun charisma. He spoke plainly. Almost as if he didn't believe the story himself himself but the conviction Georgia's is spoke to his belief that he was telling the truth by the time George was finished speaking everyone. Everyone was hanging on his every word. There hamburgers getting cold. Their beers getting warm. After George finished his story he took an old shoebox out from under the counter. Inside was one of the plaster casts that his friend George Williamson had taken the aliens footprints instead instead of tread marks the aliens blueprints featured mysterious symbols. That seemed to be from some sort of alien language. Although rebelled Ted enjoyed Georgia's story he didn't find it. Believable and the plaster casts did little to sway him. Not only did he find it. Awfully convenient lenient. That Georgia's friend just so happened to take plaster with him on their desert excursion rebelled also wondered. How the alien could have left such a clear imprint in the dry desert ground it seemed like ruffled was the only person left in the hamburger? Stand who question. Georgia's story as rebelled headed Out People were lined up to ask George for more details and to buy the copies of Georgia's UFO photos that he had for sale. Although rebelled suspected expected George was lying about meeting the alien he didn't have enough proof to definitively take George down for now George would remain on the UFO world's proverbial mountaintop. But Soon George became the target of a much more thorough investigation conducted by an up and coming coming. UFO researcher named James Moseley in nineteen forty eight seventeen year old Moseley became interested in Ufo's when he heard the story. Three of pilot named Thomas Mann tell whose plane had crashed after supposedly being zapped by a UFO after leaving college in the early nineteen fifties. Moseley was hungry to make a name for himself. He felt like there was an opportunity within the UFO community while there were a few people people writing about UFO's at the time there weren't any books thoroughly investigating UFO's with a critical eye. Moseley thought he could fill that gap with an in-depth investigation into some of the most prominent figures in the Ufo community. I up on his list. George Adamski Although Moseley was inclined to believe in. UFO's he thought Georgia story was too good to be true but Moseley knew that he couldn't just drive up to Georgia's hamburger hamburger stand and get him to admit he lied if he was going to prove George was a fraud Moseley had to take his story apart piece by piece until until the whole thing came crashing down. One of the biggest pieces of evidence George had in. His favor was assigned affidavit from his friends who were with him the day he he said he met the Alien Moseley wondered if they would maintain their story if he spoke to them individually Moseley began his investigation in the fall of nineteen fifty three a few months after the flying saucers have landed was published. His first stop was winslow Arizona. Zona a small town off route. Sixty six Moseley sat down with Georgia's friend Al Bailey. Who worked for the Santa Fe Railroad? Bailey elite was accompanied by a man named Lyman Streeter. who also claimed to have seen? UFO's on separate occasions. Although he hadn't been there the day George he said he met the Venetian Moseley thought that both men seemed exceedingly nervous. Streeter was so paranoid that he wouldn't even tell Moseley his name. At first I it was as if they feared George would somehow find out about the interview and punish them. Bailey reluctantly admitted that he never actually really saw the alien or his flying saucer during Georgia's supposed meeting with the Alien Bailey. The others were over a mile away as has bailey watched George through an old pair of binoculars. All he saw was a flash of light that he thought could have been a reflection from the flying saucer inspired. By Bailey's honesty streeter added that a photo in Georgia's book called flying saucer. Passing low over trees was wrongly attributed it to a man named Gerald Baker Street or claim that George had credited Baker with the photo in order to make it look like other people had also photographed. thevenoud thevenoud flying saucer. Moseley could scarcely believe what he was hearing. It was his first interview. In Georgia's story was already losing credibility ability. But at this point it was Bailey and streeters word against Georges Moseley needed more information before he could make a definitive judgement. Moseley's next interview was with Dr George Williamson in Prescott Arizona. From the moment. They sat down alarm bell. Started going off in Moseley's Moseley's head similar to Georgia's unearned title of Professor Williamson wasn't actually an accredited doctor. The title was merely merely an affectation he had given himself at first Williamson. Resolutely stood by the affidavit and said if he was asked to signed and again he would but when Moseley pressed him for more details Williamson admitted that he had watched Georgia's meeting with the alien through low-powered oh powered binoculars and hadn't gotten a good look at the alien or his flying saucer. All he had seen was quote someone who could have been anyone nearby. Something that might have been a saucer end quote Moseley thought that Williamson didn't sound entirely convinced of of what he was saying however Moseley couldn't get Williamson to say George was a liar. George was his friend and mentor and Williamson couldn't couldn't believe that George would ever lie for his own gain but Moseley suspected otherwise Moseley was convinced that he had to dig deeper if he was going to take Georgia domke down. He needed sure fire proof that he was a liar. And that proof Lay Georgia's photographs Moseley arrived in Carlsbad California in December nineteen fifty three. He wanted to talk to. Dj detweiler the man who had developed Georges Riches UFO photos. Detweiler had met George about ten years earlier when he went to photograph the hamburger stand. Were George worked. They had remained friends. detweiler let Weiler said that. George wasn't inexperienced enough photographer to create a fake using advanced techniques. There was no sign that George had used. Manipulations nations like a double exposure. Moseley pointed out that just because the photo haven't been manipulated. It didn't mean that it was an authentic picture of a UFO. The object in the photograph might be some sort of model detweiler agreed but like Al Bailey George Williamson. He refused to call all Georgia outright liar. Moseley's conversation with detweiler left him frustrated. He was really hoping to get a definitive answer on the authenticity. Tizzy of Georgia's photographs. Moseley was almost certain. That Georgia's story was a lie but so far nobody would just come out and say it Moseley Salie realized he needed to make the judgment for himself. It was time for him to interview. George Adamski coming coming up. James Moseley faces off with Georgia Domke and now back to the story. So far James Moseley's investigation investigation into Georgia. Danski had turned up a lot of red flags. Many of Georgia's associates admitted that there were inconsistencies in George. The Story and Moseley was having doubts about the authenticity of George's UFO photos. Moseley decided that he needed to speak to George himself. In order to come to a conclusion he wanted to see if Georgia's supposed honesty and integrity held up in person. Moseley arrived at Georgia's hamburger stand on December Fifteenth Nineteen fifty-three the parking lot was nearly full. And the small hamburger stand was packed Moseley surveyed the hamburger stands cramped interior. He saw George sitting at one of the four small tables deep in conversation with some fascinated the patrons it was clear that nobody was there for the food. Everyone's eyes were on George. They wanted to hear his story. And he the obliges them soon enough. George took his place on a stool in the middle of the restaurant and began to hold court. Moseley was drawn in by Georgia's charisma. PRISMA just as Edward Ruffled had been George had a way of engaging with his audience looking into their eyes and giving them a sense he was telling the story. Sorry directly to each one of them. Moseley was no exception. After nearly four hours the crowd had finally dwindled down to just a few people Moseley had to double check his watch. He had barely noticed the time passing. The time had come for Moseley to make his move he. I was surprised at how nervous he was when he had arrived. Moseley was full of confidence that he'd exposed George as a fraud but now he wasn't convinced that George was lying. The man radiated honesty with every ounce of his being mostly moved through the handful of Georgia's remaining audience and introduced himself. George Greeted Moseley warmly. There was no sense of hostility or suspicion coming from George as they squeezed into a booth breath before Moseley could start asking any questions. Georgia Dombrowski took out a letter George Williamson had written to him Williamson was warning saying that Moseley was a snoop and not to be trusted. George laughed upon seeing Moseley's worried expression. He promised that he was much less. Suspicious than Williamson. George told Moseley to ask him anything. He wished Moseley dove right in now that he was face to face with George George his previous trepidation had vanished. He had come for the truth and he was going to get it. The next hour was one of the most confounding and Moseley's life for everyone of Georgia's logical answers to Moseley's questions he would make an equally outrageous statement for instance it's George was actually very humble about his Venetian story and said he knew it was difficult to believe but then he went on to say that he he had begun studying the fifth dimension with no explanation as to what that even meant Moseley. New statements like this were pure hogwash. But when it came to Georgia's story about his encounter with the Venetian. He wasn't so sure anymore. It wasn't about the substance of Georgia's answers logically urgently mostly knew a lot of George was saying didn't make sense but George was so certain of what he was saying as Moseley put it quote his attitude in the face of my obvious doubts was that of one who had been chosen to have a great truth revealed to him a truth Earth. He had faith his doubting. Interviewer would someday come to accept an quote. Eventually the Sun was going down and George was getting tired hired. Although he had remarkable energy he was still a sixty two year old man. He regretfully told Moseley that he had to conclude the interview. George Walked Moseley back to his car. He told him he hoped Moseley would someday discover the truth of what he called. The space brothers message after the interview mostly sat in his car for a bit to write down his thoughts. Moseley printed these notes in his book. Shockingly close to to the truth. Confessions of grave robbing UFOLOGISTS quote. Several of his theories are definitely pseudoscientific or crackpot and of course the fact he relates are still open to very serious doubt however I do not think donskis account is a hoax at at least not in the usual sense of the word if the account is untrue adopts key is nevertheless sincere in relating it there is a very deep very small possibility that adopt skis account is a deliberate an unscrupulous hoax. There is a much greater chance that it was a psychological Goeller so-called psychic experience. There is also a good chance that adopt ski may in all good faith be lying in order to expound doctrines trends and ideas. He sincerely feels to be true. There is a fourth and final possibility. And that is that adopt skis. Account is true. Do and after meeting Danski I would say there is a very definite and real possibility that the incident really happened end quote wrote in these notes. Moseley perfectly captured the ability. George had to sway people to his side. Moseley knew that the details details of Georgia's story didn't hold up but George was so charismatic. That Moseley felt compelled to defend him. However it didn't take long for Moseley's conflicted feelings to change? Shortly after the interview. He obtained news evidence. That cast significant doubt on Georgia's story very shortly after his interview with George Moseley finally got in touch with Gerald Baker. The man who had been falsely he credited with a photo of the Venetians UFO. In Georgia's book he confirmed to Moseley that it was George who really took the picture. Initially Baker had felt indebted to George because he was being allowed to live. Georgia's campground rent-free. This is why he had agreed to take credit for the picture picture in the first place but now Baker was feeling guilty about his part in helping George spread his lies. Moseley was intrigued. Now that he was away from Georgia's spellbinding personality his skepticism had returned however he still didn't have any concrete evidence. Winston George was a liar but Baker did Baker showed Moseley a letter that George had written to him on November seconds. Nineteen fifty three in the letter. George reminded Baker that the photo had been heavily publicized and that Baker's reputation within the UFO community would be ruined if he admitted the picture wasn't his Moseley realized that this letter probably wouldn't be enough to change the minds of Georgia's die-hard believers. But this was definitive proof that George wasn't above lying and furthermore it showed that he wasn't above making subtle threats to those caught in his web of deceit despite what Dj detweiler had said about the supposed authenticity of Georgia's photos mostly was now certain. The George faked them if the photos were truly authentic. Why was it so important for George to have Baker's independently taken photograph in late December nineteen fifty? Three Moseley contacted. Dr Walter Ridell. A senior project engineer at North American aviation who was also part of a UFO club called the civilian saucer investigation as a science minded man. Ridell did I believe that you were foes could be ships from another planet but was skeptical of the decidedly unscientific story but fourth in Georgia's book at Moseley's requests. Dr Ridell agreed to examine Georgia's most famous. UFO photograph using one of the high powered. Microscopes said his lab Moseley nervously awaited the results of ridell examination. This was Moseley's make or break moment. If ridell concluded the picture picture was a fake Moseley would have indisputable proof that George was a liar and then there was another possibility. What if Ridell L. said the photo was real? Would that mean George was actually telling the truth. After what felt like an eternity ridell finally finally called Moseley he had concluded beyond any doubt that the photo was fake. The picture was a low angle shot of the UFO. Giving the viewer a clear. Look at what George identified as its circular landing gear. When idell took a closer look? He discovered word that the landing gear was inscribed with General Electric's ged symbol. It wasn't landing gear. It was a light bulb this this was it. This was the proof. Moseley needed to make Georgia's house of cards come tumbling down. Moseley breathed a sigh of relief. The photo was a fraud and so was George but if Moseley was going to take down George he was going to do it right. He couldn't just go into the world waving around hoechst. UFO Photo and shouting. The George was a liar if Moseley he was going to convince Georgia's followers that their idol was a fraud. He had to organize the findings from his investigations into a single coherent document over the course of the next year. Moseley meticulously prepared. His case against George Finally Moseley's expose titled some some new facts on the flying saucers have landed was published in the January nineteen fifty five addition of Paranormal magazine called Nexus Moseley's comprehensive thorough dismantling of Georgia's story was so popular that the expose was reprinted. The following month Moseley. I was elated. He had achieved his goal of making a name for himself in the UFO community. Now he could sit back and enjoy the fireworks as this. George scrambled to defend himself. But George didn't take the bait. When asked to comment on Moseley's expose George would only say that Moseley was an agent of Wall Street who was only motivated by money? Moseley was perplexed. Georgia's reaction was much more muted than he had anticipated. He was expecting fire. And Fury what he got was the equivalent of a shoulder shrug but behind the scenes James. George knew he needed a strong response to Moseley's accusations. Although his core followers were sticking by his side George new they. They might abandon him if he didn't do something soon. Coming up Georgia Dombrowski takes action and now back to the story story for the first few months after James Moseley's expose Georgia Dombrowski stayed quiet. But that didn't mean he wasn't taking action when the bomb dropped six months later on June first nineteen fifty five with the publication of Georgia's second book inside the spaceships. This new book chronicle Georgia's continuing extraterrestrial adventures and it was a doozy in the book. George described how on February eighteenth nineteen fifty three. He was overcome by an inexplicable urge to go to Los Angeles. He immediately recognized cognizitive as the same feeling that had told him to go into the desert when he first met his friend from Venus Normally George was reluctant to leave his home at Palomar Gardens but if his friend was calling to him George new he had to answer his summons with little else to guide him other other than his intuition. George checked into a downtown hotel and waited. He was certain that his friend would give him some sort of guidance. George look towards the hotel's entryway and saw two men approaching him. He didn't recognize them but they knew him. However for these weren't men they were aliens? They introduced themselves as a Martian named for Khan and a set turney named Romeu. George was surprised at their perfect English and familiarity with human customs. The aliens explained that as contact contact men. It was their job to live among humans and become comfortable navigating through society while George was pleased to meet the new aliens and he was disappointed that his Venetian friend wasn't there for calling in Iran. Who told him not to worry? The Venetian whose name was orthon was waiting for them. In the Mojave Desert George jumped in for Konin Ramousse car without hesitation. He was eager to reunite with orthon. Although their previous meeting had only lasted an hour. George felt a close bond with Venetian Ramu skillfully guided them through the busy streets and onto the highway. Leaving the city. They drove for almost two hours. Leaving Los Angeles has a bright lights behind them. George marveled at the desert's all all encompassing darkness. The only illumination came from the car's headlights and the starry moonlit sky without warning Ramu turned earned the car onto a narrow dirt road. George gazed out at the shadowy scrub brush and twisted Joshua trees as the car bounced along the rough off-road for what seemed like an eternity but all of a sudden a gentle white glow appeared in the distance for a moment. George thought it was as the moon rising into the sky but as they got closer he clawing. Light materialized into the recognizable shape of Orleans flying saucer sure. The moment rumou parked the car. George jumped out and ran to meet his Venetian friend as they greeted each other. George was surprised is to hear Orleans speaking the same perfect English as his companions when they had met in November or on. Didn't speak any English at all. George George wondered how or Thon had learned the language so quickly but he felt like it would be rude to ask or thon didn't seem to think it was a big deal and never provided an explanation. Perhaps Oregon was just being modest and didn't WanNa Brag to George about how quickly he could pick up new languages. It's also possible possible that if George was making this whole thing up it was easier to have Ortho speak English for storytelling purposes after a few pleasantries or on invited George to board the flying saucer. George could scarcely believe it not only was he going to see the interior of a flying saucer but but he was gonNA take a ride in it. George was so engrossed in examining the ships intricate details that he didn't even feel it. Take to the skies. The ride was so smooth that there was almost no sense of movement as saucers soared through the atmosphere as they ascended into the heavens gazing using down at Earth's pristine beauty or thon revealed the purpose of this visit although orthon had communicated the dangers of nuclear weapons when they first met he wanted to elaborate on why he was so worried about them besides threatening the entire human race or thon said that these terrible a weapons threatened the galaxy at large in the event of full scale nuclear war the radiation would escape Earth's atmosphere and permeate into space thereby threatening interstellar travelers from modern scientific perspective. It's obvious that any radiation coming from Earth couldn't compare to what already comes from the sun and other stars not to mention spaces vast couldn't the Venetians just fly around the Earth but George was never one to let science get in the way of a good story by presenting what was likely his own fear of nuclear war as an issue of galactic importance. He gave it more legitimacy in the eyes of his followers Georgia's book went onto describe these several UFO trips. George took with Oregon for con Ramu over the course of the next year during these trips. The Aliens George more about their civilizations peaceful awful way of life and how it could be applied to human society throughout their conversations. The aliens also gave George a clearer picture of the Galaxy Galaxy at large. They told him that the Solar System had twelve planets and that they were all inhabited in fact. According to the aliens every single planet in the galaxy becomes capable of supporting intelligent life at some point the alien show George One of these civilizations ends located on the Far Side of the Moon Georgia's jaw dropped as they passed over lush trees and towering mountains far below alot. He could see the human like aliens going about their daily business to think advanced alien civilization existed so close close to Earth even in the nineteen fifties. Humans knew enough about the cosmos to understand. These claims. Were clearly false. But that didn't stop people. People from buying Georgia's book when it was released on June first. Nineteen fifty. Five like Georgia's first book inside. The spaceships was a hit between the two books. George sold around two hundred thousand copies. He used the resulting money to finally leave. The hamburger stand behind signed and moved into a large ranch house further up Palomar Mountain. However George didn't have much time to relax shortly after the book's publication and he set off on a speaking tour to share his story with UFO societies all around the world? It was six months after the scathing Moseley article and yet George was doing better than ever George enthralled his audiences with the astonishing story of his friendship with or thon for Khan and Rahman many were inspired to come forward with their own stories of contact with friendly extraterrestrial beings similar to the ones George had met one of these contact. Tease was Elizabeth. Clara who frequent listeners. May recall from previous episodes but while George was jet-setting around the World James Moseley was preparing his next move in the aftermath of inside the spaceships other serious. UFO researchers tried to take down George but they had failed for instance when former project Blue Book. Chief Edward J rebelled published. His thoughts Zahn Georgia's story in his nineteen fifty six report on unidentified flying objects. He said he believed George was nothing more than a disingenuous showman. Who Story had no basis in reality but even rumpled who was maybe the world's foremost authority on UFO's was was unable to diminish public enthusiasm for Georgia's story Moseley couldn't help but grudgingly respect Georgia's ability to withstand even the harshest skeptics but he was still determined to take him down in October? Nineteen fifty seven Moseley reprinted his expose on George as as an individual special issue of the Bi monthly magazine Saucer News. He thought that if people were reminded of the holes in Georgia's original L. Story. Maybe they'd start to question the development he described within inside the flying saucers although the reprint of the expose. Sold well it. It didn't do much to dissuade Georgia. Supporters many of them were now pushing their own alien contact stories if they abandoned George now it would invite Mike criticism of their own accounts. Moseley realized that he could never take George Down with facts and logic. If you wanted to expose George as a fraud fraud. Moseley would have to stoop to Georgia's level he'd have to fight dirty recently mostly had made the acquaintance of UFO researcher Gray Barker Unlike Moseley Barker didn't personally believe that UFO's were real but the two of them agreed on one thing. George adopt ski was a fraud. After one particularly heavy night of Drinking Moseley and Barker hatched a plan they would use Georgia's obsession with with the illusion of authenticity against him in order to enact their plan Moseley in Barker enlisted the help of their friend and fellow. UFO researcher James Diva Diva Lard. He had access to official. US State Department letterhead through his father. Who held a prestigious government position about a month later in in December nineteen fifty seven? George received a letter from someone named are East Raith who claim to be a part of the US State Department's cultural the Exchange Committee. The letter read as follows quote my dear professor for the time being. Let us consider this a personal letter and and not to be construed as an official communication of the department. It will no doubt please you to know that the department has on file a great deal of confirmatory evidence bearing out your own claims which as both of us must realize are controversial and have been disputed generally wile certainly the department cannot publicly. Confirm your experiences it. Can I believe encourage your work and your communication of what you I sincerely believe should be told to the American public end quote. George bought it Hook Line and sinker. He only made a cursory attempt to confirm the letter's authenticity before he began proudly showing it off at his speaking engagements Moseley and Barker prepared to strike strike. They hoped that once they revealed the letter was a fake Georgia's reputation would take a massive hit. It might not be enough to completely. We take him down but maybe people would then begin to question the other fake evidence Georgia used to enhance his reputation but then the FBI he. I came calling forging. An official government letter was a serious offense and somehow the FBI had traced it back to Moseley Barker. Luckily for them James Alarms father was able to pull some strings on their behalf. He convinced the agents investigating the case that it was a harmless prank and no charges were filed. However this meant that Moseley and Barker couldn't reveal that they had faked the letter the F. B. I.? Told George George. He had to stop showing the letter at his lectures as well but there was nothing stopping George from leading the words spread amongst his followers. That someone someone at the State Department had confirmed that his alien contact stories were real. Moseley's plan had completely backfired. People were more interested in Georgia's story than ever and they were still willing to pay him to hear it in the US and abroad in nineteen fifty. Jeanine Georgia embarked on a speaking tour of Europe. It was during this trip that he met with Queen Juliana of Holland. The meeting was widely a hand in the press but his supporters held the meeting up as further proof of Georgia's legitimacy but George wasn't content to merely coast on the support support of his followers. He wanted to fight back against his critics as well in Georgia's next book. Nineteen sixty one's flying saucers farewell. He included a chapter meant to answer his skeptics questions. To those who said Venus couldn't support life George pointed out that water vapor had been discovered in the planet's atmosphere however he conveniently left out that Venus is incredibly hot surface temperatures and crushing atmospheric. FEERICK pressure made the existence of life on the planet. Impossible his answer for how the Moon could somehow support life was similarly incomplete. George referenced an Aviation Week magazine Article That reported the Moon is invalid by blanket of low energy ion is gases but he didn't explain how that thin layer of gas could support an entire ecosystem unsurprisingly. These explanations were sufficient for Georgia's followers whose loyalty to him outweighed the dubious answers he had provided as long as George had his followers in his corner? It didn't matter what the skeptic Said said but George was getting older and he was having trouble keeping his story straight in flying saucers farewell. George wrote that the the aliens told him in nineteen fifty three how the Sun could transmit its energy too far off planets even though it was proven in the nineteen thirties. He's that the sun's heat comes from nuclear fusion. George said that the sun worked like the cathode ray tubes used in television sets the however in one thousand nine sixty three. George claimed that the sun was actually dark and that it omitted sort of far reaching black light a few months after that. He explained that the sun wasn't really a high temperature ball of gas. It was a solid body and its atmosphere. Just I gave it the illusion of being illuminated. For the first time Georgia's followers began to doubt him but the problem wasn't that they didn't believe George George was telling them kit was that his story kept changing for no apparent reason. They hoped Georges advancing age and poor health accounted for his inconsistencies inconsistencies. George celebrated his seventy fourth birthday on April seventeenth. Nineteen sixty five. When he blew out his candles to to stay lit to anyone else? This might have only resulted in mild annoyance but the George it was a sign he was a heavy smoker and drinker and his health was in decline. George decided the number two was surely related to his death. He predicted did he had two months two weeks or two days to live it turned out he only had six days. On April Twenty Third George suffered a heart attack. After giving a lecture in Maryland George was rushed to a nearby hospital but there was nothing that doctors could do. He never regained consciousness and died later. That day. Roy after George's death his close friend. Alice K Wells els started Vietnam Ski Foundation which was dedicated to carrying on Georgia's work and the contact T- movement. It's still in operation today despite the attempts of critics such as James Moseley to discredit him. Georgia Donskis legacy lives on but Georgia's legacy doesn't mean much that ship. He was a total fraud. In hindsight the fact seemed to speak for themselves Georgia's extraterrestrial experiences contradicted addicted scientific knowledge at every turn and nearly every piece of evidence he provided to support his story has been debunked. But what if we view historic through a less literal and more figurative lands many UFO researchers have tried to Parse Georgia's words to see if there's a kernel of truth to them one suggestion that Georgia's alien friends didn't mean the actually lived on inhospitable planets such as Venus Mars or Saturn iron but rather they operated basis on those planets. This suggestion feels more like wishful thinking. George never mentioned any alien. In basis in his writings during his alleged interstellar trips he specifically describe seeing active thriving communities in places such as is the moon that are totally incapable of supporting life in the end. The most likely explanation is that Short Dombrowski used the popularity the UFO movement for his own profit. Although George insisted he never made much money off his UFO endeavors the large ranch house. He moved into you after publishing. His second book indicates otherwise ultimately. We'll give Georgia's story a one out of ten on the believability scale. There's just too much evidence that directly contradicts his narrative. It's clear that Georgia Dobbs ski never met an alien from Venus and he never set foot put inside a flying saucer in the end. George was little more than a cunning con artist. Just like his assumed title of of Professor George Donskis story was a complete fabrication. Thanks for listening to our story on Georgia Danski. The father of the alien contact T- movement. You can listen to extraterrestrial Israel and all of our casts other shows on Apple. PODCASTS spotify stitcher Google play cashbox tune in or your favorite podcast directory. We'll be back act next week. With a new episode extraterrestrial was created by Max Cutler. It's a production of cutler media. And part of the PODCAST network it is produced by Maxon Ron Cutler sound designed by Andy Weights with production assistance. Bhai Ron Shapiro. And Paul Moller Additional Production Assistance by Maggie admire you're and Carly Madden. Extraterrestrial is written by Alex Benneton and stars. Bill Thomas and Tim Johnson.

George Finally Moseley Winston George Georgia George Adamski Al Bailey George Williamson UFO George Danski Moseley James Moseley George Moseley Barker Venetian Moseley Moseley Salie Georgia Dombrowski Professor George Donskis fraud Nexus Moseley Jeanine Georgia Dj detweiler
George Adamski Pt. 2: Space Rads

Extraterrestrial

47:08 min | 1 year ago

George Adamski Pt. 2: Space Rads

"I'm thrilled to outs fascinating new park. Cast original called not guilty. It examines controversial criminal cases and attempts to determine why solid evidence doesn't always lead to a conviction. Stay tuned after our show. So you can hear a clip of the first episode to listen to the full first episode subscribed to not guilty on Spotify. Or wherever you listen to podcasts. Georgia danski bounced in his seat as the car rumbled down an isolated desert road. He was sandwiched between two aliens one from Saturn. The other from Mars the aliens told George they were taking him to see his friend from Venus, but they had left the lights of the city behind nearly two hours ago. And in the fifteen minutes, they'd been driving on the narrow dirt road. George hadn't seen any sign of civilization as the car crested over a hill. George noticed a glowing object in the distance as they got closer. He could make out the objects distinct saucer like shape, he recognized it as the ship belonging to his Venetian friend, the car came to a stop about fifty feet from the flying saucer. The new Shen came out to greet them. He beckoned for George to come aboard. Join. George couldn't believe his luck. He was actually going to see the inside of a flying saucer the aliens smiled as George chicken his surroundings with childlike wonder they asked him to take a seat on a bench in the middle of the saucers large circular cockpit. They told George they had another surprise for him in store. They weren't just showing him the inside of their ship. They were going to take him into outer space. Are we alone? Have we been alone? Will we be alone stories of alien visitation have been engrained in human history alien life may not be confirmed. But our obsession with it can't be ignored. Welcome to extraterrestrial on the parkas network. I'm Tim and I'm Bill every Tuesday. We visit the marvelous and strange stories about our encounters with beings from another world. We're aware that some of these tales may seem completely unbelievable others may seem all too real. But these stories shed light on human nature, human, beliefs and human psychology, and each story has garnered hundreds if not millions of true believers, and for that reason, we think they're worth exploring. Welcome to our second episode on George Dom sqi who birthed the salient contact t- movement when he claimed to have met of new Shen alien. When on November twentieth. Nineteen fifty three last week. We described how George's obsession with obtaining the perfect photo of UFO supposedly lead to something far greater and actual face to face meeting with a being he claimed was an alien from Venus this alleged encounter chronicled in Georgia's nineteen fifty three book, the flying saucers have landed which also included detailed photos of the liens flying. Saucer propelled him to worldwide fame and placed him at the forefront of the UFO world. But not everyone who heard his story was ready to believe it this week will explore the fallout from Georgia's book, we'll his reputation survive, the intense scrutiny of government authorities and UFO skeptics or will he be proven to be nothing more than a glory seeking impostor. In the fall of nineteen fifty three Georgia, Dom sqi was the biggest name in the UFO world, eventually word of Georgia's incredible story caught the attention of Edward J rumpled the head of project blue book, the US government's official task force for studying the UFO phenomenon rumpled was already aware of George George had sent many of his previous UFO photos to the project. Blue book offices, but analysis proved inconclusive when rebelled heard about Georgia's meeting with Venetian alien he decided to investigate the matter himself. He was skeptical of Georgia's story, but the uproar was causing merited closer observation rebelled describe meeting George in his nineteen fifty-six book the report on unidentified flying objects sometime in nineteen Fifty-three rubble traveled incognito to the small hamburger stand where George worked in the. A shadow of the grand observatory on the summit of southern California's mount Halla Amar rebelled was surprised to see how crowded the hamburger stand was. He knew word had spread of Georgia's incredible story. But he couldn't believe how many people had come to hear it for themselves. But if Georgia's fame had gone to his head he didn't show, it he bustled around the hamburger stand as if it was any other day serving customers and cleaning tables, finally George settled onto a stool in the middle of the room and began to tell his story despite his skepticism rebel found himself drawn in by Georgia's homespun, charisma, he spoke plainly almost as if he didn't believe the story himself, but the conviction Georgia's is spoke to his belief that he was telling the truth by the time, George was finished speaking, everyone was hanging on his every word there hamburgers getting cold there. Beers getting warm after George finished his story. He took an old shoebox out from under the counter inside was one of the plaster casts that his friend George Williamson had taken the allience footprints instead of tread marks. The aliens boot fringe featured mysterious symbols that seemed to be from some sort of alien language, although rebelled had enjoyed Georgia's story. He didn't find it believable. And the plaster casts did little to sway him. Not only. Did he find it awfully convenient that Georgia's friend just so happened to take plaster with him on their desert excursion rebelled also wondered how the alien could have left. Such clear imprint in the dry desert ground. It seemed like rebelled was the only person left in the hamburger stand who questioned Georgia story as rebelled headed out people were lined up to ask George for more details and to buy the copies. Of Georgia's UFO photos that he had for sale, although rebelled suspected George was lying about meeting the alien. He didn't have enough proof to definitively take George down for now. George would remain on the UFO world's proverbial mountaintop. But soon George became the target of much more thorough investigation conducted by an up and coming UFO researcher named James Moseley in nineteen forty eight seventeen year old Moseley became interested in UFO's when he heard the story of pilot named Thomas men tell whose plane had crashed after supposedly being zapped by UFO after leaving college in the early nineteen. Fifties Moseley was hungry to make a name for himself. He felt like there was an opportunity within the UFO community while there were a few people writing about you photos at the time. There weren't any books thoroughly investigate. Getting you photos with a critical eye Moseley thought he could fill that gap with an in-depth investigation into some of the most prominent figures in the UFO community, I up on his list, George Dom sqi, although Moseley was inclined to believe in UFO's. He thought Georgia story was too good to be true. But Moseley knew that he couldn't just drive up to Georgia's hamburger stand and get him to admit he lied if he was going to prove George was a fraud. Moseley had to take his story apart piece by piece until the whole thing came crashing down. One of the biggest pieces of evidence George had in his favor was assigned affidavit from his friends who were with him the day. He said he met the alien Moseley wondered if they would maintain their story if he spoke to them individually Moseley began his investigation in the fall of nineteen fifty three a few months after the flying saucers have. Landed was published. His first stop was Winslow era. Zona a small town off route sixty six Moseley sat down with Georgia's friend. Al Bailey who worked for the Santa Fe railroad Bailey was accompanied by a man named Lyman Streeter who also claimed to have seen you foes on separate occasions, although he hadn't been there the day George said, he met Venetian mostly thought that both men seemed exceedingly nervous Streeter was so paranoid that he wouldn't even tell Moseley his name at first it was as if they feared George would somehow find out about the interview and punish them Bailey. Reluctantly admitted that he never actually saw the alien or his flying saucer during Georgia's supposed- meeting with the alien Bailey in the others were over a mile away. As Bailey watch George through an old pair of binoculars. All he saw was a flash of light that he thought could. Been a reflection from the flying saucer inspired by Bailey's honesty, Streeter added that a photo in Georgia's book called flying saucer passing low over trees was wrongly attributed to a man named Gerald Baker street or claim that George had credited Baker with the photo in order to make it look like other people had also photographed the Venetians flying saucer Moseley could scarcely believe what he was hearing. It was his first interview in Georgia story was already losing credibility. But at this point, it was Bailey and streeters word against Georges Moseley needed more information before he could make a definitive judgment Moseley's next interview was with Dr George Williamson in Prescott Arizona from the moment. They sat down alarm bell started going off in Moseley's head similar to Georgia's unearned title of professor Williamson wasn't actually and. Credited doctor. The title was merely an affect tation he had given himself. At first Williamson resolutely stood by the affidavit and said if he was asked to sign it again, he would. But when Moseley pressed him for more details Williamson admitted that he had watched Georgia's meeting with the alien through low-powered Benach years and hadn't gotten a good look at the alien or his flying saucer all he had seen was quote, someone who could have been anyone nearby something that might have been a saucer, and quote Moseley thought that Williamson didn't sound entirely convinced of what he was saying, however, Moseley couldn't get Williamson to say, George was a liar. George was his friend and mentor and Williamson couldn't believe that George would ever lie for his own gain. But Moseley suspected otherwise Moseley was convinced that he had to dig deeper if he was going to take Georgia Dome ski down. He needed. Sure fire proof that he was a liar and that proof lay Georges photographs Moseley arrived in Carlsbad, California in December nineteen fifty three. He wanted to talk to DJ Detweiler. The man who had developed Georgia's you Afo photos Detweiler had met George about ten years earlier when he went to photograph the hamburger stand where George worked. They had remained friends Detweiler said that George wasn't inexperienced enough tog refer to create a fake using advanced techniques. There was no sign that George had used manipulations like double exposure, Moseley pointed out that just because the photo hadn't been manipulated. It. Didn't mean that it was an authentic picture of UFO the object in the photograph might be some sort of model. Detweiler. Agreed. But like Albay Lee and George Williamson. He refused to call Georgia outright liar. Moseley? Conversation with Detweiler left him. Frustrated. He was really hoping to get a definitive answer on the authentic of Georgia's photographs Moseley was almost certain that George story was a lie. But so far nobody would just come out and say it Moseley realized he needed to make the judgment for himself. It was time for him to interview Georgia Dome scheme. Coming up James Moseley faces off with Georgia Dome. S-k-y? You have the suspect's fingerprints at the crime scene. You have witnesses testifying that they saw a suspect commit the crime. The suspect has a motive it's an open and shut case. Or is it each week the par cast original not guilty examines? Controversial criminal cases and tries to determine why solid evidence doesn't always lead to a conviction. What police considered compelling evidence against Casey Anthony in the disappearance of her daughter Kayleigh defense attorneys classified as fantasy forensics, and she was ultimately acquitted of Keighley's murder. Amanda Knox served four years in an Italian prison for murder before later being acquitted was the media portrayal of knocks the profile of a killer or televised character assassination and sometimes jurors responsible for wrongful convictions. As was the case when the central park five were convicted despite DNA evidence showing none of the suspects were involved, sir. For and subscribe to not guilty on Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Again, search not guilty or visit parkas dot com slash not guilty to listen now. And don't forget you can hear the beginning of the first episode right after our show. And now back to the story so far James Moseley's investigation into Georgia Domke had turned up a lot of red flags. Many of Georgia's associates admitted that there were inconsistencies in Georgia story and Moseley was having doubts about the authenticity of Georgia's UFO photos, mostly decided that he needed to speak to George himself in order to come to a conclusion he wanted to see if Georgia's supposed- honesty and integrity held up in person Moseley arrived at Georgia's hamburger stand on December fifteenth nineteen Fifty-three the parking lot was nearly full and the small hamburger stand was packed Moseley surveyed the hamburger stand cramped interior. He saw George sitting at one of the four small tables deep in conversation with some fascinated patrons. It was clear that nobody was. Is there for the food? Everyone's eyes were on George. They wanted to hear his story. And he abides them soon enough, George took his place on a stool in the middle of the restaurant and began to hold court Moseley was drawn in by Georgia's charisma, just as Edward rebelled had been George had a way of engaging with his audience looking into their eyes and giving them a sense. He was telling the story directly to each one of them. Moseley was no exception. After nearly four hours. The crowd had finally dwindled down to just a few people Moseley had to double check his watch. He had barely noticed. The time passing. The time had come for Moseley to make his move. He was surprised at how nervous he was. When he arrived Moseley was full of confidence that he'd exposed George as a fraud. But now he wasn't convinced that George was lying. The man radiated honesty with every ounce of his being mostly moved through the handful of Georgia's remaining audience and introduced himself, George greeted Moseley warmly. There was no sense of hostility or suspicion coming from George as they squeezed into a booth before Moseley could start asking any questions, Georgia, Dom Domke took out a letter, George. Williamson had written to him. Williamson was warning than Moseley was a snoop and not to be trusted George laughed upon seeing Moseley's worried expression he promised that he was much less suspicious than Williamson George told Moseley to ask him anything. He wished Moseley dove right in now that he was face to face with George his previous trepidation had vanished. He had come for the truth. And he was going to get it. The next hour was one of the most confounding and Moseley's life for everyone of joy. Urges logical answers to Moseley's questions. He would make an equally outrageous statement, for instance, George was actually very humble about his Venetian story and said he knew it was difficult to believe. But then he went on to say that he had begun studying the fifth dimension with no explanation as to what that even meant Moseley, new statements like this were pure hogwash. But when it came to Georgia's story about his encounter with Venetian. He wasn't so sure anymore. It wasn't about the substance of Georgia's answers, logically mostly new lot of George was saying didn't make sense. But George was so certain of what he was saying as Moseley put it, quote, his attitude in the face of my obvious doubts was that of one who had been chosen to have a great truth reveal to him a truth. He had faith his doubting interviewer. Would someday come to accept and quote, eventually the sun was going down and George was getting tired. Although he had remarkable energy. He was still a sixty two year old man. He regretfully told Moseley that he had to conclude. The interview George walked Moseley back to his car. He told him he hoped Moseley would someday. Discover the truth of what he called the space brothers message. After the interview mostly sat in his car for a bit to write down, his thoughts. Moseley printed these notes in his book shockingly close to the truth. Confessions of grave robbing ufologist, quote, several of his theories are definitely pseudoscientific or crackpot. And of course, the facts he relates are still open to very serious doubt. However, I do not think adopt skis account is a hoax at least not in the usual sense of the word if the account is untrue. Adopt ski is nevertheless sincere in relating it. There is a very very small possibility that adopts account is a deliberate and unscrupulous hoax. There is a much greater chance that it was a psychological or so-called psychic experience. There is also a good chance that adopt ski may in all good faith, be lying in order to expound doctrines. Ideas. He sincerely feels to be true. There is a fourth and final possibility in that. Is that adopt skis account is true. And after meeting danski, I would say there is a very definite. And real possibility that the incident really happened end quote in these notes Moseley perfectly captured the ability George had to sway people to his side. Moseley knew that the details of Georgia's story didn't hold up. But George was so charismatic that Moseley felt compelled to defend him. However, it didn't take long for Moseley's conflicted feelings to change shortly. After the interview he obtained new evidence that cast significant doubt on Georgia's story. Shortly after his interview with George Moseley finally got in touch with Gerald Baker. The man who had been falsely credited with a photo of the Venetians UFO in Georgia's book, he confirmed to Moseley that it was George who really took the picture initially Baker had felt indebted to George because he was being allowed to live Georgia's campground rent-free. This is why he had agreed to take credit for the picture in the first place. But now Baker was feeling guilty about his parts in helping George spread his lies Moseley was intrigued now that he was away from Georgia's spellbinding personality his skepticism had returned. However, he still didn't have any concrete evidence that George was Aligarh but Baker. Baker showed Moseley a letter that George had written to him on November seconds nineteen fifty three in the letter George reminded Baker that the photo had been heavily publicized, and that baker's reputation within the UFO community would be ruined. If he admitted the picture wasn't his Moseley realized that this letter probably wouldn't be enough to change the minds of Georgia's die-hard believers, but this was definitive proof that George wasn't above lying. And Furthermore, it showed that he wasn't above making subtle threats to those caught in his web of deceit. Despite what DJ Detweiler had said about these supposed authenticity of Georgia's photos. Mostly was now certain that George fake them if the photos were truly authentic. Why was it so important for George to have baker's independently taken photograph in late December nineteen fifty three? Moseley contacted Dr Walter ridell, a senior project engineer at North American aviation who was also part of a UFO club called the civilian saucer investigation as a science minded man ridell did believe that you afford could be ships from another planet, but with skeptical of the decidedly unscientific story, but fourth in Georgia's book at Moseley's requests, Dr ridell agreed to examine Georgia's most famous UFO photograph using one of the high powered microscopes that his lab Moseley nervously awaited the results of ridell examination. This was Moseley's make or break moment, if ridell concluded the picture was a fake Moseley would have indisputable proof that George was a liar. And then there was another possibility. What if ridell said the photo was real would that mean? George was actually telling the truth after what felt like an eternity ridell finally called Moseley. He concluded beyond any doubt that the photo was a fake. The picture was a low angle shot of the UFO giving the viewer a clear look at George identified as its circular landing year when ridell took a closer. Look he discovered that the landing gear was inscribed with General Electric's G E symbol, it wasn't landing gear. It was a light bulb. This was it. This was the proof Moseley needed to make Georgia's house of cards. Come tumbling down. Moseley breathed a sigh of relief the photo was a fraud. And so was George, but if Moseley was going to take down, George he was going to do it. Right. He couldn't just go into the world waving around a hoax UFO photo. And shouting, the George was a liar. If Moseley was going to convince Georgia's followers that their idol was a fraud. He had to organize the findings from his investigations into a single coherent document over the course of the next year Moseley meticulously prepared his case against George finally, Moseley's expose titled some new facts on the flying saucers have landed was published in the January nineteen fifty five edition of paranormal magazine called nexus Moseley's comprehensive thorough dismantling of Georgia's story was so popular that the expose was reprint. Nted the following month. Moseley was elated. He achieved his goal of making a name for himself in the UFO community. Now, he could sit back and enjoy the fireworks as George scrambled to defend himself. But George didn't take the bait when asked to comment on Moseley's expose George would only say that Moseley was an agent of Wall Street who was only motivated by money Moseley was perplexed. Georgia's reaction was much more muted than he had an -ticipant. Did he was expecting fire and fury? What he got was the equivalent of a shoulder shrug. But behind the scenes, George knew he needed a strong response to Moseley's accusations. Although his core followers were sticking by his side. George new they might abandon him. If he didn't do something soon coming up Georgia Dom ski takes. Action. And now back to the story for the first few months after James, Moseley's expose Georgia, Dom ski stayed quiet. But that didn't mean he wasn't taking action the bomb dropped six months later on June. First nineteen fifty five with the publication of Georgia's second book inside the space spaceships this new book chronicle Georgia's continuing extraterrestrial adventures in it was a doozy. In the book, George described how on February eighteenth nineteen Fifty-three. He was overcome by an inexplicable urge to go to Los Angeles. He immediately recognized it as the same feeling that had told him to go into the desert when he first met his friend from Venus normally George was reluctant to leave his home at Palam our gardens, but if his friend was calling to him George knew he had to answer his summons with little else to guide him other than his intuition, George checked into a downtown hotel and waited he was certain that his friend would give him some sort of guidance. George look towards the hotel's entryway and saw two men approaching him. He didn't recognize them. But they knew him. However, these weren't men they were aliens they introduce themselves as a Martian named for. Khan, and they said Turney named Ramu George was surprised at their perfect English and familiarity with human customs, the aliens explained that as contact men. It was their job to live among humans and become comfortable navigating through society, while George was pleased to meet the new aliens, he was disappointed that his Venetian friend wasn't there for Khan and Rahman told him not to worry the notion whose name was Orthon was waiting for them in the Mojave desert, George jumped in for Konin Rama's car without hesitation he was eager to reunite with Orthon. Although their previous meeting had only lasted an hour. George felt a close bond with Venetian Rama skillfully guided them through the busy streets and onto the highway leaving the city they drove for almost two hours leaving Los Angeles as bright lights behind them joy. George marveled at the desert's, all encompassing darkness, the only elimination came from the car's headlights in the starry moonlit sky without warning Rommel. Turn the car onto a narrow dirt road. George gazed out at the shadowy, scrub brush and twisted Joshua trees as the car bounced along the rough road for what seemed like an attorney. But all of a sudden a gentle white glow appeared in the distance for a moment. George thought it was the moon rising into the sky. But as they got closer, he clawing light materialized into the recognizable shape of Ortho flying saucer the moment Rumou parked the car, George jumped out and ran to meet his Venetian friend as they greeted each other George was surprised to hear Ortho speak in the same perfect English as his companions when they had met in November or on didn't speak. Take any English at all George wondered, how Orthon had learned the language so quickly, but he felt like it would be rude to ask or Thon didn't seem to think it was a big deal and never provided an explanation perhaps orth on was just being modest and didn't wanna brag to George about. How quickly he could pick up new languages. It's also possible that if George was making this whole thing up it was easier to have Ortho speak English for storytelling purposes, after a few pleasantries or on invited George to board. The flying saucer George could scarcely believe it not only was he going to see the interior of flying saucer. But he was gonna take a ride in it George was so engrossed in examining the ships intricate details that he didn't even feel it take to the skies. The ride was so smooth that there was almost no sense of movement as the saucer soared through the atmosphere as. As they ascended into the heavens gazing down at earth's pristine beauty or on revealed. The purpose of this visit although Orthon had communicated the dangers of nuclear weapons when they first met he wanted to elaborate on why he was so worried about them besides threatening the entire human race or Thon said that these terrible weapons threaten the galaxy. At large in the event of full scale, nuclear war, the radiation would escape earth's atmosphere and permeate into space, thereby threatening interstellar travelers from a modern scientific perspective. It's obvious that any radiation coming from earth. Couldn't compare to what already comes from the sun and other stars not to mention spaces fast. Couldn't Venetians just fly around the earth. But George was never one to let science get in the way of good story by presenting what was likely. His own fear of nuclear war as an issue of galactic importance. He gave it more legitimacy in the eyes of his followers. Georgia's book went onto describe these several UFO trips George took with Orthon for Khan and Rama over the course of the next year during these trips the aliens ton, George more about their civilizations peaceful way of life, and how it could be applied to human society throughout their conversations. The aliens also gave George a clearer picture of the galaxy at large. They told him that the solar system had twelve planets and that they were all inhabited. In fact, according to the aliens every single planet in the galaxy becomes capable of supporting intelligent life at some point the alien show. George one of these civilizations located on the far side of the moon. Georgia's jaw dropped as they passed over lush trees. And towering mountains far below. He could see the human like aliens going about their daily business to think advanced alien civilization existed. So close to earth even in the nineteen fifties humans knew enough about the cosmos to understand these claims were clearly false, but that didn't stop people from buying Georgia's book when it was released on June. First nineteen fifty five Georgia's first book inside the spaceships was a hit between the two books. George soul around two hundred thousand copies he used the resulting money to finally leave the hamburger stand behind and moved into a large ranch house further up Palam our mountain. However, George didn't have much time to relax shortly after the book's publication. He set off on a speaking tour to share his story with UFO societies all around the world. It was six months. Months after the scathing Moseley article and yet George was doing better than ever. George enthralled his audiences with the astonishing story of his friendship with Orthon for Khan and Rahman many were inspired to come forward with their own stories of contact with friendly extraterrestrial beings, similar to the ones George had met. One of these contact tease was Elizabeth Clara who frequent listeners may recall from previous episodes. But while George was jet-setting around the world James Moseley was preparing his next move in the aftermath of inside the space. Spaceships other serious, you Afo researchers tried to take down George, but they had failed for instance, when former project blue book chief Edward J rebelled published his thoughts on Georgia's story in his nineteen fifty-six report on unidentified flying objects. He said he believed George was nothing more than a disingenuous. Showman who story had no basis in reality. But even rebelled who was maybe the world's foremost thority on UFO's was unable to diminish public enthusiasm for Georgia's story Moseley couldn't help but grudgingly respect Jorge's ability to withstand even the harshest skeptics. But he was still determined to take him down in October nineteen fifty seven Moseley reprinted, his expose on George as an individual special issue of the by monthly magazine. Saucer news, he thought that if people were reminded of the holes in Georgia's original story, maybe they'd start to question the development, he described within inside the flying saucers, although the reprint of the expose sold. Well, it didn't do much to sway Georgia supporters. Many of them were now pushing their own alien contact stories if they abandoned George now, it would invite criticism of their own accounts Moseley realize. Used that. He could never take George down with facts and logic. If you wanted to expose George as a fraud Moseley would have to stoop to Georgia's level. He'd have to fight dirty recently mostly had made the acquaintance of UFO researcher, gray Barker, unlike Moseley Barker, didn't personally believe that you of os were real, but the two of them agreed on one thing, George adopt sqi was a fraud. After one particularly heavy night of drinking Moseley in Barker hats to plan they would use Georgia's obsession with the allusion of authenticity against him in order to enact their plan. Moseley Barker enlisted, the help of their friend and fellow researcher James diva lard, he had access to official US State Department letterhead through his father who held a prestigious government position about a month later in December nineteen fifty seven George received a letter. From some unnamed are e strength who claim to be a part of the US State Department's cultural exchange committee. The letter read as follows, quote, my dear professor for the time being let us consider this a personal letter and not to be construed as an official communication of the department. It will no doubt. Please you to know that the department has on file a great deal of confirmatory evidence bearing out your own claims, which as both of us must realize are controversial and have been disputed, generally. While certainly the department cannot publicly confirm your experiences. It can I believe in courage, your work and your communication of what you sincerely believe should be told to the American public, and quote, George bought it hook line, and sinker. He only made a cursory attempt to confirm the letters authenticity before he. Began proudly showing it off at his speaking engagements. Moseley in Barker prepared to strike, they hoped that once they revealed the letter was a fake Georgia's reputation would take a massive hit it might not be enough to completely take him down. But maybe people would then begin to question the other fake evidence. Georgia used to enhance his reputation, but then the FBI came calling. Forging an official government letter was a serious offense. And somehow the F B I had traced it back to Moseley and Barker, luckily for them, James large father was able to pull some strings on their behalf he convinced the agents investigating the case that it was a harmless prank, and no charges were filed. However, this meant that Moseley embark couldn't reveal that they had faked the letter the F B I told George he had to stop showing the letter his lectures as well. But there was nothing stopping George from leading the. Words spread amongst his followers that someone at the State Department had confirmed that his alien contact stories were real Moseley's plan. Had completely backfired people were more interested in Georgia story than ever and they were still willing to pay him to hear it in the US and abroad in nineteen fifty nine George embarked on a speaking tour of Europe. It was during this trip that he met with Queen Juliana of Holland the meeting was widely panned in the press. But his supporters held the meeting up as further proof of Georgia's legitimacy, but George wasn't content to merely coast on the support of his followers. He wanted to fight back against his critics as well. In Georgia's next book, nineteen sixty one's flying saucers, farewell. He included a chapter meant to answer his skeptics questions to those who said Venus couldn't support life. George pointed out that water vapor had been discovered in the planet's atmosphere. However, he conveniently left out that Venus's incredibly hot surface temperatures and crushing atmospheric pressure made the existence of life on the planet impossible his answer for how the moon could somehow support life was similarly incomplete George referenced an Aviation Week magazine article that reported the moon is invalid by a blanket of low energy gases. But he didn't explain how that Finn layer of gas could support an entire ecosystem unsurprisingly. These explanations were sufficient for Georgia's followers whose loyalty to him outweighed, the dubious answers he had provided as long as George had his followers in his corner. It didn't matter what the skeptic said. But George was getting older, and he was having trouble keeping his story straight in flying. Saucers farewell, George wrote that the aliens told him in nineteen fifty three how the sun could transmit its energy too far off planets, even though it was proven in the nineteen thirties that the sun's heat comes from nuclear fusion, George said that the sun worked like the cathode Ray tubes used in television sets however in nineteen sixty three George claimed that the sun was actually dark, and that it omitted a sort of far reaching black light a few months after that he explained that. The sun wasn't really a high temperature ball of gas. It was a solid body and its atmosphere just gave it the illusion of being eliminated for the first time Georgia's followers began to doubt him. But the problem wasn't that. They didn't believe with George was telling them, it was that his story kept changing for no apparent reason, they hoped Georgia's. Advancing age and poor health accounted for his inconsistencies, George celebrated. His seventy fourth birthday on April. Seventeenth nineteen sixty five when he blew out his candles to stay lit to anyone else. This might have only resulted in mile Neue, but George it was a sign. He was a heavy smoker and drinker and his health was in decline George decided the number two was surely related to his death. He predicted he had two months two weeks or two days to live. It turned out. He only had six days on April twenty third George suffered a heart attack after giving a lecture in Maryland, George was rushed to a nearby hospital. But there was nothing that doctors could do he never regained consciousness and dive later that day. After Georgia's death, his close friend Alice. K wells started the Adama ski foundation, which was dedicated to carrying on Georgia's work and the contact t- movement. It's still in operation today. Despite the attempts of critics such as James Moseley to discredit him Georgia Dom skis legacy lives on. But Georgia's legacy doesn't mean much if he was a total fraud in hindsight. The fact seem to speak for themselves. Georgia's extraterrestrial experiences contradicted scientific knowledge at every turn and nearly every piece of evidence he provided to support his story has been debunked. But what if we view his story through a less literal and more figurative lens, many UFO, researchers have tried to parse Georgia's words to see if there's a kernel of truth to them once again is that Georgia's alien friends didn't. Mean the actually lived on inhospitable planets such as Phoenix Mars or Saturn. But rather they operated basis on those planets this suggestion feels more like wishful thinking, George never mentioned any illion bases in his writings during his alleged interstellar trips. He specifically describe seeing active thriving communities in places such as the moon that are totally incapable of supporting life in the end. The most likely explanation is that short Domke used the popularity of the UFO movement for his own profit. Although George insisted he never made much money off his UFO endeavors. The large ranch house he moved into after publishing his second book indicates otherwise ultimately will give Georgia story a one out of ten on the believability scale. There's just too much evidence that directly contradicts his narrate. Live. It's clear that Georgia danski never met an alien from Venus. And he never set foot inside a flying saucer in the end, George was little more than a cunning con artist. Just like his assumed title of professor Georgia. Dom ski story was a complete fabrication. Thanks for listening to our story on Georgia dob sqi, the father of the Alleyen contact team movement. You can listen to extraterrestrial and all of parkas other shows on apple podcasts. Spotify Stitcher Google play cast box. Tune in or your favorite podcast directory will be back next week with a new episode extraterrestrial was created by max Cutler, it's a production of Cutler media in part of the park cast network. It is produced by Maxine Ron Cutler sound designed by Andy weights with production assistance by Ron Shapiro and Paul Molitor, additional production assistance by Maggie admire and Carly madman. Extraterrestrial is written by Alex Bennett and stars Bill Thomas and Tim Johnson. And here it is a clip of the first episode of not guilty. It's about Robert Blake whose wife was found dead in his car from gunshot wound to the back of her head to listen to the full first episode subscribe to not guilty on Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Williamson George Georges Moseley Georgia George Dom sqi Dr George Williamson Moseley Barker UFO James Moseley fraud Spotify Georgia Dome Gerald Baker Edward J DJ Detweiler California US Al Bailey Tim Johnson professor
Transformational Living Podcast - Mission & Purpose

JMosley | Ministries

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Transformational Living Podcast - Mission & Purpose

"This is jackie mostly your host forte moseley ministries transformational living podcast ask. I'm coming to you today to do something. I should've done before releasing my first podcast episode. I i would like to introduce you to the mission and purpose of transformational living podcasts and to give the foundational chenault scriptures for this podcast. Will you go with me to the throne of god. Glorious is father thank you for the privilege of sharing the gospel of jesus christ through the medium of podcasting a knowledge that you said faith comes by hearing and hearing by the word of god god you desire for your people people to grow in grace in the knowledge of our lord and savior jesus christ's prayer lord is that every person who listens will glean from these podcasts giving all diligent to add to faith goodness the business knowledge into knowledge self control into self control perseverance perseverance badly into godliness rather kindness into brotherly kindness love god. You are a marvelous marvelous things have you done flores harass. Thank you mark jesus. In your precious name. A man the following are foundational scripture for transformational leaving podcasts of which you have heard repeatedly in previously released episodes and we'll be mentioned in future episodes there will also be additional scriptures that are specific to mm-hmm the podcast episodes. The foundational scripture is are these. I john chapter two verse fifteen that says love not the world neither the things that are in the world. If any man love the world the love of the father is not in romans chapter twelve verse two says be not conformed to this world but be transformed dance form by the renewing of your mind that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and dan perfect will of god matthew chapter eight verse thirty six. I'm sorry mark chapter eight verse thirty six and matthew chapter sixteen verse twenty six and it reads for what shall it profit a the main if he shall gain the home world and lose his own soul or what what a man give in exchange for his so titus chapter two verses eleven and twelve says for the grace of god that bringing winging salvation half appear until all men teaching us that denying un godliness in world unless we should live sorely righteously and godly in the present world and saint john chapter sixteen verse thirty three says these things. I have spoken unto you that in in me you might have feats in the wpro news show have tribulation but be of good cheer. I have overcome the world second corinthians chapter ten verse three says for though we walk in the flesh we do not war after the flesh i john chapter two verse seventeen says in the world has it the way and and the last vera but he that do it. The willem god abided. Wherever i timothy chapter six verses seven and eight says for we brought nothing into this world and it is certain we carry carrie nothing out in having food and rain meant man has been there with contents and finally i john chapter three verse one. This is for all that is in the world. The last of the flash and the lust of the <music> is and the pride of life is not <hes> the father a man praise the lord uh-huh so now i want to share a little bit about myself with you so my name is jackie moseley and i've gave my life to the lord it was filled with the holy ghost approximately twenty years ago and in continuing continuing to allow the holy spirit to mature me as a believer throw the fruit of the spirit and this this has been a very challenging journey for me considering as revealed by the only goes that i've been subtly and dan overtly persecuted for my face and i have had a very very difficult lights with numerous hardships and the enemy has tried to snuff me out and i mean literally and spiritually but but i have witnessed the saving hand of god on my life in how he has spared me from an early only gray and tragedy then i'm aneka i am definitely an over calmer and more ban a conqueror in christ jesus i joyfully and sorrowfully could continue to persevere her and fight. The good fight of faith for an on a wounded soldier in the army also a phrase in worship leader. I'm a bible teacher and a new gospel recording arts but my ultimate heart's desire is to teach minister amp proclaim flying the word of god. I am a defender of the fossil in my teaching style is with shiver collie watered down version of the truth. Lahore has consistently pad me in the areas of calm combating false teaching preaching and doctrine for over ten years by teaching in releasing biblical truth and especially for new believers that come the price and the weekend stay of vulnerable to the wolves in sheep's clothing okay so the mission of transformational living living podcast which is a j. Moseley ministry is to release on copper mines and comprehensive. You've been true in an audio format on multiple media platforms for the listener to access us twenty four seven and the purpose of transformational living podcast is is to try and build the believer's faith and to inspire listeners to live moley at righteous lives before god and to remind believers that this worrell is temporary there and we are pilgrims passing through and to dispose of earthly chaparrals and store store up treasures in heaven with christ the lord that has internal fao as spiritual millionare's. I believe that there is a prophetic aspect to this podcast ministry in that god's worm is prosthetic and messages will come in a corresponding manner to what's happening in the church in in the world however i do not claim that the lord has given me any prophetic specific visions visions concerning events that will occur in america but gone has prophetically revealed to me. What's what's happening in churches today that characterizes the loop walk church lay obese in the book of revelation and now wants this heartening is that there are many that have apostol cise and departed from the faith but they still go to church there still preaching in the pulpit still singing in the choir are still teaching sunday school and bible study. Now that's a strong delusion there and but what fouls after a person a process size is that those people fee pray the ones who are remaining true in their faith. This are the areas areas. These are the areas that that god has in concerning <hes> the church of what's happening in the church today now. I want to just give a little many message on transformation transformation mason means a or dramatic change in form four periods. That's the def the dictionary definition of transformation a thorough or war dramatic change in form or appearance but not the pharisees define fine transformation. Although the pharisees accepted the written word as inspired by oh my god they're issue was that they gave evil authority to their oral traditions which made them themself why jets by adding to the word of god that is forbidden inscription jesus said at the pharisees teachings are merely human rules when you can read mark chapter seven seven i seven for more information on what jesus said they were known for their emphasis on personal piety and warhead critical in that they did not practice what they preached. Jesus harshly rebuked the scribes pharisees and the religious influencers out that game when he pronounced several roles well no one was that they appear clean on the outside but half neglected jesus said they cleaned the <music> outside of the cuff and plane but inside a love greed and self indulgence fairest fairest scenes perform religious acts but did not have god honoring hearts and their religion legend was not true worship of god but was louis in a prideful part because their religion x terminal and their hearts were not transform america today. Jesus said the pharisees were blind. You guys leading the blind and both fall into a pit. They do not recognize that when the inside is changed change the outside to will be transformed now j. moseley ministries i teach biblical transformation as seen in the way believers increasingly reflect the likeness an image of crimes and what the apostle paul teaches that you are control not by the sinful nature but by the spirit if the spirit of god mavs in you can if anyone does not have the spirit era of christ's he does not belong to christ you can read romans chapter eight verse nine says for i have have been fine with crowds and it is no longer i live but christ who lives abson me the life. I live in the body. I live by faith in the son of god who loved me and gave himself for me allegations to and twenty the power of transformation coms from one source in that is the cross of christ for the message of the cross this foolishness to bolton were perishing but took took us who are being saved it is the power of god transform lives began with the word of god which is the power for oh god it is the gospel that brings salvation for everyone who believes i to the jew then the gentile you the gospel reveals a righteousness from god a righteousness that is by faith romans one sixteen and seventeen through the gospel message we learned to put off your old self aw which belongs to your former manner of life your old life and is corrupt through deceitful designs zayn and to be renewed in the spirit of your minds and to put on the new self created after the likeness of god in true righteousness an equation chapter four verses twenty two through. I'm twenty four now that concludes my little mini message board transformation my apologies for not conveying the sooner and i hope this gives you some insight about yours truly jackie moseley of j. bills we ministries and what i teach in the transformational living potty tax i will not close this podcast without extending an invitation tation to any listener who is an unbeliever in desire to have a new life in christ jesus romans tannin nine nine declares. If you confess with your mouth that jesus is lord and believe in your heart they've gone raise him and his literally from the dead. Did you will be say come. Romans ten nine and you genuinely believe that in your heart then and you are saying i encourage you to locate and get connected to a bible believing church and met the pastor know that you are a new believer to start your journey of new lights spiritual development and sanctification up becoming more light crates. Thank you for your time and attention. I encourage it. Invite you to tune in you too transformational living podcasts on your way to work in your car on your lunch break in your leisure time jay moseley ministries transformational living podcasts are on several meeting at platforms for your listening experience. We we are all in apple. Podcast google podcasts spotify and our newest media platform is these are all these are folks <music> out there. The net podcast episode soon to be released is babylon is falling honest tails weights and merchants. Please visit me on facebook and twitter and my website jay moseley ministries dot com to learn more about this ministry. May the lord bless you and keep you the lord make his face to shine upon you and be gracious to you the lord lift up his countenance upon you and hear you god bless you and keep you is my parade <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> <music>.

Jesus jackie moseley forte moseley jay moseley america Moseley ministry j. moseley spotify apple flores wpro matthew carrie facebook Lahore worrell dan bolton twitter paul
Part Two: Mosley: The British Hitler Who Inspired the Christchurch Shooter

Behind the Bastards

50:51 min | 1 year ago

Part Two: Mosley: The British Hitler Who Inspired the Christchurch Shooter

"Jerry Lewis v. Wave seditious Kurt Kobe, also Amy wine-house, Johnny cash and more disgrace them rock and roll true crime podcast stories about -sition getting away with murder behaving. Very badly is available now posted by me. Jake Brennan, you can listen to disgrace of the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. We're back by the bastards podcast bad people talk about I'm Robert Evans, part two of our Assode on Oswald. Moseley's don't listen to this and let you've listened to episode. One fucking maniacs might guess unless you're maniac in which case I enjoy watching all the episodes in resort verse. Order for no reason if you play them backwards. I will tell you to do drugs and worship the devil. But I did that I tell you that. While you're watching. Wizard of either way do do drugs and worship the devil. That's just come. Snoops? Did do drugs the devil. Cody. I guess today as with last time, Cody Johnston, Katie stole did not mix up your first names this time. Yes. Hi, sorry. No, it's okay. I mean, I it was awful. It was awful traumatic Campbell. I don't wanna relive it nine eleven of this podcast episode, but we've moved on. We've forget, but we're moving like we did from nine eleven to into an eighteen year long six trillion dollar warn this the second year, this this this episode is the second year of the eighteen year when we're all still kinda on board. We'll get it. Yeah. Yeah. I'm excited for the point where we all watched three hundred and take like a message about the war on terror away from it. But this conversation this is gotten off track. We've got the coffee mate back on the table one pump on cream cream cream. Obviously just I feel so guilty that it wasn't on the table before. Yeah. I mean, I felt it. But I didn't want to record the last episode. Let's do it. Let's record the last just pretend we mentioned one pump one cream an awful lot. We'll we're always thinking about it always thinking about it is that is true. I think about it a lot now because one pump is in fact one cream. Doesn't very good stamina pump is one cream puff his green. You know, who wouldn't have agreed with that? A little fascist. Oh, no. It was actually six foot two don't say named Oswal Moseley six foot to Oswald. Tommy Moseley didn't think that one pump was one cream. I don't think he did. I don't think he is on board with this guy. But now, I'm having some second thoughts, you're questioning his I mean Britain. I you know, you got to put you the first. Absolutely. And I was listening like it sounds like this guy is probably going to be on board with one pump one piloting except for that one time. But he's trying to impress his mom. I think she would have been more impressed. If one of his pumps at equal one cream. I think she wants to. More pumps before. British came true. Yeah. Yeah. Well, because you know, the the the women are supposed to lie down to think of England, right? Yeah. The phrase, so one pump is one cream. That's actually that's less thinking of England. I'm very confused now pump one cream one nation. Nice. Right. Nice one nation cream. I cream for God Rothe really starting up top pre gross. But one day we're gonna get invited onto come town. I don't know what that. I know there's a podcast called Cup. Terrible. It sounds like something Cody would great could really could be great. They could be talking about one pump one cream right now, they could be and if so. I support them. I was. Able it doesn't translate. Yeah. Today. Audio medium performance right here. It does make me feel more confident though. I'm sure everyone's loving this. What are you Sophie's gotten up from the table? She showing me a laptop cast of the combos full description. Okay. All right that adds up. I meant they make one hundred thousand dollars a month. Deserve it. Thousand one hundred thousand graves, I wonder how many pumps are in this Nestle coffee made there's only one way to find out. I think we figured a great idea for bonus content. We're canceling this episode. We're just gonna find out you can learn about Moseley lady. It's about three hundred three hundred sounds better. If you say. Ndo thirty days after opening I feel like it's been more than thirty days since we. No. But we don't know. We don't know what it was opened. Yeah. So back to Oswald Moseley Moseley Oswal telling you six. Anti semitism was obviously the cornerstone of German fascism, but it was not nearly as prominent in Italian or Spanish fascism. Those sorts of attitudes were still quite common in both countries. But it was more the result of centuries at bigotry rather than the highly evolved. Eliminationist antisemitism practiced by the Nazis Moseley in public at least declared that anti semitism was completely separate from fascism. He refused to let the BUF distribute anti semitic propaganda, which led to one of his further right opponents in the imperial fascist league to declare the British union, fascists the British junion a fascist hole dig s. You're right on there. But did you get this is union, but he made it, oh, even get that part? Kinda kinda react again. Yes. I feel like that's what it deserve. Yeah. We'll give it its due in nineteen thirty-three Moseley gave a statement to the Jewish chronicle in which he swore that quote, anti semitism forms. No part of the policy of this organization in antisemitic propaganda is forbidden, but while the propaganda was forbidden antisemites themselves. Very much allowed in the BU. F? One of the most notorious speakers was also one of England's most notorious racists, William Brooke Joyce was an Anglo Irish firebrand who got his political start working Currier for British army intelligence against the Irish Republican Army in the mid twenties. He became a conservative political activists during a nineteen twenty four meeting for a candidate. He supported Joyce claims. He was slashed across the cheek by Jewish communist with a razor blade leaving a prominent scar. That he'd have for the rest of his life in nineteen Ninety-two Joyce's biographer talked to his first wife who claimed quote, it wasn't a Jewish communist who disfigured him. He was knifed by an Irish woman. Good on you Irish. He probably deserved it. Yeah. I mean, you know, I a lot of problems with the IRA, but in in nineteen thirty's not the guys on the wrong side of the conflict. Different story later on another behind the baskets, another buying the bastards. Yeah. Joyce would later gain prominence in life as Lord Hawke casting pro Nazi propaganda from Germany into England during the course of the war. He was executed in nineteen forty six for these crimes. But during the nineteen thirties he was a member of the UF and its first prominent anti Semite, according to the death of British fascism, quote, BUF policy initially forced Joyce to temper his violently anti semitic views Moseley's position on anti semitism. Was clear it was a relevant to fascism, despite this handicap to Joyce's ideology, his talent for incisive rhetoric soon made him the most renowned speaker in the UF after Moseley himself. So Joyce was made the BUF's propaganda director in nineteen thirty four. He gradually started to pepper in more and more antisemitism with his pro fascist rants. He repeatedly stated that the core of all Britain's problems was Jewish people. He ranted about quote, a two pronged Jewish advance by means of capitalism and communism towards world domination. Yeah. Here we go you'll eat one prong. Well, and you know capitalism and communism are clearly two prongs of the same. Prong of which is bitcoin. They didn't have a term for it. Then he didn't have it. They hadn't figured it out. It was still waiting to get mind at a numbers. Yeah. You discovered bitcoin number earth, the third prong. Feel like we figured that out. Now Joyce was far from the only inveterate racist in the British union. Fascists many of Moseley earliest followers. We're sues super anti-jewish. I spelled it that way. Emphasize that you do pump is one cream now when he was questioned about this mostly would claim that these men were allowed in the US because he knew that in spite of their bigotry they wanted to move past that into a bigger and better fight. How do you reason with that nonsense nonsense? I mean reasoning might be a strong. Bigotry leads to the bitter things. I guess that's how you reason it nonsense. Yeah. You might reason it with like, I mean these phone I wanna talk. On to it. But yeah, where's your justification? Right. Like, it's just nonsense. And I wanna have I think they need to talking to your you're gonna give talking to antisemitism. I think I would like to talk to anti semitism real on the horn. Let's see what we can get. Hello concept of antisemitism. Cody, Cody would like to talk to you. He's on speaker. What? Come on. What are you doing? Giveaway to be the voice of anti semitism without just like saying anti semitic profit. Right. Yeah. Problematic. Just move on this bit. Sure my point being. That's nonsense. Taken. Well, mostly continued to assert that anti semitism had no place in his party. The realities in the street were quite different British Jews and fascist activists clash constantly in the back alleys and byways of London in April nineteen thirty three London. Police arrested seven BUF UF members six Jewish people for disturbing the peace the fascist been outselling copies of black shirt. In a nude in a Jewish neighborhood. They'd been attacked by a group of local Jews who knew damn, well, what was going on in Germany and didn't believe a word of Moseley's. We're non fascists line. Everyone involved was arrested, but nobody was charged. This sparked another streetfight the week later when twelve members of the BUF return to the same street corner to hawk their racist. Wears three of the fascist were injured and one was hospitalized. Eight Jews were arrested. The officer who booked them noted that the fascist had been extremely provocative prior to the fight incidents like this and even bloodier than this grew more common view of expanded and slid further towards outright racism, although fence to me like the anti-fascists here. The violent ones. It sounds like these guys were just handing out some anti-jewish propaganda in Jewish neighborhood of an ideology that was leading to Jewish people being put in camps in another country, not very far away. And then these violent people decided to tack them it. Yeah. The first part of what you said. I mean, you use too many words to describe your free speech, free speech. They were doing we're doing a Free State. We're doing free speech, and these these monsters showed up like an hated their free speech for no reason. Yeah, they did the hate speech. They did they hate speech against their free speech. Just because they hated what they were saying I never thought I'd I'd be supportive of fascism here. We are. It's just, you know, free speech. We don't need to analyze the question of free speech any more than that. No. And there's no way in which advocating for an ideology that led to six million people being burnt alive in in ovens and gas to death, and such there's no there's no way in which that is advocating for that speech is comparable to yelling fire. Crowded theatre. No, no, no way, shape or form. I couldn't I couldn't even like describe it in a way that that could be argued. Yeah. Let's read the next. The Jewish community. England was divided as to how to respond to the BUF. Some people obviously, preferred punching fascists to dialogue. The mini felt like the violence was counterproductive on August. Fourth nineteen thirty-three the Jewish chronicle Jewish attacks on BUF activists wicked and stupid. This kind of nation was not enough to change most people's beliefs that fascism had to be confronted violently in the streets. Rather than debate the US official turning point towards open proud antisemitism was the Olympia rally, which is the rally we talked about in the last episode disruptors Moseley gave his first anti-jewish address on Tober twenty eighth nineteen thirty four this marked the very first time. He referenced the Jews in a speech saying, quote, the Jews more than any other single force in this country are carrying on a violent propaganda against us Oswald. Moseley then stated with zero evidence that thirty two of the thirty four people convicted for violent attacks on fascists had been Jewish Moseley claim that in total Jewish people responsible for fifty percent of all attacks on his men. Now, it's. To say how much of this was ideological based on deeply felt beliefs in how much of it was just due to Seoul. This politicking the death of British fascism notes. Much of the shift in ideology can be attributed to an effort to win over the urban working class mostly hoped to fill a niche in anti immigrant propaganda present in Britain for decades organizations such as the British brothers league had gained significant following an urban areas in previous years, four hundred nineteen o to the league, spouse and anti semitic platform seeking to limit Jewish immigration from eastern Europe. It's limited success can be attributed to the traditional friction of the working class with large immigrant populations during times of scarcity perceived competition over jobs customers and culture led to reactions from native Britons conditions in nineteen thirty four were ripe for this kind of clash and Moseley hope to capitalize with a New Britain for the British policy. Thereby further marginalizing British Jewish immigrants. Yeah. Yep. Yeah. A lot about me. But nothing like anything that ever happened afterwards written for Britain for British people. Did you know that like Jewishness and immigrants and Marxism are all the same thing. We'll of course, Cody because of the of the famous Jew Karl Marx. Yes. As yet. The creator highly mayo man as as the off described German Jew car. Car as described by the creative the Daily Mail, the largest English language newspaper world. Yeah. I I've I feel confident where how? Trading is how the left owns the media. I've I've I've noticed that to notice. At the same. As those three things that I mentioned at the same of those three things you mentioned those things why don't people realize this. I should there's like more media like public figures would say the truth about how those four things are the same. Cody. I have some great news about a fellow named Dr Jordan Peterson. You're gonna love this guy right books as you have good. Name and pajamas with lobsters on them for some reason. I buy them. Absolutely. Okay. But what if I want those lobsters on like an iphone case, you'll get that along with your Cup of leftist tears. I love society six patients. Drinking there. Salty water to own the libs. You know, what I love is that it's never not been this way. Yeah. That's that's my favorite thing to this. That's the best thing we all just didn't realize it for a while. Because like a guy who was like saying in good passing sane. Yeah shit. But we were all like, but when he talks he doesn't incite racial hatred and for bar. Yeah. Super low bar, you could murder so many people. Yeah. Yeah. Like robots robots? Do it yet. Sure. Why not why not? Yeah. Anyway. Is the same. Then to Moseley continued to insist that his attacks on Jewish people were not done on racial or religious grounds. But instead quote because they fight against fascism. Yeah. Which is interesting. So he doesn't hate them because they're Jewish. He hates them because they're anti-fascist. Hate him. When he was younger. I'm curious his Granddad wouldn't let them in the house. Oh, so you're so learned a learned behavior. Yeah. So it's like it's like a learned behavior in that. Like, you learn about history, I from your parents, and you hear about it more from the school, and you read about more in John Peterson. Then you walking around and your pajamas realize you spent like, I don't know five hundred bucks. Lobsters for your iphone? Boy, that's a fun. Fact, I in the wake of that Christ Church shooting. I you know, I wrote a bunch of articles and did a bunch of media appearances talking about eight chance pull board and they have been commenting on it. And in addition to threatening me, they're now very convinced that I'm Jewish because I have a large nose, which is a I obviously doesn't matter. What ethnicity my family is. But they're very convinced of that. As are. They of everyone who was on the documentary that I was on pictures of us all together talking about our our Ashkenazi feature right of the circles, of course, of course, their service S. Yeah. That's an angry. Make jokes about it. Because I'm angry. Yeah. Okay. We are. We are well off the rails here. So now, well all the street fighting racism was going on the B O F continue to expand rather rapidly recruited, primarily in industrial areas often from the best ranks Britain's unemployed workers as many of his recruits reform labour party's supporters as where conservatives many joined not out of racism or specific desire to live under a dictatorship. But because they were desperate for money. One member later hauled, quote, the story was that Moseley was a millionaire and all you had to do was joined the BUF and you'd be looked after. Yeah. The financial backers for mostly middle class businessmen and a few wealthy snaps, but most of them refused to actually take to the streets. The poor disenfranchised laid off made up the bulk of the street movement. I found a great slate article by Martin Pugh author of her offer the blackshirts a book about fascism in Britain between the wars quote. The movement was highly opportunistic in that it exploited issues which had local relevance Moseley focused, speaking tours areas of declining industry, notably Lancashire and Yorkshire where the working class conservative tradition. Offered potential recruits in cotton towns, he campaigned for the recovery of Britain's export markets in India in the Yorkshire woollen centers, he denounced competition by low-wage Asian countries and the boycotting British goods by Jews and in mining district such as Barnsley he condemned imports of coal from Poland while British workers remained unemployed. Okay. I mean, do we need to draw the conclusion like I don't see any vision? Do. Explicitly make the comparisons. Or we don't like that question. You just asked all the work. We want to let you. I just say we just let people do with that. And break for some of those sweet sweet, I love that idea almost as much as I love whatever products, by the way, if you work for a company that makes an ads the the axe like tool, please advertise on our show 'cause I would love to do a plug like an aspiration station where I do that satisfying on a global level. If you're an ads manufacturer. Yeah. Just like a fun little graduation of business. Yeah. But you know, congratulations on your customer. Pretty. Hello friends. I'm Robert Evans, host of behind the bastards. And if there's one thing I love besides horrible dictators in history's greatest monsters. It's covering my nakedness with clothes, and that's why I'm here to suggest to you the podcast dressed on the iheart radio network. Yes. At of all the seven billion people in the world. There's only one thing we have in common, and it's the need to cover our shame join fashion historians, April Callaghan and cast Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear fashion histories about more than pretty close. This is a podcast for fashion and non fashion lovers alike. The show shines a light on why the clothes we wear matter. The history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations. It's inseparable from gender identity from sexuality from politics and religion and even advances in technology from the controversial history of African Dutch wax cotton's to the enduring legacy of Christian Dior Cassidy in April traveled through the history and around the world to bring you a new. Fascinating episode each week full episodes drop on Tuesday and season. Two begins an April checkout dressed the history of fashion on apple podcast, the iheartradio app over you. Get your pods casted. We're back so Martin Pugh author of her her offer, the blackshirts also notes that one of the primary things that differentiated Moseley from his German and talian fascist counterparts was the prominent position women held in the feminist icon Oswal Moseley, I can see we go as well. Mostly. What's the fascist equivalent of a feminist icon just wrote that into the script? By which I mean, he was happy to use women's votes to try to strip power away from women. Smart, man. Smart man Oswald, mother, Maude ran the women's section of the BUF. She was followed in that job by several ex Suffragettes who came to regret supporting their own right to vote for reasons. I can't quite right. My head around women eventually composed more than a quarter of the BUF. Their uniform was a black blouse and beret with a grey skirt. No lipstick or makeup was allowed in nineteen thirty four the Sunday dispatch decided to hold a beauty contest for female blackshirts, which again makes sense to me nobody entered mostly posited. This was because quote, these were serious women dedicated to the cause of their country rather than aspirants to the gate theatre chorus, which it's weird to me that a magazine not associated with the fascist movement would decide to hold a beauty contest just for fascist ladies like what is going on the place. You can't wear makeup. We're gonna we're gonna do a beauty contest. We're not fascist, but we're going to hold a beauty contests for your ladies. It's weird the sexiest fascist. Up there. But if we have the sexiest fascists, this is the problem this right here with their whole thing all over the place with the women all over the place like fascist were consistent because none of them were signed up. Right. I'll give that to them. All right credit to all, right. They didn't wear makeup. Katie brought down the amount of sexual harassment. A lot of sexual harassment. No there wasn't because there's no makeup. Thank you very much Tucker toward b Peterson. You did. I didn't mean to. Not knowing about. Thanks funny. Man funny. Funny. Funny guy funny, funny guy. I like also like the Tommy put his mom in church. Well, tommy's. Mommy. Exactly look at me. Mom tommy's. Mommy, mud in an alternate. Universe out there. There is an equally incredible the who album called Tommy, but it's about asphalt. And it's still amazing waiting this whole time to slip. I mean, let's start with gut feeling twenty one is going to be which is I think when he turned off. I mean, this might be what it is. Right. Maybe that's what it is pinball wizard is. Pinball wizard. Wow. There's a whole song about child molestation in that in that rock opera is there really fiddle about. Okay. It's about his wicked Ernie molesting it. It's a great songs. Great song. Great songs from that era. Hindsight it's a fucking fantastic album like they deal with it with care, whereas my favorite album about well. Do. Of the five albums about. Oh, yeah. So there's that that there was that nine our cohesion. Cambridge. Lady fascists also trained in jujitsu. So they could fight anti-fascists to came to Blake meetings. This was mainly because so many British anti-fascists were women, and it was not considered decent for male blackshirts to beat them up many lady, fascists were former Suffragettes as I already noted one of them, Mary Richardson explained, quote, I was first attracted to the black shirts because I saw them the courage the action the loyalty the gift of service in the ability to serve which I had known in the suffrage yet movement. It's all about service service loyalty, some of those success with women voters likely came from the fact that he was rather dashing. According to a good slate article on Moseley's popularity with women quote, much of his impact depended on sheer physical presence as a labor MP mostly had played up to the admiring women in his audiences by smiling at them caressing his mustache with one hand, while slapping, his trouser leg with the other. And being rewarded with cries of? Oh, Valentino I'm gonna guess you had to be in the thirties to get why women. I would say that being awarded with cries of one pump. When. Most of these lady activists were of course. Mothers and mothers. Of course, brace sons one of those sons was journalist Trevor Grundy he wrote a memoir in nineteen. Go don't come at a bad guy. Yeah. Okay. Fine for his name to be crunchy. Grundy wrote a memoir in nineteen ninety eight about his experiences being raised as a mostly the telegraph road an article about that. And I'm going to quote from it Trevor Grundy recalled how when he was just a boy after the war. His mother used to come out on the front step of their house in Paddington to see off to school as he turned out of the square where they lived heat wave back at her each morning. She'd stand to attention and fling out her right arm in full fascist salute. I returned it PJ. She shouted Moseley follower. Speak for perish Judah. I shouted back. I shouted it back and then he'd run satchel flying to catch his bus. Perished? J O pajamas Gemma's. Hey, what that stands for? Now that that little anecdotes from after the war, but I'd like to get after the after the war, and we'll get into what became Moseley during. That doesn't worse. Yeah. That makes it worse for his mom for sure. Yeah. But like to get a little bit more about the children of the Moseley I'ts. I specifically. I'd like to talk about their summer camps. There's one thing we've learned in this show that fascist. Especially like catching frogs, and you know, if you just you just want a nice cool coast to campaign. Yeah. This will be a cool coast kid, you know. All the coast in England are pretty cool are cold fucking island. Lippi great food. Let's go. You're not showing off your bikini Bod there though. No. But I don't have one. So Robert bikini bots. No make up. No makeup, gray shirt skirts. I that actually sounds fine. As a lovely color. Grays loving. Yeah. Now, I love color. I love that color. Now, let's talk about the summer camps. Quote. It was near here on farmland around Pegam and sell that fascist summer camps were set up by Moseley followers, during the nineteen thirties for twenty five shillings a week members in their hundreds would come with their children from all over England for sea-bathing fellowship and fun. There was also an educational aspect of the gatherings and even jokey camp newsletter. It became part of the folklore that Moseley's annual. Visit always brought the sun out people would refer to it as leader weather at eight or nine years old Diana was brought along by parents girl story, what leader weather. Yeah. As a as an interesting cross fascist parallel. When stormy weather blanketed, western Europe in nineteen forty four grounding, allied aircraft and providing cover for the Vermont during the infamous battle of the bulge the Nazis called those storm clouds, fewer weather. Hey is the same thing as leader leader weather leader weather. These guys think the sunshines. Fascist just losers cult. So. Yup. Leader weather, poor kids, those poor kids. It's wanted to chase frogs. They just wanted to chase frogs summer camp. Great up. We gotta be Nazis about leader weather PJ. Okay. I like pajama. No. Oh. This brutality doesn't seem so whimsical right now. I promise. So since we've talked about battles, which we did a little bit ago before digression, let's talk about another battle the battle of cable street. This is one of if not the most important moments in the history of anti-fascist activism, and in fact, most modern anti-fascists to know their shit historically will point back to the battle of cable street as sort of evidence for why their tactics are affective after nineteen thirty four the BUF grew more and more aggressively anti semitic in closer tenor to the actual Nazi party Aswa Moseley declared a war against organized jewelry near the end of that year and his black shirts begin a campaign in London's east end. This was a heavily Jewish part of town and his goal was to basically radicalize all the gentiles living near Jewish areas. For the next two years violence between black shirts and Jewish people. Escalated home aiding a plan to March by Oswald Mosley in three thousand of his supporters across cable street, locals attempted to head this March off they gathered thousands of signatures for a petition asked the local council to ban the fascist March, the council refused and in the name of free speech gather. Six thousand police officers to protect the fascist while they marched along able street. I did put the word free speech in there. So yeah. Right. That one was that one was down. I think. Six thousand cops three thousand Nazis. Perfect perfect. Yeah. Yeah. Some might say nine thousand let's see. That might. In the past. They actually do. I there are some fine particularly in federal law enforcement officers who are really concerned about the problem of radicalization as it should be. But I also I it's my personal belief that it should not be legal to a spouse Nazi beliefs. It's also my personal belief that would Nazis March people should beat the shit out of them and cops if they're decent people should be like, I'm just not going to do. He's got us one. Fuck it. He's literally asking literally asking this is the one time time that excuse as I was saying it was like do I want to say that for Nazis swastikas at target with let it stay that? Like son kind of a target. I feel like we count that one. Is this? I used to own stuff with that on it. Because I thought it look you didn't know because I was like twenty and we weren't talking about that shit. Then so weird how fascist can easily use fun symbols on the mystical. It's designed. Yeah. I accidentally made the okay sign in the picture. And then like fuck. I have a lot of mixed feelings on that. 'cause like we really gonna let them take the fundamental okay to sign like I wasn't gonna not gonna let like fascist Jason Griffing shit. Use it to provide cover for themselves. Yeah. We saying Kay. I'm sorry. Can I with one pump and one? Yeah. Don't do it to it all going in. This is go ahead. Doing the can ready for your pump. It was like a half green. Half half, a cre-, and it was too much Hazel Kipling down your shirt. He's covered hazelnut. It's almost like someone busted as on. Say that. Those horrible after half pump. Hugh, much Creedy gonna get too much cream. Did not like that. Yeah. It wasn't great point is Katie don't delete. The photo yourself doing okay. Anyway, that really disrupted my train of thought. Still very strong as on that flavor in my mouth. Oh, okay. The March was intended to go from the Royal mint through shortage lime house bow and eventually Bethnal green. I'm sure I've mispronounced all of those names again, colonial Moseley would give speeches at a number of predetermined spots along the route of March. This was the plan, but it did not quite work out that way, see the years of brawling an- escalating fascist violence that taught the series anti-fascists Jewish activists of London. A couple of things since the March was planned well in advance they had time together their own counter-demonstrators avast alliance of Jews Irish dock workers trade unionists, socialists communists, put down their differences and came together to stop some goddamn Nazis from goosestepping through the streets of London on October fourth nineteen thirty six Oswald Moseley three thousand fascists and six thousand cops assembled on cable street. They were met by a force of between one hundred and three hundred thousand anti-fascists. Yeah. The counter demonstrators commandeered a bus and a tram to. Use as makeshift barricades. We threw sticks rocks furniture rotten fruit in human urine and fecal matter at the badly, outnumbered. Police and BUF men the fascist tried to start up a chance. M O S L E Y we want Moseley in the crowd shouted back much louder. So do we alive or dead? Oh, yeah. Solid. Solid chance. The police deployed to push back the anti-fascist meeting their chair legs and pipes with good old fashioned British Billy clubs, and of course, police horses the ultimate right control weapon the last several centuries, but the anti-fascist set a plan for these as well, hundreds of local children rushed up and deployed their marble collection. Hauling them under the feet of the horse cups in the -ffective impeding. The police advance the crowd began to chant. They shall not pass a reference to the battle cry of Spanish anti-fascists who battled general Franco's men during that nation's civil war more than eighty protestors were arrested. Seventy three cups were injured in the end local resistance was just far too much for them to handle. Commissioner of police Philip game asked the home secretary for permission to cancel the March. Which was given the fascists were ordered to disperse having never even started their March the victory in the street was immediately celebrated by leftist Jewish newspapers. Here's the times of Israel quote. That'll stop Moseley March declared a banner headlines on the labour supporting daily herald will the communist party's daily worker, let its report with Moseley did not pass east London routes, the fascists the Jewish chronicle was barely less exuberant. The people said no it story of events in the east end was headlined. So max Levitas a protester that day who was interviewed about it. Many years later called the battle of cable street, quote, a victory for ordinary people against racism, and antisemitism. That is surely true. But the exact extent of this victory is a little harder to parse out cable street was not the indefens- in Britain or even in London's east end. And we're gonna talk about that a little bit more after some ads. Yeah. Advertisements at. Advertisements. I do wanna I do wanna I do to. I'm really proud of those people figuring out the marbles. Keith. Running around reader Chen leader that's like come on. And I imagine him sounding like a New Yorker. He's a little New York kid just in London's east end for no reason right is when things start entering the. Yeah. The the hook. Should be a movie if it's not already it should be. I don't watch British movies that aren't the hot fuzz. Sure. That's the one. That's that's the only British coacher. I'm aware understand also had one of their pies once which was actually pudding or vice versa. I forget what putting yes. Uh-huh. Disgusting. Yeah. A hot fuzz quitting hot firs. I guess be like peach peach pudding, I mean, actually, I putting I dunno know you trying to make hot fuzz pudding sound appetizing. I do love blood pudding, which is actually just a sausage. Basically putting sticky toffee pudding that sounds like a sticky different thing. Give it a old sticky toffee pudding. Why do they call people governor? Everyone's governor there. Oh. Oh, awesome. 'cause they controlled so much of the world every day everybody. All right. On the next Ron burgundy podcast. This is actually exciting. You got Mr Peter Dingle. He's Chang's impersonal poetry. So a lot of people actually find poetry interesting. The sound machine away series thrown of games game of thrones rod in any surprises. We can expect from Tylenol Lancaster, curious minister. I heart radio is number one for podcasts. And it's easy to see. Why? The Ron burgundy podcast on iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. And we're back. Okay. So the battle of cable street was a major victory for anti fascism in England, but it was not the end of Oswald Moseley's movement or even fascism in the eastern of London as the times of Israel noted quote in the aftermath of it mostly henchmen issued blood-curdling threats. It is about time. The British people of the east in new that London's Pogam is not very far away. Now warned high-ranking thug. Mick Clarke Moseley's coming every night of the week in the future to rid east London. And by God, there is going to be a pogrom Pogam is when you murder bunch of Jewish people break their stuff. Yeah. Yeah. Moseley was not in the east end every night of the week. As a matter of fact, he flew off to Germany not long after the battle of cable street to get married at Joseph Gurbuz house. Oh could. Yep. Yeah. You did. Yeah. A nice house stolen. Yeah. Of course, you gotta go get go to the house. Gerbeau? Yeah. But Moseley's men stayed active in the east end the weekend after the battle of cable street was witness to the worst spree of anti semitic violence in the history of modern England, it's gone down in history. The pogrom of mile end two hundred of Moseley's blackshirts ran around Stepney, an eastern neighbourhood and shattered the shop and house windows of every Jewish family. They could find they tossed an old man in a girl through window, Manchester and Leeds also saw violent attacks. Some people argue that the battle of cable street wound up being a propaganda victory for the fascist. It's hard to say whether or not that is true. But membership in Moseley's group surged by two thousand people in the immediate wake of the battle. This surge was not evidence of long lived political viability, though, six months after cable street Moseley attempted a major electoral push for the BUF in the east end. He framed the decision as between us and the parties of jewelry and yet in spite of all that local blackshirts only earned one fifth of the vote cable street also lead to increased regulations on violent political groups, the police pushed par. Lament to pass a public order act. Among other things banned the wearing of political uniforms in public and gave the police the power to ban marches for political purposes. It also allowed police to arrest. Speakers who say directed violent rhetoric towards the Jews or other minority groups so you might argue that cable street will not decisive defeat of fascism prompted the government and police to actually do a damn thing about all the God damn fascist marching around in the streets. And that that help kill off the movement. Others would argue that the main effect of cable street in the immediate term was to let the Jews of London that they were not alone. Bernard copes was ten years old during the battle and a Jew. He would later tell the BBC quote. My mother said there were only two types of people in the world, Jews and Jewish leaders. Of course, when cable street came along the Irish, laborers dockers came out, and it was them that really made. Sure Moseley didn't get through my mother and father really had to change their minds after that and accept that. Others did come to help us out so complicated legacy. Yeah. The British union fascist stop wearing their blackshirts after cable street, but Moseley continued to be. A major part of British political life for years to come. He diverted his focus away from the Jewish question and rewrote himself. As a defender of peace. Of course, this was peace with the Nazis because Oswald, really quite like, the Nazis more palatable to the broader British public straight racial hatred. He developed a brilliant slogan during this period, you wanna you wanna guess what that slogan was killed Britain. I is it. America for. No. That would not have that was my second. Guess. No. In britain. I. In fact, himself working more and more with Neville Chamberlain governments in its efforts to appease Zeman's, the BUF hit its greatest number of members fifty thousand in nineteen thirty four, but it continued to remain a force in British politics until nineteen forty in nineteen thirty nine mostly was able to attract twenty thousand people to a peace rally things, of course, changed rather abruptly winning Lind went to war with the Nazi Germany. The view F was banned having never succeeded in gaining parliamentary representation the government turned many prominent members of the BU after the war. Let's they act as an enemy fifth column. Inside England Moseley was initially moved to Brixton prison, but eventually upgraded to the nicer Holloway prison when he got sick at of Winston Churchill's desire that he not die in become a martyr which. Reasonable. Yeah. Gain a lot going on the things criticized Churchill about whatever one. Yeah. I get that after the war Moseley attempted to rebrand himself as normal conservative politician. He formed the union movement and ran for parliament again in nineteen fifty nine right after the Notting hill race riots. According to the telegraph, quote, his campaign called for forced repatriation of Caribbean. Immigrants and prohibition on mixed marriage. He's just a Nazi and a slightly more advanced day. He never again succeeded in gaining significant political standing when he died in nineteen eighty he left behind a legacy of hatred and bigotry that persist in the UK to this day the organization Britain, I was founded in two thousand eleven by former members of the British National Party, it campaigns against multiculturalism with Christian patrols of Muslim neighborhoods in mosques its name was of course, spawned by that rally held by Oswald. Moseley nineteen thirty nine in two thousand seventeen Britain first campaigners edited together, a false video purporting to show a Muslim man attacking a woman on crutches. They tweeted this video out, and it was re tweeted by President Donald Trump when President Donald Trump was criticized for this White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said whether it's a real video the threat is real. In March two thousand nineteen a piece of shit shot and killed fifty people at two mosques in Christchurch New Zealand. He published a manifesto online in noted sir Oswald Mosley as his number one ideological influence, obviously, quite a lot of what he wrote in that manifesto was calculated nonsense, but not this over and over again throughout the manifesto. The shooter expressed clear mostly views, he believed white countries should be completely independent both economically and in terms of their population. They should be cut off from immigration from the rest of the world. His desire was for the white world to remain in a state of autarky and in to multiculturalism, and so more than eighty years after the battle of cable street the ideals of Oswal mostly live on. As they dont. Yeah. thing changes changes happen. Again, sometime contributes horse cops with models. Sometimes. We've been using that are demonstration. It's just like any see them seem like under the carriage waiting. They're all huddled there. A great. We don't need to have them on horses to trip up marbles trip up some Nazis with marbles. Yeah, we invest in big marble. The it made me one of the first thing. I thought it was video the he retweeted. Yeah. Oh, yeah. I britain. I fake Muslim video. Yeah. That's him. Literally, we re tweeting propaganda made by group inspired by and descendant. Well, Moseley it's really pretty cool. It's I was gonna say bad. But yeah, it's pretty cool. Cool already smarten cool smart and coolant good to mention good. The great stuff. We really don't learn this. No, we don't I had an argument with my mother in the immediate wake of the that attack where we were talking about, you know, the the horrible murders that had been committed expressed her belief that the United States should just pull all of its soldiers back from all of the other places in the world. They are basically just kinda wall itself off from the world. And you know, you could call it a state of autarky. Yeah. Yes. We're like yourself off sorta like sorta like that isolating most jested time with the interesting I've seen a lot of people arguing that like, maybe he he's like a monster. Like did terrible things. But maybe like the reasons he did it weren't wrong. Yeah. Maybe we should consider like doing what he suggests avoid more terrorist violence like that like sort of like a pitcher -lating terrorist kind of them what they want. They stop. That's what we always say about terrorists, we negotiate. We we negotiate a long first thing we do with terrorist. Is we negotiate with them? I remember that from the documentary Air Force One in the late nineteen ninety. I also have seen that talking. I wanna know to get a little back on topic. I think it's interesting and terrible. That. When this happened the shooting happened you like everyone of the first things you sent to me was I was literally just writing. Yeah. About moseley. I started writing this like four days before the shooting right like because we were on a podcast about George Lincoln about right about Rodwell and all that kind of stuff. And then and literally you said like, I wouldn't be surprised if by the time is over something like this happens. And then like, I think day. No that that that that nice. The night of the third episode episode. It did and you in the middle of writing about the person that inspired him isn't that book mentioned in the manifesto to which one was it the Truman what was it called? I can't turn it. I return. Turner, wasn't mentioned. But it was it was a clear. Yeah. And he had the fourteen words written on his rifle we trace the descend to that back to rock. Right. It's all it's all it's all there in some in some cases in black and white. Yeah. My point being that everyone should follow and protect Robert Evans. Well, you know, I wanna stay more on point. But I have this beautiful image in my head of president Harrison Ford rolling up in the president's and they're just a plume of pot smoke rolling out and then Shiloh buff staggers out, and then and then O'Hara Ford and his sweatpants. Just sorta saunters up to to the Arlington cemetery to chocolate office shirt. To live for. Tripling. Absolutely ask do I Robert anything the plug. I have a Twitter at I. Right, okay dot com. Yes. Yes. I right. Okay. Dot com. I have the website for this podcast is behind the bastards dot com. You can find us on Twitter and Instagram at bastards cawed by shirt behind the bastards t public. You buy shirt or food and water and medical supplies to prepare for the all you. I have a podcast. That's not this one coming out soon that is called it can't happen here or it could happen here. Google different hittings, something or other happened here. It's about what happens if civil war in America. But a second one it'll be fun while you fish opposites out there. Out there. It'll be out by the time. This episode drops unless they put this episode of tomorrow against my expressed wishes and desires don't do that. So. Yeah. So she's the audio engineer today. Know how to engineer audio. So anyone to whether or not this episode will ever drop. Can you can you hear this? Tommy. We really need to just end the it's done. It's done. What is hard? But I was so afraid I could lose everything loves wonderful and confusing magical and infuriated everything about life that we had thought and planned and hoped for was just in that moment gone. I was so so so lucky to have that three millions of listeners who've made committed possible, I'm promise you it's cheaper than therapy. Listen to committed on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Mick Clarke Moseley Oswald Moseley Moseley Oswal Britain Moseley England London BU Cody Johnston United States Apple Robert Evans Nazi Germany murder Katie British union sir Oswald Mosley Martin Pugh Tommy iheartradio
BONUS : Con-Fessions

Scam Goddess

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

BONUS : Con-Fessions

"Scott Was Popping Congregation I'm Lacey Moseley, Aka, scam, Goddess and I'm Priscilla Davies. The schemers are busy, and there are even more ways to get to. Also we are bringing you bonus episodes of scam goddess to keep you scheming, even smarter hand in each episode. LACINA will break down even more scams, rackets, frauds, deceptions trickeries. What have you knew scam got his bonus? Episodes Premiere June eleventh on stitcher premium with new episodes every other Thursday. If you don't have your premium yet, go to Stitcher, premium, dot, com and use the Promo code scam for a one month free trial. That stitcher premium dot. COM PROMO HOSTS SCAM. Stay Ski. Goddess.

Priscilla Davies Lacey Moseley Scott Ski one month
Zoom CIO Harry Moseley

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

22:00 min | 1 year ago

Zoom CIO Harry Moseley

"Detect a weekly conversation with people who are shaping the technology landscape. I'm peter. Hi, president of meta strategy advisor, technology executives Ford's columnist book author and your host each episode of technician, features insights from top executives and thought leaders at the intersection of business technology and innovation. If you like what you hear we'd be grateful that you give us a rating on itunes or through whatever other source you use for podcasts. Please subscribe, so you don't miss a thing. Thank you. I guess this week is Harry Moseley Harry's. The cheap information officer of zoom. Video communications, a profitable, unicorn turned public company as a couple of weeks ago, as CIO areas responsible for strategic planning, creating value for the company can technology innovation, and for ensuring that Zunes technology platforms are enabling and supporting the company's goals per zoom. Harry was the Jeep information officer KPMG and of the Blackstone group prior to that he planned on retiring, but was lured back into the CIO role. Given zoom, stellar reputation in an unparalleled opportunity in his mind. In this interview, here, he discusses, how collaboration needs or changing with new generations, will any os generation Z make up about a third of the global population in since these generations, have grown up in a digital world. They have a different expectation regarding how they collaborate in their personal academic and professional lives. We also discussed Harry's view and artificial intelligence in five G is experienced on the board of rewards network is time is the first ever CIO zoom in his first experience as a CIO of a technology company as well as of righty of other topics. We hurry. Moseley welcomed a technician. It's wonderful to speak with you as always Peter, untested of doing my time. So he was you to and likewise. Thank you, Harry. I want to take you back to the beginning of last year. We were sitting here in twenty nineteen the beginning of two thousand eighteen you were in the middle of, of, or you're in the process of retiring from KPMG an organization where. CIO for a bit more than five years. And it turned out that you were not very good at retirements, and I wondered if you could take a moment to talk about the process that led you from retirement back into the game and not just any game actually with one of the hottest venture back to Starbucks in Silicon Valley. I remember when we when you coined the phrase is, like, you know, Harry veterinary successful career except you failed at something really badly. I remember sitting on the chair at the full of center down here in Manhattan thinking to myself. Oh my God. Let's say as I say, retirement, so they did I failed at retirement. Yes, I retired in December of two thousand seventeen in day goes, I had different ideas of what I wanted to do that the next chapter by life. You know, sort of one of the fundamentals was that, you know. So when you look at collaboration capabilities in the need to collaborate locally nationally and Logie the solutions out there really on that. Good. And then I discovered zoom, zoom goals me when they heard, I retired and that we were looking for CIO. And so we got into the dialogue. And as I looked into their into the technology, I looked into the architecture, I met with the leadership, I and I talked to a bunch of my friends in the industry. And as you know, I've got an awful lot of friends in the industry from career and without exception when asked, what do you think it'll zoom as a product has a service? They were like, oh my God, Harry assist amazing. It's like an constantly heard that phrase that has sort of is synonymous now is. Which is it just works? And so another data point for you, which is, you know. So when you look at the world's population by the middle of this year, the world's population, the middle of this year is going to be seven point six seven point seven billion people, and two-thirds of that will be millennials gen Z about one thirty. And this is a, a group of young people who have grown up in a very different world. They grown up in the world of the digital world that growed up in a world of mobile devices, a grown up in a world of internet. They've grown up in a world of, of a wireless services. They've grown up with a different expectation of how to work with people in their personal lives, as you know, said a young adults if you will in. Academic lives in schools, and their academic lives in universities, and what they want is when they go into the into the work environment, they want to have that same experience to be able to connect to people in those two phrases, which I find really interesting, which is, it's the notion of if I say, I say Peter is like, you know, let's have a chat, it's like do you see this chatting talking to each other? But for millennials even more so agenda. Chatting is very different. Again. You're gonna give you a real life example, Sunday evening. I was in soon, San Luis Obispo in California, with my younger son, who's twenty one and I go to, and we're having dinner night, say, so Benji when was the last time you chatted with semi his brother who lives in Zurich? He goes yesterday, I said, great. And when was the last time you connected to him? Those a few weeks ago. Now, what's interesting in that dialogue for Ben insanity when they chatted to each other, it was a digital experience, where they were sending a data transfer a messages to each other. That's what that's what chatting was to them. But when I think connected that was a different term, the connective meant winded. I see Sammy last did I talk to the semi last and that was a few weeks ago? So I find that very interesting. That is very interesting. The differences in how information is being consumed, how people interact in, in across the generations, how that set challenging as well. I hear you're the first ever chief information officer at zoom. You come to the organization after a storied career recross, multiple organizations international services from Union Bank, Switzerland credit. Suisse First Boston mantis, you became the CIO of the Blackstone group where you were for over seven years. I mentioned TV MG as your coast prior to this one. And I wonder if this is your first time in a digital native organization. And of course, you did your homework prudently and found out the reputation that you are now employer as but I wonder if you had any misgivings, or if there were sort of new aspects of this were particularly exciting for you, as you thought about the chain, not only dramatically from the perspective of industry, but also just growth trajectory as well. So zero misgivings. Foley, I think it's always good to do diligence on everything in life. Right. Whether it's a personal or professional even when you're going on vacation due to deliverance on the place. You're going right? But no, no misgivings at all. It's, it's very refreshing, and it's very exciting and moving at, at light speed was very interesting. I think it was in December. Maybe it was December November last year. I had dinner with my old boss, from KPMG. And she asked me, how's it going zoom in? So we, we chatted about it. And she said it's, you know, I can see how I can see and hear from your tone, and your body language. Have you're just having the time of your life, and I feel like I'm I feel like I'm not kidding. The candy store to be honest with you. It's an entrepreneurial culture, the culture at this company that Eric, our CEO and founder has established is just rather. It's just rather amazing is like it's even hard to explain. You have to live any experience, it very open very transparent. We do sort of. A Wiki all hands meeting with the company around though, every member, the company around the world. Every question that gets asked gets answer gets owned by member of the executive team, an it says. Oh, it's it's you know from that perspective. It's fantastic. And then when you look at the product on the platform on the innovations, it's, it's terrific until he our clients about our bafflement, our product is also really refreshing. I wanna talk about that a little bit. So, so you were now positioned where any position rather where a lot of your clients or companies clients or your peers as chief information officers, which I have to imagine gives you, in fact, I've even seen you in action among CIO's allows you to be an advocates on behalf of the company, but different from a sales person within the organization you're doing. So as appear to many of these clients were would be clients of zoom, and I wonder if you could talk about that as well. It's, it's really interesting. One is I know I know the challenges that they have because I've been there done that. So, and they know I've been there done that so they know I know they know so I know that sounds very weird, but it out. Yeah. Yeah. But it but it's true. And it's like so we have these, you know, I you know, I was with the CEO CIO very large institution. And, you know, he said, we're gonna run you through the ringer on, I said, I wouldn't expect anything less of you and. And so, so that's a that's a forgotten what the second point was. But that's a, that's a very important perspective. Yeah. And, and, and just the second boy was that when you when you look at the when you look at the Silicon Valley startups. Many all of them and you know who they are as well as I do you, you also see that they also hired CEOs, I you know, read the ought to Gill about Diane over at, at work das-. Yes. I and so because see I always liked to talk to CIO's. I want, you know, when I was in, you know, when I was at KPMG all Blackstone, wherever I liked Tokyo CIO's of technology companies that I was thinking about buying their services are probably because they understand the technology, and we can talk tech. So, so you see that. So I think this is a new era and then you also look at sort of the notion that we read about it, you know, that, that will do journal CEO event early this early this week. You know where the CIO is at the center of these companies, we know the author of the possible, we know what can be done. We know what can't be done, and so hiring, so the CIO's to come in and help, you sort of future. Prove your technology, stack future. Prove your company? I think it's day is here. Yeah. That's excellent. And I wonder can you talk a bit about the difference in the makeup of dry team now. And the makeup of IT teams of from your past I can imagine there was some undiminished differences, just in terms of the way in which the organization, the way the people organized, but also the processes and the technologies that we use, again, within a digital native organization as opposed to the digital immigrant organizations. So to save that you used to work for. Yeah. So. So the it's different being a technology company because it's all about the tech. It's all about the product. It's all about the service. There are sort of elements that are the same. You know you wanna have. When I have easy access you wanna have powerful, laptops, who wanna have, you know, so the office Sweden things I got. So those I is that in vain that's very much the same between the two. Being a, you know, sort of being in a organization like zoom versus any of the companies, I was in previously. This is a new tech company. Right. This was a new tech company founded in two thousand eleven by Eric we have nothing on prime everything we do is in the cloud. So we have all of our applications run in the cloud. All of our office in environment is in the cloud literally nothing's on Prem, and that's refreshing and. So. Now. That's, that's excellent. And I wonder are there as you think back if you can whisper in the year eighteen months ago to your former self about some of the advantages of the blank slate, that zoom or recently had in creating its IT infrastructure and its processes methods are there is there advice, you would offer your former self and I guess, a different way of bassinet is, is there advice you offer to your peers, as former fortune five hundred organizations CIO's as to how you might think about IT differently as a result of your current experience. Absolute Greg list have done that a now I do offer that advice of selective basis. So the somebody who are willing to hear. And so it goes something like following. You know, when when, when I look at my pass them on how I was trying to pivot the organization in transition, the organization, a tried to do it on a on a gradual basis by taking pieces being a smarter approach, I believe was freeze in situ, the existing technology stack the existing suite of applications and build a new one next to it. And as you build up the new one on the right, and I know this is a podcast video, so you won't see this, but I can't tell can't help myself, but do the hand motions the NS you build up the stack on the right, reduce the stack on the list, so you got to think about. So I if I was building this company now from scratch, how would I do it? As opposed to how am I going to migrate away from my on Prem solutions that I have on a piece by piece basis? So to be better, I think, to think think of this as a new company as a new co I'm going to build a nuke over here. And. Yeah. And guess so. And in retrospect, I guess, when, in a couple of opportunity in a couple of the opportunities of my task career, I did have that opportunity principally because there, there are they there was a Benjamin because it was just that opportunity to sort of go in with a white sheet of paper in Berlin from scratch. Yeah. Very interesting hairy ass. Wanna mention you, you have joined some board, organ boards of various organizations, wards network, for instance, by dental sciences, you're on on some charitable boards as well. And I wonder if you could take a moment to reflect upon your pathway to gaining access, as I know, a lot of your peers, actually have the emission to join boards, and maybe some of the benefits you've garnered from having joined boards so Assad with enough a profit, I the charity inside gone, a big believer that, you know, so the. In giving back end. So the helping communities in helping people who haven't had the opportunities that we've had. Are have have challenges that are just come at them out of the blue. And I think that's just a fundamental responsibility of from people who have been successful. Thank God by south in that way. And I think that's I think that's important to, you know, it's not it's important to do it from personal time commitment, not just writing checks are swiping a credit card. I think it's really important to sort of put time in, I think I think this to, you know. Besides helping the organization. I think it's important for your children, your family, your friends to another children to see that you're, you're, you're making that soda contribution that making that sort of investment. If you went up time, I don't think it's important for co workers to say that, you know, that here's somebody who wants to give back. I think I think it's the right thing to do. And then on the on the for profit. Yes, that's been very interesting too. And. I think it's from a a. You know, an experienced perspective being in the boardroom of, you know, couple of other companies seeing how they operate leadership. China has a how they navigate challenges, not just the tech challenges, but the broader challenges of running a company, you know, so that the leadership motivating the team seeing how they attract talent seeing how they attract clients etcetera how they navigate the difficult challenges as well as the grow. The business is, I think a, it's a terrific experience in education where I can bring things to them, but I'm also getting things in return from an experienced perspective. And so would you when you wrap although sort of full profit in the not for profit together, I think it's sort of niece microscope activisits, so making me a better person, and that's great. I also wanted to ask you here at the conclusion of our interview. What are some trends that particularly excites you, as you look to the future, no doubt organization, like yours, you probably are even more mindful than brats in your past as to how new technology trends, might impact the products or even the operation. And I wonder you know, which ones are making their way onto your roadmap or curiosities of yours is your own a specifically about sort of from zoom perspectives of these among white, my general perspectives from the technology industry. So one is obviously, obviously a machine learning that this intelligent automation. I think that's really beginning to take off. I read optical at it's like there were twenty eight thousand robots deployed forgotten. The actual timeframe account Marrone, who's a quarter or a year, which was up year on year, then before, which is terrific. And then everybody says, well, if we're deploying all that, intelligent automation, the robotics in the end like robots. What's happening to the us? At all those people that are being displaced weeks of we all know we have a labor shortage. And when you look at, like, what I'm on is doing as an example, upskilling there. You know, I think there. For somebody who's making about twenty eight thousand dollars. They're giving those people twelve thousand dollars a year allowance to so to get educated so they can ups guy. Learn new skills. And I think that's fantastic. I really do. I think that's just absolutely amazing. That, that I find really exciting. And I think that that's going to help the world become a reading, more interesting place in help people in various different ways shapes and forms. And then you've got you know, so the onset of five G I think five G is really going to win. We're getting closer every morning, wakeup getting closer. But now it's beginning to get deployed the that's going to allow us to make the world, a safer place Gillis. You know. So the controls in capabilities that we just, you know, only jumped about in the past. Somebody talked to me about what we can do in the home, and it's like well that didn't really excited because I like my home to be a little bit analog. I live in this digital world all the time. But those, those are two things that I'm I'm particularly excited about. So their robotics, a I, I'm five Jay's going to bring to the tables, all good topics for sure will look forward to seeing how those are each implemented whether in your life for your company or or beyond, but Harry Moseley, great speaking with you see, I hall of Famer multiple time, a major CIO and wonderful to hear about your latest experience, as a first ever CIO of, of exciting company like zooms. Thank you so much for taking time with me today. Thank you very much. Peter, thanks for tuning in, please. Join me next week when my guess will be advocates Tyson, the chief information officer of into it.

CIO Harry Moseley Harry KPMG Peter chief information officer Blackstone group Harry Moseley CEO CIO CEO officer Jeep information officer KPMG Eric Ford Starbucks technician San Luis Obispo Boston president
Done Is Better Than Perfect | The Mindset Doctor Justin Moseley | DH062

Digital Hospitality: A Cali BBQ Media Podcast

40:39 min | Last week

Done Is Better Than Perfect | The Mindset Doctor Justin Moseley | DH062

"Welcome to digital hospitality. I'm your host. Sean walsh jeff. This is kelly. Bbq media production every week on this podcast. We teach you how to turn your business into media company We believe that in digital hospitality. Which is are running thesis that every business needs to be digital and every business needs to be in the hospitality business. What does that mean exactly. There's never been a time. Where so many offline businesses have not had a presence online and even the online businesses. Don't have the hospitality presence that they need so it's really exciting time and every single week we tried to bring on the best thought leaders. That are in personal. Coaching best thought leaders. That are in branding. The us thought leaders in media marketing sports entertainment authors. Basically anybody that we find through digital las metality That compels us that we think will help benefit you on your journey. Today's guest is dr justin moseley the mindset dr Very excited to have you on. Welcome to the show. Yes sean thanks for being here. I'm excited to be on your show for sure. Justin and i met through one of our most popular recent guests which was darrel. Stinson darrel stinson. He just dropped his book Which is ben doing phenomenal. It's climbing up the charts on the amazon athletes category. He's trying to pass tom brady. So if you're listening to this podcast you heard daryl's his story. Please go out and purchases book and help him get past. Tom brady but darryl introduced me to dr moseley justin and said hey you know. I think you guys should should talk. And i did. Some digital digital digging into who. Justin is the more that i found the more impressed. I am Somebody that's you know. From what i from what i've read and you can correct me but i'm you know someone that grew up in started working at a young age watching his father build a business helping him with that video production business but then deciding to get into a chiropractor on helps people. You built an incredible chiropractor business And then realized that that wasn't all to life and now you're doing personal. Coaching mindset coaching Really changing lives For all those listeners. That are listening at the end of this Give you a free invitation to Summit that i will be participating in that justin is organizing with Some of the best mindset minds out there so we're really excited for that. Welcome to the show and tell. Can you bring me back to when you were a boy. Because i think i don't talk about enough on the show but the more podcasts that i go on i start to talk about my grandfather in the the impact that he had on me. I never met my father. My grandfather was my father figure which was the greatest blessing but take me back to win when justin was a boy. And what you remember about just the idea of work and mindset. What what is your father. Your mother teach you. Yeah i really. I remember probably around eight years old like the each summer. I would go to work with my dad and he was an entrepreneur. He started his own video. Production company here in nashville. And i just remember how cool it was. Just sit there and watch him do his thing and it was cool. I grew up around the music industry. I was able to meet a lot of country. Music artists different celebrities. But really it was just seeing what he had built in. I remember even a young age. Like when i grow up. I'm gonna own my own company. And even at the time. Because i grew up around it. I started working in his production company. I thought that's what i wanted to do. And even got into college for video production and really. I became a personal trainer at the time to and i love helping people that way. And that's what kind of led me into chiropractic. It was a way to help people at a at a deeper level but still be that entrepreneur be able to own my own business and grow something like that but would really kind of let me up. Is we started having success in our business than other doctors we come to us and be like hey man. You're doing phenomenal. i'm struggling can you help me. And what. I realized it was never their business. It was never their systems are procedures. The things that they were doing it was always their level of mindset and personal growth and development. And because i had started at a young age just watching my dad and just that inspired me all i read my first tony robbins book when i was sixteen and really just lit me up on this path of personal growth and development. So really yes. I was able to see patient testimonials and i love that in my clinic but what i loved the most was able to take another doctor and change his mindset then he would go back and his practice would just take off really. I took it from there to then branching out to other business owners and other entrepreneurs really helping them shift their business by growing their mindset and working on their own personal growth and development. Where do you think that that idea started for you. Because i i. i've been listening. I've been studying. I've been hearing other thought. Leaders talk about you know this investment in yourself because there's a lot of times we think is education. We need to do it for a credit or we need to get a certificate for it. It's something for me inherently by watching my grandfather there was never a time where he wasn't studied. He was always learning and he was willing even as a medical doctor to be the stupidest person in the room to be the oldest person in maroon task questions when people thought it was a stupid question. Ask you didn't care. He wanted the answer. But i see a lot of people. Struggle with the idea of will have a job. I don't have time to invest in myself. What would you say to them. Yeah and even warren. Buffet talks about it. Number one investment he talks about is investing in yourself first but for me. Yeah growing up watching my dad in the work ethic that he had just one it gave me the my own work ethic everything i did. I worked hard at even sports. I wasn't the most talented. But i out worked people in earn starting jobs because of the work ethic and that carried over into well even in business. I don't wanna be mediocre. I want to be the best that i can be. So that work ethic just kept coming up and coming up. So i really invested in myself and again that i tony. Robbins book awaken the giant. Within when i was sixteen really shifted my mind because it showed me what is possible. You really can change your life by making certain in your mindset and i truly believe people are one mindset shift away from completely changing their lives if they'll dive in and go deep and what. When did you dive in go deep because you were down a path of following your father and following me. There's so many people that listen to this podcast. They might be in the family business or they might have pressured to get in the family business. it takes a powerful mine. Sh mindset shift to tell having open honest dialogue with family members especially someone that you love and admired. Say dad. I'm not going. Go down your path your patterns your path this. My this is what i think is my calling. Yeah and it is diving in figuring out. What is your calling and continually questioned that because as we grow are calling can change in our vision can change for our life and it was really when i got in into undergrad. I was studying video production and realized i had more experience in the the people that were about to graduate. Because i've been working at it in my dad's business for so long. So i was like i mean. That's kinda boring to me. And then when i became a personal trainer and i actually started helping people and i was like you know what could be really good and i can grow at a successful video production company but i can't have impact on people's lives is i could if i went into profession like chiropractic so at the time because that was like hey i can change lives. I can make a difference in people so then there was another mindset. Shift along the way too. I shifted out of that business. Thankfully my wife's a chiropractor to she runs that business. But i was like. I want to affect people on a deeper level. Yeah so it was always going back to the calling. The calling was i want. Change lives and make a difference but it just changed along the way. It went from video production to chiropractic to now coaching mindset personal growth and development but all based on that passion and mission. Do you remember that conversation. We had with your debt. Yeah and i think it was tough because yeah he was. I mean that was. I grew up. He was his model. You know he was like the guy. I looked up to but he was so proud of me though because he knew that he was because of him that i was following this dream and even to this day. He's so proud of me. And what i've become but i owe it all to him because of watching him in the you know the same from your grandfather. It wasn't necessarily him teaching you lessons. It was what you saw him in the same thing with. My dad was what i saw. The example that he'd lead for me is what led me to the success. I have today do you remember. When did you meet your wife. How how old are you. Where were you your. You're and that was another shift to because we both again. We're both chiropractors. We were both in chiropractic school but at different schools and we met at a chiropractic seminar and it was to the point where i was about to graduate already. Had my plans set new going next. I knew like the next two years of my life already planned out and then boom all of a sudden. I'm meet her in. Everything changed but again because we had to figure out. hey one. is this who i'm supposed to be with in. Are we supposed to open a practice together. Well definitely don't over the practice together. If you don't know if this is you're supposed to be with so it took time to for the rest of figure. Okay our mission and our values in line it in they were and then we opened our business and things took off from there while sushi's still run the business. Yes she does yep she. We have a whole team and yeah so thankfully for team. That's a number one thing for any successful business is the team. You can't do it all yourself. In the more you invest in your team the more success you can have so thankfully we have a great team but yet she runs the show over there and win win. Did you step away from the business was there. There was a. I think you right on your website. An accident that happened. Yeah he f- for me and that was a big shift I actually blew my shoulder out. Adjusting and i would adjust patients and my shoulder would go out and had to step back and put my shoulder back in and i had a torn rotator cuff and a separated joint. That just wouldn't heal. Because i kept adjusting and kept adjusting in that moment. I realized like this could all go away like if something happened to me our entire business could go same thing for my wife everything. Go away so that was a mindset. Shift that i needed of. Hey i need to be able to scale this business so it can run without me and and what did you do. I mean what kind of conversation with your wife. Yeah well and it was the same for her. It was like letting her know like. Hey we have to. We have to do something different in. That's when we realized in a perfect book was the myth and myth revisited. I think was the updated version. But he talks about entrepreneurs get into business because they wanna change the world and make a difference but really they're just doing a job and they created their own job and they're not actually the owner of their own business. They become technicians in the business. And we actually went through a mastermind that went over that book at the time it made us realize like we had just become really good technicians in our business but we need to start working on our business and we started hiring the right people to take over the right roles so we could step away and just do the higher level tasks. And when you're a you remember two thousand fifteen thousand fifteen. That was that was like a significant shift for you to start going down a personal development. Coaching path consulting paths. Biak is in. It's a big identity shift. Because most people we identify with our profession like for me my identity was in a was a chiropractor and when i injured my shoulder incur physically. Couldn't lift my arm at one point. And i was like i physically can't do my job so i had lost my identity but like you were talking about earlier is like it was. There was always the passion. There was always the calling. So i had to step back and realize being a chiropractor was what i did. But it's not who i was so i started going deeper and figuring out like that was just a vehicle for my true calling which was making a difference. So that's when i started like okay. We'll chiropractic served me for a season but now it's time to go to the next level of serving and making a difference and that's when i went into coaching. You remember the first student that you have. Yeah there was a couple kind of at the same time. There's just a couple of chiropractors that were struggling and just reached out for help. And of course i had heart that i wanted to help them and again i went in thinking that we needed to change up their business procedures and their strategies but really it was all mindset and what we fixed mindset. They went back and their practices. Took off did you talk to me about digital in your your growth as well as your coaching growth. In what you see. I mean as somebody that grew up in the video production business. I mean the thing that we teach on this podcast. Every single week is the internet's much easier than people make it out to be especially content creation video audio words and images like at the bottom that that's what it is we're talking about digital storytelling and the problem that we see a lot of restaurant owners bar owners. Small business owners they just. They haven't given the respect to the internet. Frankly because they haven't had to but now obviously with the corona virus the pandemic is accelerated. What everyone else knew was happening and we always talk about the game within the game. You know the people that are understanding that there's all kinds of action that's happening with companies and brands that start to understand that. Even though they are small business they can create an ecommerce platform start selling things. Online start developing relationships with people all over the globe that care about. I don't care what you're talking about if you're talking about you love making so there is a group for you can find them on You can find on pinterest. you can find on twitter. You can find them at the podcast like how to make so in like that. There is a group for you if you if you're willing to find it and if there isn't a group for what you're passionate about you can become that group you can become that voice and you can start going down that path. What what you're coaching. Have you seen as far as Obviously mindset is a big thing and that's what we're starting understands me. I had to get my own ocean moments with the internet going osha. It's easier than i think. It is like having one of my best friends. adam harris. Tell me hey dude. I'm gonna put your your on wordpress. And i'm going to teach you how to use. You should be able to update it at any time and by doing that it was an ocean moment for me was saying. Oh my god will actually. I can control my own destiny by updating the things that i need for a business owner to promote the upcoming boxing manny pacquiao vs fight. As long as i get that up there two weeks ahead of time now actually controlling my own faith what after you get addressed the mindset with these chiropractors in business owners. What part what part do you start to talk about. Actually digital yeah digital is huge. And i have my own story with that because we've been using that for years in our practice and it really is just help. It helped to take off. But because i had scaled out of the practice i wasn't the face i didn't want to be the face of our practice because then people would want come. See me so. I was behind the scene so even with my coaching by coaching was always word of mouth. I would help people. They would refer other people so there was a whole period of time for years. I wasn't even put myself out on social media. But i knew hey if i really want to take this to the masses and i really ultimately fulfill my calling about one and make a difference and change lives. I have to go digital. And it wasn't until the end of last year. I step back and really again. Contemplating the mission in the calling. And i said hey. If money wasn't an issue i can do anything in the world. That just brings me joy. What would i do. And i was like man. I want to put out content on mindset and personal growth and development because it changed my life. And i know it will change other people's lives so it was right at the first of the year. I just started. Just putting stuff out there and believes in march i started my facebook group and the mindset doctors community a free free group just put down content mindset personal growth and development in even i i was like i don't even know if anybody's gonna listen to this but quickly within the first few weeks grew thousand members so it was like man. That's the importance. Because i went from just behind the scenes coaching people to straight from digital. I created a six-figure coaching business within six months using the power of digital. And what i did was. I showed up and i showed up consistently and that was the key. It wasn't any secret. It wasn't anything behind it. It was just show up and show up consistently. I think that's important too because what we find you know. We talked to so many different people in different parts of their digital journey And i mean we're talking about people like significant influencers with millions of followers on youtube or on instagram. you know significant platforms that they've built but it's just so much going on right now that until you do it you know so. It's like we have a bias like as a business owner. You can have a bias of how you think. Facebook is but once you hear a story like what you just said and if i'm running attacks business or an accounting business what did you just say. Did you just say you got thousand people that care about what you're talking about by creating a group and sharing ideas as exactly what he said a thousand people. Now that are connected to you your story but there are also interconnected yet and the more that they share in the more value that they bring to that group the more that want to divert attention from other places and go well. That's ago. Because i know when i go there i might get something. That's gonna actually help me and make an impact in my business. Yeah and you said it earlier. I mean there's groups for everything so just put yourself out there. Whatever is on your heart. Share it with the world because people need this and even for me like i am an extreme introvert and as something years ago i remember in college having to take a speech class and had my note cards and i was just shaking because i was so nervous in front of the class. I remember even in that moment. I was like when this is over. I'm never speaking again. Is something i had to process because i knew ahead this drive in his passion that i wanted to reach the masses so i had to overcome my own fears in even right now. I'd rather be sitting here reading a book than being on video speaking. But i know the bigger purpose that lives will be changed by getting this message out there. Tell me about bob personal branding. I mean i'm looking for those of you watching on youtube. I've got the mindset doctor. It's as clear as a mob mentality poster. I would hang that we have in our restaurant. But it's a mindset doctor right behind the justin's head and he also has a mindset doctor. Right above the mike Anybody who listens the podcast knows we believe in a bbc always be branding. When did you learn branding. And why is it important yet. And i'd studied it a while just from our practice so in our brick and mortar business. Yeah absolutely we did it all the time but again for me. I was behind the scenes. I wasn't putting myself out there. But then there was a shift and i was speaking at a mastermind in one of the members. There said dude. You're the mindset doctor and it was in that moment that it just clicked and one things that i do coach people on an identity shift and i know you talk about the mob mentality of like creating this alter ego of yourself though so for me when i think of the mindset doctor i think of how i want to show up so me justin moseley myself wants to sit here and read a book and not put myself out here and not be on video but the mindset doctor wants to show up because he wants to impact lives so i think that's what people can do with their brand their brand can be their their highest level themselves and then when they're wearing the brand repping the brand they show up as the best self possibly can show up as in. That's when they make a difference and make an impact with their business. I think that's very powerful Because we ultimately want to be the best version of ourselves. It's not that we're a different version. We just want to aspire every day to work on being a little bit better and that is what the mamba mentality is. that's what you know a mindset shift is that's what someone like my business coach mentor. David meltzer talks about like we. You have to be what you can be the people that strive to be the best. It's not that you are chiropractor like that's your business. That is who you are. I heard himself godin been on a lot of different podcast on tim. Ferriss podcast recently talking about his new his new book which i will order in well read because it sounds phenomenal but he talks about people wanting to be a runner. You know it. It's that mindset of. It's not just. Because i want to be a runner doesn't make me runner run. I don't have to go by close to be a runner. I don't have to go subscribe to some magazine. i don't have to join some facebook group. I literally have to go run today for ten minutes tomorrow. I gotta run again for ten minutes and then next thing you know thirty days later. I'm a runner. It doesn't matter how out of shape by like but it's that mentality. That is who i am. I think that's very powerful from what you said. Yeah and it's a shift. I actually learned. Years ago from john. Lee dumas entrepreneurs on fire podcast. And he talks about when he started he was working the nine to five job in just going back and forth and he had this idea of the podcast but as soon as he made the decision to become a podcast stor he was no longer. John lee dumas. That has this nine to five in his mind. He showed up as one of the top podcasters in the world. And that's how he showed up each time and that's the way i want to show up as a coach. I'm one of the top coaches in the world. At what i do just like you with your digital like your rapid it all the time because you wanna show up as the best you ever because you wanna have that impact. Yeah i think that's That's super super powerful. Tell me about speaking in win. Win was the first time you actually outside of when you were doing it in college but when you actually went up professionally to to get paid to speak. Were you nervous well. I wasn't at that point. Because but when i got into practice i realized so that was before we had the social media like. We had the day like we used to have to go out in public and go to different businesses and speak to crowds and even in practice we do. What's called a dinner with the doc. Like come out to dinner will buy you dinner and tell tell you about what we do. So i got reps of practice practice practice. That actually made me comfortable. So then i got through the success. We had in practice. I was invited to speak at other different chiropractic conventions and what they would always had me speak on is the mindset in the personal growth side in the more reps. i got their lead to even bigger opportunities. So it wasn't that i was nervous there. But what people. And i know we talked about this before on the summit interview that you did. They don't see all that work in the mob mentality. they see the mentality but they didn't see all the work that koby put in over the years to go out and hit the game winning shot so same thing with me. I was putting in the reps putting in the reps putting in the reps. Was there ever a time where you wanted to quit Yes so yeah in going through practice and hitting that transition. When i blew my shoulder out because he was in that moment i was like i have to do something different in. It can't be the same. I can't continue the way. I'm going so in that moment it was either. I figured this out we figured out how scale it or was do something else so that was a moment like no. Let's get real and let's figure out how we can scale this. Because it's not sustainable. The way it is now with your background in video production do you see. As far as social goes the people that are doing things well and the people that are. Overproducing are not doing things that you would recommend. It's a good question and these have changed so much because now it's like the iphone can do so much so i think people get caught up on and i do like the quality like i have a camera. Has the lens that gives the blurred background. I like that but some people get caught up on. I don't have that. So i put myself out there yet. So that's the biggest thing is like you have an iphone. You have the ability to produce content. So just start doing it. I think there's something to be said. I mean it's new always want perfection. I want perfection. I wanted to be the best quality possible but perfection is going to prevent you from getting the repson you'll never learn and you'll never get yourself out there. It'll be a year that drives you from publishing. And i think one of the things that we talk about is mean there's four four different paths to content creation bypass. I mean. this is just four basics that have to happen. You've got to plan you've got to produce you have to publish in you have to promote. That's four ps. but if you don't publish like then it's just the ideas that are in your head like you actually have to hit post got actually write the words out and then hit post with that video or hit post We you know with that with whatever those words are with whatever that images once you hit post guess what. Sometimes people aren't going to give a shit. yeah. I think that's very discouraging on people. What what what have you seen. As far as when you're talking to business owners or other doctors about the fear that they have publishing. Yeah in going back to that. Fear of can get started one of the mentors of mine years ago. He told me done is better than perfect. And that stuck with me as i. Yeah don is better than perfect because we can try to shoot for perfection and never get it done. We're not going to move the needle. I do believe in just putting yourself out there so what i'd like to tell people to do is just do a challenge with yourself do alive or not even live. So let's start with just shoot a video of yourself for thirty straight days. What you'll realize it's something you don't even have to publish but it will give you the reps and what you'll notice and it could be on day one. It could be on day ten twenty eight. You're going to start to get so comfortable and you're look back and you're like man actually. What i said was actually really good. I should publish this. Yeah but that's a way to get started if you are uncomfortable with it just do it for yourself and if you want to get comfortable with lives to you can actually start your own private facebook group. The just you have access to just start practicing. Shooting lives in that group. And you'll get comfortable with putting in the reps. Yeah i think that's a very powerful thing for people to start to understand is that it's only through the doing that. Actually learn where all the magic is. Yeah we will. People take a digital for granted like four kobe. I had to. I had to travel and spend a couple of nights away from home. Speak to a group of a thousand people or you can get on and do a facebook live in instantly be in front of a thousand people like it will take for granted like you have viewers. Yes some of those people are scrolling through not actually watching. But honestly if you're in a group there's people that aren't listening to you either so don't take for granted the people that you're getting in front of and do it consistently because you'll notice especially when it comes to business sometimes it takes you getting in front of people enough that six months later they're going to remember. Oh yeah. I needed to do business with them. They'll come back to you because they saw you on social in got to know like and trust you and whenever they needed your service. They'll remember that they'll come back to you yeah. There was a great book by john. Hall called time of mine that we talked about a lot on the podcast. Top of mind magic that these said all of a sudden. Someone's thinking about you but it's all these different digital digital touch points that you can have now you can also have You know in person in real life touch points but that's the power of digital is. You don't know who's listening at any given time and then they go. I just heard the mindset doctor on digital hospitality podcast and we need to speak her for our next virtual event. Why don't i reach out to him. But had you not come on this podcast that that would have never even occurred. Magic would have never happened absolutely. And you don't know how it's going to happen like i was talking to darryl. And he was like man you got to reach out to sean. He would be great for your mindset summit so it was like these connections happen and you never know who's gonna hear that who's gonna start following in listening to your podcast and watching on youtube and i think that's a mindset shift that i had was like man. The opportunities are endless. So by you holding yourself back and not producing content. You're keeping yourself from a magnitude of opportunities. Because they're all around. You gotta start putting it out there and you'll surprise yourself on where people start coming to you from. Yeah you know the more that i learn about it. The one of the greatest skills that is available in twenty two is communication. And if the more you learn how to communicate who you are and what you do and the value that you can bring and you can do that in a digital manner the more value and impact. You're gonna make not just on your business but on your industry on your your village on the people around you. I mean the amount of things we all spend our time and that that's the greatest resource. We have is time. So if you're a dad if your husband if your wife if you're an employer like we all have all these different requests are time what what we can do with our time but the more you learn how to be a good digital storyteller and use your smartphone to produce content published content and put it on all these different places where people are the greater impact that you can have on whatever you care about. Maybe you're passionate about a certain charity and they ask you every year to donate money or donate. Your services are playing the the annual golf tournament. Well what if you learn for your business how to start telling stories digitally and you top that charity how to do it and then now instead of them raising ten thousand dollars for the annual event. They're they're able to hundred thousand dollars because that one podcast that one video. That was on youtube. That one tweet went to the right person and they go. Wow that's my story. I want to donate my money. there yet. And people buy off of emotion and not the logic so they're gonna buy your story over your product all the time so being able to tell your story. It doesn't matter what you sell. You can sell a product that it's in itself doesn't have a huge impact but always going back to your why. Why does your company exists. You want to sell those products to make money to have an impact somewhere else so always remembering what is the impact you can make and i like to ask the question whether it's this or anything in business. What is it gonna cost you if you don't do this so by you. Not producing content. What does it cost you. What does it cost you in the last year for. Not putting yourself out there for not going on a podcast for not putting out videos. What is it going to cost you in the next six months or the next year because it adds up quick it adds up. It's compounding interest that daily practice that you can do if you set. You said just once a day if somebody practiced giving a one minute video talking to the camera. Would you be better after thirty days if you did that. Thirty days in a row every single day. When you woke up as part of your morning routine you just talked about what who you are and what you care about how you can make an impact. After thirty days. I guarantee you that that thirty days video would be a lot better than i absolutely I know you love reading your known for reading one hundred bucks hundred bucks a year. Which is for anybody doing the math. That's at least two bucks a week more than What books do you read. Y where did you learn the a practice. Yeah i've always been a reader. I love just consuming knowledge. And i remember in tony robbins book. He talked about high read. Seven hundred books in which is studying different things and i like to read on a lot of different platforms so i like to read. Personal growth and development. Allied read sales marketing as well as personal growth. And whether it's all kinds of genres. Because i want to consume the knowledge and it really wasn't until i was at a michael high at seminar years ago and i'd already i'll always heard the quote like ceo's read on an average fifty two books a year. But when i was at the seminar he challenged us to actually write down and track will be reading. And then i realized okay. We'll just set the goal of reading fifty two books a year then about halfway through the year already. Read fifty two books so i was like okay. Well what if. I read eighty and i just kept reading and listening to audio books because i love to use what tony robbins called net time so no extra time. So just like listening to podcasts. Could be done while you're in your car while you're doing the dishes. Whatever you're doing you'll have to just sit there and be like okay. I have thirty minutes right now to listen. You could be doing other things so i will do that with audio books. And then all of a sudden like the first year. I read a hundred two books and i was like wow and i really what. I don't recommend that for anyone because a lot of people if books inspire you to take action. That's what you should do. I have friends that don't read any books a year and have a seven figure. Business was the reading. The books themselves don't do anything if you're not gonna take action on what you read those books. What books have caused you to take action this year specifically any recent books that you've read that have made an impact. Yeah i think. Even craig ballantine's book the perfect week formula and i interviewed him for the mindset summit but really just helped me restructure my week. The way i'm planning things out that was. That was a really good to help. Just they're trying to get that edge in time management and. I like the way that he blocked out his week. In that really helped me reorganize things in in gain a lot of time back. Did you ever think back when you were a kid that you would have the opportunity to interview somebody that wrote the book that you read. That had an impact on you know because again back then and it's so weird and that's the power of digital like able to interview him on zoom and just had this conversation and to find out like you know you've you've got mentors interviewed. People that have done grew big things. They're just real people but people don't get access to them because of their platform and because of how high up they've gotten but when you do actually get to connect with people. It's pretty amazing. And i remember i was on zoom call not too long ago jack canfield wind that really changed my mindset for years. His books his audio's things. Like that. And i remember years ago reading his book. I never would have thought. Will this digital stuff didn't exist. I have a video chat with him. But i never would have thought ten years ago. I'd be able to speak to somebody just like this. So that's the power of just putting yourself out there because the way you show up people were looking just like with with us. We looked up each other social media. Who is sky were just introduced to somebody else. What is the first thing people are going to do. They're gonna look you up online. Look you up on your show to see okay. Who are you so you have to have that presence. There and at presents can open up the doors for lots of opportunities so we have an amazing gift for our listeners. I want you to tell them about this. Awesome summit that you planned mastermind. They can get involved. Yeah really excited. It's the power of mindset summit in it's going to air november eighteen th through the twenty seconds i interviewed. Sean interviewed dave meltzer about on the show and lots of other amazing people. And it's all free. It's a five day summit each day there's going to be different speaker. Speaking and really just the goal is to get out the because entrepreneurs like if you're watching this lot of times we try to just do more. And what's the next book. I can read the next. The course i can buy just to learn something new and reality. It's not that we have to go internally and say what's going on inside what can i shift in my mindset. That's going to take me to the next level so audi speakers are sharing the mindset. Shift that they've had tell taken into the next level so you can learn from them and avoid a lot of mistakes that they made and actually achieve success faster so it's the power of mindset summit and you can go to my website. Dr justin moseley dot com and get into it get registered for the summit again. It's free all you gotta do is register. You'll the links to the summit. When it launches november eighteen th through the twenty second is awesome What have you learned by putting on the summit man. It's a long race a lot of work. yes yet one. That is a lot of work but to a somebody who's naturally introverted. Like me one of one week. I did thirty different interviews. So that's what's possible if i would have held myself back and listen to the doubts of man. I don't wanna do this. And sometimes i set there for eight straight hours doing interviews. But again i went back to. What is the impact that we can have and you guys listening. That's what i want you to take away from all of this. Is that what you're holding yourself back from right now is keeping you from having the impacts that you can have so realize your impact can be so much greater now. It's time for you to quit listening to the doubts. Start moving forward in. Making the impact of your call to make dr justin. You are phenomenal of very honored to be part of that summit. I hope that everybody that's listening to this. Podcast that not only you sign up for the summit. Did you tell somebody about it. How can people find you on social. Yeah instagram is dr justin moseley and yeah facebook. Facebook group is the mindset. Doctor community loved connect with you in there as well. Awesome and everybody. That's listening to the show. Can't tell you how grateful we are. Stover ian our entire kelly barbecue media crew on this journey has been phenomenal to meet and talk to incredible people like like justin and We can't do it without you. So thank you for sharing the episode. Thank you for writing a review on itunes on. Thank you for sending. Dm's sending us questions. We're here for you. Stay curious get involved and asked for help you guys next week.

justin dr justin moseley Sean walsh Stinson darrel stinson dr moseley Justin tony robbins facebook adam harris darryl darrel youtube tom brady Tom brady thirty days justin moseley daryl sean David meltzer Lee dumas
Dennis Moseley-Williams, Strategy Expert, Shifting Brands into Experiences  Episode 108

How'd It Happen Podcast

00:00 sec | 4 months ago

Dennis Moseley-Williams, Strategy Expert, Shifting Brands into Experiences Episode 108

"Welcome, to episode one, hundred, eight of the how did happen podcast hosted? By Mike? Nella. TESTA. In this episode, Mike Welcomes Dennis Moseley Williams. He's the founder of DFW strategic consulting and he's also an author speaker and Strategy Expert Demos published the book serious shift, which started a movement for those of us who are determined to make meaningful positive and lasting change in our life and businesses Dennis works with. With, entrepreneurs and business owners around the world who are looking to make their life and business a better place. Dennis's also a certified trainer in the Experience Economy Mike and Dennis, cover a ton of great stuff in this episode like Dennis's fortune to be in the right place at the right time to start his career and strategic consulting his decision to live with less enjoy what matters to him like. Like taking summers off his candidate point of view on free time for entrepreneurs, thoughts on why people follow brands and his thoughts on really hard questions. Entrepreneurs need to ask themselves to be unique. You don't make a key and then go around and find the lock to fit into. You find the lock that you want to open the door you wanna open, and then you fashion key for that and And then the second thing I would say, as keep your money down people, your overhead down, you stay really small super small. It's not how big you can get a small. You can stay two primary partners with the help. Helper can make a lot of money out of a little bit of money like that. The needs of the corporation must be met. It's not your money us work there. Your businesses money don't touch it. It exists for Your Business. Don't use your business like an ATM. It's like ninety percent of small businesses fail. Those are the three reasons. Why right there. That's the top three week ago on all day, this episode is brought to you by Hello Water Polo waters fiber infused with zero sugar, five grams of fiber with five inspiring flavors, a fun and fresh delivery system to help curb appetite and promote gut health. Smile Laugh live love and dance your way to a healthy lifestyle visit. Hello wandered dot com to find a retailer near you. Hello Water Inspire Health, and now here's Dennis Moseley Williams. Hey Dennis. Thanks for joining me today. Michael. Thanks very much for inviting me. I'm delighted to be a guest. Yes. So for everybody, listening Dennis and I. Were introduced to one another by Steve Simms and Steve Simms was on the show. Div introduced. US said, Hey, you guys should get to know each other and Dennis I had. Had A conversation for. Forty five minutes or so just as Serie covid nineteen was becoming Becoming thing and and Agreed to do the show, and so I'm really excited to have them. So Dennis. I start everyone on my shows, the same way it's with a simple question, how did happen for you? How did it happen? That's the question. Well, I'M GONNA. Give you the short and the long answer. The short answer is. For. Everybody Michael. You ever read the book outliers by Malcolm Glad Well Story of success. When I read that book, I, literally understood myself. So the longer it probes through the Malcolm Glad. Well, outliers. Lens, it's like Oh Jeez started at my birth quite literally. But. For everybody listening you know the Michael Malcolm. Glad. Well, sort of summary As. You get. You catch a lucky break. You show that you're really good at it. At this lucky break. You've been given. You put in your ten thousand our. So I got. Lucky break and they went to work for a business consultant. Who never ever ever would have hired me except he was just at the stage of his business where he could afford an insultingly low hourly wage and I was just at the right place whereas like I'll take, I'll take it for a shot. So I start, that was the lucky break and I worked sort of marketing. Marketing Business Development Business. Consulting agency I learned in the trenches I was very good at it. I have I had a lot of creativity and a lot of entrepreneurial grit, which is why really attracted to the opportunity. And then Shortly, thereafter, somebody asked me if I could speak at a conference. On the work that I was doing and I said, you know absolutely, I could do. I could do that and I did and what I had sorta figured out was was this idea that all business was evolving beyond goods and services into experiences? This would be circuit circa nineteen, ninety, four, nineteen, ninety, five. Okay. Okay. SINOLOGIST tight. So one event becomes another one client becomes another. I. Continue to focus on that one subject, which is the evolution, the progression of business whereas the economy going what to businesses have to do to be relevant, etc.. And very very gradually, and then suddenly I. Find Myself Over Twenty Years in. And I still run run agency if my own now for the last ten years or what have you, and my partner, Tom Frisbee and I work with small businesses that You know one improve their fortunes through better strategy executioner innovation rank s for experience in design. And when you when this opportunity presented itself this break, where were you? What were you thinking about yourself? Where were you in your life? What had you been doing? I was right at a very important crossroads. But one wonders if they're all important crossroads, you know certainly seemed legged at the time. But I just been one hundred of them cents to. I was rated a position where I had to double down. I had to decide. If I was going to recommit. For everybody listening I live in Canada. So. Just you know. To be a teacher in Canada's really really wonderful. It's a really wonderful job if you want to be a teacher to teacher anywhere because it's a very noble. Profession and. Obviously, very meaningful and personally awarded however however just so happens it it on. -Tario. Specifically, the in Ontario Canada being teachers also, very good paying job to become a teacher was is I had to decide if I was GONNA. Say doubled down to teaching route. Or if I was going to pursue sort of an opportunity in business and I was very very interested in creating something. So when they opportunity came, I just saw it as A chance a chance to find out if that's really what I wanted to do. But also a chance that you know if this is in factors, you want to do it in one way or the other, even thinking this way for a long long time. It's an opportunity to get in on something on the ground. Floor and it's and this industry that this, the we work in the financial services, industry. And they were I just realized Oh my goodness. It's the it's the money business and they have no idea. How to attract and entice clients really and they and they are a little out to lunch forest where their clients are looking for value like I just saw it as the perfect place, the perfect space to apply all of my interests. And you know various nerdy as. And when were your parents sort of? On the where they were they teachers as well or was there some pressure or pressure is probably not the right word, but just some Nersa in your life to do one thing versus the other or. Totally my mom, and dad I visiting you today because I'm visiting my mom. I'm in her house right now. Yeah, my Yemen. Deborah fantastic. And I had a wonderful relationship with them and they were great parents. They were not teachers. My mom was in. She was a nurse at one time in her life. And then she got into politics. Education politics, etc. to the provincial left that was her bag. She was she lived the life of service. She has lived and continues to live a life service my father though he owned his own business. Man He. A genuinely happy man and said a really wonderful example and he he's not. He is no longer live. My Dad checked at six or seven years ago. But one day he paid me a nice compliment Michael and he said. Well Son. You've got talent. You know and kind of had a chuckling goes ha ha i. don't know where you get it like this. And I said to him. You know when you think about how I grew up, my father owned his own business. He was really happy. He never complained about his boss. He seemed genuinely happy to do his work. He really liked his lines, etc, and candidly by my father would take the whole summer off. He'd pulled me at a school in June I take the whole summer off traveled Canada with my mom and Dad. So as I said to my dad, that day there was no question that I wasn't GonNa ever own my own business like, did you think a kid the grew up like I did? was going to grow up and get a job like if I were honest I would have been a wonderful teach. But the only reason I was really looking at it was I wanted my summers off. And I will tell you as an entrepreneur now going into twenty some years of this. I still take all my summers off. I go to my cottage, all summer I speaking events, July and August I, go to the lake for eight weeks every year I literally taking the summer off pretty much life. So my motivational way back when really if I'm to be truthful with time off lifestyle happiness freedom I just moments ago. Do you believe me moments ago before? I. Chatted with you and we connected a little visit before our official visit. I was standing with my brother and my mother's kitchen I said to him. My brother's name is Bernard Bernie Bernie. From this moment forward in our lives. All anything about is ensuring we spend as much time as we possibly can. Stand on. This is this is fantastic us at the. Great, time. Let's IT I have I have zero. I don't have enough time to be unhappy. So So if I can't be. So you're unhappy changed that. This isn't a happiness by Gassan but. You know. That's so. That's why I'm the Ray. I am. That's my business 'cause. Okay. Well. That's that's I kind of I, want to dig into that. Little, bit letter because. That's really a gift. To have an entrepreneur as a parent who is has has structured their business in such a way where they feel comfortable taking the summer off because a lot of us. Myself included. I think made progress have made progress along the way, but that's Like a big. Step. So when you said, you wanted your summers off. So teaching was an attractive Gig well being an entrepreneur. You can take your summers off as a pretty attractive. GIG as well. Yes and let let's be really clear about something. So. I. I want cheese. I. GotTa Watch here. Michael. You're getting all fired up I. Think I, don't I ignore all of those any book. That makes it impossible promise. I don't even touch it. How to make a million dollars year and sleeping till noon and get drunk afternoon is a ridiculous idea. Any of those stupid books, how to get what you want without having to do anything for it. There is nothing in that that I want to read. Gay, it's nonsense nonsense. Here is what I think about all that. I don't like the term. Work Life Balance. Because it implies a struggle. You're pushing one against the other. This is all about time off everybody out there in blog lint. Okay. So like the idea that and just work on your laptop float in a boat and you're fishing. No. Because now you're not working and you're not fishing, you're accomplishing nothing. Here's how you have a great life. This was what I saw. My father do it's what I'm doing. It's why I take lots of time off. And I'm going to tell a story within a story, go for it. It's about. Learning to live with less. His Not really that complicated. So here's the story when this story, I, get a phone call a long time ago. With an opportunity and it's a good opportunity. Hey, can you do this? and. It might be worth. One, hundred, thousand dollars. Okay. Can you do this? And the short answer is. Yes, I could have done that, but it would have interfered with having fun. Specifically. I would have had to. You know maybe like seven to ten days of my of my otherwise free time. So. I'm not going to be mysterious is like I'm not going to trade seven to ten days for one hundred, thousand dollars, us. I'm. Not. That's. Not Enough, there is no amount of money. For July or August days that you can give me. Okay. So when I called the guy back and tell them exactly that and he's known for a long time. She sort of applauds it, and says, get free good for you. Good for you. Man Like I, get it and I'll I'll ask zones to do it. And I said Yeah for sure and to be clear everybody, it was really more. It wasn't completely in my wheelhouse, but I definitely could have got behind that. So I said, yeah. I would have had to do this in this to do. It's it's a pain and he says, you know it's funny. Do you know this guy? I. So I know, yes, I know this other guy he he told me that every time he takes on a project like this like every time he doesn't do what you just did say, no. That he regrets that he always has to bring a person on, then managed that person the person in one way or another less than down the work isn't quite his work. It's always there's always a compromise. Okay. Compromise word here, gay and he says, you know we'll call this. Guy Joe Blah Blah. Blah, Joe says, he wishes he never did it. So I say, Oh, yeah. No, he doesn't tell me the guys, nate. That's important, but I know who he's talking. So I said, okay, well, I I know who you're talking about. So I'll tell you what? You can tell him I said this in, you could use, you could tell him. He could say no more often if he didn't drive a Porsche. Yeah When you have one, hundred, twenty, five, thousand dollars parked in your driveway. You're probably GONNA, take on some clients from time to time. You might not otherwise one. I have never done that. Now, let's bring this idea of compromise in my Oh man me and my partner John. Were plagued balanced. Work Life Integration. You're not business Mike Home Mike. Working worker. Dennis. slacker. Dennis Dennis. You're just Mike and I got I'm. Its integration, you have to respect your work. You GotTa respect your time off. You've got to put your energy into your work. It's important. The needs the corporation must be mad at all kinds of other great stuff. All of that. All of that boring business stuff is all true. That's all true. Now, here's the compromise. Everybody's GonNa. Make one if you business. You can compromise the quality of your work. Hey I. I've hired a bunch of little underlying Dennis's little tiny dentists in little tiny plaid shirts. and. I'm farming them out. Are they as good as you now? But that's okay. Charge sixty percent for them I pay each one of this much. I take the rest that works understand everybody listening. That is a workable model. This is my own personal opinion. Does not be anybody. Else's opinion that is workable model. It just repulses me in ways I cannot explain. As. The grossest thing I would never do that because. So. Here's my compromise. I'm not going to compromise my work. The work we do is amazing. And a story and if I and there's no way, anybody else can do it. But me Tom End of story. Therefore, we only make a certain amount of our work. That's just the way it goes. So here's what compromise. I have a twelve year old jeep outside. That's my car. Not a porsche. Oh, so that's how you get your summers off. That's how you get to sing. No. Like I want to be really clear I. Don't really want like you know Tom and I may have a seven figure business. There's me and Tom. And, Susan, of course, everybody out there and blog land his runs us. That's it. You take those two people. Pile like that, you can have in lovely life. And manager whole world. That's everybody is different. But for me this is you know how'd you get here and? had. It happen and what's the approach you take in? What was your influence? My influences lifestyle? I do not have the. Make twenty, million dollars a year chip I'm not saying people shouldn't. That's wonderful. It's a good thing people. Do we all need each other? We need the people that are wired that way, but this particular character is not wired that way I'm wired for. A wonderful life experience, lots of time off and enough money to do whatever I want to do. But not. But if but in the compromise I make is I don't I don't drive sports cars. That way I can. Get Advice. was there. was there a time in your? Career though that you would. You would compromise because I'm thinking that. You know you just described the UN Tom and the person who runs you. Have, a seven figure business, which is amazing for three. That didn't just happen. Right. So. I'm assuming I'm Poe. Hurts your I'm assuming? It doesn't just happen. So how do you so did you make? Did you take those 'cause? I'm trying to put myself in your shoes, a lot of compromises that I took because I, thought. Any. Sales a good sale that was sort of my when I first started as a twenty-seven. Right any sales, a good sale until the point where I had. So many of those, any sales that couldn't really focus on the good sales anymore and so many of those in sales where I couldn't take. A. Summer off because I had all these people sort of. Clawing away at my time. So. How did you? How did you work your way through the through that? Painfully my Capella okay. Thank you. Because you can except. You didn't exist podcasting didn't exist when my car I'm like I'm amazed at this. I'm not even our old person. I'm not an old guy. I'm not even fifty K., but I speak a fifty seven year old level. Thank you and I. Are. I'm of my Bryant's this. You know people. Men Women in their thirties I looked say them. In Mike Chris started there was nothing that. We didn't have email. You know. What we had racks machine never rang was really excited. We run over to it like a fax machine getting paid. So, for starters, I was not always as smart as I am right now. Nobody is. And I made some painful mistakes that other people do not need to make. Right. Again, there's podcasts look at all the resources for people that need to learn like warming up to meet you. I listened to a couple of your podcasts. See what you all about. So right away. What did I do on like Geez, I gotta listen got all these podcasts, harleys a really good learning from the president digital garment. Fantastic. Stuff. So there's so much resource. Nobody has to make those painful mistakes. So instead of telling you what I did, wrong. Which I can do. I'M GONNA. Tell you what I would tell you what? To not get wrong. Got It. and. That would be like, yes. I. Took on clients I never should've taken on. So that's where number one is number. The very first thing I would tell you know who your work is for. And conversely like know who isn't for who? Who isn't your work for? Who just doesn't get you? Know, if we want to render me down to an offering. Be, offering is business consulting. We can help you make more money. and. So can a zillion other people online by the way I have? We hardly have business insight as a market cornered. Kinds of people, the dude it. So. When I say know who your work is four, it's not as general an answer as people who need business help. It's like, no, what's their worldview? So the second grabbed, the first is WHO's a four? And the you know, let's say, the upholstered gun, two questions, who is it? Who isn't it for and the second question? What change does it create? That's it. So you know and I don't want to turn your podcast into an advertisement. I think really good interviews advertisement right side. There's a great conversation somebody who is GONNA check. So I don't like to directly say this is a worker. We say this because I don't want to do that. But, but so I won't. But I'll I'll do it this way if you go stand at the finish line. Of A marathon. There will be. Runners standing around. that have the Nike swoosh tattooed on their body. Right. You. Won't probably see an Adidas Tattoo or a new balance statue, which is just funny to say out loud with the honest or a reebok that to or whatever. Or in the shoe companies, I'm ignoring or forgetting. Heard me from for that. But you're going to see the Nike swoosh. Here's why is Nike? Doesn't sell shoes. People don't buy. Nikes. They buy some of their clients buy into Nike. As a thing, it's just do it all the sell footwear, not these guys. They sell sort of a whole movement. So the idea of know who your audience is, Nike is an interested in people that are looking for shoes. They are interested in people who WanNa just do it just do what while they leave that up to you. They lead. There's there's a lot of people that Nike running she is the clearly aren't running. Yeah, either doing something. Right, you've blank so that that that's the first years, your first big giant mistake. Marketing, is the first thing you do. It's not the last thing you do. You don't. You don't make a key. and. Then go around and find a lock fit into. You find the lock, you WanNa, open the door, you wanNA open out of all the dot locks and doors in the universe that you can choose, and then you fashion key for that generalists people on the and there's this. It's all what business you're in. If there's somebody out there and they're like, Geez, we'll. Just sell bags of candy or whatever you want to sell. A lot of begs, Gandhi's you can be a generalist. That's what that's what it is. But for me, I'm on the on the other anything's I'm sort of more experiences in and such a smaller kind of audience. And then the second thing I would say is keep your money down, keep all your overhead down for what I mentioned earlier because if. You know you can, if you stay really small. Super Small. It's not how big you can get so small, you can stay a very. As you like do math. Michael Aghanistan appointed as well. To. Two and a half people can live really really well on a pile like to two primary partners with a helper can make a lot of money out of a little bit of money like that. You see what I'm saying. And then I'll just say more in all finish because, of course this, this could be a podcast on which is this and Susan. Robbery said this to me Susan of Tom Dennison, Susan? Susan said this to me. There's to be twenty years ago. She said, the needs of the corporation must be met. And what she was referring to was cash flow. So for everybody listening. Some. Of you just went a man. In. Some of your like, oh, please don't say what you're about to say. Here it as it's not your money us work there. Your businesses money. Don't touch it. It exists for Your Business. Gay in the and then I'm not even trying to be funny when I say this keeping my nine Canadian, and then the second guideline is like the government. Then you get paid. Don't use your business like an ATM. It's like ninety percent of small businesses fail. Those are the three reasons why right there? That's the top three week ago on. Good point you bring up because a lot of. A, lot of entrepreneurs will take. They'll. They'll create a lifestyle that requires them to to do that transfer of asset cash from the business to the. When you're doing, which works fine until it doesn't. Until reluctantly. Work. You're your. Yeah. You gotTa send all that. You know since when you asked me that correct cash earlier or I thought you were GonNa ask differently and I going to confess to you. Oh. Yeah. One time in my life, even money had no meaning to me unless I turned it into something. Like if I was even yours one, hundred dollars I it. It was meaningless until I turned it into a one hundred dollars shirt. I could wear. You know what I mean. You see, you have to transfer all of that to like the thing about your own business, the work itself must be the reward. And and if if you can't do that. If you can't make that scratch where you're in love with it to a fault. You probably in some trouble k. like I could tell. I could tell funny stories. At my own expense that would be boastful. But. I like to emphasize that like Oh. Gosh. I. Assure you. It's not started the cash. It's about. It's about what in for me? It's like it's about that change that you. Create, and that's everybody listening. That's they should be thinking about is what again who's it for? What changed? Does it create? That's that's the game right there. What do you know? What I'm regretting right now I've been meaning to. Add video to my podcast for a long time and I've been dragging my feet dragging my feet. But if everybody that's listening could actually see does. Talk. He is so expressive when he talks about the most expressive person that I think I've ever had on the show and I'm saying to myself. dammit. I should have had a video on this because it's so inspiring to watch. You Talk I'm just like blown away by it just as an aside. Thank you. Thank you. Make yourself feel better. I think most people just listen to podcasts anyhow. So you're you're probably OK. Okay. Northeast. So we you read. Easy. Fair enough. Hey Am. I saw. First of all before I, get into that you this this notion that you have about the summers with your your free time. Why is free? Time? So important to you or to any, or at least at least in your opinion, I get the sense that it's important to every. Certainly every entrepreneur. Why is it so important? So you got. All the time. That's all we have. I want to spend as much of my time. Doing things that bring me joy. That's it, and that's the that's the word. Now, let's like let's get. Now. Remember what I said. It's not like that means Hey, you just gotta call me on a powder day and I'll blow off work and go can't do that needs. The cooperation must be mad. You're not a ski bum, your CEO Olya clown. You can't do that. What you can do is say I'm going skiing on Friday. And I am going to work hard on Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday Thursday. Again, all of those books that tell you can make a million dollars a year. Have to work like four hours a hate. That guy makes a million dollars a year on again. So I struggle over saying this because he sold you that book. Gay, like what is what am I wrote a speakers speaking book called how to make fifty thousand dollars a day not selling cocaine. It's like. Fifty governors this early battled back. Allies come on crazy. You want to build a business. Build it with intention. And ask some really really. Hard to ask the right questions. WHO's this four? which change? Does it help create? What do they care? What's their worldview when people are stuck selling goods and services when they have that salesman mindset? They think about all the wrong questions thinking, they're the right questions. What is this thing? What does it do? They get the first two, right? Then, they go to the wrong place. What makes it different? Okay WHO's IT for? Why do they care? That's those are the questions they ask can it's like, no, you're selling staff. That's all you're thinking. That way is going to move units capable. I got really bad news for you. I can buy everything I want. Including illicit terrible things on the Internet and have it delivered to my house. Literally nothing. You can order kidney human kidney online and delivered my house. There's like you're in the selling stuff business. You better quickly get a waitering job sublets. Good. Be You. It's called. Amazon? They already exist. So. For me, it's like ask the right questions. The questions aren't What are the features and benefits go to the other side that? What's their worldview? What do they want to talk about those people? That worked this change. Where do they want to talk about? And I always say you know you create the story that somebody wants to hear twice. Tell me what that guy again. Tell me this feel night guy, tell me but his running shoes tell me about just do it. And when somebody says, tell me that again, what they're really saying is. I, want to be a part of that. I WANNA be. I WANNA BE I. WanNa. Wear those I want drink that I want to drive that. I. WanNa go there. I want to experience that by want to be recognized and respected by the people that do that. I'm wearing this Patagonia jacket company I. Love. Evokes Art Canadian Fella founded that bad boy. I am clearly not a mountain climber. I'm speaking of some person. I clearly am not an exerciser. But I am in Yellowstone Park I. saw that would be Free Solo, for instance. I am wearing Patagonia identified with this brand, but I'm not telling you about the brand I'm telling you about me. And I'm wearing it because I want to belong to that group people and I want evoke yard. Or Tommy Caldwell. Or Alex Holland or just anybody that climbs community to respect me and bring me into. So. That's in my book. You're building. You're not selling stuff. You're building a community and people that are connected by ideas and world. That's the whole game not selling stuff efficiently quickly. Making website. So that's Okay I WANNA I WANNA get into that a little bit more if you don't mind because. I know that you are a certified trainer in the experience economy. The pining Gilmore Book, which you've referenced a couple of times. I read that book many many many years ago I think I was in to that. When I was in strategic coach was program for entrepreneurs. Actually. In an. Is really good. I really love what he is done there, and what could you brought him up? One of the best things I can say about him. Is. Knows what he's doing because people become his client stays Klein for twenty years like well. You know what more do you want for endorsement? Twenty years is one of the marriage is. Good for him. So. So what? I'm thinking in your consulting business. You're probably running into business owners, entrepreneurs who who haven't grasped the experience economy thing. As you had said, you know they're selling stuff, they're not selling. Them, they're not Patagonia or a Nike Or. Or whatever. So what? What what, what is I guess? What is so important about? Competing in the experience economy. And how do you do it if you have? Just. like. So many of us will say, I, just have a normal business right i. just have a normal business I'm not. You know like an event. Yeah. Hardware. How do I create right? How do I look people come in by my stuff? This is how I was taught. This is the business. I'm sure you run into that all the time because experience economy experiences sounds sexy. It sounds like a great restaurant or a or like some of the. Yeah, it's sometimes it can be a little bit like. Create experiences in the world? Is Yours that book that that I want to buy, but it's not as easy as. It's not not. Really, watch out to 'cause. There's probably about ninety percent chance that book would have it. Wrong. One of the biggest. Mistakes that people make. Is failing to understand that service and experience are not the same thing? So this is a to answer your question. which is literally lights, the million dollar question. So Services are designed end intended as you know reading the. Book. Shoe. Save customers time and money. K.. This is in relation to your question. If you're a business, how do you evolve in switch to staging experiences? I use that term staging intentionally. So step one. I will retract administered. Overstep one, read the book the experience economy by. Line, and Jim Gilmore. Step to. Read it again, he slowly this type. Now, we're to do and what you'll learn. What you learn is services and experiences are not the same thing and everybody thinks they are, and you gotTa Watch out because if you'll hear people talk about they're really working on our customer experience and I'm not just being funny or difficult here. But I look at it, realize. No, you're not working on customer experience, you're working on customer, service. And I'm not being defecit. They're not the same thing. Customer Service is, let's make it fast easy. Friction less. And virtually. Completely unremarkable. In any way, you never remember service unless it's terrible. Experiences about creating time well-spent an experience as we get to the end, your podcast and everybody listing thinks that was an hour or whatever they go for that Oh can't. He just keep talking. That's an experience when you're in a business and you want the night to continue. When you're in a hotel and you don't WanNa go home I live in. Ottawa Ontario. Canada. On this particular year, it was two thousand and. Thirteen or fourteen. So I would've flown like you know two hundred times that year. And I would have spoken at fifty to seventy conferences. I would have slept in a lot of hotels. I was one hour away from my house with my partner Tom Frisbee, and we'd had a little business retreat at this hotel called the Chateau Montebello. It's one hour from my house. It is the largest log cabin in the world. This thing is like out of the imagination of of you know Jr toll team. You know it's just incredible. I was an hour away from my house I'm always in hotels and I was looking back into my hotel room. You know is closing the door lamenting having to leave. Wish, I could stay me like these are the only three days. They got off all year on a waste on never forget this room that my friend is an experience. In the same year. I. Had that experience. I. Probably stated the Four Seasons Dozen Times. I don't even remember. It's just really good service. So how do you switch to? Experience if you're an anybody, a hardware store. A shoe store, an anything. The short answer is be worth charging admission except that selling goods and services is not enough your dentist. Everybody listed. You remember ever in your life being at the dentist's office, and there's fifteen minutes left in the in the in the work, your mouth. And you're aware of that. There's probably about fifteen minutes to go and you thought to yourself. I wish wish I could stay here doing. Okay. Varley did probably because it's But everybody listening perhaps when you get home later or if you can do so at your computer right now, just google the dental. SPA DOT com. And right away you're GONNA see. Check that with the House that that's dental. That's a dental office reimagined. themed. So it looks like a spa with. Impressions that it makes about wanting you to relax, and it's not going to dread and it's not something you need to come to the last minute and get the hell away from his hsun. As possible. You'll want to get your so bad. You'll. While your face is still numb. I hate the dead, so much believing leading what my face is still turned off. Fighting that is no they wanted to be. From the moment you show up nobody's wearing scrubs, they're all dressed. Close. Doesn't look like a dental office. It doesn't matter where you live in the civilized world, all of our dental appointments or the exact same you show up, there's old magazines. There's a person at the desk. This medical files behind this is like the dental dot com is showing up at the finish. It's incredible. Now. Why is that relevant significant anybody in any way? Because this dentistry is also a commodity service. They're gonNA. They're just they compete on price like everybody else and when Walmart. and Costco and everybody else gets into it. If they haven't already, I'm not much of shopper. I must confess, then they'll be commoditised. So if you are a dentist that is an example of how you can create customer value for your clients that has everything to do with the experience of having the work done and not the work itself. The dentistry itself is subsumed into a larger offering much the way. The experience at starbucks is what you're paying for. So the first thing everybody listening has to understand his services and experience to create engagement. Gain the second would be to eliminate. Look at time differently. So for instance. I'm trying to choose on purpose businesses that are hard for me to solve. You, know what I mean I'm trying to find the impossible good example late. Failing A. Great, he talks about designer hotels experience. No. No. I'm trying to give you like the DMV trae like thinking like a drop off dry cleaner. How many? How long are they at the counter? Any thanks, buddy, Al pick this up in a dare or to get thanks man. Yeah. Thanks man in a transaction. As that become an experience, so go to step to. Look at time different. The moment they are at the counter engaging with you is a stage. And I mean that in two ways I mean it as a step in a process. But I also mean it as theater. I'm standing at your drop-off counter. You know dry-cleaning. Depot. And I'm at, I'm standing there looking at you. It's not just a stage in the process. It's a stage it. All work is theater and every business is a stage right there. There is a moment. I got a buddy of mine in Ottawa's name is Joe Polo. He's my dry cleaner. Somebody wrote a book about him. Drove me crazy. Idea and I didn't have it like I've been talking about you on stages for years and years it never to me that you should be a book, the books called Fortunate Job. This is the most fascinating guy you've ever met. And he said to me one time. Only at. The, counter, for thirty seconds. But he can build a relationship. Right? He goes a thirty seconds here. It's a moment in all. You're trying to be thank all of businesses at there is memorable when you're standing at the counter, that's the engagement stage, there's five stages. That's the engagement. There's two before that one. What does it feel like to open? The door and cross the threshold into your business. Either physically or digitally. What is the impression? Your Business makes the moment somebody opens the door. What are they see? What are they smell? What are they hear? What? What does somebody to the encounter? Somebody? Does the person greet them. Is it an official greeting is an information greeting flow healthy? I'm looking for Mike, he's down the hall. I'm looking Dennis, he's, upstairs. Thank you very much. Lace. Sit Down I'll notify Jimmy that you're here. Gear, whatever, or is it a moment is at an event? Do they know you're coming to you know your clients are coming? Do you know they're showing up? On it's just a hardware store. Will before entering this yet another stage in Tyson. What did they see from outside? Enticing what's the story? They hear you know a little harmonizing Q. on the enticing stage. It's fascinating starbucks. At night. And I look for the ball, the time and I had I will admit I've seen one or two, but that's think about it. They have thirty, five, thousand stars. starbucks does. Not. Light. In the evening does not like their store up. With lights on the outside shining on the sign. They are eliminated from an they glow like a beacon. What is that telling a person about starbucks before they get to the counter? So that's the enticing stage. So there's enticing entering engagement. That's when you're standing at the counter. Then there's exiting extended. So really quickly understand the difference between service and Experience Yeah. Understand, those five stages. Yeah. And on each stage track, your customer is doing and where the pain is and then eliminated. Where's the misery on the enticement stage? Get rid of that. It's gross and don't be so fixated on speed. Efficiency is. Is some weird drug role hooked on? People want member wanted to be memorable. They wanted to be memorable and fun, and interesting. I got a buddy. Go ahead. Sorry. Is the idea than just WanNa make sure I'm getting this. So is the idea that. Once, you address all these things and you eliminate the pain you can. You. Can I guess charge more for the for the experience, make more money as a result, doing it or as a monument is missing something. Note that's very, very true. So the idea is this. So I will I will. To directly address what you just asked. I will tell you this. Yes. By personalizing around preferences using time differently eliminating sacrifice for your client. You can. Differentiate yourself. Increase your relevancy to your clients and therefore justify a premium fee? Yes. One hundred percent. That is accurate. Now. Here's the here's the larger sort of. Idea at play here, it's an acceptance that selling goods and services. Is. No. Long I. Beg your pardon. It's. It's a, it's an acceptance that selling. Really good. Products and services is longer enough to guarantee your success. So I'm going to use an example that Joe Pine and Jim Gilmore and experience economy nerds the world over us all the time because it's perfect conscious every day, and that's the illustrate this concept of the progression of economic value and a third time to recommend you all that you read. The experience economy, even slower than the second time. Around three times. Got It is that. Everybody that knows that book is read it more than three times. I. Promise it's the book. and. They're wonderful guys to just as an aside. So I'll use an example from there, which is to understand the progression of economic value to your customer just using costs. If you imagine in your heads Cups, of coffee. Take. The entire multibillion dollar, global coffee business, and at its essence. The entire thing is about beans. that. It's all about the coffee bean. That's all it is the various ways we can create value with it. So if you sell coffee beans as commodities. A Cup of coffee beans, raw beans, this is very important that are not roasted or prepared for you. In any way, they're just rock beans. Self two or three. Cents Per Cup. K, but if you decide that you are in the coffee business DM. W. Strategic Consulting Coffee. You know will get you there and we go through the trouble buying the beans at two or three cents a cup, and then roasting them in packaging them and making them available either in the store or online, we can get maybe twenty you could charge. Perhaps twenty five or fifty cents. What what gave fifteen to twenty, five cents a cup of coffee. Let's say. If you want to be the business that buys coffee beans from me, roasted and ready for you to wrote Rupa. US. You can sell me a cup of coffee that might only have five beans in it by the way, but you could tell me up to like. For dollar to dollar fifty for that Cup of coffee or maybe even all the way up to two dollars. These days case, that's the service business we've gone from commodities, the goods to services, and what's important to understand is most people are stuck in the service business and what happened in the service business is all goods became commodities in that they compete on price. Because of the Internet, we can all get everything we want. You WanNa buy a car. You don't have to go to the dealers. It's the last place you go used to be the first place you. You only go to the dealership once you've already sold yourself now. What they cost, you compared every model, every other than you went to dealerships with two hundred miles or two hundred kilometers in my case. But I like to throw GonNa to my periods frank. Okay. So Okay. So now that cover coffee in the service industry and understand that everybody's got great service and service, you're caring and attention and desire to get that cup of coffee, it does so fast blinds me. Yet, well, that competes on price is gonNA kill yourself, but I'm only paying this much work. Iran this year. All night. Yeah. Well, don't sweat on me. Just hand me the damn thing. Wears. Are Marching down the street marches up the progression of economic value bring starbucks. Surround I'd Cup of coffee. In. The theater and ambiance of starbucks mix in some escapes language, gift, people, Free Wifi, beautiful seats, great decoration, create a desire with them them to linger. Make them feel complete. Right you go. You go to another place to get a coffee. You go to starbucks to get a stroke. You go to starbucks to feel good about yourself to to find your people be with your tribe to reinforce the idea that you're worth it. They you this lot. My God. You were a podcast guest today. Denis? You need an Americano. Right stuff and what do they charge for? I. Four. Bucks. And what do you do when you buy it? Tip Them. Of course you do you. Go Barista get yourself another tattoo. Here's a buck. You know. For a piercing. Yourself. So features and benefits is. Everybody's got come on everything's good. Everything's the same way before we started I, told you about these glasses, the nobody can see. Worby. Parker. Told Jal about it and I told you the. Best Part I said. I I talk just features and benefits didn't it? All it's wonderful and easy and I use my iphone. You ask great questions. You do they fit, right? Yeah. The technology. I got tried different pairs. Oh it's all great. then. They shipped them to my house. Yes, and I opened the lid and the best part. Is the customer secret per experience? Because surprise that's in the box. Where they let you know for every pair, we sell, we give pair way to someone in need. So, not only do I get a new pair of glasses and think, oh I'm so happy with my glasses I. I look good in them. Ego feel good me. Then I read this other thing and it's like Oh yeah, and as I said earlier, you got a little sort of in the ass like a little. We'd go from being a good human. We're. Like. Yeah. Right on. So where we park and just give me glasses, they create an opportunity to contribute. To Sell frigging glasses. Worby Park is trying to figure out how her Dennis donate. To different business whatever your business you're thinking about experience. Service experience the difference re-experience county book. Think about time differently in the very first thing I said is who is your workforce would help? Does it create? What does it create? Now? Look at where be Parker, who hasn't worked for people who want to give away glasses to poor people? Oh. WHO's whatever optics for people who want to buy glasses cheap. Okay. where? It wants to glasses the guys like me. Who? Pay a premium to give it away to somebody else and if you're listening going. The stupidest thing I've ever heard like, yeah, will let me make a hundred dollar. Bet You're never gonNA. Turn Classism Worby Parker Gay. Let me make another bet nothing if if you're thinking as the most beautiful incredible dancing, I've heard all day. Let me make a two hundred dollar. Bet you're already on their website. You're already look. You. Love. You tell your friend. I. Like the way walk through this starbucks, and of course, people are trying to take starbucks up upstream in economy. Now, like bluebottle on some of the others, but they I listened to this podcast called business wars and they actually did A. SORT OF A. Multiple Series on Dunkin donuts versus starbucks, and probably probably could be Tim Hortons as well. But the difference was Dunkin. They were in a race to see who could grow fastest, but they were they came from a totally different. different way. Dunkin. was about fast and cheap. starbucks was about the you know what you set, but even when Duncan decided that, they were going to go up market. And they were going to get the better beans and they were GonNa, get the better thing. They could never end up competing with. With starbucks because they thought it was about the coffee. You know they. They started thinking our coffee has to be better for us to continue to compete with starbucks starbucks. That's that was. The. Wrong. Maybe the wrong way for them to be thinking. Yeah starbucks too. Yeah can't just be better coffee. Let's let's let's. Let's create value in the drinking of it. Not In not in the consumption. In the drinking, let's think about the cops with think about the seats. Let's think about smells what this place smell like. Look like. It was a big. The whole difference was some companies were thinking of selling coffee. whereas. starbucks was thinking about making. You feel at home creating a space that you felt some ownership of and you didn't want to leave. That's a totally different strategy and therefore totally different business plan. You know you know this as well as I do. When I? When I can't remember. This is a while ago down our conversation, but it had it was when he was on. Advice mistakes that you make. I cannot begin to tell you the number of people I meet that own businesses that are up and operational. That don't know the difference between a strategy and a plan. Like. US, you know what's? What's your plan? It's like. Well, I'm. Amusing last social media. So well, that's not that's not a strategy as a tactic like what's your point? What are once again, it all goes right back to the very beginning, right? Who's it for and what change does it help create for all meaningful work begins. You don't make something and then try to sell it. You don't you go figure, you don't figure out what your client needs. You ask them. And then you make. You know. How have you? I just want to sort of pivot for a second to. You've been Canada's been locked down. Due to Stu the krona buyers for I, don't know if are you still I? Think he probably are where? That was one of our discussions when we the. One of the things we talked about the first time was your business is about going had been about going to people going to conferences, making speeches, going into businesses and and helping them with their strategy, you know making them better and. That's. Had to change So I'm wondering how you and Tom and Susan have. How have you dealt with it because I think that's something that. Everybody I'm interested in how everybody's dealing with everyone's. Situation is different, but yours is sort of one of the unique ones where it was. Predicated in large part on physical presence. And presentation. Yeah. What's right? So what have we done? So. You know. That's the million dollar question. These days is essentially, how do you continued to matter to your audience and I don't necessarily mean that in a sense, elect people sitting in front of the stage when I'm wearing microphone. I mean to your to your Trimbe, the people, the care about your work and pay attention to things you do. How do you intend to matter? So here. That's the question we should be asking time anyway, right. So I'm always thinking about it. I guess, but I have certainly. Last speaking engagements for sure. Right. But disagreed I did and you know this is some of this is going to touch on something I mentioned a minute ago. With. Third Rule said something an OAS, the boring rule own was the one where you sounded like my dad. That when we said, I'm not allowed to spend all the money. Grower. Now, one case to let me say this about that. Will you bet you bet like if you know if you're abusing your business before this thing happened, you might not make it. At I don't know what to say about that. I can just say that this about me. But my partner and I run a really good business and we follow those rules that we write about share with everybody are blogs, videos and everywhere else. So we have rules about cash and cash flow and security. So here you go. So I feel like if I need a boast about any damn, I'm gonNA vocal about that. So, how are you? I'm really really good because I run the money really well, and I live within my means and I love the work and not the cash and I kicked my consumption drug. Okay. So it's not always been more and more more more more. It's just for me about wartime more. This is more that. So I'm really happy to tell you when this thing blew in the very first thing I didn't think about his own my God, how am I gonNA to pay for every? Instead. I made some adjustments and thought Oh good. I can coast for about three years before after start touching anything that I don't WanNa touch. That's Managing Your Life and Your Business, you're a business owner come on. If it's not this, it's something else I've been in business for. Over twenty years, I've had four. Dinosaur crushing meteorites. I've had nine eleven. The two, thousand, eight stock market. Financial Crisis. I've had the cove nineteen event that I'm living through. Now at self inflicted one that I did to myself a couple and a half years ago there, there was a devastator where I lost a massive client over a tweet of all things. God guys like I've been. Yeah I wrote A. Wants call. The seven. I. Wish You'd ask me. And the first one was, can you over communicate with your clients and the answer was depends on what you tweet. Laugh, about these things. Yeah. I spent more money in less than one hundred and sixty characters then than anybody probably unheard it. Would mean stars in professional athletes that have cost themselves like even more millions of dollars. But I definitely caused myself a million bucks for that tweet. Absolutely. I've done that A. Yeah. I live to tell. So here's the answer to your question Tom, Frisbee my wiser older business partner. He said to me on day when he goes, you know what suck. And this is like when we're just accepting that we'd lost like. Hundreds of thousands of dollars. This is the. Like. Oh. Wow. Oh, like Oh. Wow. I made a joke at the dilated mark law that was still alive and idea what's just happened to me. He would be simultaneously. So proud of me and then he would die as. Sometimes. Denny. Let's just agree. That the worst possible that come here. Is that when this is over we go. Oh, my God had i. known. I was GONNA be on the shelf until they, you know January twenty, twenty one. Perhaps I had. I. Known that I would have written a book redone, the website done this done that. So what am I doing now? I'm finding. New Ways, to matter to my audience, of course, everybody else I'm looking at things like you know online things. But mostly what I'm doing is I'm reinventing my entire business quite frankly. I'm really taking this as an opportunity to ensure that when we come out of this. The question that's basically guiding me is what do I want my clients to remember about when this is done? What I want them to remember that I did and my personal opinion and I am an informed person. vis-a-vis. My thoughts on covid nineteen is in humans is this. I, support opening. We gotta do it absolutely. Let's go having. said that. How. Anybody can argue the opening early doesn't go hand in hand with being careful is just. Like it's just defies any kind of logically of course, we've got to open up every. Let's go. But everybody we should be wearing gloves and masks and just being smart like don't we all agree that's just sensible. Let's agree. Yeah, that's sensible. Okay. Great Moving to point to be best, and where are we going back to? Okay. We'll for everybody who thinks this change this forever? That's I'm just I'm so sorry. I'm so happy to tell you this. No, no, no. Your rump. That's not human behavior works where humans. We're humans. We like each other relate hanging out. It's the human. It's what makes us humans? We're going to. Close back I'm, GonNa go speak at conferences. Again is what I'm telling you. You're going to go to football games again and basketball games, and it's going to be great and theater hopefully more theatre in art. We're GONNA, go back and do all those things. It and. We're just going to figuring along the way, but of course, that's what we're going come on everybody. That's where we're going and you'RE GONNA be delighted to see you when you're there in the meantime, you should be thinking about. Who you're helping your clients be common with change your work creates. Great Answer. Thank you. I I. Totally agree with you by the way because. You know we're. We're still in the adaption phase, right? We have to adapt to zoom webinars and all that because there is no option when you're locked down, you have to. But as soon as they are not. Those things are going to be less. You'RE GONNA. Think of those things is less. Lasse than you do now. So when you're dappling to it, it's like, oh, I need this. So it's great. When. You don't need it anymore I. Don't think it's going to be. As great and people like you said, are going to want to touch each other they're going to want to be near each other going to want to collaborate with each other. And do it without going oh? Sorry. ooh. Yeah. Sorry. I forgot the anew myself or. Yeah, yeah, right. Yeah. Because I've interrupted you at you, I can't see any visible cues. Dennis. The other side of that is and re are not going to want to go back. This is this is the thing though. So I'm just thinking of my neighbor. Okay. I, live a couple of Nice little neighborhood in my city and everybody should come visit my city in reject me and I'll give experience comedy tour of my neighbor on bicycles really fun and it involves microbreweries. It's fantastic. Nice. Gay, so I live two blocks away from the commercial. Strip. I have no idea how many of those stores are going to open again when they opened again. I have no idea because of what I said about cash management. I don't know what kind of a mess was that guy. Before. How much is in your driveway, you're paying for how much is here and there you're just bleeding cash. Big Hat, no cattle and all that stuff, and you're into your business or a shareholder hundred, Twenty Valley won't let God you're a mess. Okay Melissa's give them all the benefit of the doubt Oh. They all had lots of money in the bank and they were smart. Okay. So here it is. For the last ten weeks, we've all been online shopping like crazy. Some of us. Me Weirdo, I don't do any of that. I don't buy a lot of stuff to begin with. Okay. I have bought in ten weeks. Shoes, I wear medical things. My mother-in-law has done a medical appointment through while point the camera out and let me take luck with the whole nine yards. Okay. So where this is going is anybody that has a bricks and mortar store you better similar to the starbucks model evolve beyond selling goods and services. To creating an experienced, it's so good people want to go. I. Just got asked I today I. You know I have a lot of clients in the financial services, industry, financial advisers, banks, investment firms, that kind of thing. and. We're all talking. All Jalis, all these financial advisors are talking about giving up their offices. Enough anymore at least six K. that is just here does ready. That's the wrong. Do Do I need an office? That's the wrong question to be asking the question you should be asking, do I, need a stage? Let me get the race. You want to give up your office and work from home now. Yeah. What are you trying to do an in person? Like if you're a financial adviser, are you trying to do an impersonation of a computer of an online experience? Like what are you telling me? You need to have an office is an office, will a boring little rooms with desks in you need to take that square footage reimagined it. into an experienced staging place where people get engaged, guided and transformed to a place. That's worth charging a ticket to get in admission to get in the door for your dental program, your. Accounting? Appointment. Your shoe. Store experience, your. Candy store, your pinball machines, your. Bookstore. Your clothing store, you charge me ten bucks to get in. Now. I couldn't. No couldn't. Well, you're out of business. Soon. That is an exceptional. That's how does just an exceptional thought. Provoking. Thing right can. Be Worth charging admission. I think that's That's all. That's if you start thinking about your business that way, you're definitely good ways to be to Chris Start creating experiences right as you're thinking about the products. Everybody else thinks about the product. And Yeah. What can we? Make, it shoot sparks. Yeah. That's a good idea. Thank cheaper put. Make it look like a gun? Okay. Whatever make it la fast can know know know who's this thing for? What's the story? He tells himself. Who's he wanted to become? What would we want if we wanted to charge fifteen bucks? Come look at what would we have to do? There you go. Get where you're going. Yeah. You've thank you so much for sharing everything. You have today I've just been. I'M NOT GONNA take back the video thing even if people don't watch video because I, really you're just accept your very easy to listen to you and talk to thank you for that I do how how do you want people to find you. Got Your website, of course. Sure. I just set this up literally. Here's a good thing you can. Text text this word shift S. H. I F. T.. Text the word shift. This number three three. Seven, seven, seven. And that'll that'll will you will capture each other that way? Cool videos to look. And I'd love to hear from anybody at their loved. The I'd love to hear from folks all that Kinda great staff. I love this conversation. I love talking about business I. Love Talking about experience. I'm talking about the point of it all. I love talking about. Doing work that so cool. That you can let checks pile out, and until you make fun of it like, okay, better. This is you know offensive. I really needed. It just accept that I need to do the administrative grossness of driving to the bank. Them. Things right. Neither my wife or I care when they show up. But I get real excited. To, tell my life like, Hey, i. Asked me on a podcast or hey, some guy reached via linked in and said, he read my book and loved it Hey. I had twenty five people. Out of a population of billions at twenty, five people. Liked my blog and I'll go crazy. Hey a check for the showed up. And I'm going to go to the bank. That's not fun. Literally. and. I know. You're thinking? Oh, these automatic deposits because it's Americans that I am a Canadian and it's all complicated the only part of my life. That's real. Delightfully old school. I gotTA. Go to the bank Dr Person Everything with paper. Crazy. All right, Dan. Thank. You so much. Enjoy your your your cottage and you're Bald Eagle and. Yes Ask. Ed thanks so much. Thanks brother. This was fun. Thanks for listening to this episode of the how that happened podcast. We believe that success doesn't happen unless you make it happen. You can subscribe to the podcast on Apple podcast Google podcast stitcher or wherever you like to listen, and while you're there, please rate it and leave a comment as well. I love to hear your thoughts about the show ideas for future guests or whatever you'd like to share, and of course, you can always find me at Mike Attest Test Dot Com. See you next time. Thanks again for listening to how it happened podcast.

starbucks Dennis Dennis Canada Mike Chris Susan Tom partner Michael Nike US Dennis I Michael Malcolm Tom Frisbee official Ottawa Dennis Moseley Williams Jim Gilmore Parker Serie covid
Part One: Mosley: The British Hitler Who Inspired the Christchurch Shooter

Behind the Bastards

1:04:13 hr | 1 year ago

Part One: Mosley: The British Hitler Who Inspired the Christchurch Shooter

"You have a one in two chance of having prediabetes or diabetes. We can take steps right now to beat the odds. It's baritone day Thurston. And on this episode of spit. I sit down with Tim McGraw Tracey Brown and Julia who to get the scoop on what we can do right now to live healthier lives. The things that you can concrete. We do every day that can help you move forward with your health creates a ripple effect and the rest of your lives. Spit is an iheartradio podcast with twenty three. And me. Listen to the latest episode in the iheartradio app or wherever you get your favorite shows. Boylan my crabs. I'm Robert Evans. And this is once again behind the bastard the show where we tell you everything to don't know about the very worst people and all history as you guys feel about that intro. Good did my favorite. Thank you boil on my crowd Boylan, Mike crafts that. A thing. We always stay everywhere. My new teacher. I like it more than the last time. Whatever it was. That was the what's itching my rashes rough. Rough one's good this. This is palatable it belongs on not just a normal shirt. But exclusively on sleeveless shirts. Yes. Yes. That's just what crabs. Yeah. Me think. Art works going to be key. But this is happening as you listening have probably guessed by now, my guests for today's episode are Katie and Cody Katie Johnston in Cody Johnson came stole sorry of these some news network. How are you all doing today? Honestly high. Hey. You doing? Okay. Yeah. I'm doing honestly, your high or. Say hello. But I see how that would sound like I was saying it does sound you're doing high. Right. I mean, we're in the city of Los Angeles where conservatively ninety percent of the city is high at any given to one hundred percent you walk around. And there are two predominant smells one is marijuana and the other a skunk. At least in my neighborhood. It's one of the other and they're similar. They are similar. They are similar because we have bad drivers, partly because of all the marijuana. Today. We are talking about a fellow named Oswald. Moseley you'll know you'll know about Oswald Moseley asked me again in an hour. Y'all's about two. So let's tear into this the this which of knowledge, let's eat, this crab. Let's eat this crab. That's crack this crab open fish out. It's delicious butter drenched. Meet cover our table in our shirt in crab GU I got my on got my bib on in. I I always rip the bid at some point. Throw out the shirt gets all gets. Yeah. You're having a real good crab feast, you know, keep those clothing, I just walk naked out of the crab restaurant. Just burn my shirt in their in their furnace. Google the next crab restaurant. You can find you can only go do it again. That's the key with good credit. You get you get one shot you better. Do it. Right y'all who is a glorious. It's a great four and a half hours. All right. Let's talk about this fascist for slightly shorter than you would spend at a crapper much shorter. Okay. Any we'll we'll do a four part episode. That's just me at a crab restaurant, and that will be the bastard. So you'll be I am the worst version when I'm eating crab. Boy, nobody nobody needs any of that. All right, sir. Oswald earned Moseley was born on the sixteenth of November eighteen ninety six. He was the oldest of three children. His family was one of those walkie ass noble families that the British still have for some reason. So at birth Oswald, mostly became the sixth. Baronet of F Dale hall Staffordshire his mother mod gave birth without the benefit of her husband walled these presence because he was quote, a rake gambler and a heavy drinker, nevertheless, wall de brag to anyone who would hear about the birth of his heir Maud wrote in her diary on the day of oswald's, birth thankful. It's a boy. Oswal went by Tommy as a little kid. He was ill often. And as you might have guessed by all the names and titles. He grew up. Very wealthy Omni. Tommy for Oswald. Everything the British do is wrong. So I'm gonna say something right now right here, I've gotten a lot of shit on the Twitter on the twats the tweets for my mispronunciation of of a British town names and city names, and I feel like with all of the evil that colonialism bid the one way we can make it right? Is by forever mispronouncing. The names of small towns in the United Kingdom. I couldn't agree which would up on. Exactly. So that's that's just how it's going to be this episode. I always call London Landin Landin. Landon. It sounds like a sleazy ex-boyfriend and not like the world for two hundred years fucking land. Oswald's family was so rich that they had an incest manner app hall their wealth had been built up in the sixteenth century by his ancestor, nNcholas Moseley who the book black shirt describes as quote, one of the swindling sheep farmers who at the time were expropriating, the common lands of the English people. So that's where his family money comes from kneeling common lands from sheep. Farmers. Okay. Adds up. Way broken steals from people to seems like that's the only way. I Robin Hood reverse Robin Hood sheriff of nodding the more more successful than more socially accepted. Yeah. 'cause you know, Robin Hood died in a ditch somewhere in the sheriff of Nottingham's like descendants. Now, we're like buying Brexit. Moseley's? Great grandfather, sir Oswald later, leased out their property in Manchester for a huge sum of money for reasons which are unclear to me due to my lack of knowledge of nineteenth century, British leasing laws the Moseleys wound up in a long running dispute with the Jewish businessmen of Manchester. According to the book black shirt quote in the eighteen eighties. Although Jews played only a minor role in money lending, Walter Tomlinson. A local journalist noted that the identification of Jews with extortionate or Serie was extensively believed in Moseley's. Grandfather was at the forefront of the campaign against Jewish emancipation. So his Granddad was one of the big. I don't want us vote in guys right out of the gear. Anyway, here's what they thought. Jeez. Okay. Yeah. Four paragraphs it. So at a screen dad thought about the Jews surprise it took longer than ice, Cody. Eddie oswald's grandfather will end up being his chief male influence as a boy his dad e is generally described as a piece of shit Oswald later described his father as a hard writing hard-drinking hard living, Tori squire much given to expletives. He will be the most likeable person we talk about on one memorable. Occasion. Oswald's father drunkenly drew his pistol and started shooting out electric lights in Piccadilly square. Again, seems like a guy would have gotten along with. He also cheated on his wife constantly, which is not cool, and she left. Her husband went Oswald was quite young. And he's doing this. Because you know, he's originally can get away with it too. Yeah. Yeah. What you do shoot out light? I'm down for that. That sounds like a great out her though, that's a, you know back then our move leave their husbands on often. Yeah. Good for her. Mostly would later describe his childhood with his mom and grandfather on the family estate as I Dillon. The property was a self contained economy as English estates were in this period of time. There were farmers and servants who all work to serve the rich people in all bought and sold from each other. It was essentially a we independent nation Moseley later wrote that he and his family had quote little need to go outside the closed and charmed circle. And we children never did our time was divided between farms gardens and carpenter shops where the bearded Pritchard presided over a core of experts who kept all things going as their forebears had done for generations. We were very close to nature. This is fascinating. Yeah. Because I know like a little bit about him. Yeah. What we're gonna be talking about. And like, yeah. All right. You grow up like that you up in that insular kind of. Yeah. Where you're a community. Like, you're the center of attention. And you look at it look. Oh, wow. Like, it's a very small number of people, and they all work together, and it works great. And like, I'm happy, and there's no social mobility whatsoever. I should do that everywhere. Should be the whole world. How that's yeah. I I I have to say I think that having an army of servants who exist only to serve your family is maybe not close to nature. Let's say you're correct on that nature does depend on how you defined nature natural. But yeah, chairman is natural. I'm sure you're wins being catered to in a beautiful environment. Does sound I LA. Natural hills natural up that way without any other outside influences or awareness of what the world actually is. Yes, now, young Moseley did not seem to reflect it all upon the fact that this I'd Ilic situation relied entirely upon an incredibly strict social hierarchy with no mobility whatsoever. Since Oswald grew up without the benefit of his father, his beliefs about masculinity were largely formed by a mix of British pop culture at the time, and his grandfather's example, the book black shirt describes this. Well, quote, he thus idealized the male role. Inappropriate. Those components of masculinity feared would otherwise be used against him. It was tradition that family quarrels should be aired publicly in each father challenged his son to a boxing match in front of a simple servants bucks. Vincent and hunting. We're part of an aggressive upbringing in which being the winner was all important. The combination of this, hyper masculinity, which was a defense against feelings of dependence and the lack of boundaries which gave little consideration to others feelings ensured that Moseley was always into much of a hurry. I rush towards life with arms outstretched to embrace every very chantant of. Glittering wonderful world a life. Rush to be consummated was Moseley's writing at the in their life isn't meant to be rushed. Man. That's not I have to say though, father-son boxing matches or a good idea. Is this like trial by combat? Just like. Yeah. You you disagree with what your dad says? You gotta fight him fight. You're dead. Yeah. You're you're wrong until you're telling. Yeah. That's the way the world until you're tall enough to be right? You tough enough to fight. You're dead win. Are you telling them, you're right? You're right now. As a young man Oswald, attended west downs school in Winchester college. He loved fencing which we will not mock him for because so do I by the time. He was fourteen. I don't need. I don't need that laughter. Sophie. A fairy action. By the time. He was fourteen. He was already six foot to his adult height. Moseley was described by his contemporaries as extremely good looking which caused him some issues at westbound school Moseley described public school life as with boredom which was quote, only relieved by learning and homosexuality. Neither of which he was good at just sort of British private school life. Let a young kids fucking each other. Sure. Now what you do. But he wasn't very good at it. He was not. He was not he was not inclined to home. I don't think. So. Okay. So that's what he was saying. Okay. Just wasn't ended. It was just his way of saying like, no, thank you. Yeah. He wasn't very good at this. I'm not good at book learning or fucking fellow students. These are not my talents. I tried. I studied hard. I wasn't very good at it. I just wasn't very good at sorry. Really studied. Anti semitism was a travel. Was a prevalent part of his waltz childhood. Although the evidence suggests this was not much more of a factor in his young life than it would have been in the life of any of his peers during World War Two when he was interrogated by the advisory committee on internment Moseley told his interviewers that his first experiences with anti semitism had come quote in my youth where most of one's friends and relations would not have Jews in their houses. He described this sort of anti semitism as quote old English growth, and quote, a whimsical brutality that was much kinder than Germany anti-semitist. Aw. Oh, that's rough. Whimsical brutality. Don't go together. They really do like that whimsically beat the Jewish men in town with sticks. When they come out at night. Just the same old. You just like find another way to say it. Yeah, we'll spend like this. What the Nazis doing is? Okay. But when I chucked a brick through that synagogue window. It was with a smile in my heart. I was it was whimsey. So. I tried to light that Torah on fire the same way Winnie the Pooh would've. Like. Arming lease charmingly, so British. We're british. All right. I'm from strategist reference for accents much more palatable valuable that was not a British accent. We should not try today. We're gonna we're gonna just we're just gonna. That's the accents of pressured. The guy who ran the. Specific part of. Yeah. In January of nineteen fourteen Oswald Moseley entered the Royal Military college of Sanders. It was a violent place in cadets were taught quote impeccably on parade and hooliganism off duty, which is something about military life. That has not changed free. Time was spent in London starting fights and flirting with girls, which is something else about military life. That has not changed Moseley admitted that the fighting was seen as much more important than the flirting. He was apparently unpopular and got kicked out due to a violent incident. Black shirt describes this way. Quote, order cadets decided that an arrogant Moseley needed to be taken down a peg or two and went to his room to punish him for his insolence. John masters in bugle and tiger created the legend that Moseley detested by his brother officer cadets was thrown out of a window, in fact in seeking recruits for retaliatory action. He slipped on a ledge in fell slightly, injuring a leg. Skirmishing continued all weakened as a result of which fifteen cadets, including Moseley were packed off to reflect on their ill behavior, his friend, Robert Bruce, Lockhart believe Moseley bore grudge against society because of this incident. So. So he was unlikable people didn't like them people didn't like him when he tried to like get involved in the fighting at school. He fell off a window. Yeah. Yeah. So he says he's really fooling myself. And yeah. Hit you know, Jews. Yeah. Definitely hated you. Although probably not more than anybody else. Academy at Sanders that is like one of those things about European history. Is that pretty much everybody was pretty anti semitic. Or the holocaust happened in most people were like, oh, maybe we should maybe should peel back on that a little bit. Oh boy. Oh, boy to know the path led to. Yeah. It's interesting to just like this. So many stories involve like, oh, yeah. Rich, and like really really arrogant and was just a little more racist than everyone around them just a little bit. It's a little bit you win notice. Right. And he was like a kind of like an asset about an like an arrogant person about it. And so he was unlike -able so people kind of bullied him a little bit. And then he went then he did all the stuff, then he did everything. Right. It's like, yeah. Yeah. You full yourself. And then you're bullied. Then you turn into a monster. When August nineteen fourteen came around a Moseley found himself sent back to Sanders to finish his training August of nineteen fourteen. Of course is when. You know, the whole World War One thing with all the trenches. And there was a. Oh, yeah. Yeah. There was there was yeah. Yeah. The the second one was kind of it was one of those things like the the new Star Wars movie where you know, you have you have a perfectly good thing. And then they like rebooted with a new cast, right? You know, industry better special effects and safe talks about that one. But give him one exists. The other one exists, and it was like more ground breaking up the ante, which you got up the ante. Now, there's a couple of tanks in the first one. Everybody's got the second. You know, there's pretty big bombs in the first one there's the biggest bomb ever in the second one. You know, it's just a little derivative. Yeah. I hope they'll make it a trilogy. I don't know. I mean, I'll watch. Yeah. I know. Yeah. I know. Hughes. With all with all the with all the new CGI available absolute. I mean, I mean, we just gotta hope it's like Jj Abrams or someone great, right? Right. Not like some Michael bay. But we don't want. Michael beta direct, Snyder sex Steiner. I mean, let's be honest. The only one who could really direct World War. Three would be Paul Vero. Von okay. I wanna see Paul van Hoven World War three. Kind of think we already have okay? When the war started Moseley found himself sent back to Sanders to finish his training. He wound up in the sixteenth queen's Lancers a cavalry union. He saw action on the western front and acquitted himself well win. He was promoted and transferred to work as an observer for the Royal flying corps. He was one of Britain's first pilots, although he did not distinguish himself with particular competence in this field during a training exercise with his mom and sister were watching the attempted to impress them. An accident crashed his plane say did he slip and fall off a window ledge kind of a plane. Mama. You looking this. This. Probably killed by sixteen stable boys when he crashed. But they just never wrote it down. Oh, sure. Yes. David boies, the amount of stable, boys. We had. We actually have a lot less sable boys for some reason. Starting in nineteen fifteen very few stable, boys. The accident injured him badly left him with Olympia would carry for the rest of his life. Mostly went back to the western front after that still injured in eventually passed out from pain at his post during a battle after that he spent the rest of World War One doing a desk job. So everything he does. It's like I'm gonna press so many people involved. Sounds delicate. But this. So we're gonna get we're going to get to what happens after World War One. Which is what are they wear? This story starts to pick up. But I you know, what I want to pick up is a product. Maybe a service you could recommend some. Could you? You know, what these people will recommend some to you? Love is hard. But I was so afraid I could lose everything love is wonderful and confusing and magical and infuriated often in the same day. She just finally said like if you think something's wrong with the baby, you know, what let's just check. And then thirty six hours later, they called me. And they said you have to rush her to the hospital, then I started mildly panicking. And I do gold looking for a quiz for is. My husband transgender that's not really his choice. He doesn't really have control over that. But yet he's still chooses to be the partner to me that he is. It's because I love you. I'm Joe Piazza join the millions of listeners who've made committed possible with our new season launching on April eleventh. Listen to committed on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. We're back. Thank goodness. Yes. You guys. You guys land on any products? You're going to service yourself with them. All the services and products all the services in the ones that were mentioned. Yeah. Yeah. Those are losing my favorite of the product. Yeah. I actually wasn't sure about them. But then after listening to it. I was like, oh, I've been convinced on those products and services. You know, what that technique is Cody advertising, Katie knows? I waited till you started to say before I as I know how do you both it? It's a marketing advertising is also I think we're both been around to college a couple of times. Yeah. I popped in and out popped in and out. Speaking of people who popped in and out after Oswald Moseley popped out of World War One. Okay. Indyk? He married lady Cynthia occurs on the daughter of the viceroy of India. He's that kind of guy. He was elected to parliament straight away as a conservative MP for the district of Horo or Herro. I don't care because of the Bengal famine. What's hair say that? Yeah. He was twenty one years old when he was first elected because that's the scientific a wealthy noble family political office was basically seen as his do. Now that he was in politics Moseley's ideology was quite simple. Always do my utmost in all circumstances to prevent it. The first World War ever happening, again, solid solid motivation. Nobody wants to World War. Nobody wants a war, especially not a guy who likes it. Yeah. Yeah. Films as a couple of times that were he did have fighting to the trench it like he had friends dying six to he's sixty. Trinity real tall. You see everything? Yeah. Yeah. He had seen enough death on the western front that he considered it his duty to quote conceive, a nobler world in memory of those who died so that's far so far good path. Let's read the next paragraph. In nineteen twenty four mostly switched his political allegiance to the labour party. This was coincidentally the same year that the labor party I came to power in the house of Commons from nineteen twenty six to nineteen thirty Moseley was the MP of Smethwick he developed a reputation as a young brash political wounded Kent, but in nineteen twenty nine the stock market crashed Britain was hit very hard unemployment which had been at ten percent in nineteen twenty nine shot. The twenty two point two percent by nineteen thirty two on the British economy. Looked to be on the verge of collapse. The great reserves of golden jewels. The pirate spent the better part of two centuries. Plundering had all been spent to win or sort of win the great war. Now England appeared to be staring over the edge of a cliff Oswald Mosley hit sacrifice for his country. And he had seen many of his friends die for it since he was an ambitious young man with access to political power. He saw it as his duty to save his nation. And as he looked out into the rest of the world for suggestions on how he might do that his eyes were invariably drawn towards Italy in the accomplishments. Of a little dude. Name Benito Mussolini hell. Yeah. Gets to this dude. A little bit in passing in passing handsome. Very good. Looking guy hell of a job? Mussolini's Partito Nacional as she STA had just come to power in nineteen twenty two nowadays, we think of Mussalini as basically a cheap Italian rip off of Hitler faintly ridiculous for all his evil. But that's purely of you brought on by hindsight to people in the early twenties. Mussolini's relatively peaceful rise to power seemed almost miraculous ads through the apparent instant turnaround of the Italian economy in England much coverage of Mussalini and his bold new idea fed. She's MO was positive on November eighteenth nineteen twenty two the times of London called Mussalini, a masterful man and credited his program with bearing the stamp of his strong character. Like, most conservatives the editors of the times that Italian fascism was a reasonable reaction to political turmoil. Quote, the rise officials MO is the result. The natural result of the progressive degradation of the Representative system as it has been witnessed in Rome. So even progressive papers were reticent to entirely condemn the hip new ideology, the daily Telegraph's yearly review of major world events in nineteen. And twenty two didn't even mention the fascist coup that had just wept. Italy just wasn't seen as that big of a deal Italian fascism had inspired British imitators as soon as it appeared. The British fascist e party was formed in nineteen Twenty-three the national fishes de speil split off in nineteen twenty four and the imperial fascist league kicked off in nineteen twenty nine. None of these groups gained more than a few dozen members, nor did they manage anything more impressive than some graffiti and a few tiny marches in the mid nineteen twenties. It would have seen preposterous. If you'd suggest it to anyone that Oswald Mosley, the widely admired young politician would become a fascist himself in nineteen twenty four English socialist, author Beatrice Webb called him, quote, the most accomplished speaker in the house of comments, but after the crash of nineteen twenty nine mostly came to believe that radical change was necessary to save Britain from economic collapse. His first plan was written down in the Moseley memorandum. A document that suggested hardcore protectionist economic policies in order to protect domestic industry from foreign trade during. Golden age England had relied heavily on foreign export this had caused the depression to bite them harder than most because the collapse of their major trading partners, essentially wiped out British industry when most of the empire's political leaders wanted to essentially right out the depression until they get back to selling British goods all over the world mostly wanted to reform the entire economy into a state of autarky. In other words, he wanted British people to only buy and sell from other British people cutting them out of the world economy to render them immune to the stabilisation of its booms and busts. He wanted England to basically close its borders for the most part definitely didn't want it admitting any people from outside of England or anyone that it's a it's a Konami. It's it's it's agricultural production to be entirely self deficient. Now, this was also really common idea at the time. This was like Hitler's big idea too. Yeah. The basic foundation of like nationalisms protectionist, you keep everyone out and you do your own thing. Like a like maybe like help Mr. Moseley grew up by bigger thank him for all. His life was so perfect. Everything was protected and insulated. He just wanted to put Britain. Britain. I maybe you wanted to Oconee. Oh, cody. Oh, cody. Where he wanted to get to that wouldn't wanna put stop jumping ahead boilers. Just sounds like sounds like everything else. Sounds like every other cycle. But yeah. They're all the same for guys. Just seems like maybe they might be all reincarnated a bunch of losers with a bunch of loser ideas. Way to put it most of Moseley's, contemporaries, considered his ideas, kind of crazy, but Moseley's other plans were more reasonable. He wanted to institute a massive public works program spending two hundred million pounds over three years to create thousands of new jobs for England's unemployed masses. These jobs would include a mobile labour corps to rebuild the nation's slumps. This was actually pretty reasonable. It's essentially the same thing, you know, is one of the linchpins of FDR's new deal the civilian conservation corps, which is why my Granddad didn't starve during the great depression. He's building parks and stuff. Great idea. So mostly has some good ideas, and some bad ideas, like any politician. Well, actually, the fact that he had good ideas makes him a little bit. Yeah. The ideas thing really. Mostly sunny snowman of support for this idea. But his plan for how to make this happen said a lot of people on edge. I'm going to quote from Brett Reuben's the death of British fascism quote to combat unemployment into deal with the economic crisis in general Moseley believed that political power needed to be more centralized. He argued for the creation of a new cabinet led by the prime minister and other top impedes, which was to be advised by a think tank of economic experts. This cabinet was to utilize all of the resources of the nation to fight the economic disaster now that was radical, but not entirely without precedent Britain had done something similar during the great war with Lloyd. Georgia's supreme war council Moseley was basically saying that the nation needed to treat the great depression the way, they would treat a major war. It was not a popular idea among parliamentarians, but many British people thought he was right on the money. So mostly remained popular with the people even as Britain's political elite rejected his ideals and sought the heal the nation's export trade and revive the economy that way, the labor government sought to balance the budget, which required a massive. Cut to employment, benefits and other entitlements. Guess how that went for the labor government? Yeah. Yeah. Mostly was infuriated that the labor government had basically ignored his ideas. And in the spring of nineteen thirty he resigned from the labor party after giving a huge speech in front of parliament where he said that Britain's must quote get away from the belief that the only criterion for British prosperity is how many goods we can send abroad for foreigners to consume. This is his words were met with raucous cheering which helped further convince him that what he needed to do was create his own party. The solve the nation's problems. He grew even more popular after this speech in his resignation in many of his fellow parliamentarians even began to see him as something of a hero in nineteen thirty-one Oswald Mosley announced the formation of a new political party, which he called the new party since he was not the most creative man in the world. He convinced several other members of the labor party to resign enjoying them as well. Some of these guys got cold feet and jumped ship instantly, but enough people stayed the course that they were able to give the new party the go the new party's goals were based around the principles Moseley hit already outlined. He wanted to create a small six-man council who could pass legislation it will in order to make necessary economic changes faster. What would have just six guys had the power? Mothers get this done quicker. Army? What are you doing? The new party advocated strong import controls Moseley also created the new party youth club in order to get young men. Interested in politics, his politics. I lot of British liberals and progressives joined a party, they assumed was meant for them in one thousand nine thirty one due partly to the failure of their authority measures, but largely to the existence of the new party, the labor party got fewer votes than the conservative party. This pissed off quite a lot of people quote from the death of British fascism following the declaration of the results and angry mob formed outside the town hall. They shouted at Moseley calling him traitor Judas, the son of the defeated labor candidate charged the steps and accused Mosele with ruining his father's chances. In response. Mostly turned to John stretchy and said that is the crowd that has prevented anyone from doing anything in England since the war, one of Moseley's friends would later state has believed that this was the moment. British fascism was born you so angry that people won't let him do exactly what he wants to. He wants to do. This is the same. And people don't agree entirely with they parts of it. But they don't agree with all of it. There's supposed to rich. Yeah. They need to agree with everything agree with everything. He has two six two six two on. All right. So the guy in charge of the labor party, a felony MacDonald chose to make nice with the conservatives in order to retain some power for labor in government. This meant the new party suffered attacks from both screwing over labor and was cut out of power while labor moved closer to the middle is nineteen thirty to started Moseley's party was a miserable failure in his political career seemed to be near its end before the thirty one elections. He promised to resign from public life for a decade if he lost, but he did not actually do this. Instead, he decided that the failure of his party in the election left fascism as the only option remaining tough. Let's just always left with what else. What else are you gonna do? You lose an election. You got to go to fashion given me no choice. No choice like as amazing. Every like from the very beginning. Oh, yeah. You confidently to thing. And then you lose, and then you get a little worse. Lorcy learning from it. Get a little worse. Get a little worse, and then get to get to where you need to get to where you need to be which is where he is in January of nineteen thirty two when he visits Italy. If Benito Mussolini's explicit requests, the two men both had backgrounds a socialist politicians, and we're both frustrated with dealing with their nations tedious political bickering Moseley took to Mussalini at once seeing him as a kindred spirit and a man's man. This meeting convinced Oswald Mosley, quote, the age of democracy was over. Here we go. That's where that's where it said. That's where it sat when he returned to winning Moseley wrote a loving article about Mussalini is regime for the Daily Mail stating quote, oh, we're going to be talking about the Daily Mail. Yes. Stating quote, no time is wasted. In the polite banalities, which is so irked the younger generation in Britain when dealing with our elder statesman Moseley wrote that the Italian mind was hard concentrated direct in modern now the efficiency of fascism compensated for quote the right to bladder. He believed British politicians love to well. It's officiant. So why do we need free speech? Was that going to get us? It's just going to waste time. Just waste. It says practical, you guys this is just make sense mostly rebuffed multiple opportunities to reenter the political mainstream including invitations to work with former prime Minister, David Lloyd, George in invitations from Winston Churchill. He also rejected the decision of many of his new party comrades joined the communist party. After the disastrous nineteen thirty one elections. If there was one thing Oswald Moseley hated it was communism. He believed that class conflict could only end in violent revolution. And instead felt at fascism would do a better job of providing equality of opportunity. I'm wanted to destroy capitalism. Oswald just wanted to reform nobody you got it wrong. Change change. That is the tagline of this podcast. Nothing has ever changed or ever will change. His people are just kinda dumb. A lot of the time. Lazy dumb petty. Lazy? Dumb stubborn scared of not having nice things. Moseley knew that Italian or German fascism wouldn't just work if it was transplanted in England he decided that say. Nation. It would be his duty to create a new and uniquely British form. A phase. Sure. It's what are we? What are we? I know this got seventy million people killed. But what if we? Oh, she's just like what are the British flavors? Well, sticky toffee pudding. What if it's peppermint bubble gum poison? What we what do we throw a little lie? We'll go. The poison didn't work because it was like we need to make 'em all the Jewish people. What have we tweak the flavor a little changed the uniform slightly now, they're killing Muslims. Okay. Okay. Oh, okay. What if okay? What if? Okay, what if we change it slightly again? What have we look at this flag? This is a nice flag. I like flex is a different flag last voting things to flags some of us are going to use the same flex. He's very similar flags. You might like wink at other flat. Now part of why Moseley was so drawn to the idea. British fascism was his military background during his time in the service mostly has developed a love of discipline. You can brutal discipline one of his friends. Harold Nicholson said at the time that quote, Tom cannot keep his mind off shock troops the arrest of his political enemies their internment in the isle of white and the role of drums around Westminster. He is a romantic that is a great failing keeps my arresting his enemies such your romantic romantic has wims ical. Brutalism wind cicle brutality. I see the problem here. Hugh, guys, think words mean the wrong thing. No. They know that they mean. Yeah. That problem is that we think words mean things, right. We put actual meaning into words, and they don't give a shit about anything done. He's a romantic, Cody, that's his failing. Passion. Because when I'm when I'm taking a lady out on on on an nice state and want to impress her for first thing. I do. Sure, my shock-troops absolutely in my enemies on the isle awaiting in a little bit of neck in the back of the car. It's an aphrodisiac out. Ladies love seeing the political enemies of guy. Get locked up on the Iowa white. Yeah. Since they're all British. It would definitely be why? Nineteen thirty. In October nineteen thirty Oswald Mosley officially founded the British union of fascists or B U F. He wrote a book years later. Yes. He was kind of buff. Give that to them to he wrote a book of years later, titled fascism one hundred questions asked and answered explained why he decided to use the same word as the Germans in Italian rather than invent a new term that might have been more palatable to English ears, quote, fascism is the name by which the modern movement has come to be known in the world. It would have been possible to avoid misrepresentation by calling our movement, which he capitalized the by another name. But it was more honest to call it fascism and just let everyone know exactly where we stood it is up to us to defeat misrepresentation by propaganda and explanation of the real policy and method of fascism as it will operate in Britain in the long run straightforward, dealing is not only honest, but also pays the best. So he was an honest. Yeah. Fascist hate propaganda fascist you'd like to have a beer with. If you weren't, you know, would you then you would not know with that? He wouldn't let you in his house, right? Yeah. Yeah. You know, what we'll let you in. This is a bad ad lead in that that shouldn't be how we do this. No. That was good. Maybe put like a river of something a little nicer. Little little what do we what do we what's a product. We can advertise for that's on the table right now. Alto leads curiously, cool mints. I noticed your Al towards Katie come in a nice, silver containment? You could also store your Weeden. Absolutely. Some some pills of MDA taps acid could store a lot of things in this little cops probably aren't going to search your Alto. It's container. Yeah. They're less likely than a jar labeled acid unless they listen to this podcast. Funding. There are other drugs. You can keep in there though. There are. Don't let me a little bit alcohol in their Kadhafi like this show. Don't listen to that most cops love this show. That's a big part of our listening. It's weird. All cops are behind the bastards fans. That's exactly it. Punk shows. They seemed like they cross out a lot of the words. But right, but I know it. But I know what they're like how you don't put the of or the. Find the best outcomes. I think we've put enough daylight between that antisemitism stuff. And services. Hi, I'm Robert Lamm, host of stuff to blow your mind and invention. And I'd like to invite you to the science fiction podcasting event of the year transgenesis into the world of the second oil age a richly realized world in which humanities thirst for oil takes them to the bottom of the sea and the threshold of eight world in each short-form episode, you'll follow agents pond as she investigates. The disappearance of missing you dex petroleum executive aboard a sprawling deep sea station. It's a tale of intrigue action and SCI fi horror attend episode season publishing in two parts April fifteenth in twenty nine listen in subscribed to transgenesis on apple podcast the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. And we're back so so after establishing the British union of fascists mostly outright or right away published a book called the greater Britain, which he hoped would polish the bad reputation fascism had gotten over all those deaths from the Spanish civil war and the bombing of guanaco and all the people that the Nazis put nuts and train can all of that stuff. You know in the greater Britain. He assured the English people that fascism did not necessarily mean to tell a -tarian ISM or loss of liberty. British fascism would be a dictatorship. Yes. The one that was moderated in accountable to the people via legislative assembly who did he want to be the the dignity? I mean you wanted to be the dictator. He did he wanted Oswal Moseley to be probably. Oh, man. Being on that Tommy onto. Now Oswald Moseley assured people that his fascism did not require violence to gain power. If the BUF could just gain enough seats in parliament, they implement the changes he suggested in a perfectly legal manner Queen. To talk about that. Oh, he's got a job for the Queen. And the who was a candidate skiing at this point. Yeah. So Moseley tried to convince the people that embracing this idea and adopting a gradually was a Smart Choice because fascism with the new way of things worldwide in Britain might as well get a head start if they wanted to compete. This was basically him cribbing a concept from an essay by Benito Mussolini doctrine of fascism, which said this, quote, if the nineteenth century was the century of the individual liberalism implies individualism. We are free to believe that this is the collective century and therefore the century of the state in other words, the twentieth century would be the fascist century. And there was no sense fighting it given where the global balance power stood in nineteen thirty two. It's easy to see how a number of people could have come to this conclusion Moseley told his people that both left and right wing had failed them the right wing could guarantee stability, but it could not create progress the left brought progress, but instability, a fascist middle was necessary to unite the two like like. Like, there's like they're like two ways. But what if there was like a and then the more than more than two way? It's a second plus one second plus one way. Yeah. Like a almost Fourth Way. I think those are the only two ways to to describe it. Okay. Okay. I got it. We know that quote, fascism is not dictatorship in the old sense of the word which implies government against the will of the people instead mostly believed that fascism rested quote on the enthusiastic acceptance of the people and could not endure without their support. So that's good. That's also essential wins a coal fascist a whimsical fascist. You went that support. You know, it's it's it's it's Winnie. The Pooh fish is. If it gets a little I get hung up on. So this Britain. I this this 'isolation est kind of idea but taking so much like putting Mussalini on a pedestal in like, celebrating other places. You got a problem with Mussolini, Katie. No, he's hard. I've only I've only read Italian history up until about nineteen thirty four. But it seemed pretty cool guy. Yeah. I've only read German history up until about nineteen twenty nine. Donald good speakers around that time engaging speakers really good to hear good. Yeah. Yeah. I'm excited for what comes next for them. No spoilers wonder what else they have to say. So, but we'll also because that whole where you're saying about how like yeah Britain. I, but then you support like Mussolini's people. That's just what they do. Like there's legally Hitler quote. It's like, yeah. I'm not saying we're better than anybody. I think we should be like our own thing, and like Japan, they do their own thing does their right thing. We all just sort of do well thing better China's Japan's thing. Sure. Sure. He was he was not a fan of China doing its own thing. You don't believe he said that in the that quote? Yes. Yes. Just so interesting. We respect what they're doing. And we want to steal it. But we want them to be far away from us. And you know. Yeah. Yeah. Now in Moseley's vision of British fascism, his equivalent to the German fewer would be the minister a single man who would have basically all the power in Britain. But who would be subject to a vote of confidence every five years, if the people stop supporting this dictator, the king would be able to appoint a new one who would then have to go about earning the support of the masses. So that he could win a confidence vote that seems like a lot of checks and balances there's one. That's lot. That's a check. None one that's a lot. That is a lot. Here's a good amount of time for a dictator. Didn't seem like a rulers best interest to have a dictator. But what if we have another ruler? Who's like, all right. You don't like that dictator? What about this? So you might see how reasonable people though, could get suckered into the British union of fascists considering this is before that whole World War Two things started to democracy people who've seen some flaws in. I mean, I'm I'm I understand therapy. Who can fall into like, this isn't a little more understandable and nineteen thirty two say twenty nine thousand nine. Sure, sure. Yeah. Definitely agree with that. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. As modern is Moseley's new take on fascism may have seemed on the surface it quickly turned into the battle fascism. We all know and hate the first signs of this were obvious from the way Moseley and his fellow fascist react to the disruption of their meetings, and mostly speeches the first signs of this were obvious from the way Moseley and his fellow fascist reacted to the disruption of their meetings and mostly speeches by people who will call I don't know not fascism Lakers. Yeah. Title shopping sits for shop. Shop is fresh opposites. Great starting with the announcement of the BUF party gatherings were often disrupted by hecklers, mostly communists, and other assorted fetch opposites over Moseley until they were jetted from the gathering for a little while Moseley grim, and bore it. But after a few months of this he decided to form a paramilitary organization dedicated to stopping these sorts of disruptions. Well worth things go off. Took a couple of months. Takes established a youth league right away, of course, which initially just encouraged its young members to be Atlantic and play sports like rugby, the young men wore no uniform and therefore did not set off any alarm bells is military force initially a government study later revealed most Britons viewed mostly as quote, a colorful, a Centric and fascist occasions is inner -taining spectacles, but as disruptions of fascist evinced grew more frequent Moseley reformed, the youth auxiliary into something with sharper teeth, the soon to be infamous black shirts. Yeah. They were black shirts. And yeah, teams good for fourteen for. Sports team. Yeah. You you need getting colors sports seems exam. You're jerseys. Exactly. Here's the death of British fascism. Quote, Moseley stated that the black shirt Stewart's and originated with his resolve to not succumb to disruptors Moseley claim that as the movement gained momentum. So did its resistors rather than allow his meetings to be shut down by a disruptive organized minority? Moseley created the London defense force to train and recruit more black shirt Stewart's he claimed that the creation of the black shirts was entirely out of defensive necessity a result of increasing hostility to his movement. However, there is evidence that this force had an offensive capability as well. The press accused blackshirts of unprovoked attacks on communists, and later Jews. The times testified the black shirts verbally provoking, a group of young Jewish men in London in the summer of nineteen thirty three the daily worker of January twenty third nineteen thirty six charged mostly black shirts with rating it's offices turning over cars and causing extensive damage what the blackshirts also Mussalini need brown-shirt Brown, Mussolini's shoot I forget, which one Mussalini had is black shirts luxury. What was the black church? Yeah. Brown shirts were Hitler's. They all got their dad that they're fucking shirts today today is Fred Perry. A bit more creative. Yeah. Yeah. They all got in. Punish your logos? Yeah. And they're alarm shields. Life. Shields and stuff from nineteen thirty three to nineteen thirty seven Oswald, mostly average, two hundred speeches a year each of them accompanied by a large group of blackshirts. These young men lived in Chelsea London at a barracks called the black house at the height of the BUF more than a thousand men live there fulltime they trained in jujitsu and lived under military discipline for nineteen thirty two one. They were a constant and very visible presence at rallies. Now, the blackshirts received a major endorsement in the public consciousness in nineteen thirty four when Lord Roth MIR a conservative newspaper tycoon embrace the BUF and its paramilitary auxiliary. Roth mayor ran a little newspaper. You may have heard of called the Daily Mail on January eighth nineteen thirty four the mail published an article titled hurrah for the black shirts, I'd like to read a few quotations from that article was written by Lert RAF MIR himself, he's he's counted as viscount Roth mayor in this which is a word, I know how to pronounce. Yeah. Even though spelled discount which is. Dumb vicomte. That's actually, probably right. I don't know. I mean, I don't I don't vice vice cut RAF mayor. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Great. Okay. Great. But I'm from pass because he's not good enough to be a full one. No, sir. Yeah. He could assist one. Yeah. Yeah. In certain areas. Again, quote from hurrah for the black shirts. What if the Daily Mail is is still a great newspaper anyway because of ashes them comes from Italy shortsighted people in this country think they show a sturdy national spirit by writing it. If their ancestors had been equally stupid Britain would have no banking system. No Roman law, nor even any football since all of these are of Italian invention, the Romans invented cool stuff, so Italian fascism sweet his how. Love logic and reason that's well, the baby cowards the socialist, especially who jeer at the principles of in uniform of the black shirts is being of a foreign origin. Forget that the founder and high priest of their own creed was the German Jew. Karl Marx put that ju- right in the front there, though, the name informa- fascism originated in Italy that movement is not now peculiar to any nation. It stands in every country for the party of youth represents the effort of the youngest generation to put new life into an out of date political systems that alone is enough to make it a factor of immense value in our national affairs, blackshirts proclaim a fact which politicians dating from prewar days were never face that the new age requires new methods in new men. I don't have it all on here. It's only chunk of the thing this thing, but we get the you get the idea article. It's crazy crazy newsreel is the that's the next article woman through the ages boy, so she wasn't from Britain, by the way. Now, let's thinking that too. But you can import things from other countries. Yeah. Like roads, just nothing. But not the people not the peanut the people are no circumstance. Katie. Absolutely. No. I'm not. No, they're not wearing the right shirt. Not the best from other cultures. Just not any there'd be people. Well, they're not sending their best. So they're not going to send their best. Of course, not unlike Oswald Moseley trains has bested U jitsu so that they can destroy newspaper offices exactly to his six game. Among other great ideas. Lord RAF mayor declared Mussalini to be the greatest man of the twentieth century in another one of his articles. Didn't didn't that age? Well. Trump there, by the way, he's the best the best. He's he's the best person that in one thousand nine hundred thirty two I'm confident will arise in the seventy eight years. Curious. He how his position involves. I mean, if you read the Daily Mail. The Daily Mail for reference after the Christ Church shootings just provided a free. Download of the shooter's manifesto to anyone who wanted to avoid. Are there any good publications that are daily like zeitgeist the daily podcast? Okay. That was the setup. Daily some the daily caller go. No, no. It's almost like releasing a bunch of stuff every day on a thing that you can't like do any really great analysis. And maybe you know, the best you can hope for is reporting. That's that's not nonsense, and even then a lot of the times people are going to get it wrong until like Cincinati was like instant reactions to stuff isn't responsible news, it it might be. I mean newspaper has destroyed every day. I mean lot quite a lot of daily publications that are like I roll away. Oh, yeah. They're all bad except for the daily. Thank guys extended news. I of course, I mean, literally daily wire tally collar Daily Mail Mary profit, the daily show that would be Harry Potter do not want to be listening to that. Harry Potter was a Harry Potter. The whole thing was a setup for a Harry Potter, but people well. Yeah. I'm sure once J K Rowling, here's this. We'll get a couple of tweets about what Moseley was his wizard. Ing. Insertion mostly want bad because he was secretly trans or something. Okay. But I wanna know her thoughts on the goblin bankers. Anyway. Oh, boy head is something I did not catch as a nine year old. Sneaks up on you. Derailed this enough. It's fine in nineteen thirty when the Nazis had gone from twelve to one hundred and seven speech in the right dog. Lord, Roth mayor had pendant article for the Daily Mail, stating the Nazis represent the rebirth of Germany as a nation, which was not entirely inaccurate. Fair. Fun fact, the Daily Mail online is today, the world's largest English-language newspaper website. But I'm sure they've gotten a lot better. I wrote all this before I said. Their garbage and don't don't go there. Well, Moseley's rallies grew more and more violent in the black shirts got better and better at doing violence. Lord. Roth mayor continued to praise the British union of fascists on Moseley was accused of wanting to establish a quote system of rulership by means of steel whips and concentration camps Roth MIR called his critics tired alarmists in panic mongers, the support of Roth MIR and the Daily Mail thousands upon thousands of new Britain's to join the UF this meant Moseley gave more speeches to large crowds, which led to more vicious black shirt beatings of protesters and disruptive elements early in the early in the US history. Moseley tried to dispatch his hecklers by making fun of them. He was a great public speaker some say one of the best in the history of English politics. So this worked for a while. But as time went on, the black shirts took more and more of that responsibility and used more and more violence to do it. According to the death of British fascism, quote, brutality on both sides of the podium abounded in this period. Although Moseley claimed he forbade his blackshirts to use weapons of any kind. The constitution of the black shirts outlined careful rules for keeping order it BUF meetings. It stated interrupters we'll be. Objected only on the instructions of the speaker. When the persistence of interrupted prevents those in his vicinity from hearing, the speech exa- ejection will be carried out with a minimum of force necessary in my life. Mosely recalls. The slogan he used to inspire his protectors. We never start fights. We only finish them both hecklers and blackshirts regularly carried weapons from brass knuckles to razor blades. Moseley was proud that never once was one of his meetings broken up. But this was only possible due to the intense violence, deployed by his black shirts. Moseley would later write that these devoted young men saved free speech in Britain. Her care. They did I hate how many times you use the free speech in your podcast. I know I know you. This is their favorite dog. Whistle. I know it's. Yeah. It's frustrating. It's free speech is good. It is good. But words, don't mean. Things to them know. Yeah. The communist party was the largest organized opposition to the BUF their newspaper, the daily worker cheered. When four blackshirts were hospitalized after an ambush in Edinburgh. This built and built until a plan B UF rally on June. Seventh nineteen thirty four in Olympia. This rally was planned to bring more than fifteen thousand fascist together. Twelve thousand of those people were actual audience members. There are meaning three thousand were black shirts in and out of uniform waiting throughout the crowd to break up. The communist resistance, they knew it was coming the communist party had asked its local leaders to buy as many tickets to the meeting as possible having their members Sinden ticket requests along with lurid letters of support for fascism. The plan was that anti-fascist demonstrators could hide themselves in small groups throughout the massive audience members after mostly introduced himself. They'd start chanting slogans like fascism means murder down with Mosely until they were physically removed. Other groups would cut the lighting cables. These interrupters would all wear black shirts to confuse the fascists and they'd stagger. Their disruptions in order to make sure that as soon as fascist cleared. One group out the next would start up completely derailing the planned meeting. This plan worked brilliantly for the first hour or so of the meeting until the black shirts managed to ferret out, basically, all the communists. They're moved thirty people in total twenty one of these people who are arrested outside by the police for obstruction. Public disturbance interviews with a cooperate in the end Mosely was able to finish his speech. He made as much as he possibly could out of the demonstrators showing up that same night on the BBC. He claimed that communists at attempted to shout down free speech and ask the audience. Now, I put it to you to your sense of fair play would you have handled these reds, very gently when you had seen your men kicked in the stomach and slashed with razors, your women with faces streaming and blood now there was evidence that anything like that had happened. In fact, one of the other panelists interviewed had been at the speech and denied seeing any weapons in communist hands at all. Instead he said that he'd seen interrupters struck in the head in the stomach all over the body with complete absence of restraint. He. Call it the worst violence he'd seen short of the war to their credit. The BBC would not have Moseley honest guest again for more than twenty years the media sided with the interrupters widely panting Moseley's blackshirts for their violent response to what amounted to minor acts of disruption. Geoffrey Lloyd, conservative MP attended the rally later told the times of London. He was quote appalled by the brutal conduct of the fascist last night five or six fascists carried out an interrupt your arms and legs. Several other blackshirts were engaged in kicking and hitting his lifeless body oddly enough Moseley's biggest supporter in the mainstream was David Lloyd, George liberal shortly after the meeting, George Roden editorial stated, quote, it is difficult to explain what the fury of the champions of free speech should be concentrated. So exclusively not on those who deliberately and resolutely attempted to prevent the public expression of opinions of which they disapproved but against those who fought however, roughly for freedom of speech, Lloyd, George believed that people who showed up at a political meeting with the intent of disrupting it have no right to complain. If an exasperated audience handles them rudely. Rudely rudely rudely with the whims. With win wins a coup brutality so much use of the phrase, free speech. And then of which were written by me, by the way, these you're all, oh, I believe you. Yeah. I know this wing towards greater violence occurred right alongside another event that would further radicalize Moseley's fascist party three weeks. After the Olympia rally was the night of long nights where Hitler's Nazi party consolidated power by murdering at least eighty five political rivals. Many people who'd been on the fence about this Hitler, fellow and has Nazism left, right? The fuck off that fence after the night of long knives. But mostly and the BUF back there fascist brothers to the hilt black shirt the BUF's official newspaper claimed that the men Hitler murdered. We're guilty of the greatest fascist crime disloyalty to the leader. Yeah. Speech guys. Well. Not once you're in charge speech until you get in charge. Ryan, then never again. Okay guy. That's less patchy dial, just below it. Yup. And get a lot lower. I dunno violence. I guess man. They love beating people they do love beating people up. It's a lot of fun. So. This is the move that finally lost Moseley the support of Lord Roth mayor he pulled the Daily Mail support of the B O F in the very next issue. Brave. Yeah. Brave man. He only supported them for like he's a coward. Couple of your couple of a couple of years a couple of years until all the things that he said became clear that he meant them. Yeah. Oh, you meant the things. Oh shit to be taking you literally this whole time. Maybe I'm you watching apologies. British people. Sorry at the time Moseley claimed Roth mayor had only chickened out on his fascism due to pressure from a cabal of Jewish advertisers. It was one of the first stirrings of public antisemitism from Oswald Moseley who up until this point had walked a fine line of supporting the Nazis and being a fascist without actually blaming the Jews for all the world's wars that would change rather dramatically as time went on. But we'll have to tell that story on Thursday. When we come back for part two of Oswald Moseley's life story. I can't wait. Good luck. Tommy, he guys thing is going in. Well, yeah, I'll stories have good ending. They do they do. I feel like he's going to be cool guy. I think he's going to be a cool guy with good opinions who goes about. Bring those opinions to fruition in healthy productive kind ways. I feel the same way. I think he's gonna get married and settled down I do too. I think oh, yes. Part of mind, a wife and be couple of wives. Maybe maybe a harem. Who's legally obligated to never leave the palace. He seems like that kind of guy is does kinda guy can't tell if you're there so many somebody. Let's let's let's plug some plug Ables before we we we pretend to go away until part two. I won't see you for another day or two we're going to go with somebody's that somebody do this show. We keep driving back a couple of you. Can check us out online. We've got podcasts. Even more news podcasts. We've got a patriot patriotic dot com slash some more news, which and the YouTube YouTube show has called somewhere news. It's on YouTube. You can do it also somewhere news Twitter. My personal Twitter's Dr Worcester Cody mines, Katie stall. And I think those are all of the things we can plug. I you can blow whatever you want first off. Coming back a couple of weeks. I don't think a lot of people have heard of that. Oh, it's a great show. Yeah. They should catch up on it. Check. Check that one. I want that anything has got dragons got cutting got him. But but to be fair, the dragons are computer generated. Oh, well, so sorry. This is disappointing. He's a real bummer. I thought they were cloning time. I'm Robert Evans. You can find me on Twitter at I right? Okay. You can find this podcast on the internet at behind the bastards dot com. We have shirts. T public dot com by shirt by two shirts, by three shirts. Four shirts. Five six shirts. Seven eight nine. We don't have that many designed by multiples by ten you don't have an old cop serpine the best. The crap bibs season. They're working on. That one's going to go over real. Well. People love it all kinds that'll be my new drive-in shirt instead of lives. Do crime shirt on your podcast. You haven't heard it. I said, I'll tell you. Shirts bell, man. This is the episode go. Go hug, your family or some shit. Well is hard. But I was so afraid I could lose everything love is wonderful and confusing magical and infuriated everything about life that we had thought and planned and hoped for was just in that moment on I was so so so lucky have that trying the millions of listeners who've made committed possible with our new season launching on April eleven. Listen to commit it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

nNcholas Moseley Eddie oswald Britain Benito Mussolini Oswald Mosley Cody Katie Johnston British union Italy Tommy London Mussalini labour party Mussalini England Los Angeles Google marijuana Army
Episode 57 -The Six Fight Again or The Tylenol PM Squad Doses Again

Radioactive Spider-Pod

1:19:52 hr | Last week

Episode 57 -The Six Fight Again or The Tylenol PM Squad Doses Again

"I'm checking out hot new end of day machines on triple d. dooms days and devices. Just how are you being loyal listeners. Thanks so much for joining us. This is radioactive spider pod. The podcast that looks back on the ninety spiderman cartoon and asks how powerful can fifty year old technology. Really be here to bring you episode fifty seven the six fight again. I'm your host. The may leg heaven mcevoy mealy. It's not an enjoying me. As always my fellow barroom brawlers the tussled. Vero taylor mess my hair back and forth all almost my hair back and forth And the protective. Peter is dr mine. Mine up just a reminder that will be posting screenshots from this episode. Another good stuff on our social media twitter. Instagram and facebook gives us a follow. If you'd be so kind all the links are on the web at radioactive spider pod dot com or also on patriots with exclusive bonus. Episodes takes an auditees. That's patriot dot com slash radioactive spider. Pot want to support the show. Much like our newest patron stephen. Wild has thank you so much even for your support. Well prepared to be disappointed. Don't promise much deliver less. But do we need a drop for patrons like what the heck of a job eggs and you hit the jackpot thousand dollar bonus. Maybe something like that. So you can make it be funny cue. The music thousand dollar bonus one thousand dollar phone. It's of course obese bean. It's once again time to raise our glasses in honor of season five's down memory lane. Were dusting off. Some classic wartime cocktails. What's how doing your duty today. Boys role sofala gone off. My ass made a cocktail easily. Jin soda but i got a cocktail kit from collective arts. So chatting darts. I have a punch romain or roman punch which is Rum citrus. in champagne. Fancy was annoying as to make but worth fancy. I myself have the french seventy five which is gin and lemon simple syrup and top it off with some bubbly. You might remember this drink from such evenings as new years where peter says. I got really drug. I wasn't only when you said that i'd say well. It sounds like we're cooking with helium. So let's roll personally and get ready to rumble because we're coming out swinging for six forgotten. Warriors chapter four. The six fight again first aired october tenth nineteen ninety seven was written by john. The semper sent pot. It's more of an original story arc but that still means it's time for a bare knuckle edition of peter's comic book. Minute can believe him so doing the shit. So there's a digital peter's call minutes going to be a caregiver rundown of black marvel. Oh god no news do black marvels first. Appearance was in mystic comics number five in march of nineteen problematic scrape by al gabriel I don't really know how to say this but We'll read what it says. I'd rather you did do it. Basically dan lines has a native friend that thanks him with powers. I'll just leave it at that. Do his abilities are excellent. Hand to hand combatant and peak physical condition key issues mystic comics number five know from nineteen thirty nine. Let me know if you can find a copy. It's probably on microfiche somewhere. I wonder if it's in. The marvel. App gives a shit our episode ends with robbie robertson visiting omar moseley in a bit of a panic telling them that they have to give the keys the doomsday device to spiderman for safekeeping the to head to a storage locker but when the keys are revealed so too is the chameleon having taken robbie's identity to trick the most luckily spider man in the destroyer. Gay keen marlow are tagging along and spiny recovers the keys with a little web ary causing chameleon to bolt for the exit. So dr moseley is watching a beautiful summary given to us by the news. Man of all the thefts of the statuettes that has been going on for these mysterious attacks. Were at least two of the cases. The only taken more small statuettes of agent warriors. And when he's about to turn it off. I can imagine the news man saying n breaking news. A local art student named bob has been missing since last tuesday. He was last seen in his art class with the professors. Seen talking to the giant rhinocerous was he killed or z. Or or like i said has he flipped to evil and is now the the sidekick of the rhino. I'm going with calf all the way. I'm the rhino. No question is in this news report. They have footage of these things. Who the fuck was filming them. They were all my previous episode. There is someone in the sky filming vulture. Take a person maidment. Throw her away. There are like four major fuck ups in the i. V neck forty five seconds of this episode. They might have to put a counter. Something in here. Peter like first of all they have voted the vulture in the sky which makes no sense they have footage of him beating up and robbing the art school which makes no sense. Then they cut to a static shot of the six keys together which was an incredibly guarded secret. The took three episodes to cover but now just kind of on the news. I didn't even notice that one. Yeah it's the static shot from the cia. Yeah and then. Also robbie says spiderman contacted me. You wants you get him the last two keys for safekeeping. How are these last two keys. You haven't seen them take out like one from the thunder yet so there are still three keys. These are not the last two keys that's fair but monroe becomes at the door. It's so fucking obviously not robbie. Why but you don't trust him. Yeah how about me. He goes and says can be trusted. You know i can be trusted. That's all that matters goes like. Why wouldn't you trust your pell. Rub the most trustworthy guy you know. Let me convince you more trustworthy. I am really that time. You trusted me like now. Moseley pulls captain america's shield from this closet here with his cope whereas last episode it was clearly on a mantle. Yeah he took it out of the closet. Save secret talked about it and then put it up on the fucking mantle. Then he took it down after they left and put it in a different closet. He's just trying to compress them. This only solidifies that it was a take it for company kind of move where he's like a fun got edessa soft. Look i'm so proud of it. And then he hooks it right back into the closet. That's the nice charter. It's only for only for guests. I guess but then like why would even take captain america's shield with him like he's like. Oh there's no telling who might try to break in here. I guess your neighborhoods a shithole or whatever. But it's way more likely that you know somebody is going to just rob you in new york city rather than they figured out this incredible secret steal this shield which is not actually even relevant to the main secret and robbie robbie wink no. He's also very people. Get your winking. You can't tell an old man to hurry up or to move fast. He has to take his indoor slippers off. He asked put his out door shoes on. He has to take his indoor sweater off supporters. Outdoor like it's going to take at least ten minutes before there at the door reasons element. He's probably got a couple of shoe horns at the ready you know. I'm offended by all of these remarks. Considering wearing slippers and use shoehorn regularly like four of them who wanted so convenient. Peter you're a. You're older that us so old actually could use it shoehorn. I think i'm getting that age. And she goes on. She goes up. Goes up man they go to the storage facility. The biggest one in manhattan. I assume based. It's fucking cavernous inside. But i feel like there's a storage wars joke here but i've actively blocked out all the time with. My parents have forced me to watch that shit while they fell asleep with the remote clutched their jazzy. So tightly yeah. Oh i've tried to pride away with a wake of the leg watching it is like yup. That's all i remember. Now right in the kisser. Sorry this show is ebbing into my my actual personality. And now i'm telling these random stories that don't go anywhere. That was a bit. It's kind of a bit going full most dog. It was a bit much. What it was like have moseley has two keys for two keys. That's good so he just started a fucking locker at the bus station or something. I think it's a storage unit. I'm on team bus station. It's clearly not a bus station people. It's just down at the y. Then they show it outside. There's like those shudder doors that you get when you rent a whole unit right. This storage unit. That's where he keeps palette of money from selling crystal meth sure. I dunno bones probably bones. Couple old people living in there. Probably it's worth the thunders. And so dr. Moseley takes the box with the keys. And then you see him turning the key and it pans to robbie salivating for summaries evil robbie so excited to push old man. That's only does one little shove. And he's gone. He's an old although he is checked. They're all jacked. We used to talk about that later. Got that skinny skinny muscular look unfit sick from the thirties. Or whatever. Yeah yeah maybe and then you know you you love to hate him but decides it's time to reveal yourself way too early and then have spiderman be like it's the chameleon yoink yeah just tastes so then was spiderman onto this the whole time zuma ably maybe was staking out most dogs place. But how did he know where he put the keys. Oh you the heat's staked out his house. He say yeah. That would probably make a lot of sense because they know they're knocking over all these people they're like they're probably gonna come for him now. Let's just watch him. I just noticed when When he's like pulling these statues away from the chameleon like i know. They mentioned earlier that they were statues. That were keys as well with tumblers in them but they actually have hexagonal like holes on the bottom which is kind of like a weirdly. Good attention to detail but they also just kind of look like hexagonal assholes for these hustle. Dodds need buttonholes mean what. Why did i agree with that really. Don't john i mean maybe the greek gods ooh so spiring gets the keys and then he just randomly drops them over the edge and assumes that moseley's gonna be right there ready to fucking grab them. Burlington hip priceless artifacts. Far as i can tell like the key doesn't work. They showed a schematic of it before and it was like this. Final onyx Just use god. You're not using your brain. Well i mean yeah you'll never get cap back but you never got him back and fifty years so maybe just fucking run at the clock and smash them on the sidewalk fair enough. If it's the fate of the world v getting one dude bag. I think captain america would make that fucking point. I think that's kind of what he was doing. Captain america has made that sacrifice ad nauseam. I'm sure he'd be like take. Take the red skull. I so spiderman and destroyer jays chameleon outside here but they find themselves in a six piece. Bucket trouble is vulture scorpion. Rhino shocker and chameleon are waiting for them. The ball go south right away as the to fight against superior numbers until the black marvel shows up touting captain america's shield to help out the heroes manage to overcome their personnel deficit only to discover kingpin has had a hostage the whole time robbie robertson so when they first show moseley take the keys out of the locker fancy box by the ones. We got grabs back from spider man. He just goes and shoves them back in the locker without the box what happened. The box wasn't protect office box back. Yeah because i mean it took a key to open that. It also took a key to open the locker. Think that'd be nice right. He shows how little he cares about them. Actually yeah i guess so. Nice swing outside and it's like i guess it's the biggest self locker. It's the biggest self storage location in new york. 'cause you can see those manhattan mountains in the background the majestic peaks of staten island. Gosh what the fuck. I don't know but we were right guys. The rhino is going to be the duke of jersey. Such great line next to a new choice. Yeah but it's not. It's clearly not as voice like some with it. i don't know it's it's very clearly richard mall. Who does the scorpions voice. But they dub it right here onto the rhino. It's not enough. It's not deep if you've listened to it like just the thing. That is clearly scorpion. Here's a good example. I dunno just added to the pile of fuck up so far true so they are fighting sore vero. They just started throwing each other around fighting roman big willie. Ms got a cruise out his helicopter. Any leads real hard. I do as king metaphor took bow to your even date so stupid and then. He's really getting his buddies worth of this stupid intercom system that he has the helicopter that you could hear while it's running from somehow spiderman didn't make our roundtable joke while i mean i'm surprised you didn't make a joke would Kingpin says must be a big pain. Got him he's just like laughing. Everyone the thing. Is i get scorpion. Doctor octopus shocker. Vulture chameleon. Everyone and rhino or i'll just dragging as well so one lives so then King goes on here and says that long your much to be terminated. Hold on everybody kingpins decreeing. We better listen up. Stop what you're doing. put him down. Man fucking destroyer so useless every single time. He does anything. It's literally within seconds. That he he loses his powers. You know you can do one thing. Yeah is that because he uses all of his strength to do one thing. I've no we'll like everybody else can do more like they fly all this shit and they they can last a lot. I feel like maybe because of what he said in the previous episode about how he was hooked on it and he he didn't wanna give it up so maybe he really wore down the battery than the other people have. Do you think the battery recharge is. Though i don't it doesn't it. Never comes back the way it should you know like he gets tossed into spiderman. Dick i and again it's another like you said kevin day. Asx powers loss because after he the destroyer houck's the chameleon he's struck with a bout of serious digestive distress and cripples over and holds his guts as ask faces the shocker. I mean you think you're getting superpowers. But we're really getting a super and he'll read the fine print. It'd be what happens. You're soaking yourself a mountain. Do you know you get what you pay for your back to your dead even spider ads just like destroyer complete shit. But don't worry. It's short cape to the rescue as soon as i saw him like. Oh shit it's black panther with cap shield and then my own. No way that other guy sorry. Mcu cook has nothing. No what are you talking about. Black panther kind of seem cape. I know you fucking shut up there. Good movies okay. Yeah cruises any air back to our spiderman far from home review now in our patriot patriots. Fuck in two years. I love that. He cruises in here at uses the shield immediately on the shockers blast here and it hits boulter in the peanuts boss. Young man balls old boss still seventy year old balls bureau aged because of the tablet of time and blah blah blah doesn't mean it doesn't mean they're not eighty two nine year old balls. So are you telling me. They're basically hanging around his ankles like we said some things never stretch back but the thing that topped off this scene is when kingpin says fisticuffs than. I never on fister coach. Oh yes guys. Kingpins commuters fisticuffs. More more of a more of a brawler grabber a soda if you will not a fighter kingpin kingpin slogans. Though that he has this plan up his sleeve that classic can't could stuff and we didn't know where robbie was so. It's pretty good. If you slow it down here you can see that kingman actually goes and kicks robbie and the but himself out of them upshur stubby. Little leg the door. It's great yeah. He's not proportioned. Well he's fulla ranting like you said peter two percent fat conflicts up your body when you get to that low fat. Yeah that's true and he demands the keys or Rob into the street here and then spiderman chimes in. We have no choice. We have to give them the keys just once. I would like someone to be like. Yeah no the fate of the world is at stake. Fuck you grand like well. I guess he's gonna eat pavement. Or whatever bobby drop him. Watch the three super while two and a half superheroes catch him. Yeah i mean. I saw the other day. Sacrifices must be made. I think i read that in court statement. I know this dog refer was listening during a treason trial. Sorry robbie the world is more important than you and you should have gotten caught by the bad guys k by. We'll make you a statue. Wants the world. Save my son after you. I'll try and mary. your wife. randy means father. I'll take care of it. I'll take the boy king goes and shows robbie's that they're spiral robbie and then you see robert horry host. Who's those guys who are. Your friends goes trustworthy. Rob leave character. So the years give up the keys to the doomsday device anyway and kingpin tosses robbie from the helicopter spiderman. Duff's the catch but the black marvel manages to come in with the save b. m. reveals his true identity. Omar moseley explained that he took dan lyons place in the super soldier experiment when dan's father forbade him from participating with only one key left on stolen and the thunder or missing for decades. Moseley in marlow decide to reassemble the rest of the team to fight back once. Black marvel runs in gets the keys comes back out the kingpin lands. The helicopter. takes fucking fifteen seconds. Didn't have speed go walker. Get the keys come the. There's literally no reason he couldn't have just had them in his pocket and handed them over here. It literally just burned screen time. Yeah we have to give them the keys. We don't need to see that everyone's just standing there like checking their watches. Like does he come back on the so. How about the nicks more the mets fan. The this conversation is over so kingpin lynn after that kingpin lands the helicopter. And he's like a proud mom while all his little kids load back onto the bus after their first day of school except for the chameleon because he has to get on all fours to get everybody else just hof sun cherry address or something like a poor guy with no powers powers. But i mean he's abilities no he's made from a he's here's like the fucking nights or whatever now yeah that's true so i guess he kind of does so they deserve to take off with robbie. Don't let them go. Classic move they drop him and then a black marble ends up having to make catch here spiderman fox it up and spider edges throws out this quote unquote joke. Nice catch you. Think of trying for the yankees. So omar moseley reveals that he is the the black marvel here. And i don't know if i if they didn't drawn the extreme before if i just never noticed it but scott that peter griffin ball sack chin vert stern. That moseley can't resist the urge to throw in some reminiscing here. It doesn't matter what's going on. Or how big the stakes are like. I see a chance to talk about the old days. So that's what we're gonna do. Sit down everyone. Should everyone time to sit and listen. Okay so we're led to believe that because dan lyons a super-rich he gets the full hot tub of chemicals. I'm pretty sure it was driven into our brains that it was a chemical shortage because of the war is the rich guy. Get the that being rich means that you don't have to share your vet with some pours. Well that's clearly. What daddy also. I was thinking like tubes. Not a giant vacuum of baja blast undo fucking ret conned the story. They just told us what episode ago. I wouldn't blame rise if they fucking just gave. Dan lies a mustache. Here to the mustaches. What he looked like dan lights his father comes in here. Fucking chad lions and he just shoving nerds around everybody's shoving so much in this episode. Come on keep. The minimum. The forties were a handsy time so moseley's like millionaire. Father was an influential senate. Do security clearance out and forbade it never shows everything around the he knew exactly how to run the fucking to like. Turn them off and bring back off. He didn't even ask each. That's a fucking chad lion. Say 'cause they've now. I've decided he was a millimeter off. The crane arm holding his son would have just started smashing into the seeing either the pit and he drowns him like. Oh god no. Just make another son then carry-on gentlemen. I'm gonna go smoke eight marlboros. It's good for your lungs. They're good for your t.'s. Owed did anybody else. Ship omar moseley in dan lions. Kill the asleep obvious. When it's i was gonna hit around it you're like let's get out there and say yeah fucking. It was a different time. I'll for sure when when moseley's like dang was disappointed but he backed me hundred percent. I think this is all a whole lot of free for all action here because like fuck this interaction between black marvel and and the destroyer here after this. Big reveal is so bizarre he goes. I'm glad to finally meet the wheel back model. My name is keen mono yeah. I know like we still fought together. I was there the whole time. I know who you are and destroyers just like oh my goodness the earl those cheeky jae-o we had the closet. Were you like how fucking how do you not not like how this doesn't make any fucking sense doesn't make any sense that they did. They not say anything in battle. Were they not there in those fucking long stakeouts or whatever that omar moseley the have the exact same voice somehow kevin. You said it earlier. I'm sorry every every time they get into their outfit. Dan lines is like oh. I can't change in front of miss. America like i have to go use the change room like mostly. Just do his best. Dan lines impression. I guess you can't just keep this fucking crazy bullshit. A secret for years. Can't we can't we omar moseley ends at. What's saying like why i called myself. The black marvel in black. Everyone else's names were pretty on the nose. Whoa whoa whoa. Easy the end all of this here with him using he ring me shoots this giant beacon. This guy that says six in rome new is like the ring death. All i can imagine is like a room full of those sweaty nurdling scientists like breathlessly revealing this ring that they've invented using only nineteen fifties technology. The controls all this crazy biochemical shit in these five mutants bodies and it works forever and requires no power source and then they're like Can you put us search. Slated w kind of labor so just throwing them require. There's no way they could ever make this fucking beyond now. Where's the size of cars back. Then i got a jump start at like next to the bottle. T look cracking the front of it. It's stupid. I thought that black marvel was going to be confused when after he lit a giant six symbol in the sky. Drake pulled up. We made that joke jury calling card. He's like oh you gotta searchlight used to call me on your cell phone. You need the american. Six with their beacon in the sky to the other members of the six american warriors miss america and the wizar- assemble at their old headquarters after some humming hiring and making fun of the wizards name. They all agree to fight against the kingpin put a stop to this doomsday device. Ones and barat miss. America floats in and when she lands keene just between black marvel and spiderman. And of course. I made it was like they used to bang. Oh god yeah and why not she cruises in here with fucking vintage moose knuckle under zero g tits cut that helen mirren level of keeping it tight but hurry if you look at her face zoom in on it you can tell she's just like oh fuck. I forgot how to land. The i thought this. It looks like she was gonna go. That's gonna come in a little hot. Yeah there signaling for the former comrades here so i guess you could say that they're speaking of the wizar- i'd like to remind the audience that being able to run so fast you can physically climb up. A building was considered a failure. Yeah yeah he's still. He's still not as good as captain america who cannot do anything like that like floored. He's closed the clearly most powerful of all of god's speeds jerseys overpowered. When you think about it oh yeah they just keep on adding powers to flash who vibrant through walls. Fuck off but he kind of has to be able to do these things or doesn't make any goddamn says you kill yourself. I can go back in time. Because i run so fast. Shut the fuck up. I'm also strong. Although this whole thing kind of makes me feel bad because black marvel never really got to connect with his friends like not really because he'd go and do the dangerous shit and then hand it off to fucking dan. Lyons who's been sipping cocktails back at the clubhouse and then they'd be like oh dad you badly it a switch and bean did all those fucking things. They never had a conversation. Yeah exactly doesn't make any sense in these. Other folks know that dan was like going into the vat and stuff like that and like did all these like training things with them like they show. They shy now. They show like the gymnastics shit without masks or anything. Like that. And dan lines is there is like stretching waiting for them to leave and then management. Now i'm going to show how powerful it and actually. Maybe he just was jack's naturally because it's really not that big a fucking difference. But he's coach. Steve just like detroit just like takes two steps and it's like oh. I think i've read pulled my hamstring. You guys go on ahead and ninety. Dan lyons the guy could just the iron cross and they're like wow. We've never seen anything like that horse shit before he must have superpowers so the fucking wizar- here shit it's the wizar- shows it's toys. He's just a mealy spider ads on his case. Bunches over the fuck. No no no glad at the fucking grab ass reminiscent what the fuck. I have just one question for you. Why did you call yourself the wizar- and then and then he's so charming. That like spiderman came and make fun of him. And it's kind of like it's wholesome and then depressing immediately after because he's like. Hey that's the sound i make. That's what it was like back. Then we'll be. Don't be so chipper urinary incontinence. I think that's a swollen prostate sir. You should probably get will. He says like back then it was a swell day. Now the only thing that swollen prostate. I don't doing that stops bringing it up at least at least spiderman could have been like maybe don't be yellow. Nobody calls me yellow. So black marvel talks about like peter said the sort of damocles and they have to take care of the doomsday device once and for all once and for all and then they're having a About it because they're old and that sucks but like they really should take care of it and the destroyer states that he's i'm ready for action and they pan to miss america who gives them like Cata face at the line and gives her when the bag or kicks in. Oh shit damn spider man goes and says that he take them over any crimefighters of today's like really. Yeah fuck all of the people. He's teamed up with so far this series just like pop up on the other side of the room like start crying like fucking black cat daredevil blade all of the x. bad oh yeah doctor. Strange doctor strange war machine. It's all there. They're all just like we're going to help you save the world. But i guess we won't go yeah And say that. They need to inspire the thunder. Come out but the probably reveal something shitty in the future like the thunder is actually go to old linear some shit willing who's been stealing portal devices since the twenties or two little kitchen pitcher over here little scream over. Hey over at crime. Central kingpin is wringing his hands about not having found the final key or the man who should possess it. Jerry carstairs a k a the thunder however landed has located the site of the doomsday device and so kingpin in the city. Insidious head out to secure it to land in here is like oh. My searchers failed back on the final key. I've tried other dog licensing databases. I'm starting to think this guy dog. I'm onto ferrets and cats. Arctic birds all the garbage animals. I was like he was calling the funder. But his real name is jerry. Cost took the thunder aka. Jerry carstairs aka johnny train ladder. Jimmy bike escalator zo. After landon tells kingpin the news Kingpins like do you have any good news. Yes i just save fifteen percent on my car insurance by switching to gyco because it was the nineties fucking have a great idea for a sitcom with caveman. All the only gets is the doomsday device is located somewhere in the shitty part of the bronx. Which doesn't really narrow it down against boom. I really expected the goon squad to just be like the brock's hey that's what me and my seren live. Basically everybody kind of is like nonplussed. About the fact that land just invented a hand held. Gps literally on most useful devices. That are gonna be invented owned the next twenty years. But i created this device the guide you to the exact point who cares. When did he have time to do this. He goes and says like pinpoint location of the doomsday complaints onto some condemned buildings in the bronx. When time to do this because when they're out and he's having the time of his life in public should he take googling time to tinker. He's just doing the risky business all day. Just him and his undies. Adobe picture fucking landed on that is not okay. This fucking tripoding in his cronies. Search the ruins but the doomsday side finding only crumbling concrete in a friendly tramp the decide to immediately murder. Their hobo side is prevented by the arrival of the heroes. Who put a beat down on the whippersnappers. Unfortunately their powers begin to fade and the tide quickly turns causing the trap to reveal himself to be the thunder with his help though. They're overwhelmed by the villains and taken captive along with the final key so they go and they find this place and kingpin. Is this like the new phone. Vagrant would inhabit east eastwind. I'm pretty sure this is where doctor octopus. His old lab is exploited like. Hey sarah helping the window so then they find this hobo and they're like what the fuck your problem for some reason like they're really phase about it he's like what are you doing around here on man and he was just trying to be quiet. I oh that's ironic wink. Yeah shit but why are they trying to kill him immediately. Yeah dispose of him like cheese. Is- kingpin why what even do like. You'd think they'd at least ask him like a question or two like hey. Do you know where there's any hidden tunnels right ear or something. We'll give you twenty bucks like that's all. He had to do right when their vote to draw their weapons to kill the man. Something whizzes by punches them is pretty hard here whizzing a lifetime and then he actually likes to this with the nation of him just like do each one he punches. All the six in the city of six kingpin. And then it's the geriatric time to strike. It's the fucking tylenol pm squad. Here they kick some fucking ask man. I was watching this fight and it seemed way more brutal than usual. And then i realized it's because the old people get to punch and they're just coming in here throwing haymakers the village. Or what the fuck do we do. We can't punch who can only throw punchy. Is that legal miss america. Does the exact move. The vulture does to other people back at him and he just stands there and takes it. He watches her swooping to just uppercut him in the face. Fucking fucking black. Marble comes in here. Kicks him in the crotch and then gives them what the hell was that. Tilles destroyers like better mash my brain into the right over some reason. Hell these the biggest one and used your brain. Like how i wrote a he'd be i've become destroy all right the destroyer of cervical vertebrae he just crumples into a heap and then meanwhile spider-man's just qiuping up the scorpion. While actual beat doubt is happening in an alley. Bill click there take care. He's go fill them up with webs. Hold on kinda. Put them out of the fight. So it's kinda worth it. I suppose. But then everybody's power to start failing them out once miss america's like it's unsustainable unsustainable marlow corrections. God that rosen. Covered sounds required. Common mugabe marlo catches earn his like also my power as a weakening to we just eat shit but then no one else's powers weaken. It's just those two like where's the wizar- running around within. Maybe he's he's hit a peters out. Yup that's what we do after. We whiz we instead of a torrid dribble you know. Yeah yeah he only has so much flow he can give so. Then the we go and here this screech out of nowhere and oh my god turns out that the random homeless guy was actually the thunder. Go it's actually very predictable. Actually i'm gonna jump in say. The thunder is here by handford row. Great name and he's a theatre film tv actor who has a pretty long career doing mainly one offs for tv in the eighties nineties. Two thousand actually dozens of shows and interestingly he actually did serve in world war two he was in the navy on minesweeper. Kind of cool did they re cast the thunder from the last episode. Then old almost all of them have different voices from when they're young to win their old. Yeah okay that makes more sense the thunder who said i'm going to go and stick by kept side. He said he was going to protect the site till his dying day. Yeah the the only one who doesn't have a different voice between these two episodes obviously cabinet america's same age but Miss america play by the same actress in both. But she doesn't have a ton a lines either so harlow definitely isn't because after he was in the american warriors he gained a british accent different. Sound there Black marvel he has one line and he's not credited as black marvel at all but it's him as well as but but he really didn't talk. The thunder yells his supersonic scream and everybody cowers and then he shuts up. Kingpins stands up and he's immediately from hobo to his full cost. He's just like pros. Thunder king like how i had. Oh oh my god actually do like that sound effect. It's very mega. manish to me. For some reason like after he stopped screaming it continues to make this like ooh sand like woo boop boop. Yeah yeah. I don't know it just it's kind of cool. It's a cool sound effect and it just reminds me of old video games. Thunder makes his costumed appearance. Kingpin countries like turns away. Okay well fuck this. And then thunder starts losing his powers. But he's just like oh no. I'm losing my powers. This can't be happening now. What a bad time for me to lose my powers if worst time to lose my finally but he was shut the fuck up maybe keep it under us also. Why did you to collapse that. You're losing your powers to speak loudly. Yeah i mean. I guess they come and go but like i dunno keep it under wraps maybe keep the element of surprise. Yeah right you ever know where they're gonna come back like he gets like the rhino runs up here and he like puts them in a bear hug and you can hear his bones cracking. Yeah that typical which is pretty yeah. That's not great for an old guy. I almost expended the writer. We're looking for the wizards. No i'm right here after. He goes and collapses the rhinos hugging the thunder. And then the rest of the teams just like reminded me of like when an intruder gets into a beehive in all the bees just killing attacking. We serve vibrating itself. That's how they killed but like it doesn't make any goddamn said they all just put a head on the right. Oh and then it cuts away when it cuts back. He is fucked up. How did these geriatrics killing. Were they vibrating and then cooked them to death. 'cause he's lying on his fucking ahead idiot. Yeah and then he they pan back and he's standing up but like how did they just kill them with love like everybody hug him. It was a tainted. Were original breathed. They're they're horrible. Old people smell. Yeah the old people breath yeah kidneys are shutting down enjoy but instead yeah they fucked them up they start shooting with lasers that are actually also restricted. Somehow blazers back row plays back. We missed him and then just like cool. That that's enough of this kingpins like okay. Well check him for the keys. Go check his clothes. Check his but like go check every doctor. Octopus is just like jingjing gets the he gets a couple of those arms in there so they finish up there and they have their prisoners and they had down below surface which they just kind of find a bit in the city of six. Save your their victory. As heroes can only look on helplessly using the keys. They opened the door to the doomsday device but in their moment of triumph their betrayed by the chameleon pulls a gun gas grenade knocking everyone out and making way for cried off the sound of the red skull to take his prize so the kingpin and his knights bring the five american warriors featuring spiderman down to the entrance of the doomsday device and block marvel going on a tangent about remembering this place this same evil place just as we left it fifty years ago it evens the same keeping in your pants buddy. How do you remember. The smell. Wizards like sorry. That's me i mean. Smell isn't smell them. the census mostly to memorize after black marvels. Little speech. here is it's hopeless and it's sort of like yeah okay. Your arms are all tied up. But like if only one of us had powers that revolved around not using your arms like maybe someone who used their legs in some way or their voice be able to fly. Oh well i guess we'll die. Come on you assholes food. At least try everybody. Just lie down i guess. Yup it's past your bedtime. Smell the evil ed. Just give up and then big willie gives everybody keys here. And he asks really magnanimous. He's trying to share in the victory here and as if he's not just trying to make sure the door isn't booby-trapped by getting other people to open. It is such a bullshit thing here. He's just like yeah. Yeah no no. I don't need that glory and you just look at scorpions face. Just like i'm helping. He's like actually let me do something here. Acid on people so once the door opens. I see my favorite reptile. Take a couple of steps back. Like farted needed to leave the room. There's gas involved. that's for sure. in hindsight. it makes sense. The chameleons a traitor. Like it's a bit on the nose or lack thereof. But i mean okay. Kingpin did leave them to rot in jail. But like i'd be pissed too right like there's no way he's one of those german war criminals right really not probably be. He's so happy here though like he has this giant smile on his face. People on the gas masks when the gas goes on it like magnifies his face to make it which is not something you want when you look like him but something we get as an audience and that's our that's our cross to bear but I love that the darkness is creeping in here and spiderman knows. The true hero needs to provide exposition so he focuses on doing that wall passing out instead of doing anything at all crag off the red skull spiderman is like the one whose powers are the most consistent and all the time he doesn't worry about fucking losing them but he's just like so weakened use your web shooters your web shooters don't need your strength buddy goan spray someone in the i like you usually do go to move in the doom room. Craig reveals that chameleon is both is adoptive brother and hello old they forced dr gracie to reactivate the vortex powering the place and bring the red skull back from the ether. After a family reunion old red gets his glued on about the state of the american warriors and activates the device causing giant robots to lumber to life being old. He takes a moment to flash back. During witch critic again activates vortex causing another man to step back out of time. Oh my god what fuck okay. Well now the uniform seems pretty fucked up just great you give a shitty secondary character a new lease on life and then they turn around and end up being adopted by sherman war criminal take down the banners were shutting it down with a montage of all the tons bureau been standing for fucking literal nazi for five seasons. Broken chameleon is all smiles and giggles now though which is pretty weird and uncomfortable to watch at. Meanwhile kingpin is making a million faces and there either pest off or him smelling a fired or something i don't know but they go here and say that chameleon is this guy's either like adopted brother whatever. I mean on the comics. We've mentioned this before. Like craven is actually chameleons half brother. Yeah it's nice that they kind of took gut somewhere but whatever yeah. They did their own thing with it. It's yeah craven craig off. That sounds same. I'm sure i would have rather be craven's brother. Well tell me this vero. Does the lion hunt without his main. I don't think the russians got along great with the nazis. Just i mean. I'm no student of history. There was there was ada for a minute. Nazi's decided to attack them. Do not agent or land war with russia in the winter russia was like winter. Is coming motherfucker sco so then. Then they cut to doctor octopus here. And he's like whispering to shock. Looks like a has gotten another fine. What the fuck is the point of this line. Nothing comes from me bitch. It's just like look into this episode. This episode has so many doctor. Octopus like cut-away lines to. I think he's just trying to impress the shocker. Everybody's just like but it's the shocker. Though like everyone wants to be like couvert front of the told me. Look like a nerd in front of the shocker. Yeah i assume they're setting up like the eventual destruction of the city of six. That's going for but in this. God is just like you fucking bitch so they take a second to kind of explain how this all works again. Really quick that they can bring the red skull back from the ether 'cause it's a matter antimatter vortex and just have this bit. Where like like great sake is super hesitant. And he's like biting his whole hand basically because he's so afraid to fuck this up of the wanted to like what's the matter with you next and slaps so then they go and say that this is a perpetual energy field. That keeps matter. Locked in stasis is just buzzword bingo like star trek level like these are words we know from science at. We're gonna plug in here for sure. So eventually when the red skull shows up big reveal they actually went and reused spider-man's line of criminal. He could have just said it. a what. How much money did it save you for him to not say that he's under contract. It literally isn't a guest. They may be like saw cut of it and then they were like we should probably explain. This guy is one more time because that was two episodes ago enough so then they're just like cut it just cut it in like cut him having it. I mean the temptation must be there. Because you don't normally see his mouth moves so you can just say whatever the fuck you want. Then the red skull's there. He's just got this. What the fuck is going on. I'm love i love. You know what again props to the animation department. I don't know if they did it on purpose but they gave him such like. What the fuck is this steps out of the portal. And craig just runs over to be like daddy should sickness or whatever it is. I don't know what's happening is like you thing hateful fifty years in vortex in this tuesday complex. You reinhard aged yes three years. I just fucking told you you never listen to me. Runs away. crying knows sorry. Peter more that he re that the red skull reaches out to touch reinhold face and i swear to god we were gonna get another hard dusky in the mouth because apparently that was fathers did back then he goes on a fucking face touching spree here because he grabs his sons phases. Like what the fuck this like. Gotta get in here. And then he grabs onto miss marvel's face talking about how vigorous he is you buy. I remain a young speakers. You like what the fuck is this is. This is a german things. stop it. here's a more important question for the audience. So they animate the red skull with the readiness. I'm going into his onesie and he's clearly wearing gloves. So i'm left to imagine that it kind of goes the readiness kind of goes the whole way down. So does this mean. He has a red rocket for red rock. Just move on from that. They really should have just called the character. Red rocket like if i miss lewis sold. It's just everyone watching this shit. Like what the fuck really wanted ought to be like It's so he doesn't recognize. Craig off but sees chameleon just like oh my god chameleon i recognize that fucking pay anywhere that pale face gives them. A fucking hug is just i. I should actually meant as well. The red skull's played here by earle bone or bowen. He's a character and voice actor with actually hundreds of credits to his name. Best known for being doctor silberman from the terminator movies and the narrator from world of warcraft. Interestingly though this isn't his only credit alongside david hater. Who's playing captain america. He also went to do the voice. Work in metal gear solid two sons of liberty where hater is solid snake and he is sergei Girl kebich and there is one other voice artists in that game. Who's also on the show. Which is jennifer hale. Who plays hardy. I like this voice acting from the red skull though like he's boisterous he's vigorous so vigorous and he his laugh all of a sudden is perfect evil guy maniacal memory lane whatever the fuck it is he just goes on a tangent starts laughing as ass off as like. This is what i want out of. My super villain. We may be old. But there's an fight flip take you on. So then he goes into this fucking flash back. During this entire complex was built by german agents took challenge the american six and destroy the united states classic villain just giving all like he wasn't out of the tube for a minute and he just like this is my entire evil plan classic villain exposition bullshit. Yeah he's just like whatever here's how we did this you says that shit and then you're like okay. That really doesn't mean anything to us. Because it doesn't actually give us any new information pertinent but find. I guess these starts activating all these robots all over the place. It'd be like look to my robots could have my newest employee and then fuck insured spider. Man i work for the know-how to thaw out old med adolf hitler all disney and my father. My father. we'll be thought out. Like yeah like as soon as as soon as i showed robots and like even to myself. Oh my god fucking robots again and then spider-man's like hey. Yeah he's here with us the whole time. He's on this journey but also what wizar- goes to thunder. Whatever he just like. We were crazy to try to make any difference in our age. Well that's the end of us guys didn't make any difference like is great gives it a lesson is never try accident right away like well. That's it see. Yeah and so. As as the red skull prepares to reveal the last part of project doomsday. He's interrupted by captain. America back from the past and ready to kick some nazi ass redskins activists. The object beta and cap starts a fight inexplicably silver sable arrives to free spider man before joining the battle with her wild pack allowing spicy to free the american warriors big willie fisk also accidentally released and he manages to lose the insidious six leading to an all out brawl unlike the red skull who had like teleportation amnesia captain america pulled a gun and just like showed up and immediately started eating like yeat i ask questions later like he saw the red skull and it was like. Fuck this guy. Yeah captain. America was pretty condition to that by the time. The red skull says you he's been picked up and thrown onto the ground already by captain america. Once right yeah. So like i mean. That's what captain america here to do to punch robots and throw dudes into other deuce says. Oh that's a superpower. You're god damn god damn right there. I love that captain. America theme that they get it here. Though living legend himself time to review and silver sable just shows up and she might as well just wink at the audience and whispered. Don't think about it. I don't know why i'm here either. There's no time to explain like that's just not knowing how the got here. The most secretive fucking thing in the world that you have no reason to know where this is. We spent two episodes on trying to figure out where this is. Something something something. We're here now. But then she also goes and whispers to like spiderman. He follows her in the back room door. Show and all you hear is like well. What are you know. Cap comes swinging here. He jumps portal nazis. That's what you want. In a captain. America foot is pep. Talks are a little less inspired than asked because he gets the team together and he's just like let's make the world safer democracy cap just so quaint. Yeah i'm not saying this. Podcast was recorded during a troubling time. But win exactly where they're going to make the world safe for democracy when the warriors were released they all run towards captain america to be like cap. It's us and cap. Should have just been like fucking serious. You guys some blow this place up by myself. Yeah i sacrifice myself for you guys to go Maybe we should destroy this place. And and the destroyers like oh. I thought you wanted us to keep it to lie literally made destroy. What do we pay you for. It's not a sacrifice. If you fucking just let me go and stays this for forever loving rod for fifty years. I'm exactly in the same place. I was fighting nazis. It's been fifty years. I'm not an american. But i still did really like you're going to need. This gives them the shield i know. I i like that to actually a lot you. I don't know. I guess it's like the he's been in stasis. These guys have moved on. He hasn't that kind of thing. Whatever it is but it's it's a cool little moment actually. I really did enjoy that. Because it is it. Embodies captain america. It's like the get this man. Shield like it's something about bringing the character together and getting behind it because it's like yeah recreating the icon. It doesn't even bother me. That they didn't draw the star very well and it's actually all fucked up looking or the fastest black instead of blue and it's got the nazi colors all of that doesn't matter because it's a cool moment and it's like moseley kept it for all those years to safe right like he had it this whole time. He has it ready to go when he needs it again. With the allied forces of the six american warriors the wild pack spiderman and the felonious. Five as well as kingpin the robots begin dropping like flies red skull and the sun flee to an inner sanctum pursued by spider man and silver sable the robots continue to fall some even losing power and the allies take a breather to savor. They're somewhat surprising victory. Meanwhile the chameleon is taken prisoner by a very angry wilson. Fisk kingpin joins the fight. And it's incredible. He runs tours. The robot and just like lifts its entire leg. And he's like sia this. Fascism is over flips. It's nice they were going to control the entire world using these robots and they can be pushed over by a guy who kind of looks like he lives off of beer and liquid cheese. Like i know he's like actually kinda strong but he shouldn't be able to lift up a doomsday robot. You know what i mean. I'm pretty sure these robots are powered by ten thousand precisely ordered punchcards yet. Maybe that's their programming. That's what i'm kind of getting the vibe of. It's like at the time it would have turned the tide of the war and let them win and everything. But now it's fifty years later and like that kind of technology shit like you just can't have a giant robot that was made in the forties and expected to do as well as i don't know any given attack helicopter. Yeah the patchy just flies it and just blows it. One patchy put you down. I have seen kingpin be like. I paid for better. Robots last week just like the spider slayers would have kicked this thing's ass absolutely especially if they were still like voltron together whatever what really do like though is that the animation just picks up out of nowhere like it just spikes in this episode. It's kinda crappy to begin on. Its typical season five. Shit as far as we've seen it but then this fight starts and it starts looking good and then we see Silver sable and and spiderman swing after the two villains and it becomes great. Look it looks fantastic. we talking. She looks like an animated character. Something there's a lot of stuff happening in the scene and it looks good. This insidious six are going and attacking the robots spiderman silver sable. They're making out censoring. Whatever the fuck through doing and then all that's good but it's all trump by this one fucking live doctor octopus. I could not take this fucking line into. A lack of foresight is not usually a german failing. Oh my user. German failing is bigly gestures towards this shrine to national search. Meanwhile like him and craig off and red skull have the most in common in that room. Maybe chameleon aggress doesn't talk. Yeah turns out. he's german. I i mean i guess. Actually he's actually russian but whatever in the comics but in this is not well mostly. What's he adopted because they stole him from the russian front. Yeah he's adopted. Could been one of those kids they left behind in the fucking scorched earth campaign. Yeah because he looks like a fucking monster. You leave him out. People would run for models. I like seeing captain. America punch a hole in the robot's head and then the wild pack gets in there. You know they're expensive but they get results which is destroying robots on goggles. This guy's laser guns. It's all we can all rest. You don't see the thunder uses powers though you don't see the wizar- uses powers and you don't see miss america user powers. Yeah we're kind of given cab america's time to shine. I guess i do like. I do like that. They actually did the whole man out of time thing. They did their own thing. I mean i'm not one hundred percent sure what happened in the comics might have been something like this might have been something happening. The mcu the whole math time thing is pretty cool. It is fun. Yeah it was a good nod to it in an original way. Yeah i think i think this is. They're definitely their own thing. Because of restrictions that were put on them in terms of making this as a television show. And it's pretty interesting almost as interesting. This was happening here to fucking chameleon when he's caught because oils viscous is off right. He calls in hold on now. Hold on now. He goes and calls chameleon traitorous will to me communities reptiles. I love when kingpins insults are accurate. Says it was such venom in his voice to but you know what fucking good punish him. Kingpin dive support you on that veras been spurned by this hell hath no fury like a fan girl. Scorned like so mad. He's gonna be crushed to death. That is like that is the law of pity's get a sit out of he's given to like lick lands footers crime moore's well chameleon isn't the only one in a rust spot here though because the bow on this episode has fighting and silver sable red skull and scold junior sable reveals that her main goal has always been to punish escape nazis and so finally on the same team the pair ready to face the final battle. Think i love about this bit. Is that spiderman. Greatly overestimates is billy to wall crawl at the speed that silver sable running like he's going a mile a minute like chicks on the ceiling and then he finally asked to tap out at jumped out and she's classy enough not to draw to she's sprinting. And he's like on the wall like dude. I'm ready superpowers. She doesn't so i. I mean i'll buy that. He can do that. But it's gotta be fucking exhaustig. Yeah so then. They reveal her back story. And it's something we already knew from peter's comic book minute but it's that her father was was hunting down these nazis and she kind of picked up that as you know her life's mission even though she does do merck work. But it's such a weird reveal. Given everything we know about her actions in the last couple of episodes. It's like yeah. I wanted to pay respect to my father by not bothering to do any research do whom i'm working for and then blindly taking orders to do criminal lacks. Oh wait. that sounds familiar She makes no effort to learn. What her employers want or what their goals are or whether she's doing evil or even if she was doing it as a double cross Went to our good one that will on a positive note spiderman while running next to silver sable reflects on her choices to fight and captured german war criminals and he realizes that heroes do come in all sizes and shapes and in her case. Thirty four twenty. Three thirty six omega all right. We're going to power down on giant robots as well. 'cause that's it for this episode which means it's time for some arbitrary spider ratings where we ranked the episode using whatever idiotic metric can come up with off the top of our heads vero. Well i give this episode minus three arthritic superheroes out of ten watts right sure. It had great action ripped senior citizens and a triumphant return. But i can't get the bitter taste of betrayal out of my mouth. Damn you chameleon thought we were friends. Oh damn kevin. I'm going to give this episode three low key. Hobos out of four. It picked up considerably from the previous episodes in this especially halfway through. There was a lot of shaky shit that beginning but the animation the action everything just picked up midway through this episode and it got pretty damned good and what i like best is that all the pieces are lined up. I know that there's one more episode to go in this arc and it's actually got me moderately hopeful that the last episode could be a banger. That's for me. I'll give this four out five episodic adventures i was going to give a perfect score that i found out. It wasn't fucking done yet. What's next five the forgotten six again. Fight unclaimed secrets of the legacy warriors. That yes yeah. I'm just waiting for the shit's be done. Get to the fucking next thing like this is dragged out way too fucking long. It was a great episode. Yeah it was a bit much. But it is another cliffhanger. And i mean that's good but i'm just i just wanna see what happens next. Well this copy of the daily bugle has a preview. But anything else is gonna cost you supposed to have some big the moment america has been waiting for today's issue with bucs brock's big big news to. How did you happen to get this. The price of heroism red skull activates the real doomsday device to funnel power into his son. Craig off the new super villain too dangerous to control our heroes old and you must work together to defeat the skull family damn stakes have never been higher. Probably i don't know actually all right. Thanks for being with us loyal listeners. If you like the episode please share it with your friends. Your family and your secretly heraldic elders directly or on socials the fact texas in your spider pod talk and he might even win some free swag. You love the show. you can also join or patriot. Cover your body in our weird merge from t- public and especially rayton review is under podcasting platform of choice links for everything on our website radioactive spider pod dot com again. Thanks to our patrons andrew adamat lindsay calvin doctors and steven. We'll be returning from a brisk jog down the world's longest hallway in two weeks with our next episode until then this is radioactive spider pod saying these days it sounds corny but back then it was a swell name keep swinging. Tell them i love them. I'm afraid i can't do that fishing. Hope you want. We're done with the fucking old school. Talk oh my god there but still make me laugh. You say craig me off.

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Bestselling Crime Writer Walter Mosley Will Teach You How To Write A Story

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

Bestselling Crime Writer Walter Mosley Will Teach You How To Write A Story

"From NPR and WB. You are Boston. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti and this is on point beginning middle and and that is a story in its simplest terms writer Walter. Mosely has published over Fifty Beginnings Middles and ends in his storied career. He's he's best known for his mystery. Series featuring easy Rawlins. An African American World War veteran turned private eye and Moseley's novels show us that between those beginnings Middles and ends. There is some kind of magic the happens that makes for great writing but can that magic be wrestled down into craft. Well it is latest Book Moseley takes on this question of how to create fiction that transcends so this hour on point conversation with writer Walter Mosely and you can join us has Walter Moseley's work impacted you as a reader. Do you have a favorite book or passage and writers or aspiring writers. What question do you have for the master of this craft for one of the Masters Walter? Mosely join US anytime at on point. Radio DOT ORG or twitter and facebook at on point radio. Well Walter. Mosley joins us today from the studios of NPR West in Culver City California. His easy role in series consists of fourteen books beginning with devil in a blue dress which was published in nineteen ninety the most recent installment of that series as charcoal Joe which was published in Two Thousand Sixteen and Moseley's new book on writing is called elements of fiction and we have an excerpt of that at some point? Radio Dot Org Walter Moseley. Welcome to the program. Why thank you very much glad to be here? It's a great pleasure to have you I WANNA I wanNA talk about writing for civil simply through your. We're writing through easy Rawlins and the books that you've written featuring him for folks who don't know first of all I mean. How would you describe who is easy Rawlins? And how how did you create him. Well is he. rollins is a a character a black man in America. UH coming out of World War Two. Who's you know has lived in? The South is whole life but now realizes after experiences in Europe that he has to go somewhere else he comes comes to California like so many people did then and he begins to form a new life so you can see the what's new in his life Contrast so with a history that's been you know on his shoulders and everybody else's for four hundred years and so it's a way of seeing and experiencing what's going on but But also understanding a history. That's not usually exposed in literature. Yes talk to me more about that. I mean. Was that a big motivation for you in terms of why How you formed easy Rawlins as a character and also you know where you located him? Well you know one of the things that I understand. Is that if you don't don't exist in Literature Fictional literature you don't experience exist in history in America then you just don't and so the idea of talking about that migration of black people from The Western south into southern California and to a bit central California it to say to write. That story is to actually make the people who I know and love a part of history. Yeah so so so. That's really fascinating to me because I mean this this is much much more than simply writing what you know right. It's giving voice to To what we know and people who you know and love and experiences like you said that hadn't had that voice before for me. Tell me tell me a little bit more about Growing up how you saw particularly African American men portrayed in literature. Well now on the whole we weren't. We weren't portrayed in literature and when when we were it was you know You know the slave or the ex slave the side kick the the shoeshine. The pimp there were there are certain characteristics that we could have but but we would read it and go well. But that's not me and his name I B. I know I mean what what what and you know so the idea of talking about somebody you know cooking dinner for their children. That's like that's crazy. Nobody would write that because it's you know there's there's no time in the literature that's you know about another world to to take to take chapter and talk about you know a making dinner for his children you know and of course. You're not going to write that you know. Well so let's listen to a little bit about A little bit from your most recent Rawlins novel charcoal Joe which came out in twenty sixteen there. There's a passage that I think you'd probably have before you. Could you read it to us. Sure it's a long way from West. La To what it's the same city but darkness descends as you progress eastward you pass from white dreams into black and brown realities. There were many miles to cover but distance was the least of it. It was another world where I was going in in West Los Angeles when people looked at their. TV's they saw themselves and what they wanted to be. James and Lauren. Green Mary Tyler Moore and Lucille Ball. They had their their own jokes and music and interpretations of right and wrong in the world. People in Watts saw the same shows but not their faces their dreams the hard facts of their lives and watch people spoke the same language in different dialects and at separate schools for darker skinned citizens. Employment was synonymous must with toil. The police were often the enemy as the motorcycle. Cop had been for me out in studio city. Well that's Walter. Mosely reading an excerpt from charcoal Joe. His most recent easy rawlins novel that came out in two thousand sixteen. And we're talking to Walter Mosely today about his latest book which is called elements of fiction and the craft of writing here. So I'm wondering if you could sort of A school us a little bit in terms of. Let's use this rollins. Passage does an example. What are some of the tricks here? Not Tricks but but kraft crafts that. You're using to bring to light. It's kind of A. This is a meeting rollins internal world and the external world. That he's driving us through. How did you do well? I was I think something that you said before you know rather than just writing what you know. What you're doing is giving voice to a people voices a very important part of the elements of fiction? And I think that what you do. Is You work work you you keep working and working until you find a voice that you know whatever it is first person third person they that really resonates with the experience of those people and then the information inside of it is underneath that voice and so you know when easy Rawlins Starts to to drive have toward Uh toward watts he is experiencing it. He's he's he's feeling that he's watching and and you're watching but you're not seeing we'll you know. Then I saw the street and that street and there was this hovel over here building over there. What you're doing is you're you're feeling like this kind of transition from one world world into another but it's all in the same world And you know and getting to that. It's an interesting thing Leeann when I when I talk about the elements of fiction the most important part about about Well two things most important about reading is rereading. You can't just read a book and so I got that book author put a lot of work in that book and you and you need to put the you know the same level of work in order to get it but it's also true about writing. Writing is rewriting you write it down you get pretty much. What what you what you thought you were saying you read it again? It's Oh no I missed this and then you read it again and say oh no I missed that. Oh I know I didn't get that you know and you know for me every once in a while I'll even read it into a tape recorder order so I can hear it because because that's what talking about I mean. Writing is a wonderful thing. But it's all about talking and you no I mean that's I mean that's a small part of what it takes to write something like this if i May. I'm just going to come out admit to you that I finally the idea of writing fiction to be terrifying mostly because I mean I it's it's the creation of an entire world. The possibilities are literally infinite and the responsibilities are therefore really great to not to say that nonfiction writers have it easier. I- There does seem to me to be some kind of I keep using the word alchemy but something just beyond the grasp of most people and that you just kind of no great fiction action when you see it I mean what is that thing that seems just beyond the grasp of most writers. Well I think that all all the things that you said are true except maybe the thing about nonfiction and that. Yeah there's all of these things in the way of it that's such a big world so many experiences is how do you do it but the wonderful thing is that it is possible and we know it's possible because their books we look at books we read them. Say Oh you know somebody wrote this And the thing is is not to have. Excuse me too high expectation of yourself in the beginning. If you don't have that high expectation nation then make one pass and another pass and another passing another and it it's It it it that makes it much easier. Yeah what kind of expectations did you have for yourself when you first started considering writing as a career well before I say that I just WanNa say There's more truth than fiction than there is a nonfiction because nonfiction says I'm talking about an objective world. I'm talking about a real world. I'm talking about something that happened. Then you write it down as much of it as you can. And you start editing out things and when you edit out things it's actually an act of censorship in nonfiction. Because you said well now Ronald Reagan did this. But I need to talk about that. So I'll take that out you know and either it's a good thing or bad thing depending on what you feel about Ronald Reagan And and they're so so so nonfiction is actually more fictional than fiction. As if a a role written novel will tell you a truth like in the heart of an experience and hand written nonfiction. Won't lie too much. Oh that's bowl. Those are fighting words. I love it. Okay Okay so Walter. More than so tell me the okay. So if you say that fiction possesses greater more truth in it than nonfiction but wh what what is that truth is the truth of a character is getting back to your saying the truth the truth of a voice of people you're trying to capture of voice a world an emotional experience you know and you know you can fail at join and fiction but you you have a much better chance of getting there are because because you're making it up nothing is a lie. You're not you're not. You're trying to lie to me. You're you're you're trying to be true to these characters this world this moment comment this experience. And that's what's I think. Wonderful about fiction you know. And it's you know and I think it's it's nonfiction. Riders need to think about that. They need to say. WELL HOW DO I. How am I honest to the objectivity that I'm trying to approach and in in a novel it's it's it's it's a bit easier because you can actually get there? We are talking this hour with Walter. Mosely he's the author of more than fifty books including the major bestselling mystery series featuring easy Rawlins. His new book is about the L.. It's called the elements of fiction. It's about the craft of writing and how to create fiction that truly transcends transcend. So what is your question for a Master of this craft for Walter Mosely. You heard him just say that he thinks fiction possesses greater truths to nonfiction. When you think about that we'll be right back this point? NPR's kid wants to help you make changes that actually stick this New Year from how do dry I January so I had to start a creative habit. We've got new episodes all month. You start the year off right new episodes every Tuesday and Thursday. Listen and subscribe to life game. This is on point. I magnin shocker. Bardy we're talking this hour with Walter. Mosely he is the author of more than fifty books books including the bestselling mystery series featuring easy Rawlins. His new book is called elements of fiction where he explores how great writing hiding how great fiction is made and we have an excerpt of the book at our website on Point Radio Dot Org and we wanna hear from you. What is what are your questions for? This is true master of the craft of writing. Now Mr Moseley if I can I just WANNA play a little bit from the film adaptation of Devil in a blue dress the the debut of the easy Rawlins series The film was made in Nineteen ninety-five starring of course Denzel Washington as easy Rawlins. And in the scene you'll hear Rawlins and dewitt Albright a white man played by Tom Sizemore Who Asks easy to track down a missing white woman? I'm just looking for somebody friend. desimone say Todd Carter. She'd been gone two weeks. It upset the poor man so much stopped running for mayor. That's shame see it definitely has a predeliction for the company Negroes. She likes jazz and pigs feet and dark meat automate election looking for myself but persuasion so to speak Tom. MM sizemore and Denzel Washington in the Nineteen Ninety five film adaptation of Devil in a blue dress Walter Mosely Cana- film ever ever do justice to the novel upon which it's based what's an interesting wording can do justice novel. That's probably it can can't be a novel that I mean that's the that's the question I mean. A novel can do a lot more than a film can but films can. Do you know fantastic things. That the the the difference between the two mediums. As you're actually creating the images is in your head when you're reading which makes the mind work in certain ways in think in certain ways that film you know just can't do. It can't do that that in particular you know translation but films can be wonderful. I I love double and blue dress. I think I thought it was great film. Well so before your writing career took off. It took off in. What when you're in your thirties? Right right what were you doing before that I was a computer programmer Potter Cook. Many things was was was writing. Always in your heart. Was it sort of a dream deferred for a while. No I never thought about writing until I was about thirty four thirty five and then I sat down one day in a row. The Senate are really liked it and I said hey maybe I could be a writer and And I started from there okay. So that's why this quite a leap then from just saying I I wrote. Oh two sentences in becoming a bestselling novelist. What were those early days? That wasn't that wasn't the intention. The intention was just to be able to write right a story from California. That's people in California think. Oh you know I'm eighty years old and I just retired and I'm pretty limber. Maybe I should study the ballet. You know. That's that's that's that's how I understand life being from California. I live in New York but my my heart is still somewhere in California. I wrote a sentence on hot sticky days in southern Louisiana the fire ants swarmed. I wrote that and say hey. That's that sounds good. I've read novels that kind of start like that and it must be fiction because I've never been to Louisiana nor have I seen a fire at so let me try and I tried and you know it worked. Yeah I was happy boy boy. Did it ever work. So what were there were there. I mean who where you're literary heroes growing up. We know literally here is such such an interesting thing you know because you know writers are always saying. Oh well we'll shakespeare it was. Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Was Herman Melville. You know like you know just wanting to compare themselves to great writers. I mean I started off reading comic books. Check Herbie. I mean he wasn't even a writer. It was like the artists. He was my hero he told stories in ways. I got this amazing you know. Of course I read Children's Entrance Book Winnie the Pooh and all these things and when you're a kid and you're reading things your mind is so creative. You're just you're often that world. Yeah you can't even be pulled out of that you're dreaming at your living you're eating it and And so I think you know all of those things you know. Comic Books Children's books books being read to learning how to write myself which was a wonderful thing. Yeah learning letters and then you know putting them together well so about comic books like many many people feel feel exactly that that there are those books are really formative in terms of their love of reading writing of story. When you said you open this comic books and read them and you'd say this is amazing? What was the this that was so amazing it it reached out to my you know a young and then adolescent heart and dealt with the conflicts that I was having you know now spiderman was dealing with those conflicts of you know not quite fitting in being able to do things would always getting in trouble? you know the fantastic four all all of this stuff. I'm reading going this. This is actually speaking to what I'm thinking how I'm feeling and you know a lot of time later on. That became true of literature. Chur of novels you know when I was maybe thirteen fourteen I started reading Hesse. Thank you know and and some other stuff But it it it you know the the the younger you are when you're five and six and seven those books they're so important you know they really they really form you and and if if you can get into them they hold you and you know it so from you know the age of seven to the age of thirty four you know. I wasn't writing but of course literature was in my heart. Yeah I mean what you're saying it definitely resonating with millions of people. One of my favorite things to do growing up was to get a great book and just go in my room. Close the door and not come out until it was done. Because it was the holy encompassing experience. That is just so wonderful. Wonderful no matter what would you are but somehow it feels like more easily absorbed when I was a kid but but Mister Moseley actually got some callers. Who have some questions or in order to share with you? Let's go to Andrew Who's calling from Burlington Vermont Andrew. You're on the air. Hi Thank you I just trying to say that I agree with Mr Moseley about your comment about nonfiction being fewer lies And I found your other comment That those are fighting words I used to produce in right celebrity Raga fees for TV. And I found it extraordinarily hard to write truthful stories and cut out a lot of stuff I actually just at times wanted to just take over the story and write my own fiction because it was much easier and you know it's very hard the only portions of a person's life as like you said make up the whole universe so you know I just want to say I agree with that. So thank you. Well Andrew Thank you so much for your call. Let's go to Aaron calling from New Orleans. Erin you're on the air hi My my question for your guest is How we so often aspiring writers? Here right now. No and His inspirational sentence was about something he didn't know. And I'm calling from South Louisiana incidentally So my question is how do you develop a comfort and a flow in writing When you're writing writing about things that you you don't know well? I think that you really what I would say that anyone is right. What you love because I'm not from Louisiana but my father was and He He's person that came out of me when I wrote that you know a and what you love is who knows what that's going to be. You know you know you you could be. You know somebody who you know The son of a a classical go violinist and the only thing that you love is the Blues Right. You don't know the blues but when you hear it you go God you know. That's what I want you know and also you know so what you you also writing what you desire which you would like to be true What you fear is true? I think that that the idea of right which you know sounds like somebody my saying. Oh talking about nonfiction. He says well. I know how to be a mechanic so I'm going to write about being a mechanic. Well I might be interesting. I don't know might not be fiction though Well Walter Mosely in your new book elements of fiction and by the way Aaron. Thank you so much for your call from New Orleans but in elements of fiction. You're you're really exploring what it. What are the parts of a great novel that make this novel just transcend right? Keep using that word. But it's what how do you make a great novel that stands the test of time that breaks through convention. Not You know not just how to write. Write a book. So you're asking you a very specific question here And for example in one of the chapters you begin by just simply asking what is the structure in fiction. I mean it does it. Does this question of how to write. A great novel need to be broken down into those almost concrete aspects of right. So what is your answer to. What is just what is structure in fiction? Well there there are a lot of things in structure the an the major structures I'm dealing within this book is the structure of revelation when you allow the audience to know what the the thing is is that because all all Fiction and much of non-fiction. It's like a mystery you don't know in in the beginning what happened. Something has happened but you don't know why it's happened. You don't know who it's happened to. You don't know you know what what's going on and you have to follow it down And the moment that you reveal something is the moment that you have the strongest impact and what you reveal in how you reveal. It is the most important thing that you can do. It's true character is true. True about place. It's true about the story itself how you know the people are interacting is true about language the the idea the and really honestly I can't go through the whole like the idea of all different things you know. Character Development Voice Dialogue point of view. There's all these various things that you have to deal with poetry autry for instance. I mean if you don't understand poetry you probably can't right I mean I don't say that you should be a poet because being a poet too difficult thing but you should should at least understand what the poet does when they approach language and language itself is a is a big deal because really honestly a novelist just language written language snapped pictures. It's not smells just language so but about the the structure of revelation and the different kinds kind of revelation. I mean how does how does a writer no other than I mean you said early writing and rewriting and rewriting and rewriting Yeah what kind. What manner revelation is right for whatever part of their story? It's so difficult you have to discover it at one of the examples samples in the in the in the book as there's a woman who comes to a town. She's she's walking she's been in the desert. She's partially delirious. She talks to eight different people into each person she talks. She tells a different story so we understand that she's lying reading. It would go no Y.. You told this one this and this is something absolute the opposite and this is this is this is the opposite of what what's going on in the story and At some point or another we're going to have to reveal what what her you know and quotes real story is and it may be just one of the things that she said. It might be a combination of all the things that she said and then we have understand why she's doing it and what her relationship is to the place that she's come to and the people that she's talking to all of those things have to happen you know and so you can't just you know beforehand. I wouldn't things I always say. It's a novel is bigger than your head is bigger than your conscious mind You can't know all that stuff from the beginning so what you do is you. Just start writing getting in. And you see what happens. You know you might say. No I don't like this This untrustworthy Trustworthy narrator I would like to do something else And then you might go there. And then come back said no no the untrustworthy trust worthy narrator was. That was the right way to do. It just didn't go far enough. I mean there's all kinds of ways but there's a moment of discovery and and that's a very important thing. Yeah there's just sitting down figuring it out Writing your flow chart and saying okay. Now this is the novel because once you start writing things change. Yeah so it's just going to ask you about that because some some writers they do use a more sort of concrete and structured approach. It sounds like you wouldn't recommend that at all. Well listen. I think it's good way to start your writer. You write an outline the other day I was just finishing a novel recently and I wrote the whole novel I went back through and there was one one like Kinda strange going through it. That wasn't working wasn't working logically so here I have the whole book written and I wrote a second outline just to answer that problem so the second will i. This happened somewhere and then that happened somewhere. And then this you know and then I had to go back through the novel and make all the changes to make the second outline. The after I wrote the novel outline fit into what I had done. You know I'll answer you know they're interesting you know but but they're just a tool you know it's insane well you know you need a big pin in order to write a novel housing. Thank you might be able to use a number two pencil. I duNNo. Well let's go to. Bruce is calling from South Carolina. Bruce you're on the air okay. Hello Oh thank you all right first of all I want to say Miss the Moseley. You're one of my favorite authors. Have Been real books for the pass over twenty years and I just WanNa take thank you for that. Can you call to my my question to you is how long does it actually takes Actually right the characters characters in the story line. How long does that take? Because like. What's your easy Rawlins? Book sometimes I don't know sometimes you would like maybe you're a year to gap on even three in within the The easy rawling series. So how long does it actually take you to Number one developed. Get a consummate everything. How long does that take? That process takes thank you so much and look forward to read more books. Thank you thank gail the shortest time ever take me to write a book was six weeks. Wow and there were two books gone fishing and killing Johnny. FRY those two books. Six weeks The longest book had ever took me to write is John Woman that's eighteen. Nineteen years to write that book. I just you know Stumbling when I was writing that book most books it takes about six months. You just you know one of the big things about writing writing. I tell everybody if you want to write your write every day you wake up every morning and and you and you write every morning three hundred and sixty five days a year. You don't have to be that long onto three hours but it has to be every day and on that schedule about six months For most books that that I'm working on and so what what do you do. You have a set time of day that you do this. I do it the first thing I wake up in the morning. Okay and what if what if you hit with writer's block that morning what do you do it. Right is box an interesting thing because you know it sounds like one thing But it could be many things writer's block could be like a deep unconscious you know Damage that you actually can't get around because there's something that you don't. I don't know that's telling you you can't do this. A writer's block you know might be that You know you're just nervous or you haven't had enough time to digest the data Something like that. Well you just start writing something else of like. I can't write this right now. So we'll put that aside and I'm gonNA write this other thing and that's that's fine You have to discover what the block is. It doesn't mean you should just go to something else or she used to go to a psychotherapist and it depends. I mean you know it. It's like it sounds as a writer's block that's one thing no. It's one hundred different reasons that you have writer's block well. We are talking this hour with Walter. Mosely he is the best selling novelist of the easy rawlins series amongst other others. I should say he has a new book out about the craft of writing it's called elements of fiction. And we want to know what your question is for. Walter Mosely Moseley. We'll be back. This point rat races robots in Cairo's singing for science why Mindy Thomas Co host of. NPR's is wow in the world. What is about these singing? Get ready for all new APPS every Monday. In December including a special musical to celebrate our one hundred show. But but we can't sing. It's wow in the world from NPR and tinker cast. This is on point a magnetic Roberti talking with master writer. Walter Mosely flee. He is the author of more than fifty books including the easy rawlins mystery silly series of best selling series. That's just one of his many characters that have become a major part of American fiction. He has a new book out about writing fiction. It's called elements of fiction and it's an exploration. One of how great fiction is made. You can find an excerpt of it at one point radio DOT ORG And Walter Mosely. If we've got a lot of comments coming in for example over twitter here Leslie Small Says I love the easy Rawlins's books. Never having had the chance to meet him. They give me a chance into a glance into what my grandfather's life as a black vet and migrant from Mississippi to Chicago during that period would have been like so Leslie talking about uh-huh Harkening back to what we were talking about a couple of minutes ago about giving voice to people who may not exist in the American mind because they didn't exist in American fiction really resonating knitting there. You know our caller Bruce before the break he asked about character development as well and I wanted to get a little bit more from you about that because you do right about that in elements of fiction action could could you read a passage from from the book about About characters for us. Sure the potential of the narrative real estate date the writer controls is obvious but this power can also be a hindrance to good fiction. Sometimes we load up our players with knowledge and understanding that they don't really have access to sometimes. Instead of revealing a truth. We simply have one of our players say it or acted out. Our beasts of burden can carry a ten skillet. Well it but that doesn't mean that they can prepare a mess of grits they exist in a world of sublime articulation but they themselves often have little idea of what transpires in that world and so we have it the characters much like a great boxer in his prime he can Bob and we've got power in either hand has extraordinary endurance dorrance but for all that he is cursed with a glass jaw therefore his abilities have to be used judiciously because even just a well-placed replace jab could negate all that he has accomplished. That's Walter Mosely reading from his new book elements of fiction. How how how do you meet your characters? How do you discover who they are? Actually I. I'm mostly meet them by writing and start writing and Ah I remember when I first wrote about easy Rawlins I was running short story And it was a a a I narrator. But we didn't know who he was he says his name was Raymond. and We called a mouse because he was small and had sharp features. We could've called him rat because he he really wasn't very nice but But name mouth stuck on now the the it goes on and on and on and woman comes in that Narrators interested in May and then mouse comes in and moss comes in and he looks at the narrator foreigner says hey easy how you doing. This is the first time I knew his name and I didn't. I thought it was writing about Mosman. Indeed I'm going to be writing about easy Rawlins for the rest of time and you know you discover while you're writing for me anyway. I mean other people might be different. Okay so tell this is a keep coming back to this and please please forgive me but that is the key to me. That's the magic like when you write that free. That's that's sentence. Hey easy how you doing how you doing and you you those a writer say that's the first time you knew his name. Those words flowed from your hand though. I mean what happened. In that moment that led that led to that such a difficult difficult thing to say and I'm not sure one wants to say that I mean I would I try to get people to have confidence in in what's unconscious in them. What's sleeping inside of them and comes out like when you write today you get to a certain place and then for the next twenty hours some place in your unconscious it's working and then when you wake up the next morning to sit down and write again there's new things they're they and they and they come naturally? It's it's part of the machinery not to say well. I want to understand how the unconscious works. Well you know you can go study. Psychoanalysis I'll be fine but but but the thing is is that I just you know it's there. It's a talent that you know. Almost all of us have maybe all of us have and We could just rely on all of us. Have that gives me hope because I I'm not sure I'm definitely not sure. But but let's go to Barbara. WHO's calling from Richmond? Virginia Barbara. You're on the air. Hi I don't have a question for Walter. I'm enjoying the interview that I wanted to let him know. The I am one of his favorite fans. In fact I am re re reading one of his older books right now and it's called And sometimes I I wonder about you. I absolutely love the old ones so much that I decided to do that. So thanks having him on your show. Barbara don't hang up. What is it that you love love so much about Walter Moseley's work the characters I am a black person and I can't identify with a lot of the characters that are are in his In his stories so and then I get so much enjoyment from them. And that's what I look for from fiction and especially actually when I do audio books. That's my favorite Format and when I and I haven't I issue so with his and it's just that they can take me out of whatever it is and I'm going through that I'm not feeling good about right now and just listening to here's books can just make me feel so much better. Wow we'll barbara. Thank you for your call. Walter did you WanNa do you WanNa say something to her. When I'm listening I'm just happy like books and that's a really good and Leonid McGill Sometime I I wonder about you As I really liked that book it's fun. It's fun you're Leonid. Emma Gillis A is a is a detective but you know an ex criminal. He's he lives in the modern world. Unlike easy who lives in the past. Yeah well I just wanted to say to Humana that when you were saying about you know if all you have to do and now says anyone I have to do is take a hundred days and every morning for one hundred days right right for one hour about the same thing not different things but the same thing story you WanNa tell and after that hundred days then you can decide whether or not you can write. You can't decided lighted without doing that fair enough. I think I mean I I appreciate you saying that a lot but I think when I said I wasn't sure about myself I was really thinking about fiction because I it just seems like it's such a different crafts. Well no I'm talking about fiction writing fiction write a story about somebody rensselaer about got somebody who you kind of know but not well enough to know really what happened you just making it up. Try It hundred days okay. Maybe we'll have be back in one hundred days and I'll let you know whether succeed or fail. Well let's go to you. Well you know I'm I'm I'm I'm feeling inspired here but I want to go back to our callers here because Leo Is Calling from Baltimore Maryland. Leo You're on the air. Hi Hi this is one hundred to talk to you. you brought up. Leeann McGill I'm so fascinated with that character. His is having both feet and good and evil His fight with his internal. You know with his wife with his girlfriend with his son Eh. Trying to keep on the straight and narrow That series just awesome and twenty seventeen. It's four years later. What's going on where we've got to get another in January of this book? Coming out. Called trouble is what I do. And that's the new Leonid McGill so January Leo. You don't have that much longer to wait. Wait what do you think can you give me like. What am I looking forward to me a little bit? You're looking toward Miguel. I mean really honestly. Honestly it's IT'S A it's A. It's a short book It has no chapters and it's about Leonid whiskey the blues and and the the first people to come over from Europe and that's coming out in January of Twenty January. Okay Leo Thank you so much for your call. Let's go go to Steven. WHO's calling from reliance South Dakota Steven? You're on the air. Hello my question is about something that was said earlier when you write writes your book and then you read it and you read it and you edit it and you edit it. I finished my first novel and I'm by no means a perfectionist but I'm I'm curious what you have to say about when it's good enough. When do you stop editing and Wendy? You publish a an answer for that that I always give you write the book and then read it and sell those mistakes. I'm GonNa fix them and then you read it again in the summer. It's more mistakes to fix them in you do it again and again and again. Let's say you do it twenty five. I've thought you read the book. Find Mistakes read the book. Find mistakes fix them on the twenty six time you read the book you find mistakes and you realize you don't know how to fix them. That's when your the book is finished fascinating. Stephen Thank you so much for your call Let's hop over to Miami Florida where Larry is calling from. Larry you're on the here with Walter. Mosely hi how are you very good yourself leisure to talk with you. I met you several years ago in New York and you take a book signing and we were chatting and You mentioned that you've done with easy. Rowlett were GONNA be anymore and I'll see you back. accused accused that happened and And also the process and and I'm inspired. I'm a frustrated writer myself. But you're inspiring me to do the hundred. They get something out there. But how did you get your first one published. How did I signed up? Probably or agent and all of that in the The the thing about easy Rawlins. I thought I'd finished after blonde faith but I realize a couple of years later that the reason I stopped is because I was no longer going to be talking about at my father's world and experience but I was going to be talking about mine and I hadn't understood that once once I got that I could write little green and I you know I could just keep on from there. I understood understood that It's interesting the first book I wrote was gone fishing. I send out everybody said Oh. It's wonderful it's good assist but it's it's not a commercial and so what does that mean. It's you know it's about two young black men coming of age in the deep South. You know there's no white people there's no Black women I mean you know. White people read about black people. Black women don't like black men in black men don't read so we can't publish your book. You know they were wrong about all that stuff but still publish my book. Then I wrote a the next Wednesday with easy Rawlins in mouth devlin a blue dress and I I senator an agent. She took an immediately. She sent it out to like seven publishers. And six of them wanted it. Was You know from from absolutely impossible to. Hey we want to do it. Wow well so as Walter Mosely There's there's something That leery asked. I just want to follow up on a little bit and You know because he talked about his love for easy Rawlins as a character and he was glad that so you you'd started writing again. I'm wondering do you ever reach a point with characters become really beloved by by fans where as is a writer do you feel Obligated may not be the right word but do you feel a pressure to sort of Have your character. Continue to conform to what might be fans ends expectations or D Does the story of revolve in a way where a character ends up doing something that fans may not actually ever expect him onto him or her to do and you worry about their re response like who owns his character after a while I do I mean every reader owns the the novel because when you read a novel it's your novelist no longer mine. I can't come in and say you're wrong about what you're thinking but I mean people want me to do things and that's all good and well but I don't do it unless I wanna do it and that's and I think that that's you know if a writer falls out of that particular Taylor's fear. They're going to be in trouble because what you're doing is you're you're not writing. According to what comes up naturally every morning you're writing according to what people are saying they want to see from you right. Well let's go to Chaz is calling from Coral Gables Florida Chaz. You're on the air. My God. I can't believe I'm talking to Walter. MOSELY MR Moseley I heard you on a podcast. The literary life. I'm a friend of Mitchell. Kaplan's live a mile away from books and books I ran out. I got John Woman I read it. I loved it and then I got this year. You write your novel Sir. And I m three quarters of the way on into my first novel written plays have been produced but I I read your books. And it gave me the impetus and Bob Volva courage so I wanNA thank you for furiously and I can't believe I'm talking to you man. Thank you thank you Let's see if we can get another caller in here. You got a lot of fans no surprise there. Walter Mosley let's see if we can go to gusts who's calling from Ashville New York Gus. Gus You're on the air. Yes Walter. I really enjoyed a lot of your characters and of read many of your books. I did attend a Reading you did under the Brooklyn Bridge at a Bookstore Some years back but One of my character. Dr One of your characters I think one of my favorite was a guy character named Socrates Fort Low I think he was in a book. Called the right right mistake and I. I'm not sure if he has appeared since but He just as I think he brings out. I I think one of the wonderful qualities of fiction That you do so well about You know a fallen guy and makes a terrible mess. At a young age of his life and comes back and And puts his nose to the grindstone on any fights his way back to a good life and redeemed life and I just wanted to express real appreciation for for your writing doing well. Thank you so much. I really appreciate that there. There hasn't been a book after The book you read but before before it I wrote two books. Always outnumbered always outgunned and which was also a movie with Laurence Fishburne and walking the dog. So if you haven't seen those two are the earlier re integration. Yeah well we have about a minute left to go The Moseley and I just wanted to ask you one last question about the dedication in your book in elements of fiction. You dedicate it to John Singleton the late John Singleton. I should say and you call them one of the most original and creative individuals I have ever known. Can you tell us more about why he is In the dedication of your book well you know. I've been working with John for the last four years a little bit more. On on on the show snowfall the television show Oh snowfall and as a writer and as an adviser and you know John You know just just being around John Listening to John You know He. He's so you know who so so quirky and nerdy and but but brilliant and so committed to the story that he wanted to tell I mean he was born in south central. He lived in south central. He worked there You know if went on to set. There's all these people in the crew saying. Yeah Man I just got out of prison. I went to John. John said okay. You can come work with us. You know he was. He just did everything. He's such a wonderful guy and you know boys in the hood is completely original. He made he made new film with that movement. Well Walter Mos leave bestselling novelist of more than fifty books. His latest book is elements of fiction. And we have an excerpt of it at on point radio DOT ORG Mr Mosely. It's been so wonderful. Spend pass our with you. Thank you so much and thank you to make now is really enjoyable magnox party this is on point.

writer Rawlins Walter Mosely Moseley Walter Mosely MOSELY MR Moseley Walter Moseley NPR California Leeann McGill New York rollins twitter Louisiana Europe Boston US Bob Volva NPR Walter John Woman
DIET FOR MENTAL HEALTH

CUP OF JOY ~ PETAL TALK WITH EKTA

00:00 sec | 4 months ago

DIET FOR MENTAL HEALTH

"It is okay to feel unstable it is. To associate. It's okay to hide from the world. It's okay to need help. Your mental illness is not too personal failure. And this battle! Ignites So Hello Salaam numbers. They welcome to my show. Cup of joy pedal talk with the Stop. Hello people everybody doing today. You had a nudging breakfast, and now while I'm talking with your fast today, because today's topic is related to your diet and. Our topic sees ward us a best state for mental yesterday we went to disclose the best giant suitable for the mental health so people when I talk about mental health is. Kind of getting into details, the mental disorders sneeze offered Neha or Autism or non seniors, things but entry we are going to discuss the die for the mental health like depression. It's lockdown time pandemic, and most of them out. There might seen. Only are. Kind of mental scored or mood swings. You know what not I mean We all are different. I mean times have changed Don't when back to the normal event. Dan We everybody offers you know. Letters were seriously pooled as people. I mean every one of us today. VR facing, unsought sort of mental pleasure insiders think not expedition guys, but then. Yes me, too are facing, so let's see what is the puffing died I mean the researchers or research is still going on. How Diet is really? Help, but then we have found recently some margins for this. Just you know, there is some specific diet. which can up enhance your? Mental health conditions. To See what's there? Today. And So people today we will have insights into the nutritional psychiatry's. What does psychiatric it is something which refers to cycle nutrition I mean. Do you know what I mean? I was ended with this. Back, quite interesting cycle you dishes, a new field of study, which focuses entirely on your diet for the mental health. Yes, most of the studies have focused on the effects of the standard western Diet I mean. then. I refer to the things which are highly processed foods at like high sugar, diet or high processed foods like Pisa murders, and all those junk food mainly written invest in Diet, so they have higher risk of developing anxiety and depression so the results. That you know what your mom, stay the night well. How yell at US that? Don't have the food. You know it's not good for you. That is what the research has depicted is. Linked to the anti-indian depression levels so. Mainly this. What I told you nutro psychiatry, it usually is completely focused on the benefits of Mediterranean the war. I mean by Mediterranean Diet here meditated. Indict is like it is a dietary pattern. Bob Moseley has opposed to affect on your mental health which include the plant based. Foods I don't see it. It doesn't Amish, but then it includes all the plant based all the colorful forwards which. Are Rich in polyphenols and. All the different minerals Michael. As And you know if you? Gore you know menu leak and if you just go to the doctor with a fever, did you notice on the prescription? Even gives you some kind of vitamin supplements as well adviser. Because actually they should come from your diet, but because you died as providing those micronutrients macaroni to that is the reason you have to trust. Didn't indict. Will do for you which seriously in the neurogenesis? Adults aged, oxidative stress high-fat Diet. Taisugar deitz alcohol. Smoking all the seriously affect you know they'd Axel mental health as well, which is some concern to the western Diet as well and now when I see the Mediterranean Diet and world's benefits, people, it usually include support actually did fatty acids, okay, like Curcumin curcumin life in the Indian halley that is called Turmeric, which is legal now in the pandemic times. Everybody on that even am I really hate how the yeah! The color and taste and smell of would still everything morning, Ama- taking. Turmeric water warm water to enhance my nieces. That is one. Of those people you know those Godmother Kinks, notes and everything is helpful. And you know finances by? Rich colored foods like cap secons and. Tomatoes the beaches candidates. which give. And then you have to even meet the Calorie me people that you have to start role the time line. Good calories also are very important, but then home what you eat and make sure that you realize all those. By exercising and keeping. US. Oh, do we speak There is no best died as such the mental health, but then there is a need to change the dietary patterns and see what exactly in that.

Mediterranean Diet US nutro Neha Dan Bob Moseley Ama Gore Pisa Axel fever depression anxiety
S2 Ep:2 But Where Do Song Babies Come From?

Turned Up

1:59:23 hr | 2 years ago

S2 Ep:2 But Where Do Song Babies Come From?

"Hey, just a real quick heads up. This episode is gonna be kind of long. I know we know we tried to cut it down as much as we possibly could. And if you would believe it, we probably cut it down in half there is so much incredibly interesting and amazing information. And we sat down with a legend. Seth Moseley of full circle music. The guy has won multiple Grammys, sold millions of records, whether it songs he's written or produced. And we had a rare opportunity to crack him open and peek inside of his brain to hear his thoughts as well as discussed the very history of song writing and the songs that we love and listen to. So I encourage you, listen all the way to the end. If you have to do it in two or three sittings I completely understand, but you're gonna wanna listen to the whole thing on. Until the very end, we have something very special for turned up listeners and it's completely exclusive. You don't wanna miss it as always thank you so much for listening. Enjoy the show and I'll just start this, are you there? I'm over here. I'm down here on the blue track. Make me mad because you're going to be giving away the formula. Essentially, that's keeping us employed. I am got an amazing. The cost to my wear the that, the furry pants, you'll set up fake Instagram counts and call it the first time I wanna Grammy. I didn't even know the Grammys was on TV broadcasting from Nashville, Tennessee offering glimpse inside the music industry, setting light on things. They don't want you to know and exposing some of the industry's biggest secrets. You're listening to the turned up on cast presented by real sound productions your hosts, Jake Jones. Well, good morning, my fine ladies and gentlemen, and Robert Venable evening afternoon depending on wind and where you're listening to our voices in your ear holes. Man here we are weak to season two. I am so glad to be back in the this. I've missed this over the summer. Of course we've been busy touring and traveling and playing shows and getting tattoos and yes, which mine is is healed up nicely. It's it's still in the. Process. I'm Paul man, salt. So Seth whose names Robert? Oh, sorry, robber. I'm still confused. You look like Seth Moseley. That's strange circle music. So does the gentlemen sitting right in front of us? Ladies and gentlemen. I'm Robert Venable over here to my right is Jake Jones will ourselves formerly in a second, but in front of Jake Jones rubber. But we've got Seth Moseley. Hello, gentlemen who I like it. Robert. When you refer to yourself in third person? It's kind of weird, but normal for me. Right? Robert Wright, normal for him. It's him to, yes, both both both of us. So before we get to our our lovely guests today, I wanna tell you a little bit about my amazing friend, Robert Venable not only does he have one of the most glorious beards in the room. This is new. It is. It is a new development and impression for a trip to Europe coming up. Gotta look, all, you know, going to be grizzly German. He's he's doing a better job than me. I accidentally shaved off. He's an incredible drummer songwriter singer, even though he says he's not not at all. He's a producer and engineer, and the guy literally has credits through the roof. I'm honored to call him my friend. He also builds tricycles in his spare time out of used medically Queant and gives them away to homeless children. There's some legalities that you've been trying to work out with that because of the us. Equipment might be contaminated using the syringes as handlebars was very bad idea. Our marketing team botched that one when pushed out in the magazines, the whole recycled tricycle program, they pushed out didn't sell as intended. So I would say it's the thought that counts, but that is not what the district attorney said, right, not at all. So in two to five years from now pending good, good behavior gap, good behavior. We doing season three. Maybe Nevoso three. Well, I mean, we can do it through the phone glass. Gentleman, your stand up coming tonight with Jake Jones. Sitting at four foot eight standing at six foot. What are you? Six. Two, six two, yeah. Yeah, man. It's weird having short person who's in the room with us shut. This guy plays guitar and sings for the band as we ascend formerly of we as human also song rights with shoals Ville music unite. We actually wrote a number one hit. That's right. Not as many as the guy we're gonna talk about in just a second, but you also you get to push buttons and your own recording studio produce bans mix. Netted them make them sound glorious. But my favorite thing, this is how we met a lot of people don't know this about you when I got off the airplane an airport, I was actually going on a cruise, and we got off on an island where the cruise takes off from go, the airplane walked out front and there you were at a little booth braiding arm arm hair, which is weird to me and say, armpit hair. Well, the truth, the new part, okay. But he tells how you got into arm hair and armpit hair braiding. Well, I've always have really long arm hair and really long armpit hair, and I used to try to trim it, but it would, you know, I was going through electric razors twice a day, a brand. New was getting really expensive. So how him up? Right. How can I get this under control? What do I do? And so I just use my fingers and because I mean, you can, you can little trying to milk a cat. Will you can break anything here. I've got hair Jones. Can you bring me? Yeah, your beer. Actually, you probably could right now so early, but I started doing it just for fun really in my spare time. And I thought, you know, I, I see a need that can good business looks at a need and says, how can I help fill that need? So that's what I started doing, and it's been very lucrative. I took it on the road. I made easily a dozen dollars, and it's something that is because you've found the ten dollar Bill on the ground beside the dollars he made, right? No, no. Anyway. Yeah, but sitting with us today is a legend. Did you hear that rumble? Yeah, that's my reputation preceding him. Mr. Seth Moseley songwriter extraordinaire on top of being a producer. In fact, we're here in his studio at full circle music and and Franklin Tennessee. Walking just to get into the the tracking room where we're at right now, you have to walk past the wall. Oh, Grammy's might have not some of them off the like I can't fit through the room where all those awards stabbing me from behind it was crazy. I'm not gonna lie. You know everybody's had those crazy thoughts where they're like, all right. If I were to commit this crime, how would I do it better than somebody else? This is my third time here and every time I've thought if I were to steal one of those, how could I scratch off his name or Xs name or Jericho's name put my own. And they're pretty strict about those things. You can't. You can't sell them. You can't trade them. You can't. You can't do anything to learn this. The hard way I did shop in town that was looking for. I had a lemonade stand on the corner except for still selling Steph, selling lemonade was at a Grammy stands. Grammy, STAN must be a rough life man. Grammys. Super Bowl rings. You're not allowed to use your influence to whatever you know them or maybe SuperBowl rings. Maybe it's college football that does that. But anyway, they're very strict about it and it's proprietary, you know, I, there's a whole documentary being made on this, but there's a proprietary metal that Grammy's are made out of. It's called Grammy him Graham, and that is a real fact. Well, I had no idea until we actually got the statues that's crazy. Also, another little known fact is what it takes to get the statues. There are so many little loopholes like you have to be on fifty one or more percent of a record. If you're not on that, you get you get a certificate that you have to pay for statues free, really. So why I thought you had to pay for the statue now the statues free you have to pay for this ticket, which the cost nothing to it. Have you seen the how it's made Grammy's? Is that what? What do you mean? It's an episode of how it's made? No, I haven't. And it's how they make ratio how they make the statute. So they didn't talk about Graham. I don't remember Grammy him. I don't remember. Actually, when you said Graham, that sounded familiar, but it could just be a weird dream. I had after eating some strange food cereal, golden Grahams. There's a superhero, and that's what they, that's their. That's his third Grammy. Yeah. Apparently, that's my kryptonite. Grammy you. You get week whenever you walk in the studio then. So I stay away from them at all costs. That's the only reason I don't have any Seth. What do for can country Skillet, Jeremy camp. Cutlass all have in common their all. Awesome. Are you saying that because you with. Plus times more. There's a whole huge list here, which I'm not gonna read all of them because I'll run out of air and probably pass out in my old age. However. So two thousand five Yuan song of the year by non artist as well as producer of the year. The saw wouldn't be telling fifteen ten fifteen. Yeah. I was gonna say I was graduating high school in two thousand five. That would have been impressive if I had one impressed yet. So doesn't fifteen awards producer and songwriter of the year. Yeah. Gosh, me and in Grammy's what what are? Yeah. So worn. Man been nominated for to be honest, I should do a better job of like paying attention to these things together. Well, when I am that sounds weird. That's I'm not trying to sound weird or anything. But like when the first time I wanna Grammy, I didn't even know the Grammys was on TV like I didn't even know what's going on. I was on my way to a show to see because what I really love is going to shows that's like my favorite thing and hearing songs that I've been a part of other writing or practicing feeling and you see the crowds that's way cooler to me then, yeah, a statue or something like that because it's it's real proof that people are. These are making their way out of this studio and into people's lives, you know? So how'd you find out this text from from Sean Moffatt who was a mixer friend of mine news. Hey, congratulations man for what it was like. Oh yeah, you guys just won the album of the year. The the grams that was for Kane country run. Wild was a good album, which we, we literally just got, and I'm always thankful for these things because they are so rare nowadays, but we just got our official, you know. Certified gold records for those in the studio here just like two days ago. And so that stuff just you just can't believe it. I mean, you and I met the first time in my studio that I coned with less Christel. Awesome. Just down the road here in Franklin off the wall studios, the very first edition of that. Yeah, with your band me and motion and we, we, I think we're tracking drums there. Yeah, they, we think we track drums. You sounded amazing according to as the first time we ever ran into each other. Yeah. And that was even thinking back now. It's like a feels like a whole 'nother lifetime, right? It's almost like I don't believe in reincarnation, but it kind of feels like that, like I'm reincarnated as a set point, whatever you know, but it's just so foreign to me now, but I but I love the have that chapter of my story because I feel like whenever I'm in the room with an artist or a new songwriter, a new, whoever come into town, there's nothing that they are probably going through or they're going to go to that. I didn't walk through like, and it was every broken down van and trailer on the side of the road. And you know, every trap show where like the sound was horrible or nobody was there, or catering was spam and read Kool-Aid, you know, like all of those things. So I'm, I'm sounds weird, but I'm thankful for. That experience because I know what it takes to get there, and I just have so much respect for the artists that we get to work with. Who do it every day, like it's just it's a calling. It really is. We have a million questions to ask you to. We have to probably clarify what we're doing this podcast about. So today we're actually talking about songwriting, which is why we have such a legendary songwriter with us, but they're more importantly, there's a lot kind of behind songwriting that even just in researching for this podcast and talking with you robber that has surprised me in, I'm a professional songwriter and and then a lot that goes into songwriting and the songs that we hear that. I think a lot of people just have no idea, and you'll be really surprised to hear this. In today's episode, we're going to talk about everything you can think of. It's going to sound boring in this amazing real quick, but but bear with us because actually a lot of cool facts and figures in in a bet you didn't know this and things that we. Don't even know while researching for this, but like how much songwriters get paid, how do they get paid? When do they get paid a rubber? I just want to argue, you say it's going to sound boring when I'm sitting in the room with you and ninety thousand year old man, there's never a dull moment. The fact that you're just so old and still talking and breathing is interesting enough. I think you could probably talk about anything and people would listen. I'm sorry, turn your head of trying to read your lips. Can't hear from this part of the room. Right. No, we're gonna get interesting even if you don't even care about the way listening to podcasts don't care about the music industry, but if you don't care about the music industry, this is still going to be interesting for you. Let's let's start with the history of songwriting. I mean you invented songwriting, isn't that right? Yeah, I was. I was clicking couple sticks together and knocking some rocks and their. If I, if I remember you were actually didn't you carve holes into bones to kind of like a flute quarter. Yeah, that was me that actually wasn't me, but that they say that songwriting existed before written word written language. I could believe that. So before they came up with written context, I mean, obviously people were communicating whether it be with grunts are words or their own somehow spoken language, the written language income to later, but they had songs being written in the song doesn't have to be words and lyrics and melody, it could just be melody or tune that you whistle or. But the dates back before there was. Written language by, like you said, carving holes in bones and blowing through it like like a flute or a loot or a or a recorder, which is kinda cool. But I did do some research on what could be arguably America's first full-time popular songwriter. His name is Steven foster was right. So this is the talking about the eighteen forties eighteen fifties when he was writing songs, but he was born July fourth, what a patriotic man. He was eighteen twenty six guy who had no idea. Anything about music was not a musical family that came from. He's actually ninth child born of course eighteen twenty six. He was the ninth out of like probably thousand small school bus of family members. They probably lived in a shoe. His mom didn't know what to do this crazy. But he started writing songs at the age of fourteen. Let's let's hear one one of those songs. I want you to sing it because I know I know when I see one right here on sing, it come on Duda Duda canton raising this song all the do days. Something. Stack up. Zanna Mike Kentucky, my old Kentucky home and two hundred plus more other songs that scene foster wrote. Okay, really quick. I want to add a restore point or drop a pin right here. Two hundred more two hundred plus more songs, right. Yeah, that is I wanna come back to that. He wrote a lot of songs and there's something to that. Okay. Remember that. So let's talk about Susanna. One of his most popular probably his most popular song. Ridden eighteen forty. Seven is been deemed as the first American popular song that we still sing recognized today. Who's out, don't you. For. Banjo end. I mean, obviously there are hymns and stuff like that, but we're talking about global internationally popular songs by churchgoers non church goers to average Joe knows, oh Susanna, and yet being it's been one hundred fifty years later still singing that song. I think there's something to be said for those really old simple melodies. In fact, was actually just having a conversation with songwriter yesterday about a how I've heard. So often, you know, picking out a melodies from old nursery rhymes, twinkle, twinkle little star, and just kind of intentionally over-simplifying a melody to make stick for people. Brains aren't aren't overcomplicating anything, and we talk about happy birthday and another podcast and written by a couple of schoolteachers. Yeah. So the fact that that you know, I think there's something to pay attention to these songs that are so old yet. Still everyone knows them. We'll get to this later, but a lot of time songwriter try to pull from familiar melodies to make it somehow stick in the lines and the years of listeners today. So you might hear some remnants of these simple songs in common popular songs on the radio these days like Stephen foster write some songs doing well gets married to Jane McDowell in eighteen fifty. Their relationship was kinda rocky during a split. He actually he got inspiration, right? Jeanie with the light Brown hair, which sounds like a beyond, say song on Jay z record, but totally different than that. But then he wrote a tunnel songs. He got into minstrel shows sure you've seen it. It's where Caucasian white people paint their faces black and dress like African Americans and tried to express stories and get a point across well stories like these little musicals and plays of what life was like pre-civil war for African Americans. A lot of these things have been deemed inappropriate or insulting to African Americans these days, some of them not, but that's how camp town races came to be. So as quite interesting, that is very interesting. Interesting that ever knew that. So foster himself lived in Pittsburgh and only really been to the south once. So they say that he really didn't know much about the black culture. Sounds about right Hollywood, right. Trying to make. Westerns, but he often depicted the people in songs being hard workers. You know, all the live long day, that kind of thing. And some of the lyrics were deemed insulting to African Americans. So they ended up changing lyrics or they just don't sing those songs anymore. But he actually wrote the song my old Kentucky home. The home. Duckie. So that's on was written honor of Harriet Beecher stowe's Tom's cabin, which was an anti-slavery book or freeing the slaves and expresses great sympathy for the enslaved African Americans. So the black anti-slavery activists Frederick Douglass actually praised. The song later became the official song of the state of Kentucky man. So something about Stephen foster, that's kind of maybe ironic is that while he was of course a great songwriter, he was a horrible businessman, which I still see. So often today a different side of your brain. It is create. I mean, if you really want the key to just being successful, be good at your craft and be good at being a business fan. And that's why Seth Moseley is in the room with us today. That is right. So he sold he, he sold the most songs for the least amount of money. And for someone that wrote such prolific songs that that have lasted the test of time. Literally over one hundred years. He didn't. Even make enough money to support his wife and children, which is sounding eerily familiar to my own story. Stories that we hear people coming across our paths and industry. Yeah, just can't support their families with music. So you see some of your favorite musicians. We've talked about this before handing handing you your Starbucks drink through the drive through the church. I go to an, I think I've actually mentioned this another episode my first time to go to that church because we moved and started. We, we, you know, we were too far away to the Turkey been going to started going to church. My first Sunday there someone steps down off the stage after worship and or is at the end of service and comes up to me and says, are you in a? Are you in a band? Is this you and they plug their phone and it's a photograph of me with this woman in her husband while I was working at mos- most southwest grill, I had my uniform on my hat. Which is like, that's, that's a true story. It's a, that's a very much reality for so many musicians which mos- it was the one in Springhill the, yeah, my my first label meeting like guy found me on my space, invited me to a meeting at the mos- in Brentwood, man. My space was a, that was a big tool back then I remember getting to getting like reaching out to field by Rahman and and getting a response for the ban that I was working with. And basically they, they took a listen to what what I was doing. We're like, Nope, it was our first real way of of having a point of contact with people who were previously untouchable. Guest even foster well, he didn't live very long as one way to get rid of him. He died at the age of thirty seven completely broke and alone. Yeah, he after his music career started tanking, which I guess means not being little float the bills. He moved to New York. His wife and daughter left. He turned out Kahal and he died in January. Thirteenth eighteen sixty four. So at least now we all have some goals in the room. We have a big goals in in game. He was the first musician actually to be nominated into the hall of fame for great Americans, and the first American composer whose complete works were published altogether at one little package. Wow. Okay. So this is Stephen. Fos we're talking about again, you said arguably, but for the for the purpose of of continuity we will. We will declare right now the first official professional fulltime American songwriter. And again, I just want to note wrote a lot of songs a whole lot of hundreds over two hundred songs and only be only know. Yeah, said something of, no, we'll we'll talk with you about a little bit later. Seth still current. Let's go current billboard, hot one hundred number one hits. These are three. The top three all-time songwriters based on how many number one songs they wrote on the billboard hot one hundred chart, correct, which is chart. But I guess for all intents and purposes, I guess widely noted as the standard guess number one is one of my favorite song writers in the whole world, but but more so for the band that he was in and that is Paul McCartney cool. What man was in. Breath, hot chili peppers, right? That was flea. Oh. Pomme Carney. Was he the guy hit actor? Yeah, I think so. I'm just kidding. Come on. Everybody in this is Paul McCartney from the Beatles the best Beatle in my opinion. And if you say it's John Lennon, I'll fight you. And I think that this list actually proves that point when we get to number two. But actually his best song was by the band wings called silly love songs was his band. Is that right? I had no idea. How big of a fan are you? Well, he's my favorite songwriter for the band that he was his popular previous band. The Beatles. I love the Beatles. They are my favorite. My favorite band. He had thirty two number one hits that is absolutely insane deals. So the silly love songs by wings rule, the weekly chart for five nonconsecutive weeks in May June and July of nineteen seventy six was the second best say, say, say I was just kidding, but you knew that he wrote it with Michael Jackson. Or Michael Jordan, depending on who m j is I'm just kidding. It actually spent six weeks at number one in late nineteen Eighty-three, early nineteen Eighty-four. Those are his two top songs that he wrote men. So written thirty two number ones on on this billboard hot one hundred. And some of those are Beatles songs that he co wrote with our number two placeholder. John Lennon who has twenty six number ones to his name. So just like starting over was his best. It peaked at number one on the charts on November first of nineteen eighty. Those are guys in the past. They are now number three. So Robert nigh may or may not have a cheat sheet that we are that we're peaking at. Yeah, but Steph does not. I do not. So I want Seth to take a guess who number three is, and I will say he's written. He's modern, he he's very no more clues. We'll start adding clues and seeing guests max Martin. Okay. Well, that was. Obviously knows the market. So John Lennon at twenty six max Martin right on his tail with twenty two number one hot one hundred songs born, Carl, Martin Sandberg. Late seventies, I think seventies mid seventies. Yeah, I think I'd go by max Martin. Yeah. So he started working under Dennis pop Sharon records. He's convinced him to change his name from Carl to max. So this kind of a more marketable name's Karl Sandberg. He went by max Martin, he. So he studied under Dennis for two years and got to work on lots of records, like ace of base and backstreet boys. We're actually. That road that song by himself. You're kidding me? Yes, it has like his first like huge break into the market. Well, hey, guys, I'm here announcement. So like I mean, there's a huge list. If you guys look at pedia page, you have to go to more pages to continue seeing all his works that he's written like Britney Spears baby one more time. Three, hold it against me. Actually boys, like we said, Bon Jovi Kelly. Clarkson Katy Perry, like I kissed a girl Katy didn't write that no max Martin California, Gurls extraterrestrial. Yeah. All all these songs flash Friday night roar darkhorse teenage dream, you know, all are huge hits that's max. Martin man ruined five Taylor swift Justin. Timberlake the weekend max before. Yeah, with the doctor Luke thing to. So those are twenty two number ones. That's these written several more songs that you would know. You'd be surprised how many insanely popular songs never made it to. Number one on this. Particular char, it'd be it wouldn't surprise me to see him pass at least linen, but may get up there with McCartney on number one because he's still prime on on fire still. It's it's mind blowing. It's not like he's on his way out. He is writing everything you here right now if he's not his proteges or right as name is on it somehow. Have you ever written with max have not. It's a bucket list. So max, if you ever hear this, you know where to find me max. That's awesome. I think I get your restaurant in Stockholm, just a month ago at east in estim-. What did you have at his restaurant sushi. It's kind of it's kind of like Asian fusion. It's really good. Great sound system in it of? Well, I hope so. I think Dennis pop was one of the original owners and some of the people from Sony Sweden. I think max Suming you still own that. It was really good. The sushi was great. What what did he approve improve on was the weak link. Probably the pizza if you're ordering there wasn't really any pizza. That's maybe something improve on pizza pizza pizza. Everybody needs on the restaurant sushi Asian pizza. It's of all the ideas you've had today. That's the one that's one that's one of them tonight. So those guys max Martin freak, so not start interrupt you. I have done more research and as much as you can do because he's hard to find stuff on him. Yeah, he's kind of a reclusive. Is that right? Like just he's married in a studio? Yeah. So to find interviews with them is a rare thing. There's not very many out there, so it is my bucket list like yes, to do something with max Martin someday. So dang in verse in the out there into the pod waves. Yeah. If you like it, you can keep it if not, you can just throw it right back xactly I'm he's writing so many hits hits hits. Yeah, but you know, you might not be doing it all on his own. A lot of people actually co, right? And there's a reason for that. My research I found that why co writing songs might be better than just writing song by yourself? How many hits like how many in sanely popular songs that you've written? Did you buy yourself? Seth zero, not even one, nine one and max Martin, which I didn't even realize that one that you mentioned. I didn't realize that was all him because his big Emo is co writing right. Aberration, I don't think any of his have been no, absolutely. I think he went down by himself and then everything else was co written at least two people and actually new study by music week magazine shows that now takes an average of four point five, three writers to create a hit single so four complete humans in a little over half human is this amputee. Equal opportunity. Man, dwarfism LP songwriting leaves many bodies in its wake. So it's one of those accentuation out. Previous somebody didn't make it out of the writing room. Kind of that type of deal hope to never be the point five, three. I would take the heat five three just a maximum. Yeah, exactly. I wouldn't take point five, three of the. I want it that way. I'm not looking presented them just mean I don't wanna lose almost half my body worth it worth it. I'd roll into a session and be like, here we go. Take my ours. Take all of me. Take me. This is like Christmas on wing. So the the hundred biggest singles of two thousand sixteen in this study that I was looking at how many of those do you think were credited to a single artist? I would guess if any one or two said four, you're actually probably right but four rolling Credit Suisse single artists out of the top. One hundred. Mike Posner took a pill and visa. Which was actually a remake that was a remix of it. His original ones very acoustic sounding Jill. Go look that up and then Calvin Harris's my way and then to songs by the rock band twin pilots, which is actually more than one person in the band. So if you wanna actually credit just one person, those two Mike Posner in Kevin Harris would be the two single songwriters out of the top one hundred hits, but the best selling song of two thousand sixteen that year. This this, this whole study came out Drake's one dance needed eight writers, but that even pales in significance to Mark Ronson uptown funk, how many writers you think we're on that song actually happened to know the answer to that to you? Seth, I think I heard it was thirteen thirteen there, right? Yeah, which I mean to be fair. Some of those were because of the whole lawsuit with the gap band's nineteen Seventy-nine, hit UCS upside your head, which they're like, they ripped, you ripped that off. Yeah. No, we didn't. Okay. We'll credit them. So. All those songwriters combined thirteen people had to make that hit, but we all know it. So this this is clearly trend. You know, again with prolific songwriters, like max Martin, who is pushing for co writes, and the industry as a whole is pushing for more quote, writes, especially with the music industry changing like it is and you've got lots of blending infusions and people trying to figure out how to keep this lucrative business. So you start, you know, you're Christian writer. You come to Nashville writing with country writers, your rock writer, econo- Nashville, and start writing with country writers or whatever it is, you know, pop and rock and all these different writers come together to join forces. Of course, that number is going to go up just ten years ago. The average and mind you ten years ago was two thousand eight, which is crazy. That doesn't feel like it was that long ago, but it's nuts. The average number of riders on a hit single was three, three and a half. So one less in the room when this person in the room and fourteen of the year's top. One hundred songs. Would you like to know who that person is? The one person that was not in the room? Yeah, it's the artist's actually probably very correct there on songs. Now everybody every all the in producers to are getting in and saying, I got to be on the song like if you're going to the song, I'm in part of the business model the way things change. So we'll write you in with the writers cut even if you're not writing it. Yeah. Interesting changing man even in the news recently which we'll get to later. But yeah, two dozen eight. There were actually fourteen songs credited to one person including suppose a four tenure. Yeah. Yeah. Amy one houses rehab Arctic monkeys. When the sun goes down says rock bands, man, they keep it, keep it in house. Keep it in house. So what's what's the cause of this well, in the past as you know, I mean, it bans go in the studio and they'd write an album. Do all right, and another album and do better, and then another. They're starting to hone their craft songwriters. We know now what it takes to do it. So this band or the artists we get in there and do two or three albums yet, which is a term around for the ROI return on investment. It's a long ways, long stretch, a lot of minor leagues before you get to the pros. If you don't put it that way in sports nowadays, but it takes forever. But now we're on a fast track labels on a fast track to make that money. Like we're gonna put money in. Into it when you get money out of it was fast way to do that. Let's take a whole bunch of season writers put him altogether, let them put all their ingredients and the thing put in the oven. Come out later as Dickey's cool song and hits equals money. So instead of taking two to three albums, start honing your craft, like, let's take crafts that already honed by other people. The same ten writers in a certain John Jonah thrown in the pot and different combinations like three today for tomorrow, whatever put a hit together and the pump it out, make our money back immediately. So I definitely coming into the industry. It was quite a surprise to me this whole co writing thing, not like a gosh, but definitely a didn't know that. And it's it's somewhat of a mystery. We hear the term singer-songwriter all the time, and I know in the past that was a big deal. I remember it was a big deal in two thousand seven eight when Taylor swift came out as this young girl and she was writing her own songs. But as as just a consumer at the time, I didn't know what she writing all these songs by herself. She running with someone else, we'll would what's the significance of the artist actually writing on their song versus not writing on their song and Seth, I, I know that that we kind of talked earlier about the music and how there's not really much of a mystery to it while maybe it was a mystery to me because I'm a little slow. There's definitely a formula how this works in terms of how these songs are written. Yes. A lot of people new artists come in, say, I want to change this whole thing. I want to break the mold. I wanna do my own different thing, and then they figure out that in order to get played on radio there have their stuff cannot be just so off the wall in left field. It has to fit a format and radio in certain genres is the driving factor like an in country music. It's all about radio in Christian music. It's all about radio in rock music. It kinda used to be that way. It seems like it's a little less maybe now that it's kind of not even really thing anymore, but like top forty, I mean, you know all of that stuff. So you're driven by trying to get one of those ten to fifteen coveted slots that mind you Ed Sheeran's also fighting to get, and Justin bieber's fighting to get. So you're not only up against your. Here's you're up against who's already there? Yeah. So to break in, you have to fit the format. I, I just cannot and I hate telling it to artists and I really don't ever just flat out, say it, but like what you want to accomplish, what you're saying you wanna accomplish and what is actually realistic is physically impossible. Do you think this? This takes the artistry out of the art of music. I mean, the creativity like there's no individuality, if is a format. I think the artistry is within that format, and that's what that's where the true artists are able to succeed. That's why working with guys like for king and country who you brought up, who understand that there is a format and they do not deny that. So do they right for that format? Or do they write in you? Yes. Like, hey, guys know we gotta do this way. Yes and no. I would say in every genre, there's what I would call your. Lane Weidner's boundary pushers or whatever. And they're definitely one of those. Some some are meant to just go straight down the middle, but they're the ones that are easily forgotten. Like there was that, you know, Dr Luke phase a few years back where every artists that came out sounded like Dr Luke. Yeah, and I, I couldn't tell the difference between cash and you know whatever the new Kate Perry single was or Jessie, j any of those things. They all just blended together. So the struggle nowadays, because radio is such a powerful thing, it's it's being replaced by streaming by Spotify apple music, and they will argue that it's a more democratic. It's an even playing field. It's, you know, you don't have to appease the gatekeepers. You can put your music up. It gets on the platform. It gets played. It gets heard. However, there's a far smaller number of keepers now because they're the the playlist curator's. Right. That's a whole new thing. So you're still you're not only going after eighty stations. You're going after one guy right? You know, for whatever your format is and a lot of these playlists gatekeepers, if you will, the the road maintenance guys who gets define the lanes might be sitting in their basement of their parents like house. I mean, the big ones nowadays work for Spotify or. Yes, they or hired slash employed by companies that that the platforms are on and hear me say, I'm not dissing that I don't know a better way to do it than that. Right. And they're, they're doing the best job. They can't. None of them are just sitting there saying, I want screw new bands or are they actually really take pride? The ones that I know in that we work with take pride in breaking new art, finding new talent. But yeah, that's that's a part of the fun of their job. However, you, the talent has to rise to the top cream has to rise to the top. Even for that, I wish I tunes could find some bitter playlist Curators. I mean, I tunes idea of rock music or hard rock music or metal is very interesting to me. Like looking at the the breaking hard rock charts and seeing some of the bands that are up there like those nuts, not rock music at all. Just to ukulele in Wise's rock singing with some reversed on their vocal. It's interesting. In, I don't really know a whole lot about the rock genre, the side from a couple of bands that we've worked with, but it's it's very interesting and in apple, you know, I think they would add mitt that they've, they've lagged severely behind Spotify and they're playing catch up now and they're doing a lot better of a job in the people that we know there are great, but it's the same issue. Just a different platform. You know, it's, it's the bottleneck is still the same for artists and songs, man. I have a million questions to ask you about this near songwriting process, and we have some bombs to drop on you the listener about the songwriting industry, things that we've been kind of holding for a while. As well as how you get paid, how much you get paid. How much are these people that we hear on the radio getting paid and how that works out for songwriters, but we have to take a break. I will be right back. Hi, this is Seth Moseley and I got a huge announcement for all of you song writers out there song chasers commercial songwriting forces now available, and you can get it for a special deal at turned up podcasts dot com. Slash Seth, just like my name SEPTA. This is a comprehensive course in commercial songwriting for anyone who wants to be a part of writing a hit song. Again, Gobert a turned up podcast dot com. Slash Seth, everything you need to know about. Commercial songwriting turned up podcast dot com slash, Seth. We're back will back that. I just I like saying it that way. I don't know. It's exciting. We're here with Seth Moseley gone anywhere and. Amazing legendary songwriter, as well as producer an engineer, but we're here to talk to him about his songwriting so. How how much how much we talk in or Lenny wise or sitting in a ridiculous recording studio in an awesome neighborhood in a great part of Tennessee, you're doing well for yourself, Seth, and just put this in perspective of how many songs you're writing volume wise, and then how successful those songs are doing. Because at this rate. The mechanical royalty for every song that sells on an album. You wrote a hit song by yourself in that song sells. You get approximately nine point, one cents mechanical royalties for that song. Each time, someone buys some time that either somebody the album's songs on or the song cells as a single through tunes or whatever. But you just said you're not writing a song by yourself, so that nine point one cents is split amongst all of the songwriters on that track. So let's uptown funk as an example here. Thirteen writers thirty nine point one cent every time that sells. So what's that equate to? So for every one purchase of that song, each rider is getting almost one cent. Assuming they're even splits, assuming that's, and that's quite an assumption. That's a whole nother conversation. Assuming they're even splits, just meaning that every songwriter gets the same. He's enter Senate. Yeah, they're getting point seven cents. Wow. So they get a sin in half, correct. But that's sold more than four times. We know that that song sold millions of times and you know, even at that, let me can do this math really quick. You know, there's an exception to the whole songwriters split nine point, one cent per unit sold thing, and that's with ghostwriters which will get to a minute because they're often pay for higher. We'll just get to goes Heineman. But yeah, that's the only I guess, exception to the nine point one rule as a writer. So at a big exception to it anyway, at a million copies, if you wrote and got an even share of that song as the thirteenth writer, you gotta check for seven thousand dollars. Thousand dollars for selling a million copies. Now that this is the songwriter though, and there are other ways to make money off of the sales of of songs, how how long would seven thousand dollars cover the tilles. Well, we have. We have a large house me and my wife are actually not really. You know, extravagant luxury people like we have one car and it's a Nissan. So this house is way bigger than we would ever need. But the fact is, is that we don't own a commercial studio. We don't have to go anywhere, gives me to extra hours a day with my daughter's base, so that's why we do this, but we have five air conditioning units in your. So those things go out, I guess that would cover one air conditioning unit. Yeah. Yeah. Just pay them on a house island out in Mexico, hot outside guys. It's hot. It is hot. I'm been outside today, but I'm taking your word for hot so hot. So that's a, yeah, you need to sell a lot of copies or write a lot of songs. Do you want to jump into ghost? We talk to Seth for minute. In your songwriting process personally, stripped down to how you work. Do you prefer music? I or lyrics. I, what's your process for me? And I think that's a great question because it's like why in the world would you need thirteen people? But it's all strengths and weaknesses. That's that's how why? You know, when we're teaching songwriters, come through our things, I always teach people first thing identify what your strengths and what's your weaknesses for me. It's always been music slash, melody. Depending on the John rea- sometimes like if it's if it's I've done Christian music for so long have had a good track record there. I feel like I've, it's a, it's almost like learning to speak a language so I can ride a Christian Lear now me being new to the country market. I really love having a Lear person in the room here, so because they know it, they've, they've either grown up in it. They've written five thousand songs in it, whatever it is. It's just so so my process is I like to start with music and melody, or sometimes we'll start with a song title like. That for me is a really good jumping off point. I was going to say what's an example? Is there like a song title that has made it now? Well, I mean, just because it's top of mind, we me and another friend in the Christian space. Mia fields, she's another just beast of a songwriter. We wrote a three on the new Francesca about a steady record. She so talented and the first song started with a song title when that was one called royalty, it's, you know, you can go get it on ideas and stuff now, but that one started from that to contrast it. We did another one on her record that was called, you belong. That one started with a conversation, and then we just started making a very theatrical greatest showman type piece of music, and then then the title came. So let's trip down even further. Do you have a note pad on your phone with all sorts of looking at it trello card? Well, that's cool. Trello board. So interest concepts or ideas or like that's a real. This is dozens of titles. I just collect all the time and that me I have a category of titles. I have titles must right. I have one of used like already did good call. And then if that's pretty much all I have. So there's a bunch of crap in there. Like I'm probably I don't know why I would have written this down, but I have one called Sunday Sunday Sunday, probably because I heard the guy say it on the radio ad or something. I was like. Yeah, exactly. Maybe I was thinking of it is like a sink thing or an ad ad song or something like that, but it's probably never going to get written. I, I write all I don't censor myself. I just ride all them down. It's mart. And then when I when one sticks out like. All just move it over to the title must right sector. So that's kinda my method. I, it's works well for me and that's cool. I have the same thing with with. I have tracked starts Chiloe board too. So. Okay. It's a Tuesday morning. Songwriting session starts at ten XYZ band comes in here or songwriter comes in your singer, whoever you're writing with that for that group. Let's say the Frankie franchesca comes in Besley using her as an example. You guys sit here and look at each other like now, what like what's the first move you like say, hey, let me look at my little board here or you like she go. I have a melody my head or listen to this guitar chord. I came up with this is cool. Now not any of those things. So what's the first downbeat what happens? We just talk for thirty minutes or forty minutes. That's where I was going with this. Jake, you and I have written a lot of songs together. We've co written with some of the biggest names in country music songwriters wise, and we've never met them until they show up at the studio. And that seems to be the trend. You just sit there and talk. You pour coffee or red bull or water, whatever you're drinking together and and you just talk about life like, hey, do you hear this new song? Hey, what's the news that all your car come, recycle. You ride. Whatever. What did you do? Friday night, that kind of thing. And you get to know the person because we come from totally different backgrounds, different experiences, different families, different different home lives. Everything is different, but you have a few hours to try to figure that out and knockout a song together. So you so us been the first thirty minutes talking? Yeah, because I, I really do believe in and we talked about the formula. There is a formula. There's just there's no two ways about it, but I d- believe in authenticity as well too. So I think writing from a place of that Israel to you, whether it's something you're experiencing now or or one of the co ours experiencing or even a friend something. I mean, we're, we're kind of so we are songwriters were always just mining people's stories and putting them out there for the world here. So don't make friends with us like, we'll tell you, we'll tell you to the world right. Is there ever a time where you don't get that liberty to come up with the concept? I know there's a thing in the industry called pitch sheets and they're, they're often suggestions from labels or management say, hey, we need a song about, you know, it's, yeah, pitch sheets or briefs. I mean, there's a lot of there's a lot of versions of that. There's who's looking lists. We keep those more so in country. I don't know that there's a whole lot of John outside of country that you would even nowadays. The goal is always to write with an artist for their record. Could you briefly summarize what a pitch sheet is? What's that look like? I mean, is it inbox? Yes, suffer. Just a simple could be a word documentary, Google doc, just saying, this is what this person is looking for. You know, let's just take the new high valley record. For instance, we're producing for for Warner and it'll lists the producer so it'll say, you know, Seth Moseley exa Connor on it and stylistic references like which we didn't give them any of these. So I have no idea how they got this, but they they have like Keith urban and like Mumford zones or something in, you know, make it sound something like this and content wise. Do we want uptempo? Do we want down tempo? What you know is it need to be as doesn't need to be liberal sins that out to publishers essentially for the most part music ro, they're, they're probably the biggest source of it. So if people are listening there, that's probably the best, honestly thing you could subscribe to like because they have a pitchy. They'll Email me wanna quarter. What are you still working on this record? What do you need like that? That kind of stuff. When you say music row, there's obviously the physical music? Yes, it's a publication if the pay to be on that. Yeah, I don't think it's that much either. So that's probably the best source. If you're looking in a country. Now outside of that skies lamb sink, you could talk a little bit about sink, you know? Because because you'll get what we call briefs from like a ad company or music supervisors looking for x, y, and z. I mean, so you say sink in for the layman out there. That's that's that music for commercials or TV or movie stuff Dennis replacement for for picture us television or video games. Yeah, exactly. So as much as we might have in our minds that these songs kind of happen, one hundred percent organic. You know, my favorite country artist was driving out driving his tractor out field during harvest season. We'll idea just lost his horrible. Yeah, grabbed his pen and paper that keeps right beside him and pinned it down and then went to the studio couple days later and was like, man, I had the song Adia. I want to track it. That's. The story that gets told right. Perhaps wait. So in these radio interviews with your favorite artists, when like what was your inspiration for this? They have to invent a story for that a lot of the time, yes, or or take something that has happened in a similar timeframe and just relate it to. I mean, think about the artists that didn't write the song like, how do they relate it. Right, right. So the best artists know how to communicate and we've it in and feel not feel like it is just out of left field, but there have been somewhere. They'll they'll invent specifics like I'll be listening to the radio and like, yeah, you know. So I was driving on sixty five and I saw this sign and so on. It's like, no, you didn't like that was the title we brought in that morning. Not that I don't care like credit to me whatever. I'd rather be a good story for the listener. And you wonder if the chain smokers really ever in the backseat of their Rover daughters, disappointed in that that is a question but, but yeah, so that's, I mean, that's quite interesting to learn that the. A lot of this is kind of. And I'm, I'm gonna make it sound more skit. Sorry. I'm gonna get sound more scandalous than it really is. But a lot of this kind of cooked up in a studio from a list that somebody got in their inbox from publication that record label sent, and some people sat down and said, okay, hey, I actually have an idea that I think works with what they're looking for here. Let's write this song and or the songs already written, and let's pitch it. And then now you've got mister country artist or MRs country artist on the radio saying, yeah, I was driving up sixty five and this is, you know, I was thinking, blah, blah, blah. And it's like, well, not even close. I actually saw you in Mercedes sedan. Yeah, exactly. But this is Starbucks. You know, oftentimes I think because music touches our hearts and such a personal and unique way outside of of other forms of media, or even just our average everyday things. Our brains want to have a more grandiose idea of what's romanticize exactly. This is. The unsexy truth about the songwriting industry is that ninety nine percent of it is a day on a calendar, right? And especially for the professional songwriter, you're doing like what? What Stephen foster did where you're writing hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of songs with the knowledge that there's a good chance maybe only a small handful of those will ever actually become no worthy and few few people are as fortunate as max Martin Paul McCartney John Lennon and Seth Moseley to actually have several hits and to continue to be able to grow and the the trick to that is not a trick at all. Is that right? It's not a trick at all. It's that thing of it's ninety percent, perspiration and ten percents brazen cliches at sounds. That was something when I started getting into songwriting really baffled me that you know when I when I was quite green, I was I would write a song that song was my baby. It was my child. I wrote. It. It was my emotion. It was the song about that one girl or that time that that person did that one thing and and that and it happened and I was so sad or have the or whatever and the world needed to hear it. And it was so good and got my song. And then if I ever wrote another one now I have to songs and you know joining a band cake has happy songs. Get these two songs I wrote in the the truth of the matter is it's it's not really that far off from gambling. You're, you're playing odds and it's a numbers game. And of course you want to be good at it and you have to be good at it, but the way to get good at it is by doing it a lot you think about batting averages. It's very much like that. I mean, if you're batting a thousand, you're playing little leagues. If you're batting five hundred, you're playing in minor leagues. If you're batting three hundred your planet in the in the in the majors, you're killing it later about in through, you know what I mean? Yeah. Songwriting, like you said is so true? I mean, I I was I was just trying to pull up my. We use an app called song space just to keep track of all of our songs and everything. I was trying to pull that up and I can't get. Get it to work. But I think there was like eight hundred or nine hundred songs in their last night. Check. And how many number ones just across any John. Do you have cleaning songs that we've produced an in written? It's over twenty five at this point, but one that I was a writer on maybe twenty and that's that's out of out of eight or nine hundred eight or nine hundred. And even out of those number ones, like what format is like? You know, is it a Radio, Big radio song? Like there's a lot of different types of, right. You know, there's there's a wide variety there. So of songs that you can truly point to and say, this is where my. You know, thankfully we were able to build our house from or something like that. Like it's you can count them on like one hand or two hands, right. Honestly, when you wrote one of those songs, any of them pick one, did you ever have that feeling? I know this is a hit. This is going to be a song that does really well, or is it like this the prize you like? I knew it was gonna be good song. I didn't know is gonna be that good or like this is gonna be this is going to kill just I just wrote another song. Here's another song in general. What I would say is my goal at the end of every session is to feel like that could be one of sir. So the short answer is no, I don't, but I wanna leave at the end of every session, feeling like that that could potentially be one of those there. There are your handful of days. We're like, I'm just not sure. And there are a lot more surprises than there are accurate predictions to, you know, that's completely true. So hundred percent? Sure. Because you don't know what the end of the day really, you're writing songs for for the listener. It's for. Yeah, and and that's a large. Swath of people who are affected by a lot of different factors in and you don't know because that song you wrote today may not hit an outside ear for a year or two or three, and you don't know how society is going to affect or cultures going to change that person's perception of your song, and I'm getting way deep into. That's why it's such a mystery and why can't take every song you right and treat it like it's the ring and your column and you. You will literally become that point five, three of person. If you do of that song Il, you'll get killed. You just can't live that way. And I see that with new songwriters, especially a lot. They take every song they put so much pressure on it like this has to be the one. This is the one. It's not the one. Like just write another one, maybe and then ten years back, maybe that was one, it doesn't matter. You have to do it because you love it. Yeah, so so what happens for malady wise? You get in here. You write a song like, awesome. Good one, high, five job, everybody. What do you have. Or you know, digitally at the end of the songwriting says it like an iphone voice memo of unit. It's har-. Are you like full out tracking at that point? Like what's the next step? What happens? My I can only speak to my process and my process has always been to treat everything like it's a finished on the ready to go to radio production song. And it sounds like it's on an Marty. That's the goal by the end of the day. By the end of the day. Yeah. By the end of the session, sometimes it may take two or three sessions finished, but by the end of the session, I want it to sound like the radio. And when you're done, is there ever time you're like, I dig it, but I mean, it's been like three weeks pops up on your phone on your bluetooth and you're like, man, I don't like this verse at all. You ever go back and read doing. We're all the time. Yeah. Yeah, total. And it depends on the artists to. There are some artists that it may take a year like interest in, you revisit it from time to time, and but there are other ones that will like one of the biggest part of it probably took an hour to. Right. So it's just there's no sign like there's a formula to the song itself, but there's no formula to the process with song was that I just wanna know it was a song with high valleys. It was a country. Single did really well last year called. She's with me, and I think we wrote the whole thing and like sixty minutes and was probably probably been my top earnings on of all like that to to this point, you know my career. So that is awesome. So, and I also happen to know just because you really are. I mean, I can't stress this enough to our listeners. You're not a nobody. You don't have those trophies hanging on your wall because no one's heard of you very highly regarded in his industry. And so I've, you know, I've been researching you've for awhile, and I happen to know that it's called stocking. Are in stocking by the way, you'll set up fake Instagram accounts. I like those new. The new elastic band Hanes that you picked up last week. I pick myself up some to since I saw this what you were using and that's why post it all man. But I, I do happen to know that the way you treat your your tracks of your songs, the way that you do that is a big reason why you were able to get some of those early opportunities that have led you to today. And I know that for myself personally, it's been quite inspiring because you know, I. My previous bam. We were signed to Atlantic and I know that you actually wrote with our singer once or twice, I'm sure. But you know, he, they would ship him all over the place to write with different songs song writers. And I think just for sake of the Bill, if it was a song that more than just the other writer we're going to be on, then we essentially would write a song together, and then he would take that song to another writer at the label's request. And because you know, they, they want to, they don't trust you with their money. They wanna make sure that you've got hit writer checkered. Yeah, on the song. So so being that we but all that to say. We will get some of those demos back from big, big songwriters, you know, and they sound atrocious and and so I think, you know, I, I would have never guessed such a thing and how impressive it can be to anyone in the industry here demo and be like, is this demo or is this the real thing? Yeah. And so that's that just a rabbit trail. Did they ever use those tracks that you do all the time? Yeah. Keep them that they when you turn in a song like say, hey, we're going to cut this, what do you deliver to them? So a lot of the times it's not the label like it's producing it over the next few. So like and sometimes that's us, it's just depends on if we have a pre existing relationship or what the agreement has been. So if there's another producer will send the tracks over, sometimes they'll keep them sometimes overdo them. But as far as turning it into our publishers, it will usually just be an MP three with like this best demos, we can with a song Lear with the writer names, date of creation and song splits, which usually in our world has always even splits. We always push hundred percent of the time for even I assume you bring that up before you start writing or how's that work like, hey, this is interesting what it's interesting in Nashville. It's just assumed it yet is it's just known in a lot of l. a. it's just assume. But in certain circles, it's not. And it's a dress on the back end which can get squirrelly, you know, but I'm always open handed with it. There's there's only ever been one time in my entire career out of nine hundred songs that I've pushed back and that was because we talked about it on the front end. Right? And then they reneged on it. That's not a good thing to do. No, it's not. So it's just a bad. I mean, you know, lying is one thing. Like I can forgive just, hey, we've got to talk about this and you know, but. Anyway, that's a whole another rabbit trail. It just makes sense. I heard I even heard Taylor swift, talk about it. You know, she before she writes with anyone that's even split we're not writing. Yeah, and there's a, there's just a bit of psyche. You know if the three of us right now were to write a song together, you know, I might be nervous because you're a much more accomplished songwriter than myself. And so if we were not doing even splits and he think fighting for even in my mind, I'd be battling with me and he's, he's already writing so much more of the song than me, you know, kills creativity absolutely kills and everyone's more concerned about how much of the songs there's and how much did they contribute, and then also trying to keep track of it as you go and like we wrote that line, but he changed the one word in the line, but does that mean there's physically no way to separate yourself in in that scenario where you know your words and your contributions are being measured for it to be a best idea wins environment that cannot exist in that scenario. And I think that intellectual. Oil intellectual property is is not the only thing that you contribute to a song and, and that's why just doing even splits works so much better. And then on the back end, you know if we are going to try to quantify it, they're going to be some days where you contribute mo- most of the xactly is going to be other days when you contribute hardly any of the song. And at the end, the the hope is that it pretty much you know evens out and here's the deal. If it's talked about on the front and a you, knowingly go into a situation knowing that it's not even splits. That's totally your call if you go train. Yeah. So I've been part of several things where that's been the case and it was, I knowingly went in knowing that I'm probably gonna get less on this, then I'm used to, but it's a project I wanna do for whatever reason it is. Yeah, so so splits being even I'm almost I'm all for it. I feel like that's a good way to take your mind off of it and I'll get creative. And these are now, this is all pertaining to songs that that. We right and splits in terms of the percentage out of one hundred percent, how much of the percentage of the song you're going to get so that how much of that nine point, one cents is yours every time the song south, right? But there is a completely separate scenario that happens. It's specific to other, you know, some genres more than others where these ideas don't necessarily Matt or count or the they're measured differently, and what is that? There's a sidestep to that which is ghost writing, which is essentially someone who's writing the song without intentionally not getting credit for it. So Jake unite are gonna write a song together. I, this is not happening, Mike. Hey, Seth could knock this out of the park. Seth. What do you think about us paying you twenty thousand dollars to write this song for us, but that's all you get you twenty grand. And then let us say that we wrote it and stuff like a million dollars, bro. So it okay. We'll pay you a million dollars and he does it. And then we put out a song and it's like this is the Jake and Robert band, the best song in the world to Graham and we wrote it. So we keep that nine point one since we split it between idyllic and Seth is done doing other things, but he got his million dollars because that was work for hire. So that's the thing that happens. And honestly, a lot in hip hop, not a lot in hip up more. So in hip hop, I know of and other John RAs, where rappers and artists agree to have somebody else write their lines for them, which is kind of frowned upon in the industry just because of how it is and the personal relationships that rappers have with other rappers, whether it be good or bad relationships. Mean we're putting out a distract that someone else wrote, which is very current and j will talk about in a second, but typically paid anywhere between ten and twenty grand up front for their anonymous contributions. And if it's a big label project, even more than that and popular rappers even charge, fifty grand upwards just for a cameo spot or writing a verse. I mean, I'm guessing timberland or something or Dr. Dre was to write a align costs more than Robert Venable writing align some. Who some, I think the hope for the songwriter is that they make more than they would have made had they not taken the, you know what you take lamble, right, right. And then of course, the funny enough I've never ever even heard of scenario like that, so it's probably is just in completely different genres or cultures or whatever. Then I'm used to working in. And I wonder on the flip side, if it's not as much the artists asking someone else to write, or I mean they Dr dre and say, hey, you would make our career jump start. If you'd just do this verse for us doctors, I never heard you. Jake and rubber band. I'll do a fifty grand right now. All right at us, keep my name off of it. Because he's like, maybe this will tank or approve of your other artists could be making a bet based off of them thinking it's gonna be a million dollar song. Absolutely great deal if they pay fifty grand right. You never know what's going to happen over these wasted fifty grand and they get their grandkids that dre wrote that exactly. But there are some examples that have come to light, which I don't know are supposed to be public or not. You were telling me about one earlier that just blew my mind. I thought it was hilarious. They, oddly missing you by puff, daddy, p Diddy in the fam-. Choubey to biggie Smalls it features PD or puff daddy at the time, big wife, faith Evans, and one twelve ditties lines. We're actually ghost written by Jay Z's associate sauce, money kidding. So how the puff daddy song, that's his song yet his line in the song was written by sauce money. Well, weird me totally weird. And, and you know, I wish I had more information. This is kind of off the cuff. So this weekend, you and I. The weekend that prior to this recording, you and I were in the car together for like twenty thirty hours hours of course of the weekend. And and so we were going through a lot of music and one thing that kinda hit the headlines last week week before last was this Eminem sheen gun Kelly back and forth few and they're writing distracts. That's this not disc, this tracks about one another. And, and so you know, grown up in the nineties. I listened to Eminem when I was younger, and and so one of the song that Michigan Kelly was responding to with his rap. Devil track was a song called not alike. And as we were in the car, I was writing and we were listening to the song just, you know, kind of curious to know what's what's all this hubbub about and ice girl down to the bottom in itunes, and it lists the the songwriters of any and every song that that they have those long as for me. And the metadata end on this particular song, not alike. They are listed four riders, which I find really interesting. It's Eminem with one feature. So one other artist rather or the other to the track and and the thing is they, they, they use their actual like their legal names as songwriters, not their, you know, their hip hop names, whatever's I don't. And you actually might know who these are, either one of you don't, but of course, Emad as Marshall matters Eminem he's the real shady. We stand up arm Gumri be chambers are Spencer junior are Spence too near sorry and blades. Funny because it's a district. It's a distract. It's Eminem dissing someone else and a bunch of people in a room going. Oh, you should tell them that his hair looks weird. Tell him tell him the shoes are dumb elements of submachine gun. That's funny. A lot of the times in the hip hop world. As I understand it, it's it's maybe two or three of them were the track guys. And so one guy, you know, it's a very communal way of building beats and tracks singing, get writers credit for coming up with just like the beat idea. Absolutely. It was produced by Dray and I guess I kind of assumed that he was the guy, but I really have no idea, but he may have me know how it works. A lot of the time he probably has his proteges in some some dude brought him beat, and then he put a twist on it or something. And then you know that's very common and it might have been that to other guys were sitting in a room working on it in the he put his stamp on it, and then there's all of a sudden three people on the beat, right? So that in a hip hop, that's a lot probably how it is where I don't know that they would have been contributing to Eminem. I wouldn't imagine lyrically. I would hope not, but maybe goes writing happens as maybe one of those writers is, is the the other is the featured artist who? Yeah, exactly. And that's. That makes total sense. I mean, curious to know, is that an even split I try to Google couldn't find any information, but did no, probably not probably in terms of the featured artists or the just the writers in general, the feature did. Did he get fifty percent of that song? Or did he get you know that they say out of all the words in the song and that's where it comes down to the artists I ever would have no idea. Yeah. Yeah. Fun fact about that. I'll be missing you big smiles tribute from puff daddy. So because I didn't say please to sting about getting that using that. Evanston every take sample, whatever. It's rumored that sting makes two grand day from from the sales of that some highly off this lawsuit money your how that all equals, but hearings estimated two thousand dollars a day from that song. Since puff, daddy didn't say please before using that sample. And so not only did puff daddy not write his own line in that song. He's losing two grand a day to sting for stealing his what did doesn't even that he's on anymore. It's a sting in three other people's. So you've never ghost written. I'm guessing based off of that conversation, not that I know of. So go-slow don't even remember I've, yeah, I may or may not have, whereas he not telling us that goes never tells us, go stories, does a good one. But no, I have not. I've never been approached to do that, and I'm not saying I wouldn't. I guess it's just not common practice in wasn't really to give, you know, not really. So I think the question that we're all really wondering here. Are you a part of the aluminum body? Yes, I got an imitation, Instagram. That's the feel. Checky cheese, right. Yeah, you get like ten minutes of free game? No. Once you know, talk about like the you get like the luminosity like the okay. They know the secrets about shaky case not allowed to talk about this have to kill him or is it the Chucky cheese. Thanks. You now I'm just. They, they run similar circles. Okay, they do. They really. That's what cheese the back room with the with the fake band. That's where the most of the meetings happened actually terrifying by the way those animatronic at every Chucky cheese. That'll give you nightmares. I'm care how old you are. So I worked at Chucky cheese for two years when I was sixteen then still have Badra GMs. So they got to be Chucky once this is a spoiler for young children listening to this parents turn it off. I have not taken my daughter to cheese yet, so it's just a costume, not a giant rat, but being six foot five, the costume. I wear the the, the furry pants jumpsuit you put on came to about mid calf for me, and then the big fuzzy feet that you put on over your shoes came to regular shoe level. So there was a good. It's like starting from the top, Chuck Chuck, Chuck, Chuck white skinny legs. Chucky Chucky knees? Yeah, that was it took knees Cecchini's. So that was probably really horrify. Buying for a lot of little kids wondering why Chucky was wearing white, pull up socks halfway mid leg. So I'm gonna talk about some ghost writing. We'll talk about some co writers really quickly and then have some more questions for Seth. So goes writings not same co, writing co writers do get a split, but so every artists we've talked about this before on the podcast, they're not writing their own songs and it's a big disappointment. When your favorite Britney Spears song was written by Kesse like did know those thing and how cool would it be to be Kesse and writing songs for Britney Spears? Because obviously there's a lot of influence there, similar genres and same genre similar line of song. But yeah, like so the the woman behind the words to Britney Spears single till the world ends. So they really can you imagine bragging for one of your idols. So l. John wrote the music for a lot of his songs, but Bernie Taupin actually was the force behind most of his lyrics like nineteen seventy two rocket man or nineteen seventies your song or crocodile rock from eighteen seventy three. None of those Elton wrote even Elvis. Let's go back further. Elvis, Presley. He could take care of the hip gyrating. In the smooth vocals, but songwriters, Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoler actually covered the swoon inducing lyrics of tracks like jailhouse rock and hound dog. Well, I mean Dr dre gremlin. You idiot. Dr. Dre is dead. He's locked him abasement according to dog, he in Dr. Dre quote couldn't come up with nothing as dope as Jay z when it came to writing the nineteen ninety nine single still DR eek Diori. So the songs call still DR e in Dr dre didn't write. It is ironic Jay z. did. Yeah. And this is tons like, like you said, max Martin's writing, all those things Katy Perry and. Guess everybody under the sun actually, but, but so that your favorite songs look them up, seize writing them. I have some questions though. You many questions I do. First question I wanna ask is truth bomb, blow our minds? What is what's? What's the thing for you? That was like. I had no idea whenever you got into this or something that you would wanna tell someone else who's not a songwriter, just just the songwriting related something that you not what you thought it would be like. I mean, it could be loosely songwriting related. I think songwriting relate, I say, a couple of things. First thing songwriting related that it really is formulaic. There is a formula to commercial hit songs. So there is no mystery. It's not. There's not some sort of magical inspiration that strikes suddenly and you come up with this fresh new idea. The no one is ever had before, but I mean, at some point somebody has to move the needle. Yeah. At some point, the formula has to change somewhat the lane weiner's that you're talking about, it's it's ninety percent formula. You've gotta start there and ten percent you like that's that's the, that's the formula which is very slow progression. The various steering cruise ship a sickly. So that's been that was over the course of my ten twelve years doing this fulltime probably been the biggest thing. I mean, you say formula, do you mean specifically like like the arrangement verse chorus for scores? You mean like the types of words you you. All of that rhyming team. All of that, like all of formula learning how to analyze a hit song from genre to genre. You'll notice different patterns and trends, and they change over time, but things like BPM things like rhyme scheme or lack thereof, things like melody things like Lear concept or content or lack thereof. You know, it's all of these different things and learning how to analyze those. And you really start to see holy cow. These things are like all the same, you know. And in some ways. That's the. That's the amazing thing about songs though is because how crazy is it that we hear them? And we still think holy crap like that is blowing my mind right now, even though it might not be that different from the thing that we heard five years ago. Right? Because you mentioned earlier familiarity. That's a, that's probably thing. Number two is so men. I just can't with us on the spot, the two Fs, the formula and the familiarity like those. Those things have been mind blowing to me and it's so important to half a million for a song to be a hit. So I would even imagine with camped on races Mr. foster that it was probably familiar to some nursery rhyme at the time or to like a pub drinking song or something. You take amazing grace or any of the old hymns. They're like they're familiar to pub- drinking songs. They took the melodies from pub drinking songs. There's familiarity already. They're put Christian lyrics to them drinking in the church tackling. So I think I think those two things. Really, for me what you're saying is originally it was you got an amazing. Corner going down down. With grace. This is Jesus now. Yeah, that's. But that's the reality. It's and there's nothing wrong with that. I think a lot of people probably here that they're like, oh, that's this appointing like, but for people trying to be commercial songwriters, you're kidding yourself if you are, if you believe the opposite is true, not so there's there's influence in there's familiarity, but then you get close to that line like straight up, ripping them off. And that's where the whole uptown funk thing came into play. And I mean, some of those losses becoming slimmer kind of crazy, but you listen to like, I totally hear that. And then my wife will listen to like really here, Mike, will you're listening to it a different way than I am as a producer long right here. Yeah. Yeah. I'm hearing that percussion loop in the background and I'm hearing they have crowd noise whether it's going, hey, or going woo. They're like, okay, we need this cowbell track. We need a crowd noise we need. This Qatar has panned hard right over there doing some weird abstract lick unlike. This song has all that same stuff like, where's that to close? We're like boom, lawsuit, boom. Just finding influence. You know what I mean? Yeah. And there's a songwriter in the country world will not name names, but he has about eight lawsuits at this point. So some people are more prone to it than others. I've thankfully never had one and me and most ninety nine percent of the people I work with are very conscious of that. But at the same time, it's a balance of how many notes exist, right? You know, I mean, what? Twelve, right? Twelve? Yeah. In a scale notes all chords, right? Yeah. Like I mean, in really how many combinations can you come up with them? You know, if I've written nine hundred, how many songs have been written? I it's, you just can't stress out over. And you know, if I, if I, I have actually had this happened before and find to admit it, but I've accidents written, say melody onto song to ask you, have you ever read the same song try twice? I have and they were both for two very well known like I would call. A-List artists. Have you ever written a song and then realized, oh, that's uptown. Funk, like they must have been in your head from like two years ago, like this is there's a lot of subconscious. I've had other people point stuff out. Yeah, that's like, man, you got you should probably change the and I'm the first person to want to change it that no, I wrote a song. I'll never forget. We were actually just working with Cooper Cooper. Yeah, and and so I had written a music bed couple of Lear Senate over to our singer, and he kind of finished out the track who then to John and John John adjusted a couple of things that just made it. Awesome. And we were all stoked. Yeah. Have a super RAD track and about three PM the day after all this beautiful inspiration happened with this song. I get a phone call from one of the other guys in the band who says. So I want you to listen to this. Breaking Benjamin song, and I ripped off the song almost no for note and had no idea. It was completely completely submerged, our subconscious. You know, at the time I was intentionally trying to avoid listening to certain things so that I wouldn't them off. But maybe if I had listened to recently, I would have known mmediately that that's what that was from. And that I, it wasn't actually an original song track that come up with. Yeah, it's a balance of having influences but also have not being too influenced, you know, quite interesting enough. The the last record that came out. I'm fairly certain John recycled, the Lear that he'd used for that song which never solve a lot of day, but there's a song that almost is perfectly word for word, what what would super cool and people have their tendencies to. It's like I mean, as as a musician or guitar player, like I'm, I'm gonna probably have my norms that I gravitate, which is why it's important to ride on. Different instruments and in different settings and just a break your mind out of it. You know? No, I happen to know your full of a lot of songwriting wisdom. You know, whether it's I, I quote you a lot with with artists that I work with, especially younger or newer artists, whether I'm producing or songwriting with them. One of my favorite ones is actually something I saw the first time I visited your studio by the Sanctis dare to suck and and how really I think as it comes to songwriting and specially anybody who wants to be a songwriter, that's probably their biggest fear and the number one reason why people don't write songs is because they're too afraid of sucking and they're too afraid that you know they, they might spend five years working on one song. Yeah, and and that's, you have to be able to say, it's okay if I suck at this and might just be bad and it's hang onto that. In co writing sessions, don't be afraid of your opinion to those who have been around in the industry longer than you writing songs. So Jake and I would right with you. We might be hesitant to like offer our line because we're rate of rejection, but I just heard a guy in the studio couple of weeks ago. Tell me he's he's Skyla Bank, you know, Scotty, third day he said song writings a lot like two beautiful women, a blonde brunette. They're both beautiful, but different ways, like throw your lines out. Both lines might work for the song right there, but you can't get all butthurt if they choose some other lines fitness. Like he's like, Nah, I think it's better for the song. They're both great line s he's got us to have to pick the brunette over the blonde or vice versa, or whatever it is. The both great creations can't be scared to suck. You can't be scared to throw your idea because probably great idea in a lot of cases might suck, but that risk because that line might change the course of the song to with the veteran in the room going, whoa. Yes. Let's go that direction. Let's chased that rabbit because you Pat yourself on the back, but don't show it outside. And you get to poli after. Yeah, exactly that. That's always our mantras dare to suck. And even that I stole from somebody else, like I'm I have enough hopefully humility to recognize that I really don't have that many original thoughts, including that one was nothing new under the sun. Now there's nothing new. So for me, it's more about the hang like, you know, it's not about it's not about my idea being the one that you know, there's there's different personalities of coders to there's writers at all right with who are very adamant on it's their way or the highway, you know, and that's cool if you want, if you like their thing that they do, you know it's the right number four songs number one. Exactly. Really cool. If you if you like stuff, this sucks. I mean, you know that you're doing it so records. Yeah, but dare to suck really is something that we tried to embody every day. So it doesn't. It doesn't matter if you've never in a song before. It doesn't matter if. You know, you're completely different plane than I am culturally your success. It does. It just doesn't matter because I really do believe that everybody has the potential to. Create greatness, but it's very subjective, you know, because then there's greatness. There's art and then there's commerce to those. Are this a whole gray area? So I was just trying to take the stress out of the room to take the stress out of a situation. Sometimes that can just be made myself saying, hey, this isn't the line. It probably sucks, but fill in the blank, like stuff like that. You know, Seth Moseley you have built an empire like you have the knowledge. You have the track record, obviously, all the millions of awards and all the millions of a words and and trophies and plaques, gold records out there on the walls and this ridiculous studio were sitting in, you have a wealth of information and and I don't know if you've written a book, but you should, but I do know that you are about to share some wisdom and there's ways for you the listener to partake in this wisdom and just suck it all. Up, which I'm excited to actually sit in and on. And Jake you're talking about before we start this podcast and how excited you are about this stuff. Tell us about what you are about to release on a global level with bliss about to happen. Yeah. So I thought about it and the book thing literally have thought about that, and I talked to a mentor of mine and he was like, man, you should just put everything you know into like a course. Well, the first thing was a podcast like, okay, she started podcast and then after you figure out your thing and blah, blah, blah, you should do a course. And so when I sat down to think about doing one on song, this'll be easy like I do this in my sleep. I do it. I can do it in three days. I'll bang it out in a weekend to set up my computer and blah, blah, blah. I sat down to do that in a year a year and a half later here we are with the finished product, the long weekend. It's a very long weekend, but it's a course, and it's called the song chasers course and. I I'm of course bias by saying this, but it really is the most comprehensive course out there on commercial songwriting and are a couple out there. You can Google it. There's some out there online, and I've as a great there are, but some of them don't tell the whole story or sugar coated or say, just what they want you to make a few bucks. There seems to be this sort of like proprietary seek secrecy. It's like it's like a company saying, oh, we'll tell you everything that's in our in grand playbook. Yeah. And then you look and it's like proprietary blend. Exactly. It's like, there's, there's always kind of they're holding something back. But, but tell us about your course because I happen to know and for those of you that that you know, don't know, Seth, he is. He's a very humble man and and he doesn't necessarily have to be because he could kind of carry himself as more of a look at me. I'm awesome. And he doesn't, and I think that that kind of shows through his teaching materials. So what kind of things you know, if you are wanting to get into music or if you've been in it for twenty years and you're wanting to learn how to do it better. You know, people can get something out of it no matter where they're at, but there's a lot of really advanced stuff in it. So maybe not just for beginners, not only not only so from I literally think that if you are just starting out and you've never done anything before their stuff to learn. But I also think that there's enough in there that a lot of it's gonna probably go over their head until they actually put it into practice. So that a veteran can get a lot out of it as well too, because I know that because I got out of it and my my songs, even even as a result of doing all this research and it's actually given me a good framework to think about songwriting in the process, it's a little bit distressing to have that framework. So you're not just walking into a blank room with empty space of blank page. The most intimidating thing for most people. It's actually a framework to think about, okay, well, where do I start? You know what? Water, here's five, ten ways you can start. Okay. Where do I go? Once I've got the start. What are some things I need the melody to be doing? What are some things that the league needs to be doing to elicit a response from the listener, which is really all of our goal at the end of the day. And then after that, what do I do with it? You know? So. So that's sort of what we try to distill. And that's why it took about a year year and a half. To to teach. And that's how I know why even if you've been in the industry for ten twenty thirty years, you'll still get something out of it because most people don't think about this stuff. He make me mad because you're going to be giving away the formula essentially. Keeping us employed? I am. I am. I always share that. I share that always having I have an abundance mentality, didn't always grow up that way. You know, I'm from a small town and a lot of nothing against small towns, but it's just there's a lot of sort of stuck in your ways sort of thinking. And for me, the culture that I'm trying to create here with full circle music and through things like the song course is a give it all away mentality. Funny enough. The first time at when I tracked drums what he was called, give it away. Fun fact just thought of that. That's funny, it's it was actually, Christmas songs came full circle, is it? Yeah. So. And that's really the whole thing like whether it's a relationship, like if you were to say to me, hey, I really wanna get into country and I do this. These are my skill sets and if I know you're good at it, I'm totally fine. Find out for you and say, yes, you should meet this person or that person. I'm not going to hoard relationships because I know after doing this long enough, if you're good, and if you're a great person to work with, there's enough work to go around for everybody. Right. And that's a problem. Some towns have some music circles have is like they find their team or their network, and they hold those aces up their sleeve, they do, and, and it's not the way that I it's not. It's not the way that I believe doing business. It's really just me as a believer as a Christian. I think it's a kingdom and Taliban of like, ultimately, I know how much I had to do with my first successes, and there's nothing that I have ever done to have planned me. My first label project being the band that. I got my first CD when I was a kid. And like, you can't. How do you plan that stuff? You don't. You don't interesting. Isn't it so much like Malcolm glad we'll outliers. I don't know how familiar you guys are with that our listeners, but there's just so little that you have to do with like the fact that we were born in America. First of all, did I'd pick that. No. The fact that I was born into a family that could afford to pay electric so that I could plug my piano in there. Like I, I had nothing to do with that. So I just think it's the kingdom way of operating. You know something that I think. From the outside looking in for me and seeing you in particular why I'm incredibly excited for people to be able to get this course, which actually you'll be offering to our listeners a day early at a significant like half price, right? Yeah, half price. What and then and then again, then for three more days after that, half price before it goes up to full price. And I mean half prices, the difference a, that's a, it's huge. But the reason why I'm I'm very excited about you maybe above some of these other other songwriters and course teachers is that a you, you have the successes under your belt. You learned that you've gone to the trial and error to be able to pass that wisdom onto someone else and say, this is what you do. This is where you, this is what you shouldn't do this, what you should do. Not because you know better, but because you did it, you did this and then you to this. I'm doing it. That's that's like one we sat down. A film, this thing. And if the research I did doesn't line up with what I did the same morning that I wouldn't teach it right well, and you're still doing it. It's not like you did it forty years ago, and then you been retired for a while and you decided I should put out a course to most of the material out there is, is even from the top songwriting teacher out there who won't name names, but as a fantastic's or anything. And I've learned so much from his teaching. He's never written a hit song. Right? Probably the number one, like probably world renown sarin teacher. He's never in his own. I googled that was like, I can think of a really well known to to'real course for recording and stuff again with credits that no one would know nobody ever heard. He's giving good advice on most levels and scales. Two people who no less than him. Yeah, which are learning a lot from him and the other, the other category of people who typically make inter into this kind of space of teaching in. Teaching courses and things like that are people that had success. But like you said, maybe twenty years ago maybe in the nine, right? Not the now what's situation so they can truly say, hey, I've written hit songs for x, y, and z, but they haven't done it in twenty years. Things change in the songwriting industry and the music industry and the what's in five years, music modernization act just passed in September. And that's one of the biggest pieces of legislation for songwriters producers and engineers century. Yeah, in a nutshell. What is that for people who have no idea what we're talking about just like to second version music modernization act. The nutshell is that it updates legislation to. Match where we're at in the current music industry, things like spikes streaming. I two things that did not exist in the seventies when the law originally came through something seventy six, that was something the standard were from that point that will they were from, you know, post, I feel like like World War Two era or something. Like, I mean, it's it's Indo, quote me on that. David Israelite is a good guy to go to if you want all that information or Ross goal on or any of these other guys. But what's really exciting is that it's the first Ford progression that name's not just songwriters producers and engineers, min and musicians who normally would not be participating in any back into income. It was all the artists or the label publisher, whoever. But now it's naming producers, engineers, musicians, people that should be getting credit on these things. We're off in all three within room doing those three jobs often or more. Are behind behind the scenes behind the curtains. And sometimes it's tough to see a song that you were such a huge part in Benjamin of literally and figuratively and do well in the artists. Yeah, we did that we did that and we're like, oh, remember us that actually, all those ideas were ours, or you gotta stay humble but it. But it hurts sometimes v. in the shower in the morning, like, oh, man, why do I do this? And try. And we've been your wife says petting your head. Yeah. If you're braiding your arm hair and crying and like armpit hair, you know, I mean, it's a hard business, so I'm just really, really thankful specifically shout out to NSA I and Bart herbison eight here in Nashville and Lee, Thomas Miller, Ben Glover all all the people that have been lobbying on our behalf Shing hard. Yeah, because it has been a battle we've had to fight Sirius. XM has has been, you know, a big. Hill to climb see sack at one point, their parent company Blackstone tried to block it and that's up hard pill. The swallow when the company representing you, we'll are your NC sec. I'm c. SaK and we went in and had, yeah, we met with them and they had a very long list of writers that were gonna leave their big losing their big makers. Yeah, yeah. You know, we're, we're blacklisting same to Sirius XM. You know, they've they, it's it's political suicide within an industry. So I don't understand how they can. They have done that. But but fortunately the music army is we've been calling it has risen, and people have listened for the first time in a century in and for the record si SaK did release a statement saying, hey, no, we're, we're starting with artists as they did. They came back around. I don't know where Sirius XM stands on it. A lot of it is you know the parent companies to be honest, I have great friends Sirius XM. I have great friends that si SaK that largely, you know, aren't able to influence that decision other than, hey, a thousand people here just send us petition saying they're gonna leave if so. And they were doing in businesses, which are businesses companies to make money are saying, oh crap, we're gonna lose business because every their bread and butter in the leave. Yeah, exactly. And Harry FOX agency. That was the big for a lot of people that don't know what that is. Harry FOX agency is the. Big administration or collection agency that keeps track of all these little point point zero zero zero, zero zero. One cent streams that are happening billions of times a day, and it the m. a is designed to create a essentially a competitor to that. That's a little more fair. That's great. I'm all over it. That's great. Competition is absolutely. Yes, dude. I can't believe that that you're selling the format. That's crazy, but obviously tons of things that I'm gonna learn an I am in industry and have been in this industry for twenty years support to always be learning always if bettering yourself. If you're in the room as the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room. Is that what they say? Yeah, that's why we brought in here. So. I learned a lot this morning. This was awesome, and we're just we're just humbled and in very, very blessed to have you on this podcast with us today. So. Okay, another formality since I'm like the formality guy when we do this, this course with you, are we flying Nashville to do this? Or is this an online course or videos? What like what's his look like? It's online. That's a great question. Rubber, it's online so people can take it at their own pace if they want to watch the lyric section ten times to make sure they got it, they can do that. So once people have it, they have just unlimited lifetime access to it in a members only portal basically. Awesome. Cool. So it's not like you watch it once and now you have to pay again, wanna see on limited lifetime access. And is this a combination? Video and reading material is a video only reading only? Yes, primarily video, but we also include some some downloadable assets as well. Like logic templates. Or protocols, templates and things because a lot of it, you know, a lot of people out there listening like maybe don't consider themselves songwriters, but what defines a songwriter, right? A lot of its music. So if you can create a piece of music, you're songwriter will in your your templates, your ability to create templates is part of the reason. I mean, it's part of your fame. Yeah, that's part of why you now have all of these awards in. You have a nice, beautiful home and studio, and all this as simple as it sounds. It's figuring out a lot of those things that allowed you to to move past people that were kind of at your level and kind of continue to grow and grow and grow with bigger and bigger artists. And that is the type of thing that you're going to be. Letting people in on in this course. Yeah, easy. Yeah. So you get some starting points there. There is some text that companies. There's a lot of. Links and exercises for people to practice because we didn't want it to just be a long lecture style sitting. And it goes in one ear out the other. It's actually has a lot of exercises for people to put into practice so they can secure the information and actually learn how it applies. I imagined this is going to be something revolutionary, like just for everybody out there myself included. Just the opener is what's really going on behind closed doors at full circle with Seth Moseley like holy crap. So we actually found out today that that you're doing something even more special for us that you're, you're going to give us a URL to send our listeners to to get it for more than half off, which is ridiculous already and open to turn up listeners a complete day before. Yeah, that's huge honor for us. What would you wanna make that lets us make your right now? So severe here was Seth. So why not just turned up podcast dot com. Slash Seth done, turned up podcast dot com forward slash Seth in that we'll just redirected straight over to your website which will be close to the public except for turned up listeners that will be the only link for the first day that it's out. So so the day this podcast is coming out Tober eighth two thousand eighteen in the year of our Lord. It's a Monday. You have Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and by the end of the day, Thursday, which is e eleventh, October eleventh. The eleventh to get a deal that will only be available for those four days for turned up listeners a deal that will never come up again, the best. The price on this course that you will get and we're talking over half off. So if you missed it, that's okay. If you're listening to this on Friday and yesterday was Thursday the eleventh Joyce along those into our podcast. Yeah, that's a good question. So you missed out in from now on if you know, but that's okay. Still go to turn it podcast slash Ford's. Sorry, turn a podcast dot com forward slash, Seth see what we got in store for you, and, and we're still, you know, full circle music said Moseley. He has been gracious enough to give turn-up listeners an exclusive offer through that link. So check it out and this course I'm serious. I have taken courses. I've looked into taking courses for different things, whether songwriting production, whatever it is, and I get so frustrated when you get to that part, where where they, you start realizing, oh, they left out some important ingredients of. Of of this pie here they literally tell you all the little secret. They're going to tell you in the preview for it. Right? And I learned nothing. And then you see the words proprietary ingredients, but Kentucky Fried Chicken. Tell me what eleven herbs and spices in your chicken. 'cause I wanna make it at home a love you. They're not going to tell you Moseley's going to tell you exactly what those eleven herbs and spices are his songwriting that has allowed him to be so successful and be able to climb the ladder per se, but more importantly, be able to write songs that the world is hearing. He's able to make a living doing this. He's able to have you know whether it's financial freedom or just get to do what he loves for living. I know so many of you personally as well as some that I have not met, but I know that there are so many people out there that want to know how to do this. It's their dream and they just don't quite know how to break into it. And this is the course it's going to let you know. And it's part of the reason why I myself personally, I'm very excited to man to go through this course saying, I think we're gonna. We're gonna sit next to each other and old hands really watch this and take notes hot cocoa and I watch it. Live stream of you doing that. So we will be live streaming at turned up podcast. And full. Full circle dot com. Slash slash lap sitting. No, absolutely. Not. Don't go there in person. Man? No, yes. Huge. Like I had no idea is going to be this big, but it's gonna be big. Yeah, it's it's been a labor of love. I will say that with that's every bit of that is true. It's teaching songwriting is so incredibly hard, and that's why I give hats often props to everybody else who even though they may not have hits in credit, the fact that they will teach these right brain concept, so clearly more power to him. But we've done all the work done all the research. We've come back through our hundreds and hundreds of songs and tons of other hit songs are on the radio, and we teach people how to analyze what's the recipe that goes into them and herbs and spices do will Seth thank you a million times over first of all for the hookup on that deal. And for more importantly, for being here today, letting us pick your brain for minute. Well, I appreciate you guys having me I, I love your show seriously, not just saying whatever. It's one of my favorite. Podcasts that I listen to, and I encourage your listeners to go back to the archive, listen all, and they're all really good. Thank you so much that that's a huge honor. You actually have a podcast yourself called made it in music, and it is it's by far one of my favorite podcasts, you have an ability to pull information and a certain sort of, you know, whenever you said it earlier that you like to bring an easy to the room. When you're songwriting, I love the interviews that you're able to get with the artists songwriters, music professionals that you that you talked to and work with their well, there's one with John Cooper, I think. Yeah, very first one. Yeah. It's funny because I'm known as the first one. That was the first one. One of our new season. Days of order. That was the first one I heard before that it was the full circle music podcast. We rebranded at the beginning of twenty seventeen eighteen. Sorry as the made it and music podcast, we were called the full circle music show before, and we did a hundred associates under that name. And John Cooper was episode one. Oh one, you just don't stop. Like, I guess who board I gotta do. But to your point, it's I consider myself a lifelong learner. And so for me, the podcast is a selfish thing. I, I love it for myself and the fact that I get to share it with the world is just like icing on the cake. So like the John episode, I learned so much by stuff. I would have never known about him like I've worked with him on a couple of records now and written dozens of songs with them, but ended up learning something that I had no idea. Go back and listen to that episode. If you haven't heard it before you'll be hooked on that. It's awesome. Oh yeah, it's what I was gonna say it was, you know, I've known him for a while just having toured with them and and a lot of, you know, lots of conversations whether brief along or just in passing either way. I've seen him with his family. I've seen him with his kids. I've seen him on stage. I've seen him writing songs or whatever it is and and hearing the things he says in that up Assode and you know was was blowing my mind thinking you thinking, oh somebody until they get. On the made it music podcast. Yeah, it's just, you know, much much like what y'all do. I think it's pulling back the curtain, but it's giving people tangible tools and resources to make it in music. Hence the name made it music. What you're saying? Is it similar to our podcast just better. Clientele and walks away with actual information of not useless bits from jeopardy that they'll never it's like blonde brunette. I see you're, you're drinking tea over there. Actually had a glass of tea last night. Out of my turned up podcast mug. Let's write cries. Sexy, is that this one's like three. I know in the Uraba motto, you can get ten percent off at ten percent turnout podcast dot com slash right. That's not what you're going with that that wasn't where I was going with, but but now that we have a lot of podcast at cleverly, we've that stuff in so right, we're turns into all his clever, although we will say it was a segue though. It was way we want to think our our sponsors through our patrons patrons our listeners. And if you believe, we actually have people who listen to us, first of all, and second of all, some of those people wanna send us money to help us continue talking to them, which is very weird us. I didn't know that was an option. I should become one of those people. You can pay us to talk to you. If you went, we'll talk to you for free. But yeah, so we have different stages of if you donate to help us keep turned up hot cast in your ear holes, Wissel stickers, and mugs and all sorts of fun things. You get access to a secret private Facebook page, where we can put some our, our, our notes up there in some of our uncut podcasts where like people don't hear that. We cut it out. Some people want to hear that. So we kinda swallow our pride and put it out there. Some some people who wanna be our patrons, but how can you find out more about this? It's very easy. Tell me turned up podcast dot com. When you click, it'll take you to our page. That'll show all of our episodes you'll see are ugly mugs. They're not on the mugs, you drink out of our faces. Those are those early to the all things that we have are ugly. Thank you. So if you look, they'll be an ugly in the believe it's on the right side of the page, but it says become a patron, and it will take you an intro, you just a list. So you know, you can give anywhere from five bucks a month, all the way up to. I think fifty one hundred dollars a month if you want. If you wanna give more than that, she just an Email. We'll figure it out. There is we have no problem figuring out to take your money. No, but for real, thank you so much to those of you that make that possible that are already giving donating to our podcast. And if you want to do that, we can let you in and am super grateful for you. Seth for coming in letting us crash replace chatting with us and letting us. Yep, your ear off and ask you all these questions and really kind of pry into the world of songwriting and and and now hopefully you know, not Yussef, but you listening. You know what? I'll goes into those songs that you're listening to, and it's it's not quite as simple as maybe those artists might make it sound. It might be the artists that you're hearing as spoke of true, but he's sorry for your loss of the the Grammy that's missing. I don't have a clue where it went. Don't look in my backpack. I'll send you a Bill. You got it for free. So. It's an imaginary Bill. I was going to charge a monopoly money. I don't even have that. I think my son took goal. Things like that, which is weird. Oh, and on that note, we have to think a couple more people. We have to think you'd listener for spending the last hour minutae however, amount of time with us listening to this diaper stories and songwriting stories in source from the crypt. But we also have real sound media for letting us have a platform to push this podcast through your ear buds, slash car speakers, slash whatever smart device you listen to in your house with. Absolutely thank you real sound for putting this together. Thank you, Robert for being so beautiful and not being debt as old as you are predate. You still being here, she, oh, kicking Duke. And of course, thank you said, thank you full circle music for the facility and utilise lending us your time expertise and and the beautiful Seth Moseley honored to be here. Thank you for logging safe to be here. I guess I'd be here any coming to my place. Thank you for coming. Man, if you like this podcast or even if you don't like this podcast, we'd love for you to to give us a five star review. Give us an earful. Stars, tell us your favorite joke or your least favorite songs ever been written by Seth Moseley. And when I that. Hear that message. And you can do that at turned up podcast dot com. Do it at on apple music or Spotify, or wherever you want to write us. I tunes podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Kenyan all the things. And then of course, Facebook dot com. Slash turned up podcasts same with Twitter at turned up podcasts always, yeah. In Instagram, always on interwebs at WWW dot s- turned up podcast dot com. Don't forget about that. Just just add afford slash Seth at the end of that and get in while they while the getting's good because only literally today through Thursday, October eighth through October, eleven, and then things change around a little bit. But but I highly recommended this guy knows his stuff and is legit the real deal. Thank you. Appreciate. I think that's all from from Nashville, Tennessee. This is turned up podcast, signing outs. He's. As we mentioned. Huge. Thank you and shout out to our patrons made this episode possible. Michael j. eighty three Davin see Casey, Laura and Elise, seven. Samantha Seager Natalie b. j. Walter one and Joe cya eight twenty guys rock. We love you. We'll be back next week.

Mr. Seth Moseley Seth zero Grammy producer max Martin Jake Jones official writer Robert Venable John Lennon Robert Nashville Paul McCartney us Dr Luke Katy Perry Beatles Robert Wright Tennessee
Good Morning Empire 10/02/2020

Niner Faithful Radio

00:00 sec | Last month

Good Morning Empire 10/02/2020

"Hey everyone, this is Jamie from Good Morning Niner Empire from 9 or 5th or radio.com. Let me tell you about graphic Munger. They're keeping your business are going extinct. Take a turn your ideas into reality with their game design team. There are your source for custom logo designs apparel decals and more don't wait any longer and called graphic Monger at 360-460-8526 regarding Facebook and look them up at at graphic monger. And if you mentioned our sales or radio, you'll get a discount. So please go check them out. All right, let's get back to the show. Thursday good morning. Dinner Empire. My name is Jamie. Today's October 2nd. 2020. Let's get into some 49er news. Here's the injury report from practice today. And I got this information from a tweet from that may ago and other beat writers. Here are the players who did not practice Quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo defensive end, linebacker Dre Greenlaw corner back Emmanuel Moseley running back where he moisture inside and Jordan read these following players were limited in practice cornerback came one Williams and cornerback a killer whether Swift running back Jerick McKinnon and tied and George Kittle were fruitful go and practice today also practice squad player Chase Harold wage. Spreading it by the NFL there are reports being made and it is believed that he has violated the substance abuse policy by the NFL but nothing is confirmed, but we will keep you guys also George Kittle looks to be ready to play this Sunday against the Philadelphia Eagles and is ready to go that is it for your 49 or news. Please check out our main show 9 or fifth of radio on YouTube or where you can find all your podcasts. Also. Don't forget to get your revenge tour merch at ww.w. Radio.com. Thanks as always remain faithful. Thursday

Jamie George Kittle NFL Facebook Dre Greenlaw YouTube Emmanuel Moseley Jimmy Garoppolo Philadelphia Eagles Jerick McKinnon Williams Swift Jordan
Dec 27, 2019

Sword and Scale Daily

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

Dec 27, 2019

"Hello and welcome to sword and scale daily. I'm your host Ryan Williams. It's Friday December twenty seventh and this is your daily true crime report coming up on sort and scale daily Nashville. Police have arrested. Michael Moseley the suspect in the fatal stabbings of Clayton with ARD and Paltry Pena. The third who were killed outside of Nashville Bar. On December Twenty First Clayton but third was the younger brother. Her of San Francisco Forty niners quarterback CJ beathard in New York a son. Thomas has been charged with the murder of loves Perez Peres. A mother of five was beaten and strangled to death in her Bronx apartment in October. Her two young children were left alone with her body for more than twenty four hours. Finally an eighty five year old Washington state woman has been charged with premeditated murder and first degree assault after attacking her two roommates killing one and seriously injuring the other. All this and more coming up on sword end scale daily in the Nashville Tennessee reports. That twenty-three-year-old Michael De Moseley was arrested on Wednesday by an Interagency Task Force joining the Local Police Department the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and the US Marshall Service among others. He's been charged with two counts of criminal homicide and one count of attempted criminal homicide side stemming from a December twenty first attack outside of Nashville Bar that left twenty two year old Clayton but third and twenty one year old. Paul Tre Pini dead. Another another victim was seriously injured in the attack. The third victims name has not yet been released but we know that he is a twenty one year old student from the University of Tennessee Z.. Investigators believe that the fight began as a verbal argument inside the Dogwood Bar after Moseley made unwanted advances towards the woman who who was with the Group of friends including Bavard tre Pini and the third victim the argument escalated into a fight outside the bar around three. Am mm-hmm during the fight. Moseley believed to have been carrying a sharp implement stabbed the third in Trapani sides and injured the third victim Moseley then ran away from the scene but thorn in Trapani were taken Vanderbilt University Medical Center where they later succumbed to their wounds. The third victim suffered injuries to his arm and I and has since been released from the hospital last weekend. The Nashville Police Department released surveillance. Valence video footage from inside of the bar. Showing four people three men and one woman who they said were wanted for questioning in connection with the stabbing they. They asked the public to assist in identifying the people in the video one of whom was Moseley. Investigators have since spoken to two of the people in the video but are still looking for the man wearing a Nike sweatshirt. At the time police said they still wanted to talk to Moseley because he was quote strongly believed to have definitive offensive information about the murders suggesting they viewed him as a witness to the crime. However on Monday police spokesman Dan Aaron been identified mostly as the suspect saying quote we fully believe he is the person who inflicted the stab wounds? Aaron also said Moseley usually quote has a violent criminal past he is a convicted felon convicted of violent crimes. On Tuesday. Moseley was added to the Tennessee. Bureau of Investigation's ten most wanted list. The following day the law enforcement task force tracked him to a vacant home where he was reportedly Lee alone after being surrounded Moseley surrendered. Michael De Moseley. Has Mr Aaron said along in violent criminal history going back to two thousand fourteen. CBS News reports. That in two thousand Sixteen Moseley was convicted of misdemeanor assault on a jail worker on Christmas. Day Two Thousand Fifteen during which Moseley squirted them with the shampoo bottle full of year in in December two thousand seventeen. He was convicted of two counts of aggravated felony assault. For the two thousand fifteen stabbing of a man and woman. He was subsequently sentenced to three and a half years in prison. In February. Two Thousand Eighteen Moseley was convicted on multiple counts of armed robbery and was sentenced to two six year sentences has to be served concurrently. He was released on December fifth. Two Thousand Nineteen at the time of the alleged murders he was out on a five thousand dollar bond bond while awaiting trial on a felony assault charge related to an alleged December. Two thousand eighteen attack on a thirty seven year old woman outside of a Wal Mart finally in March of this year Moseley was captured on surveillance. Video during a mass brawl at Sheet County jail allegedly stomping on another inmates head Clayton. Authored was junior in Long Island College in New York and their football team starting quarterback his older brother. Cj Cj Beathard is a quarterback for the San Francisco Forty niners and his brother Tucker. Bizarre is a country music singer. Their Father Casey Beathard is is a grammy nominated. Country Music Songwriter. As children. The brothers played in a band together and took part in local talent competitions paltry opinion. The third was a student at Rhodes College in Memphis Tennessee. Our next story takes us to New York. The Bronx Justice news reports that forty six year old son. Thomas was charged with the murder of forty year old loves Peres on Tuesday Thomas. Miss had previously been convicted of manslaughter in two thousand and was sentenced to twenty years. He was released on parole in August of two thousand sixteen but have not released any details. Regarding Thomas previous manslaughter conviction leads Peres. A mother of five was killed inside her apartment. Government in the Belmont neighborhood of the Bronx. Her body was left in the apartment with her children. A five year old boy and a two year old girl. Her body was discovered on October thirteenth. After the five year old managed to squeeze through the bars on the window unlatched the window. And Scream for help. A passer-by I heard his cries and called nine. One one police force their way into the apartment discovering Peres's body detectives believed the children were left alone with her mother's body for approximately twenty seven hours. The children were physically unharmed. The death was viewed as suspicious from the a start but the NYPD only revealed that it had been ruled a homicide on Monday. Initially police believe that Peres may been stabbed to death with a screwdriver. But an autopsy revealed the cause of death was strangulation. A Son Thomas became a target of the investigation after detectives viewed him on surveillance footage. Waiting outside of Peres's building the NYPD released the footage to the public on Monday leading Thomas to surrender himself the following day while in the company of his lawyer when he turned himself in. Thomas gave his address as a transitional housing facility acidity in Bushwick Brooklyn which caters to homeless people. He was charged with murder and is being held without bail. His arraignment is scheduled old for December thirtieth after the break an eighty five year old woman from federal way. Washington is accused of fatally shooting one of her roommates and wounding. Another the roommates. Two Sisters in their thirties had recently moved into the House and had led the woman who once owned it. Stay with them until she could find new accommodations. Hey I just wanted ask how many of you have credit cards. I'm sure that most of you have at least one. If so you know there's no better feeling than paying them off but you know it feels even better paying off those high interest credit cards getting a lower rate and saving money. That's what you can do with light stream. Did you know I know that. The average interest rate for a credit card is over twenty percent. That's crazy refinance your credit card balances and save with a credit card consolidation. Loan from light stream you can get rate as low as five point nine five percent. APR With Auto Pay. The online application is quick and easy no waiting in line at the bank or being stuck on the phone with representative. It's so easy you can apply from your phone. You can get a loan from five thousand dollars to one hundred thousand dollars with zero zero fees. You heard that right. No fees no tricky application fees no origination fees no transaction fees and no prepayment penalties. He's plus you can get your money the same day you apply livestream believes that when you have good credit you deserve a low rate and great service which is exactly exactly what they deliver. I personally never knew how easy it was to get a lower rate on my credit card debt until I tried livestream and to be honest. I'm not sure I'll ever go anyplace place else since utilizing their services just for my listeners applied now to get an additional interest rate discount. The only way to get this discount is too extreme dot com slash scale. That's light stream dot com slash scale for an additional discount L. I. G. H. T. S. T. R. E. A. M. dot com slash scale subject to credit approval rate includes point fifty percent auto pay discount terms and conditions apply. An offers are subject to change without notice. VISIT LIGHT STRING DOT com slash scale for more information now for our final story eighty five year old Beverly Jenny from Federal Way Washington is charged with first degree murder of Janet. It Oh you gotta and the First Degree Assault of Oh Yugo. Sister Angela. Tino the three women live together in a house which sisters Omega and a Tino you know moved into in November and we're renting to own Jenny could previously owned the House. Stay with them until she found a new place. Police responded to the house just after midnight on December nineteenth after receiving a nine one. One call from Angela Tino who told them ginny shudder in the chest test. A Tino also said that she was upstairs. While Jenny was still downstairs. Responding officers could see Jenny sitting on her bed through the first floor windows inside the house they discover the body of Janet. Oh Yuga who had been shot multiple times in her head neck and back and in addition sustained blunt force trauma in the kitchen. They found a bloody hammer and a bloody screwdriver when they arrested. Jenny shouldn't electric cord wrapped around her neck and her revolver was laying by her side. She had fired all six shots. Investigators believe the Jenny Killed Janet. Oh you go first. And then lay in. Wait for Angela Tino to return home and shot her in the back as she climbed the stairs inside. Beverly Jenny's car in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy seven Chevrolet Malibu which was parked outside of the house. Investigators found a handwritten note listing her complaints against the sisters especially Janet. Oh you go in the note Jenny described you gotTa as not a very nice person and wrote quote. I thought she was getting ready to a victim. And I'm eighty five and have no place to go. She also blamed a Yuga for the attack. Writing quote. Jenny just pushed and pushed and just couldn't cope anymore. As I had no one to help me the note was dated and signed December eighteenth ten fifty eight. PM I am. We're about an hour before. The attacks occurred Fox. Q thirteen talked with the owner of the house. WHO said that Beverly Jennie had owned? The house hosts from one thousand nine hundred ninety nine until two thousand nineteen when it was foreclosed. The owner bought the place from the bank in two thousand nineteen and let Janie stay in the House House while it was being renovated she then let it go to the sisters on a rent to own deal. When Jan Angela moved in last month they also decided to let Jenny stay there until she could find a place of her own? Jenny had promised the sisters she would do. So quickly but did not make any visible efforts to move out and Pastor Festus Gumbo who knew the sisters told Fox News quote the African Culture teaches you to extend grace to those who need it and support port the needy more so the elderly the children and the sick. They thought it wasn't going to take a long time for the previous owner of the house to move out little did they. We know the previous owner had plans of not wanting to move going by what happened back on Tuesday. Beverly Ginny was charged with premeditated murder and I degree assault. She's being held on one million dollar bond. As of Christmas Eve Angela. Tino was still being treated in the hospital before we leave you. We have a short update on Thursday morning. Rodney Harrison Nypd Chief of detectives actives announced on Twitter Dot. The third suspect in the murder of Tessa majors has been located eighteen-year-old. Tessa majors was fatally stabbed during a robbery. On on December. Eleventh police have already questioned the two other suspects and one of them has been charged in connection with the death. The third suspect act was being driven to turn himself in on December fifteenth when he jumped out of the vehicle and went on the run earlier this week the New York Post reported that sources in the NYPD believed that the suspect was hiding with family in the south as part of the search for the suspect who is believed to have wielded the knife during during the attack the NYPD released pictures of the boy but not his name on Thursday Afternoon Hilton announced that the boy had been questioned in the presence of his attorney and was then released into the custody of his attorney. No further details have been released. That's it for today. We'll see back here next week. And until then stay safe and sort and scale. Daily is an incongruity congruity media productions. Your host was Ryan Williams Research and writing by Hagar Barack executive producer. Mike Day if you like the show subscribe and leave us a review. If you'd like to write us with feedback or suggestions use the email address daily at sword and scale dot com yeah.

Michael De Moseley murder Beverly Jenny Perez Peres Angela Tino assault Thomas NYPD Clayton Tennessee CJ beathard Dan Aaron Nashville Bar Nashville San Francisco Ryan Williams Nashville Police Department New York
Instagram Removed Like Count For India As Well?

The Bishnu Mahali Show

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Instagram Removed Like Count For India As Well?

"Hello welcome again this service no Mahalia and you're listening to the marriage so in this episode. Let's talk about the latest thing that happened on Instagram for me. Or maybe for everyone so In the morning in the morning today are when I posted the court. I was being liked but I wasn't able to see them. Oh directly on my feet so I clicked on the view insight button and then I realized that there was an northeast on ratification It says is that nobody else will be able to see the Colombo likes on my profile or on my post. So I'm really happy about it. I wanted wanted to happen and I really support this tink and I personally believe that it would be applied globally ably and maybe in all the platforms even on his and things like that but some people may not like it. But I personally personally think this is a great step and very bold step towards abatement their Beta content better strategy. You know better people whatnot but That's the fat and I mean if this rule will be applied to everyone globally then nobody will be obsessed with likes and just for post content of which gets more life they will all think about good content and nor do content which gets more likes but the content which would be played all over the white or maybe they want to say you know. I've heard it all a lot of people post Stops which gets likes northwestern Dave really want to riposte so this thing will distinguish will go away slowly. And that's a good sign and I'll for example like Moseley mostly goes post. Okay you guys understand So that's a good thing that I have seen on instagram. And it's the started waited from today. Maybe I'm also part of tests or maybe it is now enabled all over India. I don't know but now from from now on on no-one will be able to see the total count of likes on my post of Instagram Post. So I'm I'm really happy about it and I think that it should be applied globally and will everyone so that was it today guys. Let's meet in the next Kosovo.

Mahalia Instagram Colombo Kosovo Moseley India Dave
Unfiltered Episode 21 - Cutting Room Floor / EP 3

Electrum Radio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Unfiltered Episode 21 - Cutting Room Floor / EP 3

"This week's episode of Electron Radio is brought to you by none other than electric supply. One of the few remaining aren't companies electrical synonymous with quality and has is a strong running reputation for manufacturing quality products for the Tattoo Industry. From your very first order. You'll know you're in good hands with a company that obviously puts the artists. I hop online online check us out at electric supply dot com a frontal us on facebook and Instagram at electric supply. By the way if you enjoy the podcast do us as a favor and share the podcast. Scotty and I work hard to bring you great content every week and we hope you know someone that might enjoy the podcast as much as you do. Thanks for listening Welcome to the UNFILTERED. PODCAST with your host Scotty Whitaker. Nothing is off limits when we sit down with your favorite artists and industry professionals and talk about whatever everyone comes up so sit back. Smoke in your favorite beverage and get ready for one. Hell of unfiltered starts to Welcome in there. Don't you like that. Welcome to another episode road a quickie. We're GONNA call this Dan. That's hot as we don't do any quicker. I mean we're GONNA try because this guy that we have helped. Don't let me cut you down already ready. You see what what you can't hear yourself now okay. Welcome again from the Atlanta Motor speedway Tattoo Expo Pit Road Tattoo expert. I got my partner Rob Schmead with me and I have Zane PIP and Zayn you can speak now. I've turned you back up. You hurt my feelings. No adult would start out with that. You don't even have the rate me. We we are going to okay because this this we're just GONNA go right on into this. This is a this is specified such for once on the show. The subject was special on Pacific subject. Never been done before on Scott Pod. I'll bet you we don't stick Dick to one specific we'll be talking about drag cards. No no somebody will walk distracting. It'll be something different. quit trying to act like the bucket star that you're not because we can go ahead and say this Robert Mutes is in the building. Michael Michael Berryman is in the building. If you don't know who that is twisted sister had video longtime ago. Are you really googling. You cannot tell who that is. That's not a mask. That is his real face now. The other person is Bill Moseley. Bill actually was sitting there and he's all he's gone now now combined except book. I I'm taking Michael Berryman out of the situation for a minute. But between Bill Moseley and Robert Mutes. You probably have been in more movies than both of those guys one hold on. Don't make me cut you down again. You're welcome I just cut you down so that being said They both have a booth and getting paid to be at this. Show you hopped in a dodge truck this morning early power. Would you leave Bro. Said when we're telling me back got your back. Five thirty five thirty. Am You came down here because you are the tape. The Tattoo table got we are and I'm just going to say that. Yes you've done a great job and we're very happy they choose that you came okay But I was just wondering because it's got to thinking about them like obscene Zane in a lot of movies wrong and I'm like actually seen him in more movies than Robert Mucus over there. Even though we fuck that dude was whether I came Robert Mutes has a booth at this convention and you are here. Hedlund tables lights and chairs. I am sweating. You've gotTa Sweat Ring Around your black Dude literally right there. It is. I'm I'm calling it out as I see it. You have a pit row. Expo vendor her badge oh he does not you know why he's getting paid would. It doesn't even have to wear a risk. What's the problem what you know what? That's that's what I think about that game so people know who Scott is. Look at this picture behind you sir. I'll tell you what Robert bucs we'll give you run for your money any day of the bring that Big Mitch over here. I got some. I looked at him and I was like you know what I thought. He was a professional wrestler. We're not I tell us what you think. Tell us what you really think about it. Just just give a moment of silence. And I'm I'm GonNa give you a moment. Sound some let you thinking about it and then the first thing that comes your mind you just fuck and let it out very rarely. Are you serious bro. I think it is living in a past that never existed. Are you hating on this guy right. I don't think there's anything hate on. You think that you are. He has pictures of the wall. He has a seven foot poster. It's it's almost as policy of background. Work where lady is talking. And he's holding a cooler in. That's his the main photo. The other photo is eighteen people around a bonfire and his head is behind all of them. He's just Kinda peak it over the apple. That was his son of a bitch. Made more money to come here. He's getting he's got per diem. Flights Aches paid hotel. Paid right and he's getting money to be here. He's making more here than he made for being in that movie gears. The he's getting even if they didn't pay him they papers per diem. fucking fired Bard. I'm just GONNA give you five hundred dollars all right the GO-TO shows inside now. Okay describe describe Zane Pitman's if you had a booth of it or what would look like bear. It'd be like would you. They have like what. What kind of banner would you have? I'd have a banner of Me Talk With My man John. Would you have fucking Shit. Going off with people. came out the whole I would constantly have sparklers lit behind that one of those. WW entered saver. I'd have uh-huh like flailing and you don't know who I am. It's bad as entrance music and bucket. You fucking fired shots at. I didn't fire alarm purpose. I just didn't know I mean like Bill Moseley early like I know of those. But you're you're not a That's a cult following yappy though and they get paid off that shit like to go to these things things like they go to like a horror but very rare and teams guaranteed. Yeah to get done. And they don't meet to guarantee the promoter has come up with it but there's like all these blitz man. I'm not trying to be mean 'cause they might listen to this shit but doubted who knows. I mean people this bill. Moseley's not a fucking even dealers actor. He's as a arledge actor bomber robber. Nukes isn't even on the alphabet of a list of like where he would be. What yes so like? I could get Danny trae hope to come. I've done show with Danny also I can get him to common. Be In my film and he'll come for a week for ten thousand bucks and do I can get those mother fuckers to come for like cheese biscuits and cracker the box cat food Rome. Bola Captain Crunch Mill. I've just it though and punches guys though. I'm just glad they can't hear because that one. That Robert Nukes puckers. But you're a stuntman. You would fight him. Oh I'd beat his ask him because jabs hear no fucking kick him in the knees invite his nose off in front of everyone he would. You put your rose gold teeth in that you had this morning. Yeah he would. He looked like that other guy. That's walking around here Jayco. Oh Shit. Smell road look at it. He just ducked Tindouf. Here let me call them over here. They look at him. Look at this much ease biscuit. They pay once. You're doing I do the big. I know what I'm talking about. Oh onum got an I got. I don't have to because he's going to be moving to the second hasn't heard this. This is good shit I hold on. It's probably going to be a free as up. dwayne look at cheesy right now. Look at where. He don't even come Titi now. He don't but okay now l.. Look I'm not gonNa tell you but when I when I do what I'm fixing the we're still talk but we're not do something here in a second. Just look that way that I'm not doing it now. You're GONNA know immediately when it's so good it's so fucking but it's I mean it's not like anybody's talking to him right now. Okay so again do do I need to get you a booth set up on it sears. Hold on I'm on okay. I didn't mean to do that. I know a few people in the industry that I can get you a boost walking. Look Bill Gates the walking around for Oh good. Winter can wind blowing machine as fuck ago but you can actually see that Shit I so sub. Good fucking both at the next show man to do autographs for and we'll get you fucking insurgent divergent fucking banner. Yeah penalize that one. We'll have to do the triple nine and all that other shit you. We'll do something like that. I mean we have to. We have to if we just literally fucking just set the owner puts the back of your head and just to make fucking titties. That's your banner. Please he's making fan. I'm asking you right now to make a banner like that and take it around with me for autographs. We're GONNA do it. I wanted to make abandoned rob will you. You make sign a banner because you are the master will you please make no sane abandoned. We'll we'll figure out the picture you know no. I'm not doing this right now because that right there. That's all we need. Borough I'll just find the movies can just tell me the donor that club and then the next show we go to. We're literally just going to set a booth up and not say nothing to nobody. NC Five dollar autographs. Yes five dollar picture an autograph. Guess we'll make fucking at least fifteen bucks. Who did you bring this weekend? No are you fucking serious. I was going to but his hi. I was hot. I did bring my shorts though. A debt please note. You're you're right close to it now. I I did see you sitting over in the chair while ago and I saw the monster peeking out and I know you did that new. Oh Ah come home and I'm just so confused at how you know. What did you see the lady walking around the baby monkey this morning? Yeah that thing was creepy. That was creepy. Yo Dude you'd eat that guy. That's my favorite bucket with. I'm just I'm just a little hurt I'm GonNa say I am just a little hurt. The Andy reached out to one of these hieroglyphic letter actors. The Roman numerals. Here give me a shot like this. Was your work in town. Yeah this is my bread and butter. They got the they got the first dead girl from it from walking dead here the half half after the fucker. You not hear you but you are your girl that was laying any are you. Can you stop. Ah for second do that again. So good I you know Andy He. NFL Little Short. This time you could have gotten me here you're here could payment cheese biscuits and set me. They gave me a little we love and he's like I gave him. I'm just saying shots or fuck and fired by the Zane Hitmen. Listen Calm Down Robert Robert Mosely is GonNa make making them Youtube comedy coming back at me. If I see a more choke slim. I just want to sit here and fucking do the walking thing. Every time he moves. It's the here's another one right. Yes it is. I wish I had twinkle toes do but I don't of it. You should get that but these are free I'm chief Robbie bust-up Mural fucking free throw as I'm flipping through and I'm always late. Yeah you gotTa have you almost have to have a real board. They make a salad or they do. And it's nice it's color coded and all kinds of Shit. Oh my God I mean. I think he's legit. You are tire boaters. Seven thousand followers broach. Hold on full shows up and say show-me something I mean. So what do I get shit on your shit on you know I got out. It was seven thousand follower instagram. Take my wife has more followers from marrying me and then he has not lost more followers all aware since Mary a lot. You need like field continental steel either we sell but yet your shit did yeah. Yeah it was it was that was that was getting. I'm getting twelve. Fourteen hundred likes down. Two to four hundred was bad. I it was a bad day. So we're we're on board for this thing right your board for the yet AAC autographs and pictures five dollars in like legit if the promoter comes up to you and says Who are you? What's like dude I emailed Brandy Brandy emailed me? I'll make a huge thing. I'll bet you you this is an outrage. You paid me to be here and he will. It'll be like do you know who I am. Obviously they don't a friend emailed me. I'm I'm here I'm your guest MC l.. Flew me here it is what it is. I'm not leap. Yeah all right. Let's do it. Let's do it with Dwayne and see if it does the same ship. No it's not. It's not a suspect. Not As footsteps are too small they were variously BBB. He did he drop some shit in the guy picked it up handed back to one of French fries. It's been on the floor Bro. Come in here. I'm going to has come to see if I can. You need a little one. I can't won't fucking do it sphere to now. You don't know what's happening here. Let's do him much better. You know what it'd be good on him for that. For the way he was walking was like walking in Shit. Aw that would be working on these twinkle. Toes won't fucking in one of those fifty million pages on raw. Aw favorites folder on that I did that is my favorite show. You mean seven pages long no check this. Watch this if hold on watch this one this one you know my bed Mackay have like fifteen favorites in their watch. That's it all now that there's already up there. Call Bro Wiley. Why Oh you need all those you don't but it comes free Zane? Yeah but you are. That's it oh I like this one. I like this. They like ugly. You're ugly in your mother Plano ugly. That's a good. I can't wait to use that one. Yeah around somebody's trey hold on. Let's see it's to like I'm just shoot joy real gunshot or your news. You need like a machine gun it. I don't know if that's randy savage or lap. That randy savage said ooh. Yeah yeah and I was like what is that Randy. Savage snap into a slim. Jim Outlaw shut the fuck ocean glass shatter. You're listening stone-cold advocate will. Hig Saw Jigsaw is a little box we had when we kids. Remember anything except Jigsaw Zion I got this one right here too though not yet. This one's got fucking five hundred on. Don't look at it for look at Bill Moseley. Didn't we get off topic we're still we even talked about your your wig. That's what we were talking about. Look at this talk. Those are sounds. Yes why. That's why you can't artless random. Not Touching to be big. Ma'am Ma'am Bam. No down down there. Hey Look that's how Bill Moseley feels like now three people you missed you missed it. Got Too many fucking soundboard but hey I'm working on it So yeah one of these days Zane will graduate to the big leagues. And we'll actually have a you know like producer sitting next to us. I like that that can be on top of that. He knows he knows the by here. Here's the kiss like this. Here's the kicker though like looking for new serves as soon as I grab the MIC. You'll have the shut the fuck up like ready. Because that's all fucking Scotty ever does take take you fucking the Mitch all this. She signed copies all out. There comes one right there. Oh Oh oh hey I on the big do your Robert Mutes serve over you cool. You remember that one senior in what you said at by everybody because she was awesome. Talk while he's walking. Apparently clearly saw your face in the campfire whole doubles. Give me this do the witness cropping and you hit. He was this crocks. Get Tony here comes another one off. Everybody here's kind of. There's this a lot of peaches pro look a lot of people. Look I want you to look at how eager bill is signed something. Go over there and come here go there and get some Sun. Hey Are you bill Moseley Moseley. I'm like are you bill. Mutes he show you that. He's showing these guys like. I'm I'm doing these this week so I'm going to sell these this week. Promise Amish upset with them for seven dollars you should think about this over your check. Gal Who Robert Stand up. Let me get a better look at cope. Sugar ooh shit. That's cool man. How much for joining with them out? Though John John Roberts up any movie makes I'm doing booklet. Jaws eighty talk so so just listen to what size pants you nine hundred Forty eight this. He's got to be a forty eight wrong. Sixty five lies at that dude. NFL Bro. He probably used to be your subsidies is he's got his arms he's gotta be at least fifty five. I mean this dude is like biggest fucking Kevin do but flabbier. He's a flabby Kevin. The older Bro. Come on the guy a break. Listen I would. But his hands wanting fitness pockets. How come that dude's never been on the fucking biker? He has the background motorcycle. Uh he was making sure to clean them back. That's a that we could still blocking the entire fan from guy right there is like like during the gotTa say anything he's like. Oh you is catching some wind bro. Now you're not smart. You can catch US thank. He's looking at his looking at a beat us. Some bitches laughing at this is maybelline. It'll go I don't know if we can put this put this episode. Oh this is terr- maybe born with his bad Karma in the make. Yeah I just feel bad. He's moving. Oh it's not. He's look it's a bag. It's a silver foil bag that he put his prints in what's on the front of that. He's kicking his leg. Each time I can think is uh-huh Pittman Sane. Pittman spell it with one or two no-no. Pi Tt Joe the ITT in a way toothless tear on instagram. Don't don't match plus you can. You can find me on everywhere except for Tumbler. uh-huh snapchat previewed. We're GONNA do this exciting. Are you putting this episode out there. Yeah I'm Sharon. Let me tell you what I'm GonNa tag some bitch are you Susan airs. I I'm going to say why don't we just get him over here on the podcast with you know because we'll be fighting that you you said you can handle it. That opening advertisement. Here's the chair. Yeah Oh what are you going to say i WanNa know what did I could the fuck are you. Listen we've been thinking about it. We've been the WE WE ABC. We wonder if do this podcast. We see your background pictures. We still know the fuck you are. He's that guy who gets. What does he get so matty storms out first of all? He's storming out the YETI voices yelling at Andy who who shoot. No way you on the podcast tell the other seven people listening who you are. Oh my God oh good God. Does that bother. You wonder if he'll come to my hotel later. Look I rock on down warriors. Baby baby come on over here. I'M GONNA say we're Robert. Musa take backstage. Tell me if I knew that he had a decent personality I would totally like just go straight in on it but he does it. I don't know if he does. Oh I thought you know what what if we got him over here and he just made up a ah or what if what if he liked takes it to heart starts fucking cry. It would be really nice guy. He's just like really been when you go picked on in school. I mean you know he could hear this eventually cinemas. He does a lot of shows. Go to see him again. The the fucking pat the fact that he neither you can totally tell that that is Liam. That's me he just shaved his beard off the Tattoo. Oh my gosh yeah. I'm a fucking table Guy. I'm trying to think that looks like Scotty. Who does that? Look like that character. Speed it now catching it before. Yeah see I got my hardcore mustache on so I can't fuck be smiling but I'll say it's tough but I'm asking you this one more time because I want to be certain that I'm correct on this. Yeah so in your opinion you are a better letter actor. Where would you put yourself in alphabet? No I'm definitely clean up better than bill. Moseley do what. Bill Moseley definitely has clout because he did the what was what was the name that fucking thing chop top. No what did he do. He did that movie with. Oh doubles reject. But he did chop top Texas this chainsaw to he does all the shit that That like I said that Rob Zombie creates but he did. Devil's rejects like. He's one of the main three devils. Rejects Yeah Otis. Obviously you know. Sit Down with rob wife. Is the girl that the the most famous of them all but then on the other hand now you got fucking Robert over here. Look he's got a fan right now. Yeah how I love you so much the way you cared that cooler out of that was a maith. I'm having Ballantyne my house later. I know you like bonfire. You know what we need to do. We need to you Robert Nukes see. Are you going to do that. Yeah so I seriously want to get him over here now see I wanna see how many of us there on video so Robert Nukes. Seen on Youtube it came up out. That's a whole movie. All this isn't anything it's just a bunch of him. There's nothing monster com that's just house of value works of. I mean do all right here we go one point seven million views. But you know what I like a lot but this one that actually has him has three hundred and if the one of your hoodies on spheres he's got an actual bears head on his. Yeah like he is the there yeah. He's just more fodder killed a bear wearing begats stab stab this big mall. Fucker might have to come over here. got a beer bottle right there. We're good gene tanker. Oh Lord Like I said I just don't Oh God all the Shit Shit with him. Look two hundred ninety three of us. A hundred. Eighty news cheered a shirt on YouTube. A shirt cutting video and you got more use out of cut off about five hundred. You hundred loo looking. At first I was GONNA Walk to well told me to walk to the right and actually they are very. Hey good friends. WHO WHO? He's speaking to right now because they work a lot of the other shows together. Listen fuck off taken up for now. I'm not I'm I'm taking up for that family. That's talking to them. How much is he charged for an autograph? I I don't know front like defense on the show if he has to pay his bills mortgages just because you got to charge at least back because he's doing what do I got to pay for the autograph of somebody with seven thousand grandfather's. Well whatever it is I'll give you another. What would a picture on my wall? Look she's all like hey. You got a pin pin right now. Do you need a pen or are you excited. She needs a pin thought. She she was running over to you. Notice me use your. They don't have a pin on your baby. Look now. He's not on the phone on the on the head now he jumped off the show. Say Now we don't even know. This is what happens with Scotty all time every time a shiny object he gets distracted. It's in every one of his episodes. A piece of candy piece of candy and a little dog could walk by. You got a monster. Hold on sake see guy walks up up shaking hands and how you doing sir so we were doing a podcast right now. Excuse Sir sees me. Hey we should put her on and ask. Hey Hey pick up that headset. No no real they put it on. Put It on. Hey what's up what's your name. My name is Amanda Amanda. Yes we got questions. It's okay you gotta answer. Probably who the fuck is Robert. He was in One of the fucking the one of the fucking Rob Zombie movie. I don't care so okay. Cool he was in one so look at his poster. Yeah he's background right there in both of the things. I don't watch horror movies really no. I'd never seen any of the movies I just know. He's a super nice. Hi Steve when he comes to our show. Here's another thing. Do you have to pay him to come. I don't think we pay him at our shows. But I'm not sure where you gotta pay like anything. We'll get his airfare hotel and per diem hotel and travel expenses. I don't know about all of that. So what shows do you do I work for villain arts. Okay Google so he goes to a lot of Illinois shows this year off but he did all of last year all of them every single show pretty much. Yeah a lot of time away from his day job it shows a lot of that is a day job in itself. Six months Added several more shows next year. So I heard that's us up. We've only announced two of them. So far that's cool. Yeah maybe one day I'll be cool enough to do villain art shows shows. Maybe I what was your name. My Name's Zane Zane. Yeah it's nice to meet you. I'm okay I do okay for myself. I don't have seven thousand followers on instagram in. Hey I got kids. Mine's not private. What's wrong with her? Mike on Mike's not work thank you bye okay. Cool thanks man. Sorry to put you on the spot. We are still left wonder. I don't know Scotty is abandoned. The fucking pod is he did did it has gone did a good job of interviewing it was good. I think you can do your own. PODCAST Day Zane show. Yeah something something. Tattoo table podcast election radio visits tattooed. Table guys podcast. Talking around tattooed table I would say yeah. We're like hey lou the fuck is that person and what are they do. Oh okay. So they're legit. That's we'll see from the outside looking in their users Sir so we know that Robert Nukes is a nice likable guy. That does a lot of tattoos. Convince a ton at Tattoo Conventions with not just big burly hand is came out of there but no tattoos just does background groundwork for house we we need to get on that level. That's all said it's talking earlier about these youtubers Meghan famous for citizenship suit. I think it's easy to become famous. Nowadays you just gotTa have a stick that it's fucking different. It is if you can locked in if something POPs I mean you've got people famous for doing pranks on each other. You got that one. Do vape God dude. That's famous for Boeing. Fate tricks does is like twenty three year. Old Lives in New Jersey. Does date tricks. He owns a vape shop. Yeah he's got three million youtube subscriber driver and celebrities pay to come to parties and do vape trick. Did you see. That's crazy shit. I mean he's good at it dude. He does some crazy shit with some vape smoke but speaking speaking of Youtube taken off did you see that Old Grandma from Mexico that just picked up like three million followers in her first three three weeks of having their work. She does homemade recipes of all meals. She cooks really yeah and and like everyone just loves her a a scene The potty mouth granny one or whatever you see her now the old lady that she cooks too but she swears while she's cooking this sweet little lady that just drops bombs all time what yeah grant it's called Granny potty mouth liquor up grant potty mouth. I think you're really a fan. I think you're a fan dude. He looks tough. He's six ten. I don't know why he's not aquaman why. How did they cash? Jason Momoa for Aquaman. I mean that dude is obviously Auckland. I wanted to see how much he's word. That dude is obviously Zeus fourth. Org Dude he could definitely be a suit he could be for like thorns granddad. Zeus duty could be Zeus. Like yeah do the big AAC fucking dude man. We like. We like ask him to come over. I who are you. I mean that's cool and you know the old show that had Kevin Sorbo in it with the Hercules show love duty new Hercules the new Hercules. For sure that guys. He's a no they're talking about. Your smoking pointed ended. I saw fishing's are confirmed. Tell you what I'm GonNa do sitter from this fan and I'm going to try to cool off it if a can't on DISK GONNA go smack smack that guy with all those tattoos on the that that's bad ass. Yeah that's the best trophy ever. You looked at the dillinger bike right. You're looking at the dillinger. By the time he handles pegs exits. Shoot that thing is tight. Did you see it actually had a Tommy Gun out of Tommy Gun drum mounted to it wasn't holding round around what did is walking around. Oh Shit now I didn't see the check it out rollback over there since since look he is abandoned ship. Shit Yeah Go make a quick one and now this motherfucker daisy left yes new A. We should be so far off topic when he's just lost. What should we talk about the molecular structure? Let's talk about the yearly sales of Goodwill Harry on the front. Yeah so how do you. How much do you think goodwill makes in a year? It's gotTa that'd be up there you gotta cut down. I didn't cut shit now. No you're in and out. You just left the podcast. I had you abandoned your show. I can't help that. I have more people coming over to see me than these people over here. Listening live together so we we put a man on I. I heard that yeah. So she guest. She spotted real quick and she actually gave us some valuable information. What's the show? Know what the fuck does nobody does but he did. All of the villain art shows lashed yet. He's he does haircut right there he's he's come. What the fuck out here? It's in your court senior Co.. I don't understand how he can take that much time off of his day job. You don't know what his wife does. Maybe he doesn't have to work. Maybe he does this because he actually loves his fans maybe maybe he made so much cooler. Seen working look how much he loves that Fan Right now. I mean Jim Carey makes a move right now stopping to. He's been making twenty minutes way back long time right is he still the highest paid actor Balking at one time that twenty million was the highest. Won't live but now he passed. He passed Tom Tom Cruise. Yeah but now. There's people making way more than WHO's the highest paid actor. Now last Google is the Ron Atkinson bike. Yeah or Kevin. Hart Kevin Hart is thinking. He's fucking let's look it up. I bet it's Kevin Hart Twenty Dollar Bill Y'all betting twenty dollars Iran Iraq over Kevin yet. I think I I think it's the rock over everybody but Kevin Hart every fucking thing. WHO's the highest paid actor? Hello Dick what. The highest active is. It ain't neither one of them. WHO's the highest paid actor Google? I don't know probably not. I don't know we're using my phone Bradley. Cooper and Adam Sandler alert. What no way if the eight million who gets fifty eight million Jan Bollywood actor ASCII humour gets sixty five million a bollywood actor make sixty five million per movie. Jackie Chan Dan makes fifty eight million hold on hold on concern with hostile towards the highest paid actor. He's in the dude he he well. He made eighty nine point four million but not June's verdict. That's in a year. This is one moment okay. Do Fifty four million the movie. I just said WHO's the high actor prize. That will Smith thirty five million. Paul Roads. Forty one Chris Evans is forty three point five zero per foot for and Adam Sandler Kevin. Hart's two thousand nineteen highs paid actors right here and Kevin both of yours. Names are on there that you've said so let's say okay. Look at number one. It's Robert Downey junior look at number one. I can't say I don't come glasses. Join Johnson Awesome. Do Wayne here just a mother. Fucker did seven movies in two thousand eight to six and gave motivational speeches. To football. Players can fucking do it to Robert. Downey junior sixty crackerjack when I love the wwe the the year for the year. Oh yeah but that's still not much not we're going to try and see a moot but we wanna do you said we said per movie while so we gotta site we gotta say this. I mean it does. They've given they're given rock decaying the ground. Hey that's a twenty dollar bill. That's Iraq is rockets. The man talented knows this. Does he do his own stunts. Now he's got it does and he's on his instagram really now. That won't fuck wrestle. He could do his own. GODDAMN stunt doesn't auto insurance. I could let him do this shit. I mean that's all wrestling is a stunt work dude right. Am I right. Yeah extent work does Robert Mueller. His own seats It keeps go do yet. I'm okay he might have had. So who's the highest paid actress. I got the answer right here. I don't think anybody can guess I don't think anybody will get own. We got away Scotty to come back on and look it up. I'm not I don't think either one of you will get this of the highest payed paid movie roles of all time including one hundred million for a single film of this of this movie this year. Show Sorry Oh Shush Sir. For Instance Carey was paid. Twenty million for the Cable Guy In nineteen eighteen ninety six Jim Carey. Yes how much. Twenty million million in. Nineteen that's waiting started getting paid twenty million Affleck in ninety six. That's like twenty six million William Today. It's got to be more on. Descend on Friday. Thirty six Ryan Reynolds is making twenty seven million for his upcoming netflix movie. Wow How emma stone twenty six million per movie all right. Look let's talk about. WHO's the WHO? Who Do you think is the most the highest paid actress rally? No I don't want you to look. I want you to guess talking. Yeah no I don't watch TV. Just take a fucking guess. Because I don't think either one of you will get it. I wouldn't fucking guessed it so you've already looked and we're not allowed to look somebody's gotTa fucking okay. Got The highest paid movie star or actress. Actress Thousand Nineteen two thousand nineteen actress so movies woman Could be movies or TV shows. I don't know what else she's been in. Could be it either or I will tell you that she earned women apparently make a lot less than men in Hollywood because the highest paid actress in Hollywood made eight thirty five million dollars in two thousand nineteen. Yeah that's a considerable difference or not reporting other income. No wasn't there a big thing. Yeah that's where the college wasn't there a big thing about the discrepancy between. What's that chick's name? What's that chick's name I'm sorry I'm sorry wrong. Fifty six million for the highest female paid actors I'm going to say two thousand nights eighteen bowl two thousand nineteen yeah. I don't know ash been anything watching the movies like ten years from cheese. What are you going off of speed Donovan? Was that a movie of the bus What's the thousand nineteen was? What's the chick from hunger games? I don't know that I have no idea that that's who I thought you know. It's not see I think I think it is the see here. I'd like to think about somebody from the Marvel series being being being Bing Bing Bing you all right all right so scarlet Manson orders absolutely Scarlett Johansson Mammalia Johann. Good Fuck you. Yeah you got it. And how much does she make fifty six million but so you got to think about what the the the march that you're GonNa really made two hundred fifty on these matrix right. What did he make on his John? Where Betty made more I know keep off of the Matrix felt I mean it says so? I'll say has lost two hundred fifty combined on the three the Matrix look look at this. He didn't keep any of it. What what did you give it to you? He gave it all the way to charities. Yeah yeah he's a very generous guy because he used to be homeless right. I read that one time that he was home. He was a server and he robbed banks with printed Here's some Trivia. which president was he in that movie? Hold on hold on lower. So did anybody win your bed because it was over over under on that does he. Oh you twenty bucks. Are you calling him out on this. I mean he lost the fucking Lost would the rock over. Oh Yeah love. Kevin Hart wasn't even on and I feel like He. I should've been. Yeah I feel like Kevin Hart Kevin Hart was in everything but look at that girl next. This is the great who's the highest stage comedian could be male or Kevin Hart apart. He thinks I'm Kevin Kevin Hart. There's nobody how much money do you think. Joe Rogan in makes not much Kevin Hart Bill Rogue has got to be not even claiming that dude's in everything podcast fucking UFC. Shit about Joe Rogan take. He's probably got hell of endorsement. Let's see what Google says. I'm Ben He makes twenty on the dudes insincere shit and his pot. Google Google Assistant. How much money did Joe Rogan claim on his tax? This trace your podcast can't be famous is because he has like seven dudes looking at shut up. Yeah we're we're to delay homebrew and I keep cutting out. What the fuck is going on with my shit and he sliding like they're sliding monitors around the look at youtube videos? They're what they're asked. They know. They're I would like to thank you know what Tom for. Commercial break folks. I would like to thank the tattooed table guys for sponsoring the show this weekend They give me a hundred fifty dollars for gas to go home with appreciate the Hank Ma. I mean Zane thanks thanks right any oh here is some fuck encouraging news for the likes of you and me tell me. Tell me. Please enlighten lightened. Because I need a new set of headphones. Apparently because these right here don't fuck it work. The more go joan. How much you want to you? I'm Joe Rogan. Make seventy five five thousand dollars her episode of his podcast. I'll even quit by. We are fucking done they were. That's what I'll think about that. Those things things are really loud to the radio. I don't give a fuck. I made two hundred fifty dollars this weekend. Thanks saying you're appreciate. Can I get that now or Sunday. Empty Sunday Eurogas. Worst about twenty five million total which makes year says seventy five thousand and episode. I think that dude cut in two episodes a week that dude's pope episodes out like like OCTO. Mom is shooting them out. We ate listeners. Can hurt any any episode genital. Yeah have which one I listened to the IRA Tj all the way through. Why because you were mentioned in it no was just long it dude? I can't help yup or sometimes they'd like time to listen to four hours. A podcast. All your movie I was driving. I listen do it on the way to Dallas figure. You're working sixteen hour days behind the camera. Touche y'all got to change his headset. What else did I do you? You know what I'll listen to a lot of them. I listen to a lot of barrels. I think it was that one. But I'll tell you why. Which one do you know what my he? He's got the most list with the Tattoo coalition but my top one. Hey I listen to that one to my top one because I didn't realize they were separated right and then I got into it and I was like I like this Joe Capobianco was it and then then t the first Joe Begat then it was. Begets gets dinty. Jason The begats entire story. But I think Jimmy's is gonNA take over. Jimmy's got good counts taking on and he's only been up for a week. Yeah which means I think you probably have more than seven listeners. Now I can start saying ten. I'd even venture to say seventy because we're talking about people that are subscribed. Yeah I mean but look for real like people people that come up or he's sitting here early and it was like that Guy I'm one of your seven was which and I might. That means you actually listen to me because I say that all the time this kind of thing so I feel like if you had seven it's natural just to go to eleven seven eleven it is. I'm a gambler. Hi I'm against. How many how many do you say you have What he he done episode in six months? Why not? He's been busy. I've been depressed shits a real thing. The Real Palm Stop Stop. Stop You WanNa cut this at an hour and do you want to do that because you want to do an episode on the eight mental illness. I definitely want it at mentally. Ill motherfucker I mean I. Ah I'll tell you what I definitely want in on the mental illness. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA hear yes want and go right to it because I can go find some money on the Florida's fucking nuts to do kid rock's here what the fuck do take. Looks like data from Star Trek. That's cute fucking rock. Goddamn Crossover Kid rock all ever. y'All cut it. We might put this up with might not. This could be a car floor. This could be cut room. I like this one for the cutting room floor. Trash talking episode. It was trash-talk episode Just to Robert what you will have go. He will have eight thousand five hundred twenty only followers by the end of next week this episode I will say will people will WanNa know. Who's Robert Mucus that we were talking about they'll check you out opinions and and All the other shit expressed in this podcast are solely Zane the Hammer Pittman. Fuck off just saying that were solely you get into small and the whole tattooed table guys. y'All you don't know who they are and you do. Tattoo conventions hit him up. Tattoo table guys us own instagram's D I even have a bucket website yet. Toothless knowing actually re protects us a website. Okay so yeah for all of your massage table needs light needs and you're Raleigh chair needs. Hit Up Zane or Jake not from state law tattooed tablas ask bloom. Thank you saying. Thank you rob always always and again. This is probably hit the cut room floor but We have to go. It does about Syria. She deserves to be on the cutting floor. This is an episode worthy totally is. Don't make me go there you're trying to trying to trick. Is No what he's trying to trickle. I can barely get a headset dude. I want to open a doughnut shop like weed. Infused donuts we started. I got a name Eh. It's good it's a good name to hold on. I gotta go into the extended episode of the cutting room floor. Possibly with Sane the the hammer and Roberts meet. It's a ten minute encore. Might only be what you said about Japan. I just had Ed this. So this is how things work in my world. Scotty say how things work in my world. I just sitting here staring off in space and some fucking idea. uh-huh creating version created all my God. My assholes stole my fucking favourite puck and pin worked. What that right suit? Amazing Buddy took your fucking booking. Can I see that they had to sign autographs earlier. Okay Oh had to sign a baby. I see we're not see what you're talking about. Do Look at the top. That's that's the fashioned fashioned code. They came because they heard you. That's the fashion coalition okay. DONUT donut. Donut we shop shop. Like a cannabis cannabis bakery liked it makes cannabis infused donut okay. It's going to be called glazed in confused. Tell me that's not fucking gene. That's got hey I'll tell you right now fucking stop by. That's not fucking jeans. Why he told me decided tell you? It's not Pucca Jing's tell you what you gotta do. You gotta go by that that a check. The domains already taken website doing shit with it. They're waiting they're not making will they're waiting to. Yeah no charge twenty grand for him. That's a hell name for cannabis. DONUT shop why. Oh you don't like good. I do good fuck. You encores over donut shops a dead idea because you just told me it was just call me a fucking idiot. I did not know what didn't that's on the other hand he said it wasn't genius then Suck Luckett told me that. When did I say that and say you know what I meant when I said that you damn any say that? Where's the fucking idiot thing at the fucking thing on yourself button? We'll take a break and give rob a chance to be. I don't know where it's at right to say it on your cell. You gotTa push do it. Thank the audience. Thank you I gave you two idiots all right thank you. Well you know what you ugly. You're ugly ugly ugly. They have a ugly family. You know what you're not going to. You're not allowed to be section more pliant on route that read that Oh thank you l.. Thank you I did that. You're welcome. I got five minutes. We're out ending the show. Nope nope we got one more minute. Oh Shit I need a minute rant I it does. I fucking disagreed with him because he told me to disagree with. I didn't say that whatever but I'm not glading we're confused. Yeah yeah is it amazing concept. I thought so for what you want to do. So my advice to you is to you find somebody that lives in world of states and say hey. Let's open a bucket glazed in confused place. Yeah Sane would buy doughnuts there. I would but South Carolina doesn't fuck with that. I'd say you would buy them when you go there for a show. Yeah there's a website for it now and their mind. It's authority down. Oh Oh what a waste of fucking party. What a fucking waste of a good name? What we're going to go out on o glazed aged confused as handpainted ceramics for people dogs cats and niggers

bill Moseley Moseley Zane Zane Instagram Robert Robert Mosely Scotty Whitaker Andy He Kevin Hart Kevin Hart Youtube Adam Sandler Kevin Google Robert Nukes rob Robert Mutes Kevin Hart Robert Mucus Michael Michael Berryman randy savage Jackie Chan Dan Dick
The Porn Reboot Podcast Episode 84: Orestes's Experience

The Porn Reboot Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

The Porn Reboot Podcast Episode 84: Orestes's Experience

"Welcome to the porn reboot podcast where you get practical tips to gaining control over your porn or sex addiction. I'm your host. JK A easy certified sex and porn addiction recovery coach. Welcome to the episode. Today we are going to be interviewing one of the members of both our group. Coaching program the porn reboot intensive and this brother is someone who has been with us for about a year and one of the reasons. Zain's why I am interviewing him is because he has made tremendous progress in his recovery and he's also an individual who tried different methodologies before joining us. I think his story would be one that resonate with the man who is listening who has tried some other modality liberty which hasn't really worked out for him so today I'm going to be interviewing a brother or restless. Let's get started. Alright brothers. We have arrest us with US day. Arrest US why don't you go ahead and introduce yourselves. Let's your age is a little bit about what you uh. My faith have a Christian I the weightlifting and I just got off to American his job. And I'M GONNA recovery for about two years now with jk but before that year so yeah let's go. So what was it that made you WANNA call them. The Art of the rebooted answer Eh. What was going on like you said he'd been in recovery year? What made you go like? Well let me try out this report intensive for me. 'cause I felt was lacking talking some now been a big part will stick group would just constantly recovery sold for me keep slipping relapse being like what. What am I missing? I technically never finished a Tulsa against the final set was our enemy joined. JK's group and it wasn't As expensive at the time. Now I'm GonNa do it like I want to better my life. I was just tired of just laying in bed and is the coaches relapse again. Relapsing I just had enough of it so that kind of pushed me towards investing myself that amount of money to and I mean it was program what you expected. The porn people intensive. Yeah definitely I mean. At the beginning I was just like is this just another a bunch of webinars and Dan just like take notes but not very practical goal and I took it. I had like one hundred percent commitment so my legs. I I gotta read this book so breaking the cycle was like great and I just I just use couple of the techniques the dialogue and asking questions and their feelings exercise. I never did that so that was that was a great. That's so help me up. Just keep going further. It was great the beginning remember. They just mentioned a few of the tools that you use or audrey and I'm wondering wondering in your life outside recovery just life in general I was that impacted you as it sparked anything new as it inspired you to do anything because is it changed your regular day to day life in any way. All definitely I was more open. 'CAUSE I was used to like not sharing my feelings or or being honest with myself were being hoy dislike I always thought people mandate. I'm just as watches. Aren't really new. Me Of the though we lay. Oh you sick. Oh but beyeler to see in the beginning had this man. I'm seeing this person is woman while you're you're you're human like like I am and I feel compelled to be opened in film great and then I was more like a human being I spell great great and also I started Was it releasing emotions. So I started going into that few in the. Let me run on Miami. The Ami Right I talked about that and also to California which is in Miami. I signed up for that Experiencing in Miami. I went there. Amanda it was it was like you just had to like experiences. That shit was also light. They found out. You're never went for stuff like this. No I never. I would not like spitting night. Four grand for for coaching like going to California was a guy spent I to be honest. You guys tonight almost five grand and RBM in everything. I'll say I find myself a blessing more than myself as wow on started low myself more right. Yeah but it was. It was scary Zoysia. Fear there but you know he's GonNa push yes. I caused me to be more masculine. I can say it's been pushed boundaries for sure if I wasn't like most of my addiction I'm still recovering but most relaxing again. Just pity party. This victim mentality. which is I'll just be that guy watching Youtube Videos Jacobs the commenting energies definitely? It's very different when you were the program a few months ago. You're so much more confident and I really value. It's so much more open it's subtle but it's something that I've seed year out year after year with guys it's just that a just stop coming into themselves smart and this much doing. That's an awesome exits scene. I mean there's a lot of people who you know listen. Spot on cast are a lot of or watch videos. Read the blog post. Would you say one of those people who is out and doing okay on my own. I'M CBS slipping every couple weeks. But I am making progress state in a long time. Is this intensive thing. What would you say to somebody who is sitting on the fence? Because you know he's been while was nice someone like that I would say like. Do you really want to take the next. The I guess you could say leap of faith because you might not know if it works here but you have to come to the point. Where like do I really look? You sell five years from now do. Do you WanNa see yourself like in your room. You know as you say masturbation spatial disdain here for hours or do you wanna live more meaningful impactful life you. I don't know where this is GonNa take you for me. I didn't plan on being on the field of light. Releasing emotions and energy edits. It feels great. I just have some kind of purpose. But you're clouded with with the lustful or just less with pornography ages. Caused your your vision right your goal. Your Heart's not open to anything though I would say just. Are you willing to invest in yourself or US WanNa live on mediocre life. which which I did for May here's why would you know what to take that step and it's it's worth the money trust me in? This group is Great. There's many people that you could relate to someone in the group. Your problems are not unique to union on this one going through the same thing you are or something similarly but yeah I want to take that step. What's stopping like ask yourself? What's really stopped is the money? I took out a loan data even though it was as a small amount but I still I did it. 'cause you know what man I I know this initial for me I also I was committed other. You know what this feels right now. Nine Non Pornography Right Buddy program. You know what I'm not GonNa do it later though if you have they're like wow I'm passionate I'm Jay non damned. Just do it at that moment. 'CAUSE you're Your heart showing you a still a manly sea. That badly I think one of the characteristics of a lot of guys driving resource. They all have that in their life and South Lakes flips it clicks clicks this. They'll do whatever it takes to go in then like always say when I first invested in coaching over a decade ago it literally was thing those in my head was. Don't worry about. The decision is made the decision and make it writes in whatever APP. It's GonNa make it right. Let's also which you said which is very true bad. It's when you come into the program you realize that Y'all you are not your situation is not unique you think it is because you've been dealing with it myself you come in and you see guys this shed his law Moseley or this aren't going to be a love of this you know. Let's see well. How would you describe program allow you describe it a little more? Doesn't you just feel yourself right now. Zika all by yourself. What is the one word that describes the reboot intensive process? And everything you do. The best you munch being in the program. I would say what is coming to me is just showing I want. You know you may not feel like doing the feeling you know why us like your ego writer big enemy here let us show up and know that at the Internet light or the Internet tunnel. There's something good there and you have to believe right. Lo Fi just takes a little bit of faith. Inches believe manages But just follow these steps j just trust this guy warning. You pay good money and this guy's GonNa lead you to freedom if you're willing to and you got to commit to yourself and that's something I just show a man like something I would say you gotta be willing and committed about all right any other last Last words or is from your heart or any of the guys out struggling with bad watching this video gives me hundreds of thousands of going to watch this so last words for them. I would say if you've been doing it on your own for so along. That's what I did for many years even in recovery sounds we are in twelve said. I never looked for an accountability partner and that was one. Why didn't have one but it was a strong one? I encourage you like if you've been doing this on your own. You still believe that. Like just just analyze where you came from in your results all trying to miss the same thing right because his insanity doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results would encourage. We've been doing this law than it's not working WORKINGTON. Why not try something else right just program and will give me right but Jason will give you a great really or or just a person right a human connection that you guys are the same struggle? Because we'll pick your pick yourself Picasso's up you know when you fall down it's like a journey. It's it's great and I would say that like just try finding help if Jacob and someone else you know 'cause in something we need help That's what I would say. Now you know. How am I going to be unbiased? But it was thank you something baby Jake aiden someone right. That's what I would say like. It's not an iron wants fit for Jacobs program tonight and I've seen that right. I love the fact that you mentioned that bank. You project that or is this Just that human connection and getting out of isolation is one of the first things that many addicts needs to. It's possible that you'd never would have ended up in the rebooted. Let's celebrate upgrading or less intimidating. So thank you for sharing. That and I appreciate Ed's GonNa see you and thank you for taking out a few minutes Saturday. John Needs they bet. Thank you GONNA win.

JK Miami US California Zain Tulsa Youtube Jacob audrey Dan CBS WORKINGTON Amanda Jason Jake South Lakes Ed John Moseley
Scam Goddess Trailer

Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Scam Goddess Trailer

"Hey friends we're going to give you a nice little sneak peak to one of our friends podcasts her name's Lacey Moseley and she's hosting a podcast cats called scam goddess premiering on Air Wolf October first each week lacy kicks back with her favorite Comedians to run through some of history's wild eldest scams guests included poff Tompkins learn laugh Gez Nicole by it. We Love we love scamming and you're. GonNa love her. Two so listen to this clip of Ya. Aluminium is Lacey Mosley and I love fraud hoodwinked hoaxes swindles and across his which is why I wanNA tell you about my new show scam goddess. My new pod is dedicated to all things fraud and that's come into ear wolf Tuesday October first as a part of my congregation each week you can listen to me alongside of some of my favorite comedians break down some of the greatest griffiths hottest hoodwinked coolest cons from the past present and a UTICA. Don't get y'all yeah from ten to shakedowns insurance rackets and international con men of mystery. We covered all some of my favorite guests include Paul Tompkins. I was going to get the coin from this. She's GonNa come out of jail richer than she left to. This was the scam all along Lauren Omb. I got wait so are they. Just like your loan is still with the original company and they're just like we'll help. You and they're like just give us. Seventeen thousand dollars will pay it off and then there actually was keeping yeah. Nicole buyers fully sociopathic and I kind of love it like inbetween rides. You're murdering people but not right now. I'll get you does SARS Jamie. Amy Loftus miles an more honey so be sure to listen to scam goddess when he premiers October. I subscribe now on Stitcher Apple Podcast AH.

poff Tompkins Gez Nicole Lacey Moseley Lacey Mosley fraud UTICA griffiths Amy Loftus Lauren Omb Jamie Seventeen thousand dollars
Darnold's Spleen, The NFL's Officiating Problem And Playoff Baseball

Boomer & Gio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Darnold's Spleen, The NFL's Officiating Problem And Playoff Baseball

"Live from the Investors Bank Studio Hoover in Greg Jian boomer and Geo on the fan simulcasts across the country on CBS sports network good Tuesday in the beginning of the season could not have gone worse for the jets it is about as bad as it gets and they are one of the teams that have stuck like in this this place of neutral where Dr Zang Good morning our you off doing all right there gio and bingles thick last night why even wildcard game and then the Abbey American League wildcard game and then you get the division series in both Leagues These Start Times already tell you could be a long week for jet fans as they get ready to play for the or against the Philadelphia Eagles from what I heard yesterday would have to take miraculously turnaround bowl I think for him to be ready to go under the current set of circumstances with all the things that they're telling us about what he's allowed to doing what he's not allowed to do it's all over said and done with because I'm telling you there's no way their quarterback is playing this weekend Philadelphia no way he's just not ready yet it's just not humanly all safe will they make a decision on Mickey callaway or is it something that's GonNa drag on where he doesn't know his future they don't know what's going on some of the other candidates her for something on Sunday just seems unlikely it seems unlikely and also see it's not a good situation for for Adam Gates either because he's got to decide on they've got a couple of days here where the manager twist in the winter season ended on Sunday yesterday no announcement today you know when you read the writers like Oh we gotta do something here you know Adam Gates has got to somehow when these games are schedule is just absolutely true bowl painful football to watch offense of line is a joke of the bengals and Andy Dalton running for his life and it was interesting my man Steve Young said at halftime lift weights he can't get hit other still worried about the size of his spleen with all these things on get hit so what does that tell you can't get it today doesn't mean that they're not gonNA clear that they had for the rams when Zack Taylor was there and opportunities about early in the game last night could not pull it off at all and the bengals now like one of the worst teams in the League right there with the dolphins right there with the redskins you know the giants were there two weeks ago I don't know where the jets are going to be in this whole mass with their manager you would have to think that a decision would be made on Mickey callaway the next couple of days to the top yes fluid is Alveda pick and other places to go some of these big name managers are out there already making their decisions one is Brody Van Wagon and Jeff Wilpon at one of the mets going to do aw I don't know because it's a football game and it was Monday night and was it watchable again and it was just it was just painful painful painful pain he's getting the wraps what's going to happen in getting Luke Falk ready for this game I getting Sam Darnold writing for this game or coming off a bye. Cj Moseley's not gonNA play again by the way so this is today I mean that's not a fair comparison because Tom Brady is not going to be running down the field exposing himself to a spear like it to his by the way I actually exactly what I've been saying the whole year about any Dalton Zack Taylor you figure figure it out but they haven't figured it out because they don't have the same player four that's that's that's the that's the most nineteen fifty during this period of time and then since we don't know really the is a repeat offender he's smiling and kissing blowing kisses to the crowd as he runs off the field on Sunday the guys Jerky is a dirty player he's got no regard on for Sam Darnold it'll be playing against the eagles the fact that he was cleared for you don't light non contact football activities and that was the best that they could do he can't different reasons bontes perfect hitting guy that's on his knees and he's launching himself like a missile and Jackson is actually running into a guy that's bringing the status of Josh Allen Mitch Trubisky is not going to be playing and we don't know what they're gonNA do in Washington with case keenum and Dwayne Haskins there's a very good chance that ounce Friday seven hundred seven Saturday five seven is the Yankees point the wildcard game for the first time in a long time which is a great thing for them and that's for the AAC and we were talking about I was talking about this yesterday guys like Mitch Trubisky and Josh Allen put themselves in bad situations they have got toll learn to stay in the pocket that play on that was a helmet to helmet but I thought it was a football play I thought there's no way that Jackson the defensive back for the New England his peers and he deserves every bit of that suspension and for the NFL now he's GonNa have to deal with this stupid appeal process I really hope that he doesn't we don't see him on the field again I mean so you know he very rarely ever takes it and mica hide the safety for the buffalo bills you know if we would hit Tom Brady the way that they hit Josh Allen I just down and his helmet spring now I know he's going to get behind that he's probably GonNa get a big fine for that matter because is a quarterback but the quarterbacks running out of the pocket Oh say Mike Mayock and Jon Gruden went down this road with him and went down this road with Antonio Brown right what does that tell you about their decision making it or maybe get a light suspension whatever it is that from a guy who still hasn't learned his lesson we were talking about this is fourth suspension now patriots and then got caught in the Antonio Brown and now the other one vantera perfect going to be suspended for the rest of the year we're just waiting for Richie Incognito to take a bat to John Gruden's car backup quarterbacks would be tied second most since nineteen fifty through week five yeah I mean it just goes to show you just how hard it is you know and then guys capping off a coffee and snacks and breakfast items thank you I appreciate that to boomer as you speak if you're that rustling in the background that would be that would be another eleven quarter actresses trying to do that that's not bond has perfect if you look at the two plays they're both the helmet but the players are hitting helmet download for complete APP was called you know that that's not the right way that's just not the right way and then you see him run off the field blown kisses and smiling like this is what he's supposed to be doing now I would yeah you know I think that vonnas perfect got exactly what he deserved task was happy to see that the NFL stepped up the NFL wasn't playing games or the hit and and make their decision under three seconds and get rid of the ball and be accurate with it and this is what you know when you watch even like you know Tom Brady struggled against buffalo how they're running their franchise your I mean we said at the time I mean they had a whole different philosophy when it came to the draft and it seemed like they were going all character guys all character guys no question that the hits were different and I still say that I feel this way now even more so after we finish week for that the official in the last five years or so and two of them are gone one is basically exiled from the NFL after they they caught him and then he went to the yeah you're GONNA struggle a game every now and again all the great ones going to struggle I mean the fact that he's forty two years old and he's out there doing what he's doing against a good defense on the road in buffalo not easy but uh-huh wheelchair and that's that's not it's just not the way the game is is supposed to be physically but if you watch him hit Jack Doyle the tight end for the Indian but then what they did in free agency and trades in the off season was bringing three of the largest maniac personalities that the sport has offered up a

Tom Brady CBS Hoover Cj Moseley Greg Jian Geo forty two years eleven quarter three seconds five years two weeks