35 Burst results for "Morton"

Young, No. 8 Alabama roll past Auburn 49-27 in Iron Bowl

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 hrs ago

Young, No. 8 Alabama roll past Auburn 49-27 in Iron Bowl

"After a slow start, number 7 Alabama took control and thumbed auburn 49 27. The victory made crimson tide coach Nick Saban, a happy man. To win the iron bowl is a significant accomplishment for our team and for our fans, which we certainly appreciate. And this team to win ten games. Saban believes that ten and two, vampire deserves consideration for a playoff spot, 2021 Heisman Trophy winner Bryce young passed for three touchdowns and ran for another. Auburn is 5 and 7. I'm Bruce Morton

Nick Saban Auburn Alabama Saban Bryce Young Bruce Morton
Adams' 35-yard TD in OT powers Raiders past Broncos 22-16

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 6 d ago

Adams' 35-yard TD in OT powers Raiders past Broncos 22-16

"Derek Carr through two touchdown passes to Davante Adams and the Raiders roared back to defeat the Broncos 22 16 in overtime The second of cars scoring strikes came from the Denver 35 when he saw no defenders anywhere near Adams So I just said look it's go up in the air and really I mean it happens it happens slow but it happens fast So it wasn't really a whole lot of thinking It was just locking on the ball and just making it look like With no time out Carl led a drive that culminated in Daniel Carlson's game tying 25 yard field goal with 16 seconds left in the fourth quarter Both teams are three and 7 Bruce Morton Denver

Derek Carr Davante Adams Raiders Broncos Denver Adams Daniel Carlson Carl Bruce Morton
Saad, Binnington help Blues hold off Avalanche 3-2

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last week

Saad, Binnington help Blues hold off Avalanche 3-2

"Robert Thomas scored one goal and assisted on another as St. Louis held off the avalanche three two After the game all he could do was rave over how goaltender Jordan Bennington and three teammates preserved the win even though the avalanche pulled their goalie to gain a 6 on three advantage over the final 57 seconds Can't give enough credit to those three guys out there and better I mean they did an amazing job keeping their chances to kind of the outside and better made some huge saves So I mean what a way to close it The blues have won three straight while Colorado saw its four game win streak come to a close Bruce Morton Denver

Jordan Bennington Avalanche Robert Thomas St. Louis Colorado Bruce Morton Denver
Tannehill returns, throws 2 TD passes as Titans beat Broncos

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Tannehill returns, throws 2 TD passes as Titans beat Broncos

"Ryan Tannehill bounced back after missing two games with a sprained ankle to lead the Titans to a 1710 decision over Denver Things were ugly early Guys hung with me and kept battling in we just found a way to start making some plays I'll take advantage of some looks that we were getting And made some big plays especially there down the stretch and we needed a big part of Tennessee's heroics where Tannehill's two touchdown passes to Nick Westbrook akina the last of which came on a 63 yard flea flicker At 6 and three the Titans lead the AFC south while the Broncos fall to three and 6 I'm Bruce Morton

Ryan Tannehill Titans Tannehill Denver Nick Westbrook Akina Tennessee AFC Broncos Bruce Morton
No. 24 Washington rallies late, topples No. 6 Oregon 37-34

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last week

No. 24 Washington rallies late, topples No. 6 Oregon 37-34

"Peyton Henry's 43 yard field goal with 51 seconds left gave number 25 Washington a stunning 37 34 road victory over number 6 Oregon U of O coach Dan Lange This game 100% falls on me right Our players gave phenomenal effort They tried really hard We shot ourselves in the foot a few times in the first half but we're able to move the ball You know much better in the second half you know that being said we weren't able to get a stop defensively Oregon saw its 8 game win streak come to an end Overall both the ducks and huskies are 8 and two I'm Bruce Morton

Peyton Henry Dan Lange Oregon Washington Ducks Huskies Bruce Morton
Nix, No. 8 Oregon turn up gadget plays, beat Colorado 49-10

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

Nix, No. 8 Oregon turn up gadget plays, beat Colorado 49-10

"Number 8 Oregon dominated throughout thumping Colorado 49 to ten Quarterback Bo Nick showed off his versatility running for two touchdowns throwing for two touchdowns and catching a TD pass Continued to just stop them throughout the game And so as we kept scoring they kept stopping them And so we just as a unit all sides of the ball we just had a complete game The high flying ducks have won 8 straight and lead the PAC 12 with a record of 6 and O The buffaloes are one in 8 Bruce Morton boulder Colorado

Bo Nick Oregon Colorado Ducks PAC Buffaloes Bruce Morton Boulder
No. 7 TCU gets to 9-0 with 34-24 victory over Texas Tech

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

No. 7 TCU gets to 9-0 with 34-24 victory over Texas Tech

"Darius Davis scored on a punt return and grabbed a fourth quarter touchdown pass leading 7th ranked TCU to a 34 24 win over Texas tech Davis returned the first punt 82 yards as the horned frogs improved to 9 or zero for the first time in 12 years Kendra Miller gave TCU the lead for good by rushing for a TD for the tenth straight game Miller finished with a season high 158 yards on 21 carries Max duggan was 12 of 23 for 195 yards and a pair of fourth quarter TDs Tech freshman baron Morton was 7 of ten with a touchdown before leaving with the left leg injury in the first half I'm Dave fairy

Darius Davis TCU Kendra Miller Texas Tech Max Duggan Davis Baron Morton Miller Tech Dave Fairy
The latest in sports

AP News Radio

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

The latest in sports

"AP sports I'm Bruce Morton The World Series stands at one one after the Astros defeated the Phillies 5 to two Houston jumped on loser Zach Wheeler for three first inning runs more than enough for from Vera Valdez who went a strong 6 and one third innings to get the victory As far as stroh's manager dusty baker says from valdes it's just more of the same This guy has been as consistent as any picture that I've ever had throughout the course of the year and he just continued to do the same thing during the playoffs Game three is Monday in Philadelphia College football second ranked Ohio State came on strong down the stretch to thump number 13 Penn State 44 31 The Lions went up in the fourth quarter 21 16 but buckeyes defensive end JT to imola said that's when OSU went to work We never broke you know we always stay strong We always we always just love the challenge you know And you know after they scored there was no break We were just telling each other like hey it's stuff we gotta fix Top ranks Georgia led from start to finish topping Florida 42 to 20 in the third quarter the Gators tried to come back from a 28 to three halftime deficit but UGA coach Kirby smart said his guys were equal to the task The time there where we lost momentum and that's happened to us more this year than it did last year And we bounced back So I was really proud of the players AP top ten upset victims were number 9 Oklahoma state which was squished 48 nothing by 22nd ranked Kansas state and number ten wake forest which lost at Louisville 48 21 Top ten winners were Tennessee Michigan TCU Oregon and USC Pro basketball the bucks improved to 5 and by outlasting Atlanta one 23 one 15 and Sacramento won for the first time in 5 tries this season by defeating Miami one 19 one 13 Hockey in a battle of two teams off to hot starts the hurricanes went overtime to defeat the flyers four three Bruce Morton AP sports

Bruce Morton Zach Wheeler Vera Valdez Dusty Baker Stroh Valdes Astros Phillies AP Kirby Smart Imola Houston Buckeyes Penn State OSU Lions Philadelphia Ohio Football Gators
Jokic, Nuggets keep Lakers winless with 110-99 victory

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Jokic, Nuggets keep Lakers winless with 110-99 victory

"The Lakers fell to zero four when they lost to the nuggets one ten to 99 Denver pulled away in a third quarter that coach Michael Malone said was a thing of beauty only 17 points they shot 33% 34 assists 11 turnovers So we did a much better job in terms of valuing the ball not fueling their break And then 35 points in transition The nuggets held an opponent to under 100 points for the first time this season They were led by Nikola Jokić who logged 31 points 13 rebounds and 9 assists Bruce Morton Denver

Nuggets Michael Malone Lakers Denver Nikola Jokić Bruce Morton
Fields, Bears score 23 straight points, beat Pats 33-14

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | Last month

Fields, Bears score 23 straight points, beat Pats 33-14

"Justin Fields ran for one touchdown and threw for another as the bears thumped New England 33 to 14 He said the key to the win was a solid approach by all of his teammates I'm just proud of everybody The way they prepared this week the way they perform today and it's always great And in the night with the duck for sure Chicago's group effort included three interceptions by a defense that did not allow any patriot points in the second half Both teams are three and four I'm Bruce Morton

Justin Fields New England Bears Chicago Bruce Morton
 Next UK prime minister: Sunak closes in after Johnson balks

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Next UK prime minister: Sunak closes in after Johnson balks

"Former treasury chief Rishi sunak is the strong favorite to be Britain's next prime minister Sunak could well be offered the post after former lead up Boris Johnson dropped out of the Conservative Party leadership contest The government party is choosing a replacement for Liz truss who quit last week sunak is the only candidate with confirmed support for more than 100 lawmakers the number needed to run in the election House of Commons leader penny Morton has so far fewer expressions of support but is aiming to reach the threshold by the time nominations close later in the day Charles De Ledesma London

Boris Johnson Sunak Rishi Sunak House Of Commons Liz Truss More Than 100 Lawmakers Last Week Conservative Party Charles De Ledesma Prime Minister London Penny Morton Britain Expressions
Hall hurt after 62-yard TD in Jets' 16-9 win over Broncos

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | Last month

Hall hurt after 62-yard TD in Jets' 16-9 win over Broncos

"The jets are now 5 and two after scratching out a 16 to 9 victory over Denver a big part of that shiny record is the jets being four zero on the road Safety will parks knows why I'm gonna tell you two things Got a bunch of gangsters over here with like literally love football And none of us are scared to go to somebody else's house lock their door and play football And made the best man win This game also marks the first time gangrene has won four in a row since 2015 The Broncos fall to two and 5 Bruce Morton Denver

Jets Denver Football Broncos Bruce Morton
Cook's late touchdown gives Vikings 24-16 win over Dolphins

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | Last month

Cook's late touchdown gives Vikings 24-16 win over Dolphins

"For the Vikings the view from the top looks mighty nice By beating Miami 24 16 Minnesota now leads the NFC north by two games over Green Bay Coach Kevin O'Connell We can do a lot of things as coaches better to help our guys But I'm really really proud to be 5 in one right now We talked about any way it would take any means necessary to get to 5 and one going into this by Kirk Cousins threw for two touchdowns and Dalvin cook ran 53 yards to the house Losers of three straight the dolphins are three and three I'm gross Morton

Kevin O'connell Vikings NFC Green Bay Miami Minnesota Dalvin Cook Kirk Cousins Dolphins Morton
Quid Pro Joe Threatens the Saudis With Jack Posobiec

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:08 min | Last month

Quid Pro Joe Threatens the Saudis With Jack Posobiec

"Gears here, Jack, I want to talk about OPEC and quid pro Joe. What is the story here? It's a little confusing to most people. Walk us through it with your foreign policy expertise. So the timeline on this is important, right? So over the summer, when gas prices were getting really bad, Joe Biden and his crack team at The White House decided to go over to something called the strategic oil reserve. There are these giant caverns down in Louisiana bio, they're underneath the Louisiana Bayou, these actually salt caverns, limestone, one of them used to be owned by Morton salt, really interesting story. And we, in the 1970s, our country started filling these up as a reserve in case OPEC ever conducted another embargo against the United States or ever looked to cut production. Pay attention to that because that's going to come up later. So Biden decided that he didn't like where his approval numbers were. So what did he do? He started releasing oil from the strategic oil reserve into the markets and prices dipped for a little bit, but now they're back on the upswing again. So last week, Biden calls for OPEC to increase their production. And of course, we remember it was. He goes over there. He has the fist bump with MBS, The Crown prince that's basically in charge of how do you right now. Saudi Arabia's government is basically run my game, like Game of Thrones. It's Game of Thrones rules over there. So the king is pretty much he's down, but he's not out yet completely, but MBS is the prince is really running the government. Yeah, the prince is running down. So if you've seen Game of Thrones, that's basically how they run Saudi Arabia. And so OPEC plus last week comes out and says, you know what? We're actually not going to increase production. We're going to decrease production. Joe, we're very sorry about that. We don't like the things that you've been doing. We've decided that we're going to push off. And Charlie, you had Steve Bannon on here yesterday for that incredible discussion about the collapse of the Anglo American financial system worldwide. This is part and parcel of that because of course everyone knows that system. And maybe we should do some more episodes explaining this for people. It's backed by the petrodollar. It's backed by the fact that all oil transactions petroleum LNG must be conducted around the world in U.S. currency, even if

Opec Louisiana Bayou Biden Joe Biden JOE Morton White House Saudi Arabia Jack Louisiana U.S. Steve Bannon Charlie
Avs raise banner, beat Blackhawks 5-2 to start title defense

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | Last month

Avs raise banner, beat Blackhawks 5-2 to start title defense

"Colorado dominated from start to finish breezing past the Blackhawks 5 to two but before the opening puck drop the avalanche got to watch the raising of the banner that came with last season's Stanley Cup Colorado's arturi lechon Amazing feeling for sure I don't really have the words to describe it How I felt at the moment but it was amazing for sure He scored two of the F's four power play goals with the other two coming from Valerie and this on a night in which they outshot Chicago 35 17 Bruce Morton Denver

Colorado Blackhawks Avalanche Valerie Bruce Morton Chicago Denver
Colts grind out 12-9 win over Broncos in injury-filled game

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

Colts grind out 12-9 win over Broncos in injury-filled game

"On a night punctuated by punts and field goals defense saved the colts in a 12 to 9 overtime victory over the Broncos After Chase McLaughlin's fourth field goal of the night Denver drove to the Indy 5 but linebacker Zaire Franklin was happy to see the defense force and incomplete pass on fourth and one That's what you look for You know as a defense that's what you want You want the game to be in your hands You want to be the last player you want to end the game And you know it all comes down to execution and you know that's what he was able to do The colts are two two and one while the Broncos fall to two and three Bruce Morton Denver

Chase Mclaughlin Zaire Franklin Colts Broncos Denver Bruce Morton
Broncos, Wilson edge Niners, Garoppolo 11-10 in prime time

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Broncos, Wilson edge Niners, Garoppolo 11-10 in prime time

"The Broncos had high hopes for their defense in 2022 and on Sunday that defense asserted itself in an 1110 victory over the forty-niners Denver allowed a first quarter touchdown and the rest of the night held San Francisco to three points This made Bronco linebacker Bradley Chubb a happy man It was never like oh man we gotta go back out there It was always yeah we going back out there We're gonna put the fire We're gonna do this we're gonna do that so it was just fun to see The Broncos forced three turnovers in a safety Melvin Gordon's one yard run with four ten left in the fourth lifted them over the top Bruce Morton Denver

Bradley Chubb Broncos Niners Bronco Denver San Francisco Melvin Gordon Bruce Morton
AP source: MacKinnon signs 8-year deal, highest paid in NHL

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

AP source: MacKinnon signs 8-year deal, highest paid in NHL

"Nathan McKinnon's next athletic move is finding additional room in his wallet The avalanche Tuesday announced their 27 year old star center has agreed to an 8 year contract extension that will keep him with the team through the 2030 31 season According to multiple sources the deal will total $100.8 million making him the highest paid player in the National Hockey League The team leader in points per game McKinnon helped the abs to their first Stanley Cup title in 21 years last season Bruce Morton Denver

Nathan Mckinnon Avalanche National Hockey League Mckinnon Bruce Morton Denver
"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:45 min | 6 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

"First one. Yeah, I hope it did the trick. It did. She didn't walk away all this well. We're good now. I can't write another one. So that was fabulous. Right. Yeah, what's crazy is we were in a good space then. It's almost like I have to process it and go through it first. In order to talk about what I can't really talk about what's happening while it's happening. Usually. Yeah, but a lot of the albums very heartfelt, very vulnerable, I would say. Yeah, it's very much about breakups or the possibility of breakups. It's a tough album. Sure. When you sat down, you play that for your band. And then you don't write music. So how do you arrange it with them? Yeah, well, thankfully, I mean, well, I do have, you know, Berkeley graduates with me and stuff. But thankfully, all my guys around me are all so church cats, the way I grew up. So we communicate in a different way. It's not through, you know, sheet music is through, just talking. You know, I can call out the two or 5 or one, you know, or four. So I know enough where we can communicate musically. It's not. Because I didn't go through school, it's not that I don't understand the movements of things. We just kind of have come up with their own language, I guess. It's a shame they had to go to Berkeley, really. Shout out to Brian. Take some so long. So what's next for you? I'm going to get on the road. You know, I miss that so much. We just did a few shows and I can't wait to play this new stuff live. I mean, it's made for it. I thought of the album in that way. The album just continues, like my shows do, you know, it's not really a lot of break in there. They just flow from one to the other. And I just can't wait to present that to everybody. And really to, it's the community. I think it's me that church growing up in church and having that weekly community where you share this experience. I just can't wait to share this experience of this really honest music with my supporters. So that's next. I'm scoring an animated film right now. Okay, what's that like? It's fun, man. Well, in my case, because the director is a fan of mine. Like, you know, he really already digs what I do. I imagine it could be frustrating when somebody is just you're just putting in a position to do it. But this guy wants PJ songs. So it's so cool because this story is so weird that it allows me to go places that I would never get to go in my own music. So it's like PJ during weird, different cool stuff. It's really exciting for me. I'm enjoying that process. So there's that, there's some TV shows that I'm scoring as well. I like that side of it too, 'cause my music is so visual that I like when I have to create to a visual. It's pretty fun. So recovering workaholic, huh? Yeah, in my sense, you know, even like this big tour. This is new for me. Brand new for me, where in the summer we'll do two weeks on two weeks off, something I've never done in my life. But I understand now that just as much as I plan for these things, I have to actually plan for the other stuff that's important to me. So we'll see how that goes. But two weeks on two weeks off is a big start for this recovering workout. Okay, let's see how that works. Let's see. I'll check back in. Okay. It's been fabulous. And the album is fatty. And thank you so much for coming in. Thank you for having me. So beautifully in a pleasure. It's great album. It's real treat. Thanks to PJ Morton for taking us through this incredible career as a solo musician and a sideline. You can hear all of our favorite PJ Morton songs on a playlist at broken record podcast dot com. Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel at YouTube dot com slash broken record podcast where you can find all our new episodes. You can follow us on Twitter at broken wreck. Broken record is produced at help from Lee arose, Jason gambel, Ben holiday, Eric Sandler, and Jennifer Sanchez, with engineering help from Nick chafe. Our executive producer is Mia Labelle. Broken record is a production of pushkin industries. If you like this show and others from pushkin, consider subscribing to pushkin plus. Push plus is a podcast subscription that offers bonus content and uninterrupted ad free listening for 4.99 a month. Look for push plus on Apple podcast subscriptions. And if you'd like to show, please remember to share rate and review us on your podcast app. Our themes expect any beats. I'm Justin Richmond..

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:40 min | 6 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

"Coverage in excess details at T mobile dot com. We're back with the rest of Bruce hudlin's conversation with PJ Morton. I do want to talk about this new album, watch the sun. Yeah, of course. Tell me about the recording of this album. Tell me what you were thinking going into it. Yeah, well I wasn't really planning on doing an album. I just was coming off of a crazy run. I mean, I just went back to back to back with music more than I ever had before, actually, but it just was rolling. So I was rolling with it. And then we got shut down. I was with maroon 5 in South America in real time. The show started to get canceled. We had to fly back to the states. And when we got back initially, I had voice notes from March 2020. I was in this creative, it was just coming faster than I could even control it. And I got some music beds that actually ended up on this album two years later, but my laptop crashed like right after that. And I lost all that stuff. All that was the voicemail. Nobody could get it back. I got a lot of my files back, a lot of my drums back, but not those new songs that I was working on. It was just not saved yet. It was pretty pretty. Always back up for the musicians at home. Please, yeah, I know this too. What I did was it got bad and I probably could have recovered it. I went further than I should have and got this something offline that say they could save my files and it just my computer did something I've never seen before. It was so bad. I was just desperate. But what I realized was I needed to stop to stop, you know, and not do anything. It's okay. I say I'm a recovering workaholic. So I took that time to really focus on family, focus on life, top my two youngest how to ride bikes. I mean, just really, I was building bookcases and bikes and all kinds of stuff, you know. So I had these music beds because I wanted to start with just music, no lyrics. And I usually don't do that. I go pretty quick after I have music. I usually go in and write it. But I want it to be so intentional this time around. More intentional to that I've ever been more honest and open than I've ever been. And so I took that time to just have the music beds, then we moved into gumbo studios, and I started to build it even more. Still music, no lyrics. And maybe about a year after that, I told my engineer Reggie that we should find a studio where we could live there, you just built a studio and then you wanted to use a studio somewhere else. Because I don't know if people realize, but when we were all shut down, we lost all these gigs, but it was replaced with live streams and more interviews than ever, really, because you were there, you know? So I feel like I had to, I wasn't away enough. I needed an away from the away, so I was like, I just need to go away. And we discovered studio in the country and bugging Louisiana where Stevie did secret life of plants. There's a Frankie Beverly and maze album that was made out there. I hear there's an unreleased Bette Davis record that was recorded out there. But this amazing studio that was built in the 70s and there's a house on the grounds that you can stay at. Me and the band and this was the first time we were even starting to, you know, I remember we had to test to go out there. First time we were around people without masks. And so that was freeing in itself. And this place was so magical, it just made me want to write immediately. All I wanted to do. I threw myself into it. And this is the first time I started to write some lyrics. I feel like I had finally processed these things I want to say. And we just started building. I had the band, so the Hollywood go is I'd wake up because I wake up pretty early every day. And go in myself, go to piano, write, come up with some ideas, and then I call the band and to hit the parts that I wanted to hit, and first week of us being there is majority of the album as far as sonically. Yeah, a couple of the vocals I ended up cutting vocals later, Reggie and I went again. I mean, we did three, four trips to the country. I didn't fully started singing into the second time. It just wasn't experience. It felt magical and it felt deeper than just records at this point. It's like, I really was by being as honest and authentic as I was trying to be. I think it's going to connect to people. I've seen it that I've let people here now, but I think it's going to connect in another way. After you've made as much music as I've made, it's almost like that was all that was left at this point was for me to get, you know, just give you more of myself because the type of songwriter I am. There's always myself in it, but I also, in general, bring other people's stories. I'm a people watcher, you know? But this time was a lot more specific to me. Can you play a little bit of a song that came out of that first week? Yeah, well, please don't walk away. I said this on the piano album just as a passing thing. Before I sing to my wife, I said that, you know, this has been like the toughest, I either I said year or it's been a rough period for us, but that was true. We had really gone through some challenges, you know, been married 13 years. That Mary really young. So please don't walk away was literally the first song I think I wrote lyrics to..

Bruce hudlin PJ Morton Frankie Beverly Reggie South America Bette Davis Stevie Louisiana Hollywood Mary
"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

08:20 min | 6 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

"As far as what? What you were just playing? Yeah, I mean, yeah. That chord right there is like, you know, I think I use that a lot like a dominant, but I hear those boys sings those harmony. That's a very powerful thing as well, yeah. Wow. Did you ever hear from Robin Gibb, or are you Barry get pardon me? Well, I heard from the social media account. Okay, yeah. I talked to somebody, but no, I got word that they love that version and I'm honored, man. It was always one of my favorite songs and it was a last minute decision to record it. It became one of, I have to play that now, you know? You recorded that on, is that on gumbo? It's on gumbo and then gumbo and plugged with yuba. And then I did it on the piano album again with Alex eisley, a totally different, broken down piano version. Yeah, which is a great great your whole piano record is. Oh, thank you, man. It's fabulous. We have to take a quick break, but we'll be right back with more from Bruce hadler and PJ Morton. There's a recipe for getting your car running just right. And whatever you're cooking up in the garage, you'll find what you need at eBay motors dot com. They have over a 122 million car parts and accessories in stock. All at the right prices, and that can help you turn your ride. Into something really tasty. The parts you need are just a click away at eBay motors dot com. Let's ride. Experience the power of 5G with T mobile. With faster 5G speeds nationwide, you can upload your favorite video super fast or game on the go. Plus, T mobile has more 5G bars and more places, so you can stay connected to what matters most from almost anywhere. Switch to T mobile today, the leader in 5G T mobile has America's largest by V network fastest based on median overall combined 5G speed according to analysis by hublot of speed test intelligence data 5G speeds for Q four 2021, C 5 Giga device coverage and excess details at T mobile dot com. We're back with more from Bruce hudlin's conversation with PJ Morton. Did you study a lot of the traditional New Orleans players? You remind me of Allen toussaint. Maybe because you're a songwriter and you accompany a lot of people. That was a church kid, right? So I missed a lot of that and because I didn't read, I didn't go through the traditional jazz path in New Orleans. You know, it kind of made me an outcast, actually. Growing up there because I didn't fit into any New Orleans box, really. Alan Tucson later on in life became a blueprint for me because he represented what I wanted to be, you know, which was New Orleans through and through, but really lend my hand outside of New Orleans as well in a big way. The way he had a studio in New Orleans that was all his own, you know, it was a blueprint for me. And you're right. The way he was a producer for a lot of different artists is how I saw myself. So Alan tusk was, he was the person I looked to to say, that's what I want to be, but that came later on in life. He was a couple generations ahead of me. But no, I didn't, I didn't study in that way. I was studying gospel musicians and then I got like chick Korea and for me though, although I was a musician, I was always drawn to the songs. It was always the songs over the plan, over the singing. So I never really studied outside a chick. I'm trying to learn Spain. I never really studied keys that way. I studied songwriters. So I was drawn to Stevie, of course. That's what started it all for me. Do you remember what the song or album was with him? I do. I don't remember if it was an album, but a friend of mine gave me a cassette tape. And I knew I'm an 80s baby, right? So I knew I had just called to say I love you and, you know, part time lover when I was, you know, I knew those songs, but I hadn't heard that early voice. And it was, I never dreamed of leaving somebody that's that song I can remember playing that cassette tape and hearing that and my mind just like, why is this making me feel this way, you know? And soon after he gave me Donny live, Donny Hathaway live. It seemed like that was happening all back to back to back. In my life, I don't remember how much there was a break in it. But then I heard The Beatles and I'm like, what are these melodies and how are they saying the same thing but a different way and then that got me to James Taylor somehow actually was watching an awards show and they were honoring him and they were playing fire and rain as he was walking up. And I was like, what is that? You really were a church kid. You hadn't heard James Taylor. I had you heard James Taylor. And I knew the big stuff, you know, but it was a different mind as a songwriter. It was like, I started to want to do that. How old were you when you heard Stevie Wonder and Donny Hathaway? That was like 12. Somebody gave me that stuff. Again, I had heard Stevie and he was just a part of it, you know? I hadn't heard Donnie actually, but that was about 12 or 13. The Beatles, my mom told me stories 'cause my name's Paul. And my little sister was born and she got a lullaby, CD, and it had, hey, Jude on there. So I was really young at that time. I was probably 7, but I didn't really get to The Beatles until later. So what was it like when you finally met Stevie Wonder? And how did you meet Stevie Wonder? So like met in person, there were a couple of quick ones. I remember Kirk Franklin is the first person that introduced me to him in person. But that was really quick. And then 2013, I had a song called only one that I wanted him to play harmonica on. Didn't know him at all, but I just was like, you know, I'm just gonna try. A drummer friend of mine, teddy, who was played for him, and he hooked me up with a stylist of his who happened to be from New Orleans and happened to be familiar with me. So she was down to get him the song. If you can get it to him, I mean, it's two things. He's got to want to do it. You got to be able to get it to him. You know, but it's not like you can sell him on the idea of this being a good career move for him, you know? He just got to want to do it. You could really break it for you. Yeah, yeah. Man, Stevie, I'm telling you, if you just do this one, it's going to take you to the top. You know, it was none of that. I feel like he heard some of himself and was down and he cut harmonica on it. That still hadn't met him in person. And then we were on a plane and I didn't know he was sitting behind me and I went to the restroom and Stevie comes behind me. He used the restroom too. And I turn around like, Stevie, it's PJ, you just did my song, and he was like, oh, I love that song. And we connected then. And that was special. But it didn't really turn into a full relationship until maybe three years ago. He invited me to do toys for tots, his Christmas thing, and we did a song together. And we really started to build then after my album gumbo first began, he told me love this song. He told me he wished that he wrote that song, which is, you know, I don't need any more compliments in life. That's it, you know? That's it for me. And so now we have a bond that is, and I'm not over it. But he told me, you can call me like, you don't have to, you know, we're Friends. I'm like, you're Stevie Wonder though, you know? It's like more than I ever dreamed. That's the biggest, that's the biggest thing I ever dreamed, so it's amazing. Have you ever talked about songwriting with him? We talk about it in a way. We more talk about life, but what's fascinating about Stevie to me is his recall. I don't have that. I can't, if I don't record it in my phone and have a voice note, I'll forget something great. He'll recall ten songs, said he's never put out that he's got, and he'll just run through him. I think it just speaks to his genius, you know, that he can hold all of this stuff. Full songs, a meal play on for me. But we never really talked about technique or anything. I mean, I think he just appreciates what I do, and he tells me he's not bashful about telling me how much he supports me. I think that in general, I don't think that's unique to me. He's very encouraging to artists and writers that he believes in. Now, you almost you've done a lot of producing. I think he won.

New Orleans eBay motors PJ Morton Alex eisley Bruce hadler Stevie Bruce hudlin James Taylor Alan Tucson Stevie Wonder Alan tusk Robin Gibb Donny Hathaway yuba Allen toussaint Barry Donny Korea Kirk Franklin America
"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:05 min | 6 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

"It was like, oh no. And..

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

02:47 min | 6 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

"The New Orleans based singer songwriter producer and keyboardist of maroon 5. More recently earned a Grammy Award for album of the year. For his contributions to John batiste, we are. But even though he's been up for multiple Grammys, he almost gave up on the idea of a solo career altogether. But then he moved back home to New Orleans and reconnected with what got him interested in music in the first place. Now, Morton's releasing his 8th studio album watch the sun. The new album is made up of 11 original songs and features collaborations with artists like Stevie Wonder, Nas, just Scott and wale. On today's episode, PJ Morton talks to Bruce huddle about what it was like growing up with preacher son, and how his relationship with gospel impacted the way he makes music. He also talks about being a recovering workaholic and his friendship with the great Stevie Wonder. This is broken record. Liner notes for the digital age. I'm Justin richman. Here's Bruce huddle and PJ Morton. You played Oregon growing up, right? Oh, yeah. What was the organ in your church? Yeah, like a beat three. Oh, was okay. Yeah, it was a beat three. Yeah, my brother in law taught me, I learned on the job, basically, and by ear, you know, but he taught me to draw bars and settings and kind of just built from there. I was amazed to hear that well, I heard it on your record. You said it. You don't read music. I don't read music, yeah. So you learn to play in church by ear by ear, yeah. 100%. Wow. It kind of blows my mind, you know? When I think about the things I can play, I just remember not being able to play. And then I remember being able to play. I don't really remember learning. The only thing I remember I would just play the same thing over and over and then I would make a mistake in my ear would say, oh, that's the chord from death song. Oh, that's how they did that. It literally like one foot in front of the other. Now, your album New Orleans begins with a tape of your father, Paul S Martin. Introducing you at church. Well, we were actually at home. Oh, you were home. Yeah, so my dad, every year since 1983, I mean, I remember the camcorders got smaller and smaller through the years. That was the big one. Every year though, we would have a talent showcase during Christmas. It was me and my sisters, we all had to do something, you know, my sister was a singer. You can see me through the years go from drums to trying to play guitar to finally, you see me settling on piano about 7 years old or 8, you know. And that was, I think that was 8 or 9. Do you remember what you played? Yeah, I used to think I invented this..

PJ Morton John batiste New Orleans Stevie Wonder Justin richman Bruce huddle Grammy Award wale Morton Bruce Scott Paul S Martin Oregon
"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

01:31 min | 6 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Broken Record

"Pushkin. Have you ever wished you had a whiter, brighter smile? Whitening treatments can be very expensive..

"morton" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

08:19 min | 9 months ago

"morton" Discussed on Forever35

"Meanwhile, Dory, sorry. He tried but Dory said no thanks. Oh, boy. Well, Kate, even though this wasn't like a full on Dory's hotel, you did lead me down a really nice path. Can I just make another just add another fancy? Going back to our couples massage. Yes. What if you were getting massaged by hipster zaddy Chris Pine? And I was getting massaged by like AARP old man Brad Pitt. I think the honestly, I think it would be like two sensual for me. Could you imagine? I would not be able to handle it. I could have him serving me drinks, but him giving me a massage. I think might like, I might be too. I don't know what would happen, yeah. Okay. So I see your proposal and I have to just rein it in. You need me to rein it in. I need to rein it in just an iota, just a tad. Okay. But I'm gonna stick with Brad. I really like where your head's at. Thank you. I think we can continue this exploration. And it probably none of it will probably come true, but we can try. I mean, we don't know that. That's true. Don't know that. Kate, completely switching gears. We have the most fascinating conversation with our guests today. Catherine desert Morton. She is just this amazing genius who studies mom influencers. She's an academic. Yeah. And she has gone deep on the world, the social media world that really quite frankly touches us all. Whether we are moms or not, totally. So she's based in Montreal. She writes about parenting technology, city life, and lots of other subjects that excite her and she is a PhD candidate in sociology at concordia university. As of September, 2019, she's an ABD, which means she has finished all her coursework. She just has to write her dissertation. So good job, Catherine. She is researching the transition that mommy blogs have undergone since 2012 from confessional texts to monetized personal brand platforms. In particular, she's interested in how online platforms have created affordances that have allowed for previously untold accounts of motherhood to become socially significant. Yes. I mean, read this really got into it. Yeah, it was really interesting. Also, she has an amazing self care practice. Yes. Yes, she does. That we've never talked about on the podcast before. So no, we have not. No, no, we haven't. No, we haven't. And she has a really great newsletter called mothers under the influence. That I highly recommend. So without further ado, here is Catherine. This podcast is sponsored by better help online therapy. You know, we all hear it and we all know it. You have to put your mask on first idea of self care, but in practice, it can be really, really hard to put yourself first. And it's hard to remember that you matter just as much as everyone else in your life does, but therapy is a great way to make sure you show up for yourself. I have been in therapy on and off since I was 25 years old. That's almost 20 years. And it's had such a positive impact on my life. And I actually just signed up for better help and requested that I meet with my therapist via live chat sessions, which I am really, really excited about. Better help is online therapy that offers video phone and even live chat sessions with your therapist. So you don't have to see anyone on camera if you don't want to. It's much more affordable than in person therapy and you can be matched with a therapist in under 48 hours. Give it a try and see why over 2 million people have used better help online therapy. And for over 35 listeners get 10% off their first month at better help dot com slash forever 35 that's better HELP dot com slash forever 35. Today's episode is brought to you by purple. Look, you know, I use my purple pillow every night. It is the difference between a good night's sleep and a great night's sleep. There's just one problem. I have now gotten other family members hooked on purple pillows. And so my child was stealing mine, so I had to go out and get another purple pillow because yes, even my 9 year old knows there is nothing more comfortable than the purple gel flex grid that cradles just the right amount of your head. It stays cool all night long. And it's still super supportive of my head, my neck and my shoulders in the best and dreamiest way. You'll never have that I'm stuck feeling that people get with memory foam. You know the feeling. I do not like that feeling. I've even tried their mattress, and I can say it is worth the hype. You can try purple mattress, risk free with free shipping and returns and financing is available to. Getting a great night's sleep starts with having a great mattress. Get a purple mattress go to purple dot com slash F-35 and use code F-35 for a limited time. You can get 10% off any order of $200 or more. That's purple dot com slash F-35 code F-35 for 10% off any order of $200 or more. Purple dot com slash F-35 promo code F-35 terms apply. Well, we are so excited to be talking to you today, Catherine. Welcome to forever 35. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah, this is Kate and I are both like chomping at the bit to ask. We have a lot of questions. Questions. You cover some of our favorite stuff. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I'm glad that I'm not the only one that's as kind of obsessed and fixated with my area. Because I feel like it's been so nice. A lot of people have had questions and so I feel less alone when I started doing this research, I felt a little bit like I was an obsessive and no one else cared. And it turns out that I was wrong. I mean, isn't that also kind of a function of just like being in academia, right? You can feel so siloed, but I don't know. Is that your experience? Totally. And it's also just like where you're doing research. So it just so happened that at the university that I met, which is wonderful and I adore it. But there was no one else that I knew that was doing this kind of thing. And people were always like, oh, interesting. And I was like, you don't really think this is a real thing. Right. Totally. Well, we think it's a real thing. And yeah, I'm just thrilled that I think I must have first come across here work on Twitter. So I'm glad that you decided to kind of share it with the wider non academic world. Well, as you probably know, we do like to start off our conversations with guests by asking about a self care practice that they have. So what is something that you are doing these days that you would consider self care? So yeah, I mean, I think if I were speaking to you in the summer, I would be like a totally different person because I live in Montreal and the winters here are really serious. And so people who live here have two lives, we have like a winter life in a summer life. And we're kind of different people. I sort of think of myself that way. So like this past winter, you know, it's been really.

Dory zaddy Chris Pine Catherine desert Morton Kate Catherine AARP Brad Pitt concordia university Brad Montreal Twitter
"morton" Discussed on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM

News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM

"Get you my guest today. Is kate olry from the morton house kate. A lot of great things happening at the morton house And i love it because this is Spooky season for me. Then i know you really get into the The festivities with all that not only your home. But i'm sure at the morton house they love. They love spooky season right. Yes thanks for having me. The house lends itself to spooky. Yeah and if you drive by the house you kind of say ooh spooky. It was built in eighteen. Forty nine fell just got that sticky. Feel old. houses will do that whether it's creaky floors or just you know history or rumors about ghosts or things like that now. I'm not. I'm not one hundred percent. Sure is is the morton house. Would that be considered something. That may have some some extra people hanging out. Absolutely we do now. I myself have never seen anything or really felt anything. And i've been in the house quite a bit. But i'm one of those people who so desperately wants to see something that they run away. She's too needy but other people have seen things have been documented. We've had paranormal groups in We had not long ago. We had a camera of warning on camera. Go off late at night and there was a missed that came across a messed. Wow missed and we have had our staircases both to be quite active. A lady in white and other people have seen The apparition of a man. Okay house and there have been lots of paranormal groups. That have bump through. That sounds really interesting now. You got something happening coming up on saturday. The thirtieth october thirtieth. Tell me about some of this this fun stuff that we can have At the morton house. Okay we'll we'll get we'll off with with your fun. And that's the mini monsters at the morton's this is something new for us and we decided it'd be nice to have a halloween party for the kids. There will be trick or treating from in the upstairs rooms. There will be gains and stories. It runs from eleven thirty to one o'clock and it's cured three two nine. You know but depending on your kids you know you know your kids. Best acta come. It's five dollars per child and the child may bring an adult for free and then extra guests would be five dollars. That's really cool. That does sound like bring you right exactly. I may bring nieces and nephews. That might be interested in something like this. This is really cool. And what are some other things that are going to be happening during that during the mini party the mini monster parts. Well in addition to the stories and very different games will also have a cauldron there. And i like to teach a little shakespeare along with my haunting things. So we'll do double double toil and trouble and we'll bring around the cauldron and put our hands in and get a special treat. And then i have kind of a neat thing going. I think it's an ice by game. And i don't know johnny. If you're you're of the age probably were you had beanie babies. Oh yeah lots of beanie babies well. Because i don't throw things out. I have from my five girls quite a few beanie babies and i'm going to be up positioning those throughout the house and the kids can play sort of an ice by game and see how many of those they can find. I think i have more than five right. Yeah obviously that was the. Your kids are at that age where they were. Probably getting a large accumulating a large collection of the beanie. Babies so yeah. I'm glad you didn't throw those out but they do make So we'll the kids then if they find them will they get to keep these beanie babies. No they we'll give them another price so that we use the beanie babies later wonderful. That's really great. and so. Is this something that we need to register head of time or just go show up. Yeah please you can email me. That's how we're going to do it. We have be h benton harbor. H morton house at g. Mail dot com. And if you just shoot me an email we will correspond that way and that way you'll have a spot there of the house is it's a big house but we are limited in size It is going to cost us anything to enjoy this This festivities it is five dollars per child Any child can bring an adult for free. Wonderful this is really great then. So that's what's happening for the kids and you know the maybe the kids at heart if they want to enjoy that but then there's also something else that's happening a little bit later. Tell me about what's happening at five o'clock we do have. Actually we switched the time. It is now and we will be having a discussion. Debbie guy who has been a member of the board and involved with the martin house for a long time Is going to give a talk about all the paranormal activity. That has happened at morton house We've had quite a few groups over the years. go through. We have a book that has Some findings in it and she will give a lecture and we will serve you a mock tale And a scare kutaragi board. Yes creepy food and something to drink while you listen to the lecture and that should go from about seven to seven forty five and that costs ten dollars per person and then if you're very excited by all this paranormal activity and he'd like to try it on your own. Starting at eight o'clock you can bring your camera Recording device and we'll let people go through the house for about an hour and a half from eight to nine thirty and see if they capture anything and that's ten dollars as well wonderful. It's something you turn the lights off. And then you get to go around with flashlights. Or you're going to keep the lights on at the more now. I think the lights will be al For the most part. I was part of a. They had a paranormal group. Come in and i was part of a paranormal group and they. They sat in the dark for most of the time. That's really cool and like you said you haven't witnessed many things yourself but there are a lot of stories and just being in an older house and learning the history and learning about that stuff but also kind of getting in the spooky mindset. It certainly is something that a lot of people will enjoy doing. Yeah it's just a lot of fun and we've never had any scary things happen at the house. That's really cool this. This is a lot of fun and is this something that we should again register ahead of time and get more information that way. Yeah please status. Well The lecture we can accommodate more people at the lecture than we can at After the election for the ghost hunting so we probably only got about fifteen spots for the ghost hunting. Okay so if you district for that or if you want to register for both again. It's b h morton house at.

morton house kate olry Debbie guy kutaragi benton harbor johnny martin house
"morton" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"I'm trying to do support. I really had to go through. Apple dot com for to help with an order. Microsoft's is the same thing they're big big reliance on bots and his so frustrating. Trying to figure out navigate the menus You know riverside is one of the is the platform the actually use of podcasting may have a bought. And i'm sorry riverside guys but your thoughts. There is no way to actually like tell you what the problem is. There's like a pre-selection cantu things and it's just it's infuriating grape product but the support music get better on the bodies isn't cutting it jim about your your stories over so getting cut off from riverside now not the made that comment but so my my delta bought story so traveling over the weekend Including monday my baggage got delayed and so i had an open issue with delta or trying to open issue using their chat feature which is really nicely integrated with your thought. It just shows up within your your chat just like if you're chatting with the human But i i you know basically just use the function to try to get to a human being some answering whatever questions i have to to get to you. Know like if you call in and you get a robot on the phone you hit zero zero zero and it's like transfer you to a person. Yeah customer service agent elp. I finally figured out okay. What does the path to get through to get to person and like my third or fourth triumph. Had this down pretty. Clean the response i would. I would get was due to heavy call volume heavier than usual call volume. There may be a while. So i had to wait for like an hour and a half. I'm thinking this is monday morning. Around eleven am in the middle of october. So there's there's no holiday weather throughout the united states. it's like perfect right. There's no there's no heavier than normal hall volume match. If you actually called in on the day before thanksgiving or something you would be waiting for hours anyway. I find so the prop goes that. I finally get to a person had fantastic service i really loved delta as an airline of course said that there is probably going to jinx me but i really do and i had great service so then it was like you know. Hey please tell us. Would you refer other people to use this chat bot on a scale of like one to five five being absolutely. I'm definitely going to recommend this. Other people and i gave it a five. So what i'm doing now is making good on that commitment and i am recommending delta chat ought to everybody who to this. Podcast ended up right now. Yeah exactly. i teased a little bit. You know my my. Boxing is a comedian by the name of john mullany People may know him. He's relatively famous. Does things on saturday night. Live or used to be a writer. I think for it. has Stuff going on but he has a bit around not being a robot. And what. I wanna play. Here is a ninety second clip. Roughly of a bit that he did on saturday night live as part of his monologue. They did. I think it was.

"morton" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Which is your kind of pulling back to that that ransomware thing in in a way but really more about some of the bugs that have been in the news. Relative to microsoft azure and. I'm kind of wondering what your perspective is from candidate. A candidate hot. Take on this. Which is do you feel like a lot of these bugs ever happening. In the azure environment are because of the way as your was built. Is i take that minivan analogy that you you made in. I kind of feel. Like they took enterprise computing enterprise data centers in spun them up in the cloud. And it's a managed data Traditional data center now not talking about the officers sixty five bid in azure ad bid. I think that's different. But i think the rest of azure kind of seems like it's like servers that are running that run la the same kind of Utilities and underlying os software that People kind of figured out ways to attack and penetrate over the years and now it's just happening on a larger scale because if it happens at asher pretty much. Everybody azure for something eddie. Email the gym. I like the way articulated that man. I'm over here greening. I'm sure people can hear it in the podcast but again i love microsoft the machines i use on the microsoft fan so when i make the statement. This is what i mean. That's kind of what they did right when you go to buy. Minivan have certain expectations. It's going to have steering wheel. It's gonna seatbelt. You might have a plug in for my phone. If it's new right wireless. I can set it on there and it'll charge but there are certain expectations of how things should work and versus aws. Who had to start from scratch. And that's why a lot of these new ideas iraq because they had no bias when they went into it. So in azure you see things. Cosmo's db you see things like the back side of the world. You see things like officers sixty five and this is actually a benefit to most of the people that they want to sell to you. They already know how to do this. I don't have to go recruit some as your expert for five hundred thousand dollars to manage my environment because a lot of it is very similar to what we know. And you're right. They kind of lifted and shifted some things so as an attacker. It's harder for me to go and say okay. Let me go reverse engineer. How s. three work. So i can establish new bucket for distributing ransomware when i can just pivot over to azure. Which has the exact same server version from five years ago which exploit already exists. I'm gonna go ahead and attack that it's that concept of low hanging fruit right so as you did a great job and making the minivan accessible for everyone and it does a great job but at the same time people know what's happening there. Positive and negative players always expectation of. Whose responsibility is it secure. Which parts of the cloud from a customer perspective and we talked about this in our previous episode about you know who is responsible ultimately..

microsoft eddie la Cosmo iraq
"morton" Discussed on Identity at the Center

Identity at the Center

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Identity at the Center

"Kind of what i'm thinking about it right now. You're wrong so To repeat that presentation were giving it the fido alliance conferences on the nineteenth roster. Doing a webinar. Jeff assuming you can link to in the show notes but that webinars on the fourteenth of october twenty twenty one. So i guess depending on when you're listening to this we should put the year in there as well so hopefully people can check it out. Yep it's productivity webinar. So it'll be on demand obviously don't do too many commercials but because it's and i actually doing something with our pierce who's also been on the show as well We figure we'll we'll plug it there. So yeah tober fourteenth I'll put lincoln the show notes for people contract if they want to. And then yeah busy speaking schedule for for you and i in the next couple of weeks between that and then Going to seattle and meet our identity friends and giving a talk there as well. So that'd be kinda cool or hopefully we'll be able to record some episodes there And have some interesting chats of some of the identity so to speak who who may be onsite absolutely well. I'm already tired of talking. So what would you say. We bring our guests into the picture. Yeah i think you kinda hit off the direction that we're going to go today. And i think that's as a service right so now we're talking about the cloud and things like that so we're kind of thinking here brainstorming before we started. The show's all right. So what do we call this. And the idea that came up with is the cloud is different. So what does that mean so to help us with that conversation We've got our friend john morton. He's the director of solutions engineering at bright. If welcome to the show. John thank you. Thank you jim. Thank you so much for joining us. And it's tradition around here that when someone joins us for the first time that they tell us how they got into the identity space or maybe when they first realized that they were in the identity space maybe it can kind of take us through your origin story of how sahata jammed up brevin in what was a is a identity. Something that you chose or did it. Zeal the wild and intriguing story of submarines as in tons of activity. So i would say identity by any any means right started off in the. Us navy and the submarine fleet special projects undersea research and development work. Done on the jimmy carter at general dynamics electric boat any of your listeners. Have some free time and wanna look up some funny interesting very cool stuff going. Give it there. And then i Bounced around the federal space of veterans affairs. The postal service and ended up in finance at oppenheimer funds always A defender right in while at oppenheimer funds. This is about a little more than ten years ago..

fido alliance tober pierce Jeff lincoln john morton brevin seattle general dynamics electric jim John Us navy jimmy carter oppenheimer funds
"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Of go through the go ahead kitty. My my hypothesis about that is the we've shifted towards because of the lack of connection so you think you would you agree we have. Yes and i've seen it took did you would you. Were you having that thought before. I said it to you about history. It's been a few months since put any thought into it. But i've i've heard more about it. People are calling narcissism. But it's not the same and trying to get people to understand how it's a little bit different and why that's what's coming out. That's really really interesting. 'cause i yeah so it doesn't surprise i can't quite read it. It's too small we. I'm gonna read the criteria really quick so we doing tagging Diagnostic criteria center of attention. Inappropriately seductive shallow rapidly shifting. Emotions is the thing i've seen. That's number one for me Preoccupied with physical attention dramatic impressionistic speech that lacks detail man. That's all now on so on exaggerated theatrical emotional expression that's on easily influenced by others. This is the thing that huge right. Now and in situations assumes relationships are more intimate than they are again. It's back to the. I think that's the tribal stuff. And that's the you know seeking we were talking about the lightning bolts Instructors with a Often elma self reporting inventory missy patients state of mind. Let me see more. There's something here was. Oh that that they. They tend towards delusion. -ality become delusional. I'm telling you. There is delusion all over the place these days which i had not seen before that caught my attention. I started seeing people saying things around like. That's delusional thinking. That's that's not. That's not real that everybody everybody's a nazi for instance and everybody. Everyone's a hitler and that's delusional. When people started talking about nazis. And hitler in two thousand five. I put them in the hospital for for frank delusion. -ality now that delusion sorta everywhere and i thought ooh that's a change and that's what got me starting to think about. That's what got me thinking about. Histrionic cova has really brought it to light. Or i don't know if it's like it created more histrionic traits right are narcissist in this situation. Prone histrionic i. I don't know if that work. I know yeah. I feel especially with like cancel culture. It feels very much like this like a delusional thinking. It's like you get enough people talking about it that it's like it's fact swept into it. They said in affected by others ideas rather than sitting and thinking about superficial. Doesn't think doesn't move and i i would argue. Maybe they really interesting thing to understand is whether or not. Let's say during the french revolution. The guillotine rob was there more histrionic stuff going on then we interesting because it feels like it feels like a historic would be more prone to scapegoating. Yeah and i think that's kind of part of that. I know people aren't going to like this phrase like the social justice warrior type of things online feel very history on it to make various people say like. Oh you virtue signaling. That's really history on behavior. Horr- act you. Somebody writing about this. Don't katie about this youtube please. Because i'll put his less because it does. It should come from psychologist not from a medical doctor. And i think i think it's something that people and please if you do it. Notify me and i'll tweet the shit out of it because i think it's something that people should be. It should be on their radar And you you got it you get it and we were both on the we are on the exact same page with this thing and both of us are way out in in speculation about it and yet we've experienced in a very particular way that's based in fact and and and we're we're both in a position to think about it from a place of knowledge and experience and so this is not a trivial matter. This needs to be sort of brought up a little bit. So i'll put it on the list and start talk if you could. I can't wait to see whatever you put pressure on the list. How how much. How big is your list. Oh top of your list of the top of there's damage. But but i'm also see i don't know how to treat history. I kind of knew how to treat narcissist because because all all all the drug addicts have nurses disorders or at least behave like that and But i'm not trying to treat histrionic so i'd be interested in that too of this something collectively we could do to kind of bring online. What we be healthy for history onic only treated a few history on patients in the over the years i think too that i can think of. Quitting and a it was based in trauma for to score which. I'm not surprised. So i wouldn't be surprised if it's Similar to trauma treatment. You know i know. There's a lot of shame and embarrassment that comes along with the lake meeting of attention over-centralised behavior and things like that. But but yeah all all dig into. I haven't talked about history personalities. In a long time i avoided it because i don't like histrionics i don't do well with them. And i and i find and i and i also don't like delusional paranoid thinking it. I hate it because it's not. You can't reason with do. It's just very upsetting. And so hispanics for me of always been something. It's probably why so uncomfortable in today's world..

frank delusion missy rob katie youtube
"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Lot of times you'll see a lot of overlap with things like borderline and stuff like that so a quick note about dissociation Have you noticed that people that have a lot of associative experiences in childhood start to use dissociation as a defence strategy like kept like like every intense emotion trigger some sort of defense some sorta social strategy either. It's a somatoform dissociation. I can't really. I have alexa thiamine. I can't really feel my feelings or literally. I'm sort of checked out. In the moment. he can many different. Sort of protean manifestations right when one hundred percent a lot of my patients even will have told me they like it. They associated regular coping skills. Yeah and then some cut themselves to bring themselves back so they go out. They got to come back. Yeah yeah because we don't know other again. It's like going back to that resilience if we don't have a way to acknowledge what we're feeling ensues right again. It's self soothing. So key finding ways to kinda calmer system down. we don't have that knowledge or wherewithal. We find other ways in self injury is very calm. And that's one of my biggest frustrations with the. Dsm is because self injury falls only under the diagnosis of borderline and they do have in areas needing further study like non suicidal self injury. And i wish they would move that into an actual diagnosis because so often. I have patients especially with trauma in their past that. I don't believe meet all the criteria for borderline personality disorder because there's no attachment visual fear of abandonment. It's more just soothing And there's no diagnosis that really fits. It's almost oftentimes. I think of it almost cutting disorder much we have substance use disorders. Yeah i'm just using cutting example because the common thing although you seeing less cutting now i feel like i'm seeing a little less of it. It has some down. I wouldn't say it's necessarily gonna know notes dot com. But i feel like for whatever is not making a judgment or or even a construct. I've just noticed that as gender issues have gone up cutting has gone down and never thought of it in that direct correlation. But i would say that even online i hear less and less chatter about it which is usually a good indication of kind of what's happening. You know under under our thin veneer of what we think is going on like. I don't hear anybody talking about as much. I definitely saw like big surge of it. Maybe five years ago it comes in waves and then finally you see you mentioned. Ptsd complex ptsd in what we can do to treat it. Yes in the treatment. The thing that was kind of interesting speaking. I'm glad you brought up. Vander kokin body keeps. The score is a wonderful book cannot encourage people enough to read that book. It's super helpful. They talk about how when we're treating trauma the way. I was trained as actually talk therapy. That was like the golden standard. You put your trauma into a like trauma timeline. Meaning let's say we have repeated. traumas do remember. This happened at seven than i remember going to. I don't know changing schools. And this was this time. And you know you try to put it into kind of a time in what we call it. A narrative form like a story. And you talk it through and you're supposed to talk it through so many times that it doesn't have any emotional charge attached to it meaning. That doesn't cause us to dissociate or flashbacks or any of that. Were kind of quote unquote. Okay with it however we find for about sixty percent of people that's not enough and so in the book i dig into all the other treatment. Modalities everything from what we're talking about like peter levin and The somatic experiencing where we like move our body to release that stress response that energy that was tied up in the trauma. We do things to release that. There's also things like. Em dr which is stands for. I'm movement desensitization reprocessing which is just a fancy term for making is go left to right my sleep giving your brain another chance And then even digging into some of the newer in maybe talked about things like vegas nerve stimulation treatment has it's been beneficial really beneficial for one of my patients in particular who is struggling with trauma based symptoms while as intense suicide alley and then a newer one. But it's it's a treatment that's been out for a long time but not for trauma is stella ganglion block. That's interesting Well i know that we've been using stellar. A ganglion and other sympathetic ganglion blockades for hyper Madressas hands and there's a whole army of people out there with all kinds of funny symptoms afterwards so it doesn't surprise me. They would have some therapeutic value. Yeah they find that when it blocks that nerve that cluster of nerves rather it the flashbacks lesson and the hyper vigilance lessons interesting. It's really interesting. Yeah i i mean i'm not a neurologist so you know obviously if this is something you're interested in be assessed and treated by proper proper practitioner. But it's very fascinating to me because we do know our body brainer so closely linked to think that only talking it out is the only way to fix it is just you know it's not correct. And there's a burgeoning new area of hallucinogen research. Yes i have a friend in the silla. Sivan research sivan and then there were some very good published literature again. We interviewed The head of a maps now that one and just as he was about to publish the A and therapy and showed some results with Again complex cps pse from military action. Gary what numbers that habit again. The computer's not responding. It's rick dobelin. I'm just trying to pull up the number here for number okay quite a bit about blood. Sugar i'm not talking. Strictly about.

alexa thiamine Vander kokin trauma peter levin stella ganglion vegas Sivan sivan rick dobelin Gary
"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"What we do is a tuning our bodies to the patient but you can have a lot of that through zoom. I imagine you can't do it for long like indefinitely. You know to get to certain if the patient is certain. Needs at least but you know i've done it seems i've seen it senior like i feel that way and i was never a big huge advocate for length there because like you said a lot of that is being in tune anything. That's there's a huge i specialize in eating disorders and self injury work. That's like a lot of what my practice has always been. And there's a lot of that that. I need to see a need to be in the room with you to be able to tell especially functionality. To write are showering are able to get dressed. If i'm only seeing you know the top of you. You could be disheveled on. I wouldn't fully no. And i think that there are some things that are missed but there is also to your point so much work that can be done online in zoom meetings or whatever so these traumas can be experienced as something. That's called narcissistic injuries. And i'm personally of the opinion that the traumas is the reason we've had such a narcissistic turn And i wanna talk about multiple things going forward. You wanna talk about the impact. The social media has on that Both both are personality. Functioning and our symptom apologies most particularly. Ptsd so talk a little bit first about and of course no and ask you is do you think we've had a turnoff narcissism torch histrionic in recent months. But i'll let's get to that in a minute before you think about it. I want you to talk about. Ptsd in why that's important as as as a something related to trauma not everyone that's traumas. Ptsd but your book is about fouled. ptsd So talk a little bit about the importance of that. Yeah so. I think resilience okay. So let's get into a little bit about the fact that we can all like you know you drew an i can be in the same situation. Let's say we grew up together right and we had the same abuse we sustained however you might go on to be fine right. Essentially we have no symptoms of ptsd. There's no irritability. Don't find yourself avoiding the things that remind you of the trauma and then i am like completely unable to function in my life due to my intense. Ptsd symptoms but we came from the same experience and a lot of people especially siblings will say like why am i. Struggling so much in my other siblings are fine. You know the real term that we use for that is just good. Old-fashioned resilience and resilience is our ability to whether life storms. And be okay. And unfortunately we're kind of just born with different levels. I say people think of resilience i. I don't think of that so much as a psychological process. I think that has a constitutional power. Central nervous system is set up. Some people are dandelions and some people are orchids. Yes one hundred percent and people are just more like i'd even use my sister-in-law's a good example. She is just really good at creating a support system. She is constantly seeking people who really get her that connection. We're talking about with the. You know the paulie bagel theory and how important that is for us. She's always looking for things to do that in making time for it without realizing. I don't even know if it's necessarily book about her. The bottle that you know what i mean. It could really help people press. How how is it that she's always done. Yeah but some of us are just more predisposed to be that way in the same way we could be predisposed to have more symptoms of yesterday right to have lower resilience and so there are ways that we can generate resilience. Don't think if you were born as an orchid that you can never become more like a dandelion but it just takes more effort in that you know kind of like the self care things that we do the acknowledgement of some of your false thoughts and challenging them versus letting them spin in. Live free in your head on talk a lot about how important our thoughts are because they really run our life you know and so all the way back to your question. We can be traumatized yet. Our level of resilience is such that we don't come out of that trauma with ptsd symptoms. And that's just kind of. That's i think it's the second chapter get into like. How do i know if. I've been traumatized because i think it's important for people to know if they've been in a traumatizing situation and then dig into what's ptsd conflicts state. And how do we diagnose treat that want to give a little primer on. All three of those people are interested in that. Pdf see complex treatment. Ptsd is is the only thing that we have a. It's only diagnosed people because of the ict ten in the dsm. Which all you need to know about those. Those are just diagnostic manuals. We use essentially to give us some kind of guidance and framework in a lot of china's just for insurance purposes so don't be very diagnoses are so we can study so so diagnoses should have a common biology and a common evolutionary source environmental triggers and a common biology and as such. You can group them together and you can charge for it. Insurance is one thing that you can study it and yeah if you if you study the this one biological group and you find a particular treatment that works for that group then you can start to predict that given that biology. I can use this treatment and it's likely to work. And if i'm not if i can't confirm that biology i really maybe not shouldn't be applying said treatment because a lot of people try this. Try that we shouldn't be doing that. We should be trying to come up with provisional theory about what the biology is and what the psychology is then apply the treatment and then we can also prognosticate based on that groupings. It's really the purpose of diagnosis. So great in many ways people can feel like it's kind of limiting or mistake. We're talking about you know studying pneumococcal pneumonia. That's a particular cause of agents a particular biology as a particular set of treatments which sponsor that doesn't mean that we look at that person as pneumococcal pneumonia. It's it's a person with a disease and it so it sort of helps us address the disease but it is not turning them into the disease per se. Yes one hundred percent so when it comes to. Ptsd that's the best the diagnoses that we would have to offer to a person with symptoms. Light run Extreme irritability avoidance of the things that remind them of the trauma flashbacks dissociation. Which if you're not familiar with what dissociation is. It's it's really when our system becomes overwhelmed. I call it like our brain pulling the ripcord. It's like i'm outta here in it. Removes us from self or environment in order to really allow us to continue its mechanism and so those symptoms are what we would call. Ptsd and that's how we will diagnose it. Now if we have had repeated traumas in her life where let's say you know. Our childhood was rife with physical abuse and we felt like that was happening constantly in then we grew up. We got into maybe a violent relationship and then maybe we're a car crash. People who have these repeated traumas can show signs of what you call complex. Ptsd or cpt ptsd. Which really. I would argue as like. Ptsd with another layer of emotional dysregulation and issues in intense issues in our relationships as results and are functioning overall so it's sorta has a personality overly kind of thing..

ptsd symptoms ptsd pneumococcal pneumonia china pneumonia
"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"We have a dr drew. Tv streaming shows there and they've been really interesting lately there's All of them are up. You can take a look at them and some interesting interesting stuff. Justice scott adams yesterday in fact or last week rather and yeah and we are also of course at your mom's house with after dark and check out the instagram. Dr drew pinski. Dr pinski and Spend time on tig talk yesterday during a live. take talk which. I tried to do on a regular basis. I'm way behind and actually producing talks. But i'll try to get that as well as just plain old at dr drew today. Katie moore morton is with me. The book is traumatized. Identify understanding cope with ptsd in emotional stress traumatize katie. There could be no more relevant topic than that humble opinion especially after the year year and a half two years we have. I feel like forever right. I sure you could have written the book before that. But the sort of stressors of the moment have i re traumatized or add to the trauma symptoms. I'm sure for many. Yeah especially and. I'm sure you've you've heard like relapse. Rates are up for those who suffer from drug and alcohol addiction. Because you know we're for lack of a better term totally triggered by this last year. I neglected to mention. You can follow katie on twitter at katie. Kfi morton and it's at katie morton. One is their website katie. Yeah it's just morton dot com perfect Katie's a clinical psychologist each other for a long time and particularly his book. I'm very very interested in. I just read a book with my daughter called. It doesn't have to be awkward about about Relationships and Consent which is kind of interesting in the in the shadow or aftermath of all this. Talk about governor cuomo's inability to understand what consent is consent but okay But trauma i had my trauma and There's actually a word world of traumatology. There's actually international society of traumatologist alley vessel best. Best coke is sort of leading score and peter levin the waking the tiger. There's so much great stuff out there. People should be aware of your book of course falls in line with that literature but this has been going on for a long time that childhood trauma. We're childhood trauma primarily. Yes yeah this. What trauma is and how to identify. Who should be thinking about this. I think probably the broadest definition for trauma is anything that happens in her life that makes us fear for our safety or the safety of someone else and it is overwhelming to our system so much so that we are unable to process. In the moment. I tell people to think about feelings of powerlessness and helplessness. That that's that's the sign that you're in one of those moments and we want to talk about what happens to people when they're in a dramatic situation terms of their brain and psychology. Yes of course For people who don't know when when you are overwhelmed when our nervous system is overwhelmed it pushes us into what's called her stress response or what we usually call fight flight. And dr peter. Levin is a great example of the reason that we talk about fight flight freeze because when our body goes into the stress response readiness to take action right. Can i can fight this threat to my system or may safety or can i run away and it was his belief that when we can't do either of those which happens a lot more children right because we're not strong enough or fast enough. We can feel trapped. We go into that free state like play dead kind of situation. It is his belief and research obviously proves it that in the free state is is one of the ways. Ptsd in those symptoms are born because of that helpless. Like i like you said hopeless. Helpless feeling is is definitely what causes us to be traumatized. And there's actually a name for that neurologically it's called jacksonian. Disillusion where we see brains. Don't evolve into different systems. We sort of add stuff on top and we go from this fight or flight response. That is a fairly evolved. Mammalian thing to a deeper mechanism. That's in our brainstorm mediated by the vegas nerve we did. How many interviews a steven porges at least two or three probably theory. We he's going to give us the number of those those interviews and he talks about the political theory. How how the pro. Social emotional exchange system of the vegas nerve becomes not functioning when the free state sixty three and ninety. The buzz episodes sixty three ninety and then Alan shore is a nice cohort with all this. Maybe altro was earlier even where he's talking about again the biology of trauma go ahead. K- here comes episode. I see gary work in a way. They're not coming up as fast. I want to episode ten overweight. Now it's just not coming up fast. I want you sec all right. So so there's a lot of this. Biology be worked out in my experience. One of the big issues that happens as a result of the pain of having this powerlessness And the sort of experience of shattering emotional regulatory systems is it makes young people. Not trust closeness and closeness is where would episode sixty five sixty five for sure Closeness is where everything happens with you and so to talk about that a little bit and how you get people through that connection. I mean we're wired for connection from birth right. I don't think enough people recognize. Even just the the fact if you talk about the vegas nerve like sucking and swallowing to be fed as a child like off of a bottle or being breastfed or whatever as we're sucking and swallowing that vegas nervous being stimulated and we feel soothed and connected and that is so vital to our growth as human and healing human feeling cared for and so if we've been raising environment where maybe no one came when we cried right or maybe there was abuse in a household so we came to instead of getting that connection in that security that self soothing in soothing by being cared for we were hurt or harmed or or you know exploited in some fashion. And so it can. We can get to a point in her life. Where closeness or connection actually feels dangerous. Something i find really fascinating about trauma and dealing with my patients and my viewers even with ptsd. They've let me know that. Sure certain situations in life can be triggering an overwhelming but also feeling safe. The word safe or trying to come up with a safe place is too scary. Because we don't even know what that looks like what was supposed to be deemed as quote unquote. Safe was not right. Trauma happens that safe place. That's where the expect trauma because it feel vulnerable right. We let our guard down and a lot of times for those out there. Then thinking will what am i supposed to try to do. I always tell my patients. we're looking for neutrality. Like maybe it's the sound silly but sometimes it you can be as calm you know. Oh okay just putting the dishes away or folding laundry. Repetitive tasks can be really soothing door system without having to feel safe and then therefore vulnerable right. How does somebody identify if they have issues with trauma they were. What in the book helps us with that. Let's say there's a ton of different questions. I pose to the reader so they can kind of assess their own. Talk about the aces. I don't know if anybody is familiar with the study but it was a it was a huge shift in how we think and talk about childhood trauma. It was when the medical community finally acknowledging that this affects everything. And i think. What's what still isn't emphasized enough in the ace. Ace stands for adverse childhood experiences and it was as a so-called famous study in the late nineties at kaiser And the the what's not emphasize. What's on the list of aces..

dr drew katie Justice scott adams Dr drew pinski Dr pinski Katie moore morton trauma symptoms Kfi morton katie morton governor cuomo peter levin dr peter ptsd vegas steven porges Alan shore altro morton Katie Levin
"morton" Discussed on Brandi Glanville Unfiltered

Brandi Glanville Unfiltered

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Brandi Glanville Unfiltered

"Katie how are you. I'm good how are you doing. Oh gosh i think. I'm just having a day already in the weather's affecting me. I'm just feeling like it's wednesdays are hard as well because i feel it's like it is the hump day. It's not the beginning of the week. It's not the end of the week but luckily we have you here Get all of this advice for me. Okay so tell us why you started your youtube channel. i am all about. We started the youtube channel about ten years ago. And i say we exists my boyfriend at the time. But now my husband whose actual idea was so i specialize in the treatment of eating disorders self injury and at the time i was working in treatment center and every day we would have girls that would graduate from the program and we have no one to refer them out to who really understood eating disorders and a few clinicians we had were always full in. This was in los angeles. So it was really shocking. You know and so. I come complain as one does to their partner and i told him i was like it's so ridiculous and i don't know what to do and this is so disappointing. And so he'd gone to this event where they talked about the power of youtube and he was like what if you just talk about it. Then like more people knew. He's like in crete this channel and at the time like youtube videos and take my finger exactly and i was like i. Don't i know absolutely not and he was like is try and so after some persistence. On his part we started it in. So you'll notice. I mean please. Don't watch them. But my i like year of videos are pretty much. Strictly eating disorder base. Because that's how the idea was born but as you know nothing happens in a vacuum so other low came in. Yeah we went from there. I mean especially in los angeles. I mean there's so many people with body image issues and like self sabotage when it comes to like our physical like i. I definitely Some therapy for things. That i would do to myself flake on cutting thing. But it's not a cutting thing it's like picking thing i would just pay skin there. Yeah it's called creation. But yeah yeah i still do it. I mean i went to so many therapists if there wasn't that like you said there wasn't anything after that. There's no barrier needles in your tweezers but there's no like follow app unless you want to go back and start over. I mean like you're done. You've graduated your treatment like then. It's like i needed reassurance and it would have been great because it was so expensive. Go see this person to have an outlet like you on youtube where i could just like log in and connect and just know that. I'm not alone in this. I i've been right now. I hate that. I brought that up because i hate talking about it but i tried to be vulnerable but well dang in Because it just puts a puts a not in my style make because right think about it. Like i feel like i want her to do it and i been doing a little bit Just most of us of kobe. Now are you getting a lot of questions that Obviously we all have anxieties and we all there's body issues and all of that here but now my issue is leaving my house. Yeah i i so like. Are you getting a lot right now. Yeah definitely in for a lot of different reasons. And i also want you to know that skin picking very common and i don't know someone's told you this but i just want you to know that it's anxiety driven. Wouldn't be surprised that it's coming up more now. Because i think we all would admit that. This whole cove lockdown chaos. We've been in for a really long time is is wearing on us and we Anxiety disorders you know seattle relapse rates for out drugs alcohol through the roof right. You're not alone out here. it's very common But yes. We are seeing. Especially because kobe even personally. It's been a heavyweight you know. It's the only time. I've shared in an experience with a patient. It's usually right. You know them reflecting on what's going on with them in need holding the space for them but we've definitely people are i. It was we hated being stuck at home. We felt very isolated mad about that and now it's like we went from foam to fogo. You're going out. It's threatening and there's been so many mixed messages and signals in politicizing the whole thing and it's been very complicated for people and i think especially in los angeles where we just moved from We my husband were out walking once outside. Not close to anybody. Nagai across the block was like cover. Your face like yelled because our mass were down below and right you know. I wasn't training that mom anybody but you know people are on edge. We obviously are messed up. I did not argue with this person. It's not worth it. He's not by yourself outside. And there's somebody like far away from you. I mean it's i get saucer phobic in the mask and if there's no around when i'm outside like i'll pull it down as well i mean i can't exercise on it but i exercise at my house so it's fine but me to saying but like for me in the beginning. I was like so excited. I'm like i excel at staying home midland. I started to get like filling very lonely feeling. Like i didn't have purpose feeling like the world was ending definitely had cut back on drinking like prior to this and was in a really good place that I i would only normally drink wine and Whatever was in the house. I would drink it. I would just like it's noon. Let's do this you know And now look if. I have one thing to do to leave the house. I have anxiety and it takes everything that i have to go out to do this one thing and when i come home i'm physically mentally exhausted and i'm literally just going to lunch with the work. You know work lunch and talk about something coming up. And i was like oh. That was a really hard i used to do. Go out and run errands and be social. Nc all my friends and like not at four o'clock. I feel like my day is over. Yeah it shouldn't be that way no is shouldn't and it i mean i know this isn't helpful in a moment but it will get better as things with covert get better and i know that sucks because now it feels like we're kinda thrown back into it like i've finally for the first time felt like oh things are getting a little bit better things or opening up people getting vaccinated. We feel okay okay. This is moving on and then now they're like delta very you know And but i do want you to know that the reason it feels exhausting is because it's stressful to our nervous system right. We feel threatened in life. In general we go into fight flight and so being in that is supposed to be short. Lived right it gets us to safety. We either like beat somebody up where we run away. But he held in that where we can't take any action for even if it's just to have lunch a work launch right. You're you're getting ready in preparation. You already feel threatened. Then you get in the car and it's la so you know wherever you are like takes an hour to drive somewhere then you know. We have the thing that lasts for like an hour. Maybe two and we come home. That's a lot of time to be held in that response. That stress response feeling completely overwhelmed. Right and like nike i. I'm not comfortable eating indoors. At i know he's like i'm inside to the right and i was like. Do you think possibly like we could eat outside. Because even i'm just. I'm not. I mean i had anxiety prior to this gap so mine is definitely double but now i almost feel like it's given me like social anxiety where i i was so excited to get out and now i'm like how to stay at home. I'll make a plan. It's then. I think the plan all week mike just gonna flake just gonna stay home like keeping me in and cut my friend circle by a lot because i feel like people are going out and being irresponsible and dot.

youtube los angeles Katie Nagai kobe seattle midland la nike mike
"morton" Discussed on Get Out There and Get Known Podcast

Get Out There and Get Known Podcast

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"morton" Discussed on Get Out There and Get Known Podcast

"Morton edgy mel dot com. And you know if they know you pam you you pick up the phone and give me a call you know. And so that that's that's networking right and isn't that working really is a matter of the clients. That place on different shows different magazines and things like that is because either one of them went to school with them by class entity jay which is associated by journalists. I met them there. So it's a lot of different ways where your networking. But they have to know what they're about they have no what i'm about right right right. They have to have a good legitimate concrete yet. Isn't this or you know. Be an expert in their field. Or you just can't come on willy. Nilly you're absolutely right. It s one of the things so talk about the media training that you do you do a little bit of media training and you do a little bit of helping people with their brands. So give us some ideas if someone were to go to morton media dot. Tv immortality me. Yeah you know they. Abbas s saw that it was that com that You help them in terms of one that branding and explain to them why or explain to them in terms of media. Coaching or training what. They what a person needs to do not to today. So for a lot of years. I worked with Different companies like comcast And i produce commercials for them for their clients their clients who wanted to get more exposure in the in the media and be on huge networks like cnn or fox or msnbc or owner bt like there's over fifty networks that you know of course air commercials and even when you're streaming Shows on netflix. Or hulu or something they stop for the ads. And so my company morton media tv dot com was producing commercials for these clients and a lot of them didn't know what to do how to present themselves because many of them want it to be in their own commercial. They didn't want to either hire an actor or actress They wanted the audience to see them as the face. Their business but a lot of them didn't really you know they say for instance. I did commercials for dentists. And you know. They're not accustomed to being on television. So a lotta times. I'd have to throw in a little training session you know. How do you speak. how do you come across. How do you enunciate. How should you look into the camera. How not to be intimidated once. Wear you know Sometimes i'd have a hair makeup person on set for the women for the ladies on because a lotta times. They didn't know how to do their hair and makeup. So that that goes to the media training you know how to present yourself in any situation on stage in front of a lot of people are shy and so on television. When i first went on television. I realized there were millions of people watching And so it took me a couple of times to get over the nerves And so i teach people you know what to do to get past those nerves. Once they get on television. I show them how to get on television or how to get their business on tv. How to Get on those major networks for commercials And so that's that's the media training part. It was the second part of your questions. So you talk about branding..

comcast hulu fox netflix cnn msnbc morton media dot. morton media tv dot com one first Nilly millions of people second part over fifty networks Abbas today Morton edgy mel dot com things of times