35 Burst results for "Morrissey"

Two dead in two Boston area stabbings

WBZ Afternoon News

01:01 min | 5 d ago

Two dead in two Boston area stabbings

"Two fatal stabbings in the region yesterday. First up the VCR. A 24 year old Quincy man was fatally stabbed in Quincy is Wallace in section last night just before 11 Police were called by associates of the victim and found him in a parking lot at the corner of Hancock and Woodbine streets. 24 year old camera and no me of Quincy was taken to Boston Medical Center but did not survive. Norfolk, D a. Michael Morrissey said they know there were witnesses to what he called a brief altercation and he is asking them to come forward. Earlier in the day, a woman was fatally stabbed in Attleboro just before 4 P.m.. Att. Six LeRoi Street 28 year old Kimberly do Feli of Attleboro was rushed the sturdy Memorial Hospital where she was later pronounced dead. A 20 year old woman, also injured during the incident, was treated for minor injuries and has since been released. There were no other injuries and addle borrow. Police say they do not have a suspect or a person of interest at the moment,

Quincy Attleboro Michael Morrissey Boston Medical Center Memorial Hospital Norfolk Hancock Kimberly
Vicki Wickham on Ready Steady Go

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Vicki Wickham on Ready Steady Go

"Well, the rocks pages podcast. This is Mark Pringle with me is my colleague Jessica Murison Bowie I'm mark and in third zoom window is very, very special guest Vicki Wickham Hi Vicki Hi both. The keys perched on her. New York, city this is eight o'clock in the evening London Time I've had my first Jones Hannukah Day and we'll be hearing sirens all of that sort of New York City soundscape. So for those who don't know I mean is legendary carrot tourneys business over the years I think as I say, produce on the fantastic pioneering pop TV series, ready steady go subsequently manager of La Belle, and in many ways, a CO create of La Belle was an artist and a friend and manager of Dusty Springfield and subsequently of the likes of Morrissey. Marr and Vicky tell us about how you got into pop music and as a professional activity totally by default. I would inland I was working. I had several jobs and I had one job that I really liked which I was working for radio BBC like entertainment it was cold. And My job was a production assistant and the writer, my producer, my boss Charles Chilton wrote these wonderful one hour specials. Flooding Allen or the moment or the songs from the First World War and so we have. Autism singers, musicians, actors, etc, etc etc and my job is to put all together. And I learned a lot needs to say but I I was thinking that it conciliates should be doing television radio and I don't quite know why but left thinking everybody would want me nobody walked in. One Luckily one of my really good friends Carolina with Carter was seeing somebody at associated rediffussion. Sunday could Elkin Allen. Let detail who set don't have it at the moment but. A secretarial job will come up. No I don't want to be the secretary. So he was great. He's lectured me and said, you want to be anything. You can just get your foot in the door and about a week later called me up and said come in. For you sat me down and said yes, your secretary but I promise you anyways cut a long story short. He had this idea for music show cooled ready steady go and by the time we will put together. The pilots can get at I was producing it. Did I know anything about pop music for? Thing but no did anybody else. So the show was picked up and luckily a couple of other young people we were young came in and we started working on a program could ready steady go at elk was mabus he left us alone. Yeah just great. It's it's amazing I mean ready steady go is so different from anything that come before it. Really I mean I suppose some the Jack Goods shows sort of pointed in direction to some extent but then you had a lot of really stiff stock not much pop music television full stop did you feel that what you're doing with revolutionary from very early point? At all we we just going out to you know as as you would our age going to clubs seeing people listening to Radio Caroline talking to people, and you know suddenly became very obvious that we could have these people on the show that when we went to see the rolling stones when we love Brian Jones who had the best hair in the will We could say come on the show and they did it was on the sleep. It was just gut reaction and knock I. Mean did anything to see any of this? No. Fantastic. I mean also. Undid you love always love music yourself. Personally was was all be something which is always chime to you because ready steady go was fantastic. Inner suspect it really focused free. Key American black music I didn't even know about black music I was. Gilbert and Sullivan. And South Pacific I knew nothing as we started ready steady. Very. Few black axe or autism in England. So inevitably, booking although the white exit cetera and the Springfield we became friends and dusty would play me these great blue soul rb records and that's when I fell in love with them and suddenly when we have these people own and literally would call agents and say other coming over, we could use the. and S Luckily, the show became big enough that it was worth people bringing them over because they knew they would be on the

Elkin Allen Brian Jones Jessica Murison Bowie Secretary La Belle Vicki Wickham Production Assistant Dusty Springfield New York City Morrissey BBC New York Charles Chilton Springfield Carolina Marr England Jack Goods
Boston - Massachusetts man indicted for killing neighbor while disguised, prosecutors say

WBZ Midday News

00:40 sec | Last month

Boston - Massachusetts man indicted for killing neighbor while disguised, prosecutors say

"Who who disguised disguised himself himself as as a UPS driver and fatally shot his former neighbor is indicted by grand jury. Norfolk District Attorney Michael Morrissey's office. Said. Robert Burning of Marshfield appeared remotely in Quincy District Court yesterday following his indictment earlier this week. He is facing multiple charges, including murder, possession of a large capacity weapon and illegal possession of ammunition. Prosecutors say burning shot 59 year old Laurie machine Honda outside her Braintree home. Back in June. They say burning shot her while he was wearing a surgical mask and brown jacket and the gun was hidden inside a box.

Robert Burning Quincy District Court Attorney Michael Morrissey UPS Norfolk Marshfield Braintree Honda Murder
Final Derby Dress Rehearsals

In The Gate

04:48 min | Last month

Final Derby Dress Rehearsals

"The favourite for Saturday's travers stakes is the Belmont stakes winner Tis the law, the owners of the law, a group of fairly regular guys from the Saratoga area they go by Saka. Toga stables are the same guys who owned funny side the winner of the two, thousand, three, Kentucky Derby and preakness they showed up to each triple crown race in a yellow school bus, not a limo. It was a scene to which many of us could relate but I'm going to give you a comparison of two other. Owners of horses running in Saturday's travers they are and Lori Hall who owned the Third Place Finisher in the Belmont Max Player and Orlando and Jonathan Noda who liked their travers entrant I line are the longest of longshots George Hall is the founder of a Hedge Fund, the Clinton Group that company's assets reached a high of five and a half billion dollars in two thousand, sixteen. Orlando Noda is a thirty one year old trainer who co all of his horses with his brother. Jonathan who's in the car business? George Hall and his wife Lori sold a six level. Manhattan penthouse in two thousand seventeen for somewhere around thirty eight million dollars. Orlando notice biggest return on investment so far has been the horse not loves a fight who not claimed for ten thousand dollars in May of two, thousand nineteen and whose win a month later represented his trainers I ever. T loves a fight won four races for his trainer and finished second last week in the John Morrissey at Saratoga. You. Get the idea Max player for George and Lori. Hall won the withers stakes back in February and finished third in the Belmont. STAKES IN JUNE FIRST LINE FOR ORLANDO. Noda just earned his first win in four tries and he's returning on only ten days rest to take on an imposing field. But if his trainers story is any harbinger, don't count first line out and we are pleased to welcome to win the game for the first time the trainer of First Line Orlando Noda what went into the decision to turn this horse around in just ten days. The horse came out of it good and I nominated him prior to even run especially. Like figure that especially wasn't GonNa go I was I was GONNA test my luck there and restaurant him because. The horse had shown me talent ever since I had him and I think got strike while the iron is hot right now and everything is just clicking on all cylinders. So I. Think we're just going to give it a go is not every day that we can have a three year old peak at the right time via because of this corona virus that maybe I might might just be able to pull off the upset and get my derby points that that I high horse up about the beginning. You would said to a couple of racing aficionados over the winter that you had a derby horse and first line what made you think that then Oh no the horses super talented it from the first time that we breathed him. We knew we had something special. I'm not the lightest of riders and horses just noting on track with me and I just can't picture it. Any other way because everything has played out to where it should as he broke his. Maiden here in Saratoga and I think the past two races, six furlongs, it was just the the too short for him for his long strident. He just went comfortable and those fractions buying the mollering Nathan not many horses hold up biting the whole time that they are at the top of the stretch hometown in first line and they've been at it. Right from the START I line on the outside pokes ahead and front hometown continues to battle down at the rail. Now, they're at the eighth bowl it is first line and hometown go to battle for a mile and a furlong here first line hud and front hometown not giving up they come for the finish and first line is first under the wire. Race I'm wondering if he's even cooled out yet from that race, I mean that was affirmed and Alydar Rier Dan Against Jaipur was neck and neck for a mile and an eighth I mean, how do you think that part of a racist going to affect him the ten days notwithstanding? Even fresh I'm not doing much with him and. Keep Afresh to the to the race. Then you gotta show up on the race checking in, and that's how he is all game once it gets onto the track. IS A. Very level-headed. Once once he gets into training just like train I'm just giving just. Keep them -freshing raider fire. For for the drivers.

Orlando Noda George Hall Orlando Jonathan Noda Saratoga Lori Longshots George Hall Kentucky Derby Nathan MAX Hedge Fund Belmont Founder John Morrissey Manhattan Clinton Group George
"morrissey" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:39 min | 2 months ago

"morrissey" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Meaningful patterns so something like a rage, click or the health of a e commerce website or the number of times that I click on something and it doesn't display properly. These are things you have to learn to extract from unstructured data. So what's the process for scanning this event stream of user behavior on the Front End, and then extracting value from it. Right so a lot of it is, we run full story on full story. No surprise, and so we have a lot of data going back years actually for own site, and that is one of the richest testbeds for us to understand user behavior. We can look at user behavior owner. Recite identify it frequently. Visually and then turning that into. Hey, is this a that we can describe through heuristic? Is this something that we can build a model for experimental with the data in? Sort of straightforward ways, and then rerunning sessions through these new analyzers in seeing what your precision recalled curve look like. Tell me more about that. So when you say precision recall I, think those are terms that not everybody in the audience would understand. Could you define those terms? Explain how they're useful. Sure precision and recall are essentially taken together. They define the accuracy of what you're doing. Those people are familiar with the concept of just whether it's a tool is accurate or not. So precision is really about how well you are categorized in something and recall is the number of times that you're catching it essentially. There is a strong mathematical definitions for these, but that's the gist taken together they represent accuracy, and so of course you WanNa tune these things to be as precise as possible, but also having the highest recall possible, and that's always when it comes to data science. That's the ongoing challenge always. Let's talk about the workflow for somebody who is using full story, so if I'm the developer and I find that there are lots of rage clicks occurring in a particular area of my application. What am I doing with that information? How am I finding fixes? And how does the deployment workflow the solution and deployment redeployment workflow? Go for somebody who's discovered an error after looking at their session captures. Yeah, that's really great question and the answer is frequently in most companies. It's bigger than just a developer. One of the key strengths of full story and technology like this is that it becomes sort of Lingua Franca for all these different departments to be able to work together. So if somebody is filing a support ticket. That says my hair was trying to buy this concert ticket and it wasn't working. That will go to a support agent who? Frequently. If you connect something like desk through integration to full story, you're actually seeing the you immediately have a link to the full story session where something happened. In fact, you have the moment in time in that session where it happened so customer support agent may look at it and then decide. This needs to go to engineering. They'll send it over to engineering. Engineering now doesn't have to guess based on just the written. Written text from a user about the type of experience they can actually see all the different things that led up to it so the workflow for the developer that point is frequently to dive in and see whether there's something on the screen which makes it immediately obvious or something in the event stream that triggered this issue, and because we also have the network activity of what's going on, you can correlate what happened. In the front end experience for that user to log so that you may have on the back end, so you can tie those pieces together, and it tends to make solving those mysterious problems much faster and much more pleasant developer. So good practice at that point. If you think this is a widespread issue, is then to set up a search for the type of issue that you had so if you know certain events that led up to. That bug occurring for the user. Then, what you can do is set up a search that defines it find the actual population of people who have been affected by this, and then set up an alert potentially on that were you can say let me know when this trend either goes above were below a certain amount, and then you'll actually get notified when those things happen, so that's a nice way to say okay when I. Actually push out a fix to production I can see this number. Go down. And then I know the issue is fixed for real. Tell me a little bit more about the engineering stack on the. Full story side of things so. You mentioned the data gets collected into Big Table, and it gets run through a data processing pipeline to detect the kinds of common errors that might be presenting on the front end. Tell me a little bit more about the data infrastructure. That's processing all that data. So we are pretty big believers in simplicity, and really a big drivers for simplicity is just doing things in a standard way, so our back end is all written in go. We standardized on that language along time ago. And so that makes everything very consistent and very simple or front end is all in type script as well so that's pretty simple. Just having those two major languages dominate everything that we do. Makes life pretty easy. As I, said we sort of rely on a number of different google managed services for different pieces, but really the heart of the system that we have on the back end is solar. That's our main data store and our main index store for the session data that our customers are interacting with, so as the data flows through different services. It's passing through a analysis pipeline that's built of different micro services..

developer google
"morrissey" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:32 min | 2 months ago

"morrissey" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"If. You're looking for all of our content. You can subscribe to the podcast software daily, and if you're interested in become a paid subscriber, you can go to software daily dot. com, and subscribe, you can get ad free episodes and with that. Let's get onto today's show. You probably do not enjoy searching for a job. Engineers don't like sacrificing their time to do phone screens, and we don't like doing whiteboard problems and working on tedious take home projects. Everyone knows the software. Hiring process is not perfect, but what's the alternative triple bite is the alternative. Triple Bite is a platform for finding a great software job faster. Triple Bite works with four hundred plus tech companies including dropbox. Core Sarah and cruise automation. TRIPLE BITE improves the hiring process by saving you time and fast-tracking you to final interviews at triple by dot com slash s daily. You can start your process by taking a quiz and after the quiz you get interviewed by triple bite if you pass that quiz. And if you pass that interview, you make it straight to multiple on site interviews. And if you take a job, you get an additional one thousand dollar signing bonus from triple bite because you used the link triple bite dot com slash s e daily. That one thousand dollars is nice, but you might be making much more since those multiple on site interviews would put you in a great position to potentially get multiple offers, and then you could figure out what your salary actually should be. Triple Bite does not look at candidates, backgrounds like resumes and where they've worked and where they went to school triple only cares about whether someone can code, so. I'm a huge fan of that aspect of their model. This means that they work with lots of people from nontraditional and unusual backgrounds to get started. Just go to triple by dot com slash s daily and take a quiz to get started. There's very little risk and you might find yourself in a great position getting multiple on site interviews from just one quiz and a triple bite interview goes triple by dot com slash se daily.

"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:37 min | 4 months ago

"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"I'm John Morrissey on cable news radio live everywhere on the I heart radio app yeah judge of coming up this afternoon at three we get to react to having sports with Albanians yeah NASCAR and we even had soccer and we'll catch up with their NFL network insider Ian Rapoport we'll see you this afternoon at three okay away many a time six thirty it is Colorado's morning news a process by Marty lans RT fifty degrees out today we're gonna get your ninety gonna stay warm tomorrow for the same but then again a bit of a cool down but as you alluded to able to cool down his into the heating that's right maybe seventy two on Thursday but otherwise eighties all week our top story on Colorado's morning news the governor says he expects public schools to re open when it comes time for kids to return to class the fall on fox news Sunday the governor called schools a critical necessary part of our society it's also going to be somewhat of a hybrid environment but by and large I think across our state across our nation kids are gonna be able to return to school in the fall he did say that school should be prepared to close from time to time when a breakout happens in that some students will be allowed to work from home exclusively governor Poloz will be providing another update on the state's battle against the virus coming up at ten thirty this morning of course we will carry that live on KOAA news radio are covered nineteen numbers continue to rise in Colorado but there is some good news out of the latest round of stats Keighley news radios Connor treat explains since early March three thousand eight hundred seventy two people have been hospitalized with a novel coronavirus and by Sunday only four hundred eighty six were currently hospitalized according to the data that's the lowest number of patients currently hospitalized with confirmed cove in nineteen cases since the end of March in the past twenty four hours thirty four people recovered enough from cove in nineteen to be discharged from hospital or transferred to a lower level of care according to the state what twenty one thousand nine hundred thirty eight people have tested positive or believed to have covert nineteen here in Colorado officials suspect the number of infections is actually many times higher than the cases confirmed through testing Qatar free of Callaway newsradio White House trade adviser Peter Navarro says the C. C. quote really let the country down early on in the fight against covert nineteen not only did they keep the testing within the bureaucracy they had a bad test Matt did set us back Navarro appearing on A. B. he's meet the prestige to specifically brought up the issue of testing is that the agency kept testing in the government at the same time the former director of the CDC is warning there won't be just one wave of corona virus in the U. S. Dr Tom Frieden is predicting we will see several rounds of the corona virus we know that.

John Morrissey
Tracie Egan Morrissey and the Curious Case of Jameela Jamil

Celeb News Ride Home

01:22 min | 7 months ago

Tracie Egan Morrissey and the Curious Case of Jameela Jamil

"Some updates about the Jamila meal thing. Apparently she's been deming with the writer. Who came up with the Munchhausen's conspiracy theory? Her name is Tracy Eakin Morrissey by the way tracy about it on her instagram stories. Saying quote she was damning me for seven hours last night long. After I stopped responding I never reached out to her. She reached out to me. Who's Zoom in who? She also revealed that she's going to release stimulus dams in a patriotic. Only podcast episode. Today Oh my God. This whole thing is wild why is Jamilla deeming this person why is Jamilla getting involved in this at all like she could have said nothing? And then none of this would have gotten picked up. And we wouldn't even know about it also just a sidebar if you of you also deemed me to tell me that none of Jamila Jim Meals. Good Place. Cast members follow her on twitter or instagram and to make things even juicier her classmate. Darcy Carton does not follow Jamila but does follow tracey. Morrison the founder of this Jamila Djamil conspiracy theory. I mean that that he scalding to be honest with you like my hands are burnt from getting all this tease deliver it all. Oh my God. It's too much it's too much

Tracy Eakin Morrissey Jamila Jim Meals Jamila Jamila Djamil Instagram Deming Morrison Darcy Carton Writer Jamilla Twitter Founder
The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

Hostage

03:44 min | 8 months ago

The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

"Our first clip is from podcast original female criminals covering the attempted murder of one of the most well known American artists of the twentieth century. Andy Warhol writer in Radical Feminist Valerie solanas befriended warhol in nineteen sixty seven through the New York Avant Garde art scene. He showed an interest in producing one of her plays titled Up Your Ass at invited her into his inner circle of artists and influencers influencers at the factory but in nineteen sixty eight. The pair had a falling out. Valerie became convinced that Warhol was trying to steal her ideas and pass them off as his own in paranoia fueled rage. She confronted Warhol in his studio armed with a thirty two caliber revolver it. She pulled out her gun aimed at Warhol's back while he was on the phone and fired before Anyone could stop her when the first shot went off no one in the studio realized what was happening Amaya. Yeah thought sniper had fired through the window. He threw himself on the ground Hughes on the other hand thought. The sound was an explosion from the offices of the Communist leanest party located two floors above them. More Hall was the only one who realized what was happening. Though her first shot had missed missed him he turned the sound and when he saw Valerie was holding a smoking gun he yelled Valerie. Don't do it no no. Oh but his words couldn't deter her Valerie wasn't discovered marksman her second shot also missed however over the third bullet struck Warhol in the abdomen hitting his left lung spleen stomach liver and sopha guess before exiting his back he collapsed to the ground. At which point Valerie turned to a Maya. He was the only bystander who hadn't taken cover making him a perfect target for Valerie. She fired twice more one shot hit but miraculously passed through Maya without damaging any organs Valerie then approached Hughes pointing the gun directly directly at him. He begged for his life but Valerie told him simply. I have to shoot you. She aimed the gun at his chest at such a close range. It was impossible for her to miss. But fate intervened the gun jammed and as has she tried to get it working again. The elevator doors opened Hughes realizing that Valerie was distracted and agitated told her to just take the elevator and leave. Valerie did exactly that Morrissey and Hughes immediately called nine nine one one. When the paramedics arrived and saw the blood they believed that Warhol was already dead no one could have survived the injuries he'd sustained Amaya had to convince them? That warhol was still breathing and that he needed immediate medical treatment. Finally the first first responders loaded warhol into their ambulance at the hospital. His heart stopped at four fifty one PM. The doctors doctors declared him legally dead but they were able to resuscitate him by massaging his heart and rushed him into emergency

Valerie Solanas Andy Warhol Hughes Warhol New York Avant Garde Writer Amaya Morrissey
"morrissey" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

04:36 min | 10 months ago

"morrissey" Discussed on WRVA

"Morrissey every day of the week I always love to wear my thin blue line bracelet hello we just came to our neck of the woods obviously and I had my great Halloween bracelet which had skulls on it little spooky but I still wore it and now here we are we getting ready for thanksgiving we've got Christmas coming up we've got Hanukkah coming up so I know there's going to be a whole new variety of bracelets from families bracelets Emily's bracelets dot com so I'm thrilled to tell you that not only is family Morrissey joining me in the studio to chat today but her brother PJ Marcy and if memory serves it said PJ Marcy twenty forty yes says you launch a campaign for president PJ is here as well and PJ I love talking to you but I want to talk to Emily first so Emily first of all thank you so much for making these thin blue line bracelets for as we love the you yo outcome all they are beautiful and I hope you know just how much people love the everywhere I go I see people wearing them feel well you my friend have made me happy with all of the bracelets and you've made at last count I think well over a thousand people happy with all of your bracelet so I'm excited now I we're gonna talk with PJ a little bit but I know you have been working hard on some new designs for Christmas right yes and what colors are you going to feature for the most part no yes some of them on right now you do yeah let me see if she's only goodness debuting on well some reading green ran why all my gosh there we're gonna have to take off in there's Rudolfo more room you know way are able put me down for Rudolph because I always loved Rudolph okay U. K. all right so let me is PJ a couple details here PJ I'm looking at some of these brand new beautiful bracelets from families bracelets and we're talking about Christmas so give us an idea number one how this whole Emily's bracelets dot com journey has come about because it's only what little more than a year old right yeah it's about a year and a month we started this business for Emily since she love making bracelets for everybody so much and she's been doing it ever since she was a little girl in occupational and physical therapy you know the builder fine and gross motor skills and you know we wanted some for to be able to do after high school and it looked turns out that this is what it's going to be in well been great so far I'll tell you what it is a it's just a constant reminder every time I look at it that there are some really talented people in our community and I'm I'm very humbled that I got to meet Emily and then you you're you're both talented folks were helping people where some beautiful creation so as we get closer to Christmas now we have if I understand correctly the first time it is going to be like a live craft show appearance for Italy so this Saturday November ninth at the principal church of the redeemer and we will have a booth and she's debuting her Christmas twenty nineteen line never seen before except for you of course I can keep a secret and that those will be nobody has seen yet and so if you want to get them early then come on Saturday and they will debut for everybody else the next day on Sunday November tenth okay so I know we don't want to give away all the secrets but it was just a a little taste of of what the designs are going to be this year so I think there's seven new bracelets for on Christmas and the holidays there's some Santa read off some snow flakes things like that everybody yep I love that yeah I love that now I tell me a little bit about the show itself what time and and what's the actual location total be nine AM to two PM come out to the fiscal church of the redeemer and we'd like to actually think Greg in more Kallada they actually sponsored Emily's bracelets and got us our booth which is very cool their listeners of your show the and that's a pistol Jersey redeemer it's in Salisbury kind of tucked in the middle in Midlothian survey yet and what was the time again nine nine AM to two PM nine till two okay and will be able to buy them there yep yeah you can buy in cash credit we got all no kidding all right now what about the website because I know is I.

Morrissey
Washington Post CRO Joy Robins on working directly with ad agencies

Digiday Podcast

09:12 min | 10 months ago

Washington Post CRO Joy Robins on working directly with ad agencies

"Welcome to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Morrissey thank you for joining us. This week I was joined by Joy Robbins. Joy is the Sierra of the Washington. I I we talk about everything. From balancing a subscription business with an AD business to the problems with the F. B. and Y. News publishers. Heat Block List Hopi enjoyed episode joy walking on the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me so you are eight months in now. It just out. You'd spent six years and quartz. Yeah Yep completely much larger organization yes absolutely absolutely. Explain that transition so I think coming from a place like courts which you know was this Example of a new publication created for the time I am in which it was launched To The post which has the balance of both this incredible rich heritage of brand and an audience but also I think has the spirit of a startup And I think that's why for me thinking about leaving somewhere that I had helped essentially build old the opportunity to go into something like that with loyalty at scale but still this relentless spirit for innovation Felt like an incredible next step. Okay so in the first eight months you reorganize the sales team and this is something we recently talked about. But like WANNA go into some depth about Explain what you did the first six months before an figure out how you want to be organized for success. Yeah So I spent my first six months at it. Sounds sort of cliche. But but just listening I talked a lot with our internal teams but probably more importantly I talked to our customers. are both existing customers and our potential aw customers and really started to understand. Okay the the post has several teams assigned to The market one sits in DC in our our retail and regional market really focused on that local market looking after brands who are just trying to reach Washingtonians but we have a Division that has grown exponentially the as we've become over ninety million unique S- in the US now in twenty five million internationally working with what we call the global brand team And that team had been organized by by Ad Agency so ultimately you're signed an agency and all of the clients that fell underneath agency were essentially your responsibility and You know it was working tremendously. Well I think that you know you've seen that through the growth at the post is experienced however I think we all are starting to see he is that In a lot of ways a the importance of understanding clients business is is is paramount For both our agency partners as well it was our selves. We need to better understand their business. Better understand how they make money And in another agencies off exactly exactly well and and I think that's never a part of the thinking it really has to come down to. How do you actually make the agency your partner In ultimately serving the brand rand on the other side of things you start to see more and more that the agencies represent their own business model they are facing their own challenges they are facing their own method or of of disruption. So how do we stop looking at these ad agencies is essentially you know the purveyors of the RFP which by the way my own I think the RFP processes is has been broken a long time but probably never never ever more than right now. But how do we also then start to think about what I think the platforms have done a really. We really good job at is is thinking about the ad agencies and how we can add value there as well so explain that for for those unfamiliar with how the platforms have organized. is their sales efforts. Sure so I think I mean I. Years and years now a lot of the platforms have had these agency development teams That have been working directly with The higher levels in the teams within the agencies to really understand how to both utilize their platforms best leverage their platforms as well as provide value to those agencies particularly when it comes to some sort of unique capability or partnership that they might have So you know that may seem intuitive live when you think about okay agencies are going to have to buy the platforms ultimately aren't they just helping them figure out how to do that. Most effectively perhaps but but for a brand like the post what I see the opportunity as is we are constantly innovating Both in our product as well as in our editorial we have a user lab down in. DC where we're constantly looking at User behavior reader behavior creating insights and to me that ability to leverage that in a in a in a particular way or or think about You know different ways that the Post and particularly agency group or holding company can actually Add unique value is is an opportunity for the agency so ultimately the way that we have organized since October. First essentially is we've created a group who our client partner teams and our agency partner teams and the client partner teams are responsible for or owning the relationship at the client level. All the way through to the agency team focused on that client. An our agency partners will be tasked with breath Really working with the senior level executives at holding companies and AD agencies to understand you know what are their pain points. What are the things that their clients are tasked talking with And how can we ultimately partnered to create something that adds value to their. So you want to have a relationship with the average at the advertiser level. Whenever absolutely I it's critical? I think as much as you know. It's funny I always thought coming from a brand that was perhaps not as well known like courts and before even the BBC which believe it or not was not as well known in the US I always thought just Visibility and familiarity was something that was really kind of hardest to overcome when it came to the clients directly but even a brand like the Washington Post who you know are is not well known. They're still an importance of educating educating at the brand level as to you know what our capabilities are. What are the audience How can we actually help These marketers uniquely weekly. Reach their Their targets Gimme your beef with the RFP So I think the RFP probably worked when people were just vying holes on pages and you could tell somebody the audience that you're targeting the ultimate sizes of the creatives but as things that people don't know give us an example of what appears is like well could range everything from like eight pages of just trying to say that they want something out of the box and never been done before each at scale scale exactly but but also with never been done before but with a clear Roi Capabilities So so you know it comes down to defining and target audience Stating in objective of the of the brand which you know in three sentences or less and Some of the creative tactics that agency will expect every once in a while even understand how you might be evaluated In terms of your submission and but as the marketing journey and and as what clients really expect has become more sophisticated and complex. The way that you are actually going to be able to our peak or something like content or data or insights is just it requires an in in person conversation And often I think what's most troubling about the R. F. P. is it will ask you for a twenty four or forty eight hour turnaround time. which and new and also your best most ambitious ideas at your most aggressive efficient pricing? And so you are you know adding to the human capital required quired at any media company to really like as those scale as you have four hundred five hundred six hundred eight hundred. RFP's if you're close rate doesn't actually really go up with those are essentially just adding human capital to like a game of like loss. Then he can get ghosted to expel. You never know if you're actually actually just an idea factory right so I mean when you don't get feedback but then you ultimately see your idea pop up in some program another publisher you're like wow coincidence students surely All this move to automation. Should I mean it should change the nature of salesforce explain what automation can instill instill cannot do. Yeah because a lot of advertising is becoming automated to some degree yet at the same time the sort of Doomsday Proclamations the units can eliminate. Doesn't seem like it's happened. No and I think that that's I think one of the things that we're really focused on right now is understanding what is best left if to automation and what does a direct relationship still

United States Partner DC Client Partner Ad Agency Brian Morrissey Joy Robbins Washington Washington Post F. B. BBC Publisher Y. News The Market R. F. P. Eight Months Six Months Forty Eight Hour Six Years
Democrats win control of House and Senate in Virginia

Glenn Beck

00:54 sec | 11 months ago

Democrats win control of House and Senate in Virginia

"Democrats are obviously thrilled to be returning to full control after winning majorities about the state Senate and house of delegates in Tuesday's elections Eileen filler global likely be the new house speaker and said they heard the voters clearly owners of the Commonwealth of Virginia loudly Virginia and did discrimination where it exists Virginia said we want we want reasonable winners in local races included Republicans current **** and Amanda chase along with Democrats collar van Valkenburg and Joe Morrissey because Allah Hashemi ousted incumbent Republican Jim Glynn start of it two of the races are very close with your mind out of it and rocks and Robinson holding narrow lead over Deborah Rodman in Larry

Senate Virginia Amanda Chase Van Valkenburg Joe Morrissey Allah Hashemi Robinson Deborah Rodman Jim Glynn
"morrissey" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:20 min | 11 months ago

"morrissey" Discussed on The Frame

"Building it wasn't that hard for fans to let such song slide given more cease championing of the underdog in the outsider he criticized the monarchy and police brutality and then last year came a controversial endorsement not afraid to be called anti-islam and I'm not afraid either for us as a party to embrace that and go with it it's about opposing Barbara's Anne Marie waters is the founder of four Britain a radical far-right openly Islamophobic party it all went mostly unnoticed here in America until Morrissey performed on the Jimmy Fallon show earlier this year with a four Britain lapel pin stuck to his jacket Morrissey support of such far right anti Bloomberg politics is now one of the singer's biggest and most devoted fan bases Latinos especially in the British singers one time home Sanjay's once a month the cozy boyle heights bar east side love Morrissey Karaoke known as Morris Yoki as usual the place is packed with mostly Mexican American fans queuing up to croon their favorite there's also chatter about more sees divisive embrace of far right politics who asked that we not use his last name is conflicted disagrees with the singers coarsening views but more sees also kind of been lifelong companion I think even back then I already knew that I was I was an out so I kinda related to a lot of the songs were saying a lot of these crushes that I was having on the boys decided to boycott the singers recent La area shows. I struggle a lot and if I'm GONNA give my money I'm not as prone to be like here I love you take money you don't need me in your auditory among some people might say well then you're not a real fan but that's my truth the cracks in Morris he's fan base in the US appear to be spread Eddie most recently during a show in Portland last month the singer exploded after spotting a protest.

Morrissey Morris Yoki Britain founder Jimmy Fallon Anne Marie Bloomberg Sanjay La America Barbara Portland US Eddie
"morrissey" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on A Podcast of One's Own with Julia Gillard

"I'm Julia Gillard and this is a podcast of one's own. I'm offended by the lack of women in positions positions of leadership and the way those that do make it a traitor die. I helped lead the Global Institute for Women Slave ship at King's College London mm-hmm headquartered in Virginia Woolf Building in Nineteen Twenty Nine Virginia say she aspired for women authors to have the space to write in a room of once on here. I want women leaders too. Have a podcast once Mike Mike is this podcast is Helena Morrissey financier.

Julia Gillard Mike Mike Global Institute for Women Sla Virginia Woolf Building Helena Morrissey King's College London mm-hmm Virginia
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 1 year ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"John Morrissey the big door hinges split you're still going to be I've got to go I don't you're going to be talking a big al on Tuesday I can't even do a big a laugh I know no one can of the gal laugh yeah he does so glad he's on the stage yeah I'm so sad I'm not talking to on a regular basis but we'll have to get together and do the chit chat club yeah know that I'm all miss you though but let let's do traffic in the we'll have our last sad goodbye at three forty five okay we've got ourselves a cut of said Dr I mean it's been pretty tough through downtown core downtown is extra popular we got the taste of Colorado crank it up and you've got street closed around the state capital you've got the rock about showdown see you see issue all levered up for tonight's game and you've got the Rockies game in town so I mean it's it's big doors down tell right your friend tried to get them down all right now getting into downtown cell but I twenty five at seven you've got a crash over the mountains that's really based on this not stick around town for all those big events downtown and I seventies real heavy after evergreen going west twenty five is jammed up from condo for headed west I ended up for the tech center you've got delays on something like twenty five others say it's Starbucks it was on fire smoke a quite a bit they got the fire out is now just sit there looking all sad southbound on the ramp to a rap and responsive for seventy at Santa Fe there is an accident fox thirty one bit boy whether it's eighty two right now we're on our way to fifty nine overnight with a chance of showers and thunder showers before nine this report is sponsored by further to roll this Friday through Monday.

John Morrissey Starbucks Colorado Rockies thirty one bit
"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Way John Morrissey is there to pick up the baton that I just dropped right your lap that was a few segue yeah I thought of fame what do you think stream ironing John if if I iron and all its extreme I I've I haven't ironed a decade so I don't think I can pass this game here well I I think that I feel like you should iron in the hell all my gosh in a jet copter that's going to happen John Morrissey I can afford don't have to a full size ironing board now you can get one of those little ones that your lab with an iron and then take a picture and posted on the extreme ironing out shock I'm super excited about this we have to make this happen in the pilot now you'll be fine you don't have to plug the iron and you think the guy skydiving or actually ironing that's ridiculous we could have solar power I don't think about that on the road to a friend you know what we've got a pretty decent day to just chat I believe during traffic because there's really not a whole lot going on we did have a medical emergency somebody a bad problem lost control of her car went into a tree Colorado in Alameda they're still trying to figure that out get them some help there was a crash county letting go back that's been played really the only crash on the highways right now south of the metro area heading down into cal's rock on eighty five south on eighty five a Daniels park road which is down south of Sedalia almost out of gas rock you've got next address your drug yeah you've got crowded drive downtown your I. seventy drive between bright Boulevard and Central Park is seven to seventy in both directions and that ever slow eastbound thirty six past holes villa had big construction project at under for church friends that kind of problem as well your fox thirty one pinpoint weather showers and thunderstorms tonight down to fifty seven and then a sunny start tomorrow the chance of showers in the afternoon and I've eighty six it's eighty one right now next update.

John Morrissey Alameda Sedalia Central Park cal
"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"With John Morrissey has gone outside it's better the roar area looks like self out too few but only just opened up after I look but just watch the last of the the record should cops a fire truck clear the scene so if you're stuck in the back of which all stopped up to do but go back almost back to Alameda take part only drove it in front of you a look so good a heavy drive on I seventy before your I. seventy drug been real busy eastbound I. seventy crossing I twenty five for bagels over bad right what about a seventy five video Boulevard past due to five got big jams all your he fell to seventy Dr the right lane up that ramp was blocked from east up to seventy on the eastbound I. seventy it was destruction the ray of light so that's what your big tie backed up there looks like we got a second crash possibly get the backup of discretion the roar area just like that you do five Dr and I could see truck and two cars on the right shoulder south up to do but right at the door Mississippi so right after Mississippi you've got another crash the thing is is that the cops will come in here and probably blocked the right late so expected delivery delays what's up up to do but the crash after I live is gone you've got whatever Mississippi all the right shoulder this report is sponsored by the losses of jobs in the only record if you're hurt in a traffic accident the DVD club verbal double city urine floor they have attorneys are also licensed medical professional what is that your legal or physical pain get help but Denver traffic accident dot com that divert traffic accident dot com next update six forty K. we do radio color of the traffic and weather right so show will have near record highs around ninety six degrees the record ninety seven set back in nineteen eighty six down to sixty.

John Morrissey Mississippi Denver Alameda ninety six degrees six forty K
Egypt's former president Mohamed Morsi dies at age 67

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Egypt's former president Mohamed Morsi dies at age 67

"Egypt chief Rossiter says they're looking into the dramatic. Courtroom death of former president Mohamed Morsi Morsi died after he spoke for five minutes during a court appearance Monday before judges were set to announce a break more from correspondent Jala Gorani Muhammad more. See burst onto Egypt stage after winning the presidential election, the country's first civilian and Islam is president, the Muslim Brotherhood thrust Morrissey into the presidential role after the election commission, disqualified their first choice Caratto shot. They're dubbing Morsi the spare tire. Team of insect. Experts is being assembled to examine more sees body to determine the cause of death concern. He was being mistreated in

Mohamed Morsi Morsi Egypt President Trump Jala Gorani Muslim Brotherhood Rossiter Morrissey Caratto Five Minutes
"morrissey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Even Morrissey, Gina specter Regina spector, and Dave Chapelle is now bringing his comedy tour there for five shows in early July. And these are the kind of shows that if you've ever tried to get tickets to a day Chapelle show. They are going to sell out immediately, so they go on sale. Next week, they go on sale next Friday to the general public next Tuesday to people who have the special TicketMaster verified fan pre sale, which, that's a whole other thing. But if you are interested in, I would definitely be on your computer at ten AM, those days looking into getting, you do have to leave your cell phone, right? So this is another way Chapelle is actually sort of on the forefront of this was that for couple years now. He's been doing his Yang do packages believe. That's what they're called, where they take your cell phones, as you're entering the building, and they put into kazoo ziplock bag, and they put it away, so that nobody is taking photos recording. Trying to write down potentially damaging quotes about comedy routine and a lot of other prominent comedians have started doing this as well. But he was the first one to do it, but they're very specific in their instructions where they say, you'll be required to place them in a locked pouch for the duration of the event and anyone caught with a cellphone. Inside the venue will be immediately ojected. So you don't even want to mess around with that tickets go on sale next week. Liz, j Jenin Ben from Gotham is thanks so much for coming by guys next week. Thank you coming up. A look at a new podcast called this land. It reveals how murdering vested led to an upcoming two thousand nineteen supreme.

Dave Chapelle Gina specter Regina spector TicketMaster Morrissey Liz Gotham
What are conservatives saying about Joe Biden's new video?

Joe Walsh

09:14 min | 1 year ago

What are conservatives saying about Joe Biden's new video?

"So I looked at what Ed Morrissey had written about Russia. Hangover muller. Hangover said, hey, let's talk about that. But now knowing Ed knowing hot air knowing what he's doing. I just offer the curve ball of front and safe. Hi, welcome. It first of all have you caught the Joe Biden video this morning. I've got some of it. I just I I was kind of ripping through it right before I came on the air with we would probably come out interesting. Probably one of the more effective campaign videos that I've seen so far the ones that I've seen from other democratic candidates were sort of all over the place. At least one thing Trump. I, you know, and I'm just so disappointed, and I'm probably naive to be. I mean, I've I've tried to be a head of the curve on a lot of things and not be surprised by so many things. But I thought we would see Joe come in at his likable best with with some things to say about Trump, and we need to sort of point things in a different direction. And I've got a different view of immigration and a different view in the environment. And I just welcomed the opportunity to become your nominee, blah, blah, blah. I did not expect Trump is Hitler America is Germany in the nineteen thirties under him and only I can save you. And my shallow analysis is to be disappointed. I hate this. I wanted better. But I think you might be honest you called effective. And it probably is for exactly the audience that he's pitching to today's democrat party. Remember what he's probably got the centrist ready enhanced. Right. That's the analysis. That's what he's got to be looking at is that there isn't a lot of competition for the traditional Joe Biden democratic voters there. Everybody's pushing to the progressive so biting I think thinking I got those people just by jumping into the race. What I've got to do is be able to compete for the progressive activists against Kemba Harris, you know? Elizabeth Warren along with a lot of other zero percenters in yield. And so so that's tailoring. The message to to hit those progressive activists to to to take those voters away from that into claims sort of a consensus among all the sides of the Democratic Party. So I see the strategy there. I'm with you on that. I kind of thought that he'd be killer uncle Joe coming out of the gate to. But it doesn't surprise me that that he's seeing as the has the activist blood of the party at the moment. And that's what he's going for. Because the the danger is that by being the likable of jeweler guy that he gets tagged as being weak gets tagged as being unfit for the fight. And he's gotta show that he's willing to throw the sharp elbows. I don't know if it so much that or if it's just the fact that he's got to overcome the fact that. He's an old white guy. I think that's really the big issue. Right now is politics Democratic Party. And he's got to find a way to cut through that. And the one way to do that is to go after Trump. Listen, heavy mentioned identity politics on wanna get to your wonderful piece at the week dot com called the Muller war rages on I've got you and the gift of a little bit of time since identity politics does want so much of the democrat party a lot. A lot of women are having a lot of impact Coppola Harris has the the the double dip of women of color, which is such a shameful thing. Because she is is a smart and talented Makamba person. And yet in today's Democratic Party. It's all about the kind of of identity stuff that you mentioned. But here sitting here in Texas. I'm watching beta meltdown, but the more at least as interesting story is how unaccomplished Hispanic man like on Castro has crickets and tumbleweeds. Have you noticed? He is he conspicuous by his absence in any kind of discussion of. Early buzz. I actually a little surprised about that too. Because this is a name that's been popping up for quite a while. I mean, the Castro both Castro brothers have been talked about for at least three or four years maybe longer than that about being the the the index comers in the Democratic Party. And I'm wondering if. I'm wondering if it's just an issue of. Platform. I mean camera Harris comes from California, California's very blue state. It's very large state very important state in in the democratic primaries now because it comes early in the primaries it didn't use to come early in the primaries. I'm wondering if that if it is media situation when you're in the Senate, it's easier to get media attention to when you're in the house, or when you're mayor of a city in Texas. So the Castro brothers haven't really been. Media dominant, right? See them around the media. Has something to do with it. And then again, you get Kirstin Jill, right? Who also comes from it, very important democratic state, very blue state, highly popular state and she's zero percent to. So it's see I think that's the very good analysis. Right. Let's go to what I actually wanted you on the show for but in today's fast moving world. Let's not part company before we talked about your piece, headlined, the Muller war rages on what is your basic feces there on how Democrats are living in post Muller, America. I think that they can't let it go. And I think that they're going to find the more that they can't let go the more. They're gonna disconnect from voters on this. But clearly what they wanna do is they want to reconstitute the mullahs report under their own steam. And and so they're going to try to do what you especially when it comes to obstruction of Justice. I think that they've given up on the Russia collusion thing. Adam Schiff aside? I think that kind of given up on the Russia collusion. Hardly anything about that really since bars report. But certainly since the mullahs report came out, and so I think it's going to focus on instruction as an impeachable offense. And what they wanna do is. They wanna drag all the different witnesses that Muller talked to during the investigation and Adam testify before congress, so they can try their own conclusions rather than Muller's conclusions are William bars conclusions. I I don't think the administration's gonna sit for that second work. And Secondly, I don't think people really care as much as Democrats things they do about. This is something that I think most people felt the Miller report settled and without the without an underlying crime of Russian collusion that really concerned about whether or not Donald Trump head temper tantrums over this looks something else and how it will play than the next chapter of President Trump's combativeness well seem to be to resist every subpoena that comes his way in order to pile on impost Muller, America. Everybody knows my dog knows that these are punitive subpoenas because they can't let it goes you've described. But there's something about resisting subpoenas that have. It's it's it's dicey. It's risky has that gonna play. You're right about this. And in fact, I think is Jonathan swan Mike Allen, it actually has a pretty decent piece about this today is that you can the White House can simply stall this thing forever by refusing cooperate with subpoenas and congress can issue citations all day. But the Justice department isn't going to force that, and if you wanna get example of just look at Eric Holder with fast and furious. They stonewalled it over executive privilege. The Obama technically wasn't even involved in this discussions, and they didn't settle it until Donald Trump came into office where they Eric Holder. Finally turned over some of the documents that they've been looking for so, yeah, you can still this thing forever. And the question of whether does your political damage, it it certainly didn't with Obama Obama got reelected, even though Eric Holder was found in contempt over operation fast and furious, and he was very popular throughout his presidency. Even though he was stolen that investigation. And in this case. Factor for both sides is that they waived executive privilege for more. So Muller is interviewing all these people. Executive privilege now Democrats are arguing look that the precedent. That means that you that. It's it's waved forever. And that's a legal question. It's certainly going to be. Have to be nailed down. However, the Trump administration can turn around and say, look, we cooperated with the independent counsel cooperated with the guy that we didn't like, and we all these people already talked to investigators, and they have a report a full report that tells them exactly what they found reductions part of the report, and I think that's Trump administration. Can't successfully argue that they cooperated so much during the special counsel investigation that it is illegitimate attempt at congress to try to reconstitute that into a kangaroo court, and they're simply not going to cooperate with necessarily gonna hurt

Hangover Muller Democratic Party Donald Trump Joe Biden President Trump Coppola Harris Democrat Party America Castro Congress Russia Executive Hangover Ed Morrissey Eric Holder Texas Obama Obama Elizabeth Warren
"morrissey" Discussed on Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

"More season. They're very bizarre them Morrissey. He's just. Long-stay winding down the way to Morrissey. Like just in general. I think that that type of film making where econ rely on the images, and you can't rely on the dialogue. And there's always a feeling that it's kind of overloading the scenes there were so many things I was watching, and I was just like this is intended as a quiet moment between two of the characters, and it would it would feel like one. If there wasn't some kind of like drone or some beats in the background. You know, I was watching the film really really wishing it would just embrace the the quiet for a little bit and almost embraces sense of modesty. But it never did. Ryan till the end it was just very like full on music music music, for me, a textbook example of like know, how to not use music. Pushing my buttons when it comes to like, you know, pop music in films being interesting experiment. You should Recode it without the sound. Joel is really funny. I was actually thinking let's facts Steven Soderbergh and get him as little experiments. Re-cut without the music. I'll be really interested to see that. Because I think it would be a very different and possibly more interesting film. There's more focused on light the detail in the film, rather than trying to create an atmosphere is the detail there. That's why I kind of disagree. I think it remind two sizes because this is partly how the film sets off on quite romantic for is Stevie breaking into ins ream despite being told explicitly and with ins fists, not go in his room. And so you've seen as he leaves cedars into the room. And it's this shrine to the era, you can tell Jana hose just kind of lovingly crafted, and he's them mocking down which music. He needs to listen to you on these alphabetized. I can't even have that many discs that stage. CD's types of writing them down ordering this. This. Shelf of many that would have been an amazing five styles from Jenkin..

Morrissey Stevie Joel Steven Soderbergh Ryan Jana
Morrissey And Smiths discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:10 sec | 1 year ago

Morrissey And Smiths discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Fans of the Smiths and Morrissey will like this Morrissey announcing he'll perform on Broadway. This may for seven dates it'll showcase highlights from his career, plus new material

Morrissey Smiths
"morrissey" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"A straight line alone. See properly without a Paris specialist glasses means that few directors and producers will be willing to take a chance on you my future, which ones seem so positive has been stripped away from me. And now, I'm struggling to make ends mate. Forget making lot full-time living as an actor. My thanks goes out to both here. Therefore for allowing me to live my life by Carris -ly through the various guests that you have on your show. It's fascinating to hear about the Marianna. Why he's which different people found that way to become TIs and how their careers developed over the years of no idea what my future holds anymore. But being able to listen to your show been really important for me in a why I call quite into words. People the kebab by the best what she's. Adam stevens. He says that you can't quite put into words, Adam. But he really does. To share it with you. I thought it was a really important aim. We don't know what life's gonna throw. Adam certainly didn't he didn't say in the Email. Whether we got married on how affected anything else. So I I know you're listening, and I just wanna reach hours. I'm sure every listener will and say thank you so much for sending Email. We just send you so much love and. You know, this is a community support network. We can all talk on here. Remember said ages ago last year. Email, and if you've got questions or concerns or problems are we can share them with this lesson listening community, and that's what was just done and. Yeah. It's kind of bold as over. So Adam thank you for sharing with us. And we send you out to love. Okay. Thanks for listening to that sorry to our knee. When things throw you, you know, she doesn't respond. And we need to be honest with each other. Right. Okay. Episode seventy one here we are. We met David Morrissey in London, it came to meet me and my Otell while I was filming full of stinking cold. I was but he was brilliant. Now, you'll know diving Morris as the governor is in the walk in dad, Imai cinnamon, Julius Caesar in London onstage recently the bridge there. He's he's a legend. And he's a lovely lovely Falah. He's very beautiful episode. And it goes, very deep and. There's a a slight fragility to the episode. Explain any further described him on that one of us trying to reach the words and speaking of reaching for the words, you'll hear David is considered. I don't mean that derogatory. I mean, he when we talk you'll hear he considers what he says. Connect to his brain. And then it comes always mouth. Not like me. I wish I it doesn't it just falls on my whole allow rubbish. But it sad. It's a lovely everything when he cares. A lot. And a lot of friends and nothing after this episode. You will to this is episode seventy one of the two show podcast with the majestic David Morrissey. Enjoy..

David Morrissey Adam stevens Julius Caesar Paris Marianna London Imai cinnamon Morris
"morrissey" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

MedTech Talk Podcast

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"morrissey" Discussed on MedTech Talk Podcast

"Morrissey. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you, Tom. Nice speaking with you. I want to hear all about Lydia. It's an interesting company interesting origins. And I think you've got a unique approach. But as always let's find out a bit about you, and our guests like to find out how you found your way into tech for my reading of my intensive research on linked in it looks like you started at Kimberly Clark. Did you go into Kimberly Clark, knowing you're going in this direction? Yeah. So I that's actually where I started out med tech. Was Kimberly Arkan Eshel healthcare division, and it was not completely by design that I ended up in in health care when they offered me a job. It was the best package, and I had just totaled my car, and they offered me a company car the job at the PR firm took a very distant second to Kimberley park. And that is actually how I found my way in to Mantech and said yesterday, tack might think what kept me in midtech was during the training that Kimberly Clark. Does which all big companies? Do I spent a lot of time in the operating room in hospitals? And it was also the time that we learned action sperm into cases. I scrubbed into my first case, and I was hooked. So that's where I got my start notice looking person in the last month of mentioned that the getting in the operating room and seeing it happen was really what what dot them onto miratec. So so there's like this whole kind of faith thing, you know, if you head until your car, you might not be CEO of company that right? I'm definitely a believer. At this stage. I'm like her that I think sometimes opportunities present themselves, and they don't always follow Mike for not following a linear path by any stretch imagination. But it's been interesting. And I think that there is the continuity throughout my career really has been about making a difference. So I've hopped into a few other areas where to nonprofit I also worked in consumer products for short period of time, but I would consider Mantech in medical device. My Homebase for sure looks will your your to turn. In in midtech. After Kimberly Clark, you stayed with a big company. What was your path out of new? Ultimately, find yourself in start up. Say also I carried a bag, and I started out sewing drapes gowns to operating rooms, which was not very glamorous. But was great way to get exposed in a commodity products. That was a pretty tough road to go. But it was a great exposure. And what I very quickly realized was that. I liked men tack. I like the industry, but I really wanted to work for a smaller company at wanted to be more surgically focused in a pretty quickly realized I also wanted to be on the inside not just taking what strategy people had laid out going out and just saying the patch. I wanted to be part of figuring out. What was right pet markets who we be in. And what the products look like I did spend time I was in sales for couple of other companies for I actually went to my first of marketing role, which was actually a company here in the bay area, which was general surgical innovations. They were working in general surgery, cardiovascular and plastic and reconstructive surgery at that time in so I actually join them as a as. A product manager in very quickly. You know, love that and took on started out in their possibly reconstructive group. And then ultimately took over all the product lines there, which was a really fun opportunity for me. It was a fairly young company adjoined right before the IPO. So I got to go through that experience in nineteen ninety seven a lot of So us. that's kinda how I got from you know, from the from the outside into the inside of of midtech million legal as you recall phone or in vivant hundred you've come on that situation. It's a very small. It's very small industry. It was and it still is to hey in in many regards. I actually this is actually pretty funny. So I was at GSI and GSI had moved from Palo Alto to not know, the commute was brutal. I lived in the city, and it was like, you know, I don't know if I can continue to do this this commute..

Kimberly Clark Kimberly Arkan Eshel midtech Mantech GSI Tom Morrissey. Kimberley park Palo Alto CEO Mike product manager
TransCanada asks Montana court to allow preliminary work on Keystone XL

Rush Limbaugh

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

TransCanada asks Montana court to allow preliminary work on Keystone XL

"Building company the Keystone Pipeline heading to court to ask a Montana judge to unblock part of his order that halted that project. Here's Jeff monosso US district judge Brian Morrissey, President Obama appointee blocked transcanada's permits earlier this month to build the keystone XL pipeline from Albert 'as oil sands through a half dozen US states to the Gulf of Mexico until further environmental. Studies can be done now. Lawyers for trans Canada will ask the same judge to clarify or amend his order to block the project. So that. Reconstruction work can continue while it

Keystone Pipeline Brian Morrissey Transcanada Jeff Monosso Barack Obama Trans Canada Montana President Trump Albert Mexico
The NHLs New York/Brooklyn Americans With Dale Morrisey

Good Seats Still Available

03:15 min | 2 years ago

The NHLs New York/Brooklyn Americans With Dale Morrisey

Dale Morrissey Brooklyn New York Rangers New York Larry King Madison Square Garden NHL Stan Fischler Amazon Producer Chretien Jerry Hockey Director Writer
Rockets disrupt presidential holiday speech in suspected Taliban attack

Morning Edition

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Rockets disrupt presidential holiday speech in suspected Taliban attack

"Police in Afghanistan say Taliban militants. Fired two rockets today at the presidential palace in Kabul has the country's president Ashraf Ghani was speaking to the nation one landed near the presidential compound the other hit close to. A NATO building and. The US embassy to police officers were injured the attack prompted an. Aerial response from helicopter

West Virginia Ashraf Ghani United States Patrick Morrissey Charleston West Virginia President Trump Dave Mattingly NPR General Trump Kabul Nato Afghanistan Brittany Patterson Washington Barack Obama Senate
"morrissey" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"morrissey" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I'm part of the vox media podcast network here, vox media headquarters in New York City. If that is relevant to you, it's not just ignore it. It's fine. One thing you should not ignore. I was out for a little bit and my colleague, Kurt Wagner did an awesome job stepping in for me, you talk to Ryan Hoover for product hunt and Jesus Citerne from discord. Both of those are very interesting companies. Those are interesting episodes if you haven't listened to go back and listen to them right now, it will stop. Wait. All right. I'm back here, but prime Morrissey very patiently waiting for me to stop talking. So he can say, hey, Brian. Hi, Peter Primorsky is editor in chief of digital may bizarre, grander title, president and editor in chief resident and editor editor digital media or media. Technically, we've got all the way. I think the crossover between listeners to this podcast and consumers of digital and listeners the digital podcast, probably one hundred percent. Does that make. Us the rivals? No, we're coz something. Something xactly collaboration? Yeah, it'd be weird if you're listening to this podcast and not consuming digital in some part because you guys do a kick ass job covering the ins and outs and minutia and big picture of digital media, right? Yes. That's talk about here plus occasionally have a movie director in which you don't do your little. I keep in my lane in narrowly focused, but thanks, I, I am big admire of you and your work. I'm also tomorrow the fact that I'm when I emailed you earlier this summer and said, hey, you wanna come on. He said love to, but I'm in Serbia, which is the only time I wanted to do. No one has ever used that excuse to get ever podcast before. What were you doing? What are we doing in Serbia? My wife is Serbian, so I go to Serbia every now and again, because she visits there with you. She doesn't live there. He's not live there now, but her parents, you know, however you make your relationship work and find me your nearest. I think you're Dumbo right from your tweets and someone I feel like I know really well, even though I've only talked to handful at times. Entirely through social media through Twitter feed. That's true. Yeah, I'm in Dumbo run into a lot of people from the media industry. They're Brooklyn dumb. Oh, what happens? You live Dumbo you are serious runner. What else did I do? I think I know about you based on your tweets. That's mostly due to the crazy ultra marathon. I have. I haven't in a couple of years that's like run like a hundred miles. Yeah, I got up to almost sixty. She's what happens when you get to sixty miles. Well, for me stop. But like in a like a like a euphoric state at some point in the in the funding. I don't know my understanding of marathons when you're done running twenty six point two miles, you're tired. That's true. They wrap you in the silver blanket and you go who that was a lot, even guys. We're really good at it. But if you pay yourself, you can go longer than twenty. Six. I think that's a great segue into media. Do you do this to prove a point? I remember seen in. Dacosta. Whoa. I think you know, what is this as fiftieth birthday interview and saying, why are you so intent on on this fitness regimen? You're doing. Didn't. I'm sure there's a real answer involving psychology Freud because I work with a lot of younger people and I want to sort of keep up with them. The average Twitter employees age is twenty. Six. Is this the the impulse behind your gay? I have a lot of writing a lot of younger people who who work with who I work with now..

Serbia vox media Dumbo Twitter Morrissey editor in chief Kurt Wagner editor New York City Ryan Hoover Jesus Citerne Brooklyn Peter Primorsky director Brian president
Morrissey Postpones UK/Europe Tour Dates

News and Papers

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Morrissey Postpones UK/Europe Tour Dates

"Who was separated from their parents as part of mr trump's zero tolerance approach there's been a big rise in the number of british people getting possible from other eu countries since the brexit referendum two years ago according to figures obtained by the bbc news last year almost thirteen thousand uk citizens took the nationality of one of the seventeen member states which supply data seven times the level in two thousand fifteen the immigration lawyer nick rawlinson isn't surprised by the figures they reflect rainy what we mean things today also referendum vote i'm ring looking for an opportunity to keep that doorway into europe by having not citizenship fail as we all now free to go things work anywhere live anywhere i think it's about freedom then on brexit which is really might the airline virgin atlantic has said it will no longer work with the home office to forcibly deport illegal immigrants it's face pressure from campaigners angry about the government's treatment of postwar caribbean migrants known as the wind rush generation morrissey has postponed next month's uk and european tour the thing is manager said it was due to logistical problems mercy has been criticized for making comments in support of tommy robinson the jailed founder of the far right group the english defence league and for criticizing the mayor of london dave haslam had organized the protest to coincide with a morrissey concert in manchester are becoming more and more concerned about his defending tommy robinson and support for far right organizations and a lot of comments made about sadique kahn for example i'm just cross the line that's the news now with the weather here's chris folks thanks a lot of talent and we're in for another hot and sunny day alot we'll start off required a bit of cloud across eastern areas so starting off with the forecast first of all for southeast england central southern england the midlands eastern england northeast england it's a cloudy start to the day with a few mismatch around as well that cloud wilbon quickly this morning to leave pretty much clearly sunny skies to take from the middle part of the morning on into the afternoon it's going to be hot and sunny day then temperatures about twenty three degrees around the east coast with the onshore winds inland highs could reach around twenty eight maybe twenty nine degrees celsius source oh yes feeling very hot in the sunshine here for south west england wales in northwest england for the most part is sonny starts the and that's the way the weather's gonna stay another very hot one temperatures peaking into the low thirties by thirty two degrees the top temperature today knowledge also enjoying plenty of sunshine highs of around twenty three degrees for belfast but around twenty eight or twenty nine for western counties and in scotland plenty of sunshine developing once the early morning cloud is broken away highs into the mid to high twenty s allen thanks kris now for a look at the papers and the times deals with the unvarnished assessment of one donald by another eight says the president of the european council donald tusk has warned that president trump has declared war on the international rules based order describing the eu nato and the world trade organization as bad for america a diplomatic source says mr tusk made the comments to e you leaders in brussels on thursday night the male believes that despite claims of the major breakthrough in migration policy even a cursory glance at e you deal announced in brussels is enough to tell you it won't work the paper says it has huge sympathy for the plight of migrants who are willing to go to desperate lengths to reach a promised land of europe but with no e you country volunteering to take more refugees under the new agreement the deal raises more questions than it answers there disturbing accounts in the daily mirror of the treatment of elderly people at the fourteen care homes in england with the worst care quality commission ratings it says frail residents have been left in urine soaked clothes filthy beds and had no baths or showers for weeks on end the research carried out by a law firm also uncovered cases where residents who are being prescribed the wrong medication the daily telegraph says tens of thousands of retired workers face cuts of their pensions after hmo identified errors in their record stretching back forty years the calculations by pension schemes mean retired workers with both public and private sector pensions face reductions to their payments in some cases retirement incomes could be cut in half and the weekend edition of the.

Mr Trump Twenty Three Degrees Twenty Nine Degrees Celsius Thirty Two Degrees Forty Years Two Years
"morrissey" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"morrissey" Discussed on WCHS

"Well i mean it certainly could and it depends on what blankenship wants to do you know the president called blankenship presumably to get blankenship to lay down his arms and and endorsed the nominee but of course we know what trump said to people in back when i was not clear that he was going to be the nominee we know what trump said when they asked him and he said maybe we'll maybe i won't i dunno and obviously or at least it would seem to this point the blankenship has not been satisfied he the way that the way that morrissey went after him you know there's gonna be some hard feelings there obviously how far does mike and chip wanna take it and is he worried about a backlash if he ever wants to run again or is it would it just be worth it to to play the spoiler especially by the way they think about this scenario but let's say that the way things shape up it more he can't catch on and it's it's not working for him if you're blankenship do you want credit for playing the spoiler let's say you're not going to run again but you want credit for being the maker or the un maker maybe you do want that it i guess i'll say this being rich and not particularly caring what people think does give person a considerable latitude just wasn't gonna go there is that i don't think blagojevic gives a possums behind what anybody thinks so i think i think he i think he wants to be respected i think he wants to be feared i think he wants i think he wants west virginians he wants west virginia republicans and democrats like to not mess with him and a good way to put that marker down would be to blow up morris or help blow up morrissey whether he really wants to do it and whether there's something you know that's the hard thing what do you offer a guy like that what what what is what does morrissey offer blankets or anybody what do you know what he got yeah exactly.

blankenship president trump morrissey mike morris blagojevic west virginia
New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman resigns over assault allegations

ABC News Perspective - Cheri Preston

02:04 min | 2 years ago

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman resigns over assault allegations

"Trump's recommendation a despondent blankenship addressing supporters just about an hour into the vote count at this point is not nearly what i would hope it would be so we'll just have see if we can come back as the evening went on attorney general morris lead strengthened and blankets ship fell into a deep third by ten o'clock with the writing on the wall blankenship hit the podium it didn't work out being asked of course whether some of the things we did whether it's cocaine mitch or whether it's some of the other criticisms of mitch mcconnell or whether it's china people made the difference i really don't think so i think if there was any single factor based on the polling at different times the debate and all the things i saw it was probably more likely president trump's i know lack of endured on what to call it but don't vote for it on a tweet a little while later morrissey declared victory heaping praise on the president's mr president if you're watching right now let me tell you your tweet was huge previously floated the idea of running as a third party candidate but admitted primary the voters didn't turn out at areas he thought he'd be strong as for whether he'll back the gop nominee come november my personal opinion is that patrick she's associations with the drug companies that covered us up with opiate drugs and his association with the abortionists makes it very difficult for me to be supportive at all it will be patrick morrissey against senator joe manchin in the fall ryan burrow abc news new york attorney general eric schneiderman resigned this week after reported allegations from four women who said he abused them the women three of whom said they were ex girlfriends said that schneiderman had hit them after drinking often well in bed schneiderman denies it abc's aaron katersky followed the story closely this week he sat down and discussed it with our brad milkey abc daily podcast start here can you just walk us through these allegations a little bit the allegations involve four women two of them came forward to the new yorker anonymously but.

ABC New York Ryan GOP China Cocaine Morris Attorney Donald Trump Aaron Katersky Eric Schneiderman Senator Joe Manchin Patrick Morrissey President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Blankenship
"Serious mistake" to exit Iran nuclear deal [Video]

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"Serious mistake" to exit Iran nuclear deal [Video]

"Among five losers in the contest to main thing is not to be dismayed i did everything i could do that i know of in this election unofficial result show state attorney general patrick morrissey winning the west virginia race three other states also held primaries today that includes ohio where former consumer financial protection bureau director richard cordray has won the democratic primary for governor cordray will face republican attorney general mike dewine president trump's nominee to head the cia is facing a grilling before the senate oversight committee tomorrow gina hassle will be questioned about her time as head of a covert detention site where terrorism suspects were waterboarded she said that the cia would not resume the harsh interrogation program if confirmed republicans on the panel have publicly supported her while some democrats say they don't know enough about hassle because the cia is refusing to declassify enough data on her thirty three year career there this is npr news their new evacuation warnings in hawaii county because of two new law officiers caused by way volcano the cellphone alerts were sent to residents of community were few dozen people were told to leave last thursday the lonnie puna garden's area is east of layla neha states that's the subdivision where lava has destroyed dozens of homes the new fishers are causing the release of dangerous gases civil rights advocates are suing the department of housing and urban development and hud secretary then carson as npr's brockton booker reports the plaintiffs are upset over a plan to suspend a hud requirement that communities examined and address housing segregation the suit brought by the national fair housing alliance and to texas based groups says that hut is failing in its mission and study duty it says the agency a lawfully suspended an obama era fair housing provision and they want the court to compel hood too.

Texas Barack Obama Carson Department Of Housing Senate President Trump Mike Dewine Director West Virginia Attorney Patrick Morrissey Brockton Booker NPR Secretary Lonnie Puna Garden Hawaii County CIA Donald Trump Governor Cordray
"morrissey" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"morrissey" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Animal byproduct you have to kill something and even the vegetarian slaughtering karen all right and slicing them dyson them up and shredding them yes so the fact that we have to kill other lifeforms on our own planet for our own sustenance could easily be seen as one of the most barbaric things to another civilization where they all absorb energy from their host star right yes there you have because they're absorbing and not consuming whether and and and they're limited not ingesting their limited source of energy from their son just like planets by plants on earth right they don't have to eat anything there's some that do of course but most don't the venus fly trap is carnivorous and what's that other one that eats flies that picture plant so that one okay so they are carnivorous but all the rest are doing just fine with sunlight yeah and that's that's an awesome way to live i think if outer evolve the human into something another form involves with solar panels on our skin nice skin would be one big solar and that way getting sunburned he's recharge your energetic yes believe they call that african i'm just saying last i heard that's why they're black i say hey that's why they're black crazy all right mega morrissey says hi i'm showing for the first time an episode of cosmos in my high school earth sciences class for the teachers or the world yeah you go one of my students just asked me if a ship that is designed like a ship of imagination would actually be able to fly into space with that be possible love your show and thank you i'm not authorized to say whether i actually own one of these.

morrissey
"morrissey" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"morrissey" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"It was in two thousand fourteen nine was hosting a quiz and i was trying to avoid i booked for months so i couldn't get out of it and north i want to obviously because i'm professional in that way and it was the game will be replaced chelsea and we were going for the title and you an idiot and the worst person i've ever met texted me the score while i was doing the quiz and i go a little bit upset i walked around the oh to which was it was born of sundance london and i won't run do to in a funk for a solid hour i was not happy it's an open because i've never ever texted you about football before or since yeah so your lesson well that's true it was terrifying but yeah i don't know why i don't know why that kind of thing i think maybe always texting to demonstrate that anew something that had happened in the world of football supposed to be a bonding thing between you to make close by destroy me emotionally basically yeah were way would've found out the score sooner or later it would have destroyed manually but yeah one of my best friends especially as you didn't know what you're doing you just pulled the peninsula handgrenade just through it and didn't give a shit what you do anyway david morrissey he's a lot of fun he was a governor talking to get me seen recently he was seen in britannia as well and now he's backing under screens in the city and the city which is on bbc and he pumped paul booth to have a good old matter with me a hasn't happened yet so hope it's it's a lot of fun so i i'm sure i had a lot of fun doing this enjoy i am delighted to welcome to the empire podcast the one only marcy i'm very well it's a beautiful day.

chelsea football bbc sundance london david morrissey paul