3 Burst results for "Morrison Patti Smith"

"morrison patti smith" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

09:41 min | 6 months ago

"morrison patti smith" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"I Hey, welcome back while we have good news are scheduled guest has joined us and now we're going to explore the visionary, mystical and ecstatic traditions that influenced the music of the 19 sixties and musical artists like the Grateful Dead The Beatles, Bob Dylan. And Christopher Hill is here. He's going to explain how the British invasion acted as the detonator to explode visionary music into the mainstream and how 19 sixties rock and roll music transformed. Consciousness on both the individual and collective levels. Chris has written about rock and roll music in the pages of Spin Record magazine, international musician, Chicago magazine, Downbeat, Deep Roots magazine and other national and regional publications. His work has been anthologized in the Rolling Stone record Review, and he's the author of Holiday Holidays and Holy Knights, and also into the mystic The visionary and Ecstatic Roots of 19. Sixties rock and Roll Christopher Hill. Welcome. How are you? Well, who's very well tonight. Thanks. I'm glad we could finally get together. Um And where there's a chance to talk little bit about on the subject. I'm pretty passionate about as you can probably guess from Taking a look at my book. So absolutely, yes. Well, I think we share that passion of Well, I'd like this begin at the beginning, if we could, because in the introduction you write about the French, the 19th century French poet Arthur Rambo and you write in the book Limbo is one of the household deities of rock and roll. Like the family ghost, he pops up at significant junctures junctures. So let's begin there who was Rambo? And why is it important to understand who he was in order under understand the music of the 19 sixties? Well, he was very unusual young Frenchman who kind of revolutionized poet Li by the time he was 20. On and never wrote another word poetry at a time, and he saw that provided the the model. Who were, um yeah, idea of the young person who is has this intense vision? Of Assuming visionary art. Um he was Very disappointed with the poetry in the literature of his day and believed This. You needed to sort of all two years Legion in order to be a real artist and a lot of people. Gives me a lot of people like Oh, Jim Morrison, Patti Smith. Um, but Dylan Have found a lot of inspiration, his career as someone who just had this Intensity of desire to just sort of push things, every father and his heart and in his ability to, um to open up his perception. And his consciousness. Seo a broader range of things that is that it Then they're usually Uh, so the sign their way into Uh, that's accepted. By the masses. And S O Use me, Um So he became sort of, um, the model for a lot of these rats and roars in the sixties of what an artist could be what a rebel sort of artist could be. Andre what very young person could bring to pushing the boundaries of their art ever further. Do they have? I guess you could put I guess you could also throw William Blake in there too, as well, right? Sure you're good? Yeah. Mm hmm. Blake was definitely not he with, um In the living much longer, progressive life. Then, uh, productive life, then Rambo did But, yeah, he was very much into the same kind of thing, and he believed in the expansion of ordinary human perception. In the same way the Rambo did. Yeah. So they both helped to inform this this visionary art this initiate Torrey Art. Um, that the 19 sixties really became all about, But there was something different, and another element added on top of that, which you write about, and that is this profound connection. Two African American music and the spiritually tradition. So let's talk a little bit about that. This this cultural cross fertilization of the new, You know the white youth culture meeting the sacred music of the African diaspora. Yeah. The win the when the enslaved answer. Sion's were first brought to the new world. Um they brought with them, although it was On. In one sense, it was very much impressed by slavery's, um they brought with them aspects of their religions have band practice. In Africa, and this had nothing to do. This was entirely separate from the European kind of tradition represented by guys like, um Blake or Rambo. Um But It. Um, it did she with that the idea of trying Tonto building into their practice. And The science of reaching ecstatic levels of consciousness on this was something that eventually well, it's a very long story, but It worked itself by way of African American music into the mainstream of American culture until by the 19 fifties. Um, whole lot of people who your whole life of white kids Were hearing in dancing town and pursue music that, um, head essentially had its roots. In this African American extent of tradition. So what happened to the fifties is that you had These two very different traditions coming from extremely different worlds. Um, kind of Discovery cellar, and there's a lot of power in that. When they met. And in the two forms of sort of reaching ecstasy through art came together and it was very potent. Kind of mixture. When they discovered each other. There's another quote in in your book into them into the mystic, and it's from Michael venture up from his book here, that long Snake moan And he writes, the voodoo right of possession by the gods became the standard of American performance in rock and roll. Which is not to say rock and roll is voodoo. But it does present qualities of that American or sorry of that African metaphysics. So talk to me about how rock and roll performances, American performances in rock and roll. We're like voodoo. Well, um Marriage in music. In one sense, American popular music has been said to have its origin in New Orleans. Where l onus of Slave, traditional resist practices. African American traditional religious practices, um, were first discovered by a mass American audience. And where be what had been religious practices on Lee, um, became great, gradually modify themselves into popular. Music. That, um, they asked, will buy little came of a powerful force in itself in American Popular music..

Patti Smith Christopher Hill New Orleans Arthur Rambo Jim Morrison Bob Dylan Africa Chris Dylan William Blake Rambo Michael 19th century 19 sixties Deep Roots Spin Record Lee tonight Blake 19 fifties
"morrison patti smith" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

13:21 min | 1 year ago

"morrison patti smith" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have the most remarkable series of connections though to have a traumatic injury lead to more reading time to then lead to a particular niche that you've carved out a which is a among other things in your portfolio literary portraits. Do you remember who your first contact was in the literary world as a photographic subject? Three things happen within a few months time of each other. I ahead as I began to dive into. This world already studied photography. Formerly I'd studied at New York University. Got My master's there and I studied with the year track program at ICP International Center photography which has a partnership program with New York University and I had assisted. A number of photographers was continuing to assist to learn as much as I could and I done. Independent workshops with photographers. Both here and abroad to that point and within a few months of each other three things happened. I was very involved with the German community at New York University. My mother's from Humboldt. And so I. I'm very enamored with her culture. Her language my family of course and I wanted to keep that going so I was hanging out often deutsches Haus the cultural arm of Newark University and Deutsches Haus had a writer in residence program and the Director of that program had asked me if I would make portraits of those writers so every six weeks there was another writer from a dramatic country and that led to some early Photo sessions with some great great writers among them. Daniel Kinman who had yet to publish a book called the world to enjoy the success that it did went on to become the best selling book in the history of Germany after the Bible it was so successful in Germany that was actually read on the radio or certain amount of time every day overtime. And can you imagine in our lifetimes that happening in this country it? What a great great thing and his publisher saw the pictures. We'd made and went onto ben a reach out to me for commissions for photographs of writers here who were being published by that publisher in Germany. That was one thing that happened. Another thing that happened was that I actually had my start in fashion. I knew a number of people net world. I wasn't really right for that world The Whiter Hilton. All's who at some point I'd photographed had once famously written it. Fashion is for the masses in style is for the individual and I'm very curious by people have style Fashion is perhaps a different thing. And there's amazing amazing latitude for creativity. Some of the greatest photographers in history. made their mark through fashion. But I found myself in photographing for fashion years ago. More interested in the people who were wearing the clothes in what they had to say than the clothes themselves. Oh My F- tell me about what makes a portrait beyond just very good what what makes it excellent. I'm looking at your about. I'm looking at your body of work here and I should by the way pause here to tell the people who are listening if they want to sort of follow along on your website which is Beowulf Shan Dot Com. Spell it out your B O W L F no space S. H. E. E. H. A. N. dot com beowulf. Sheehan DOT COM I'm looking at your body of work here. That's on the website and some of the people there. Their faces are a world known Winfrey for example. We all know what she looks like. It's there's one type of challenge in coming up with a extraordinary portrait of her. There are dozens of authors whose works we may know but their faces are complete blanks to us. How how do you go about bringing them to life as well? What Right Greg Questions? Well I'm going to quickly finish up answering the prior question. Which is that through the fashion world. I was asked to do a story for Vogue. Nippon which is Japanese Vogue and it had a story called fashioned biography. Fashion biography wasn't end of magazine. Last page one page story on somebody who had been in fashion and now is doing things and I photographed a person who had been a fashion model went on to write a memoir about growing up as the daughter of a well-known soul singer and her publisher. Harpercollins saw the pictures after the magazine was published. Contacted me and asked me what charge for all the portraits. That was another foray and then the third was being asked to photograph the very first pen. World Voices Festival of International Literature which very quickly introduced me to a number of writers from around the world and sixteen years later. I'm still at festivals photographer meeting a good fifty plus photographer. Sorry writers from around the world with each and every festival that comes in it's joyous joyous experience for me and that that has fed that experience has just with each year Expand the world of the community with which with whom. I work in literature a to the idea of what makes it great and author portrait portrait. It is a very very slippery thing because there's no single image to my thinking history that's ever spoken to the entirety of a person if that's the goal of a portrait if a portrait has to say this is who. I am good luck features. We're we're everything each and every one of us has been ugly.

New York New York University writer Fort Lauderdale Miami Dolphins publisher Oprah Winfrey Germany Scott Olsen Beowulf Sheehan Bill magnet high school wrestling Beowulf Shan Dot Com Dan Marino Deutsches Haus Florida everglades Japanese Vogue Yale
Beowulf Sheehan

Photography Radio

07:33 min | 1 year ago

Beowulf Sheehan

"Hello everyone and welcome to frames. My name is Scott Olsen and I am talking today with Beowulf Sheehan. Beowulf is one of the most sought after most successful and I believe most important portrait photographers in New York. These days he has worked in more than fifty countries lectured at New York University and Yale among other places and if you go to his website you will see portrait of people like Oprah Winfrey Twenty Morrison Patti Smith Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewart in Kellyn Paul Simon and dozens and dozens of others. It is a body of work of which I am personally Quite envious good morning. Bill could he's got great to hear Your Voice. I do have a quick thought for you. I've not traveled to fifty countries the photograph I photographed in better than ten by way of commissions however I have photographed people from at least fifty countries and hopefully been able to travel to their worlds in cultures through those experiences. Okay I saw that on your resume and I was impressed and I'm still impressed. So tell me how things are in New York this morning. New York is a beautiful place this morning. The air is cool and crisp outside. I did have a short walk this morning. I am very fortunate that out my window. I have a cemetery so I get to see less trees and I have a great deal of quiet. What sounds I hear. Every morning in this new time of ours is usually One of two things that I hear all either your birdsong or I will hear the sound of a passing ambulance and of course happy to hear the former not to hear the ladder. That is the time in which we live summer mornings in New York. City yes Tell me about portrait photography but let let let's begin where people how in the world could you get into photography? How did you get into the kind of portraiture that you do specifically I into photography being a shy boy and wanting to make friends and prior to the thought of making friends? I wanted to be reacquainted with my father. My parents divorced when I was in elementary school. My father was out in my life for a few years and when he came back the beginning of my high school years he had a Konica thirty five millimeter camera. A Long Lens to go with it and when I arrived at high school which was a high school outside of my neighborhood I went to magnet high school for foreign languages. I was busted very early in the morning to get there. I was in the ethic minority in head a world of new friends to make and when I got to school my classmates were speaking about two things with which I was unfamiliar of the Miami Dolphins. I grew up in Fort Lauderdale and girls and I knew very little about both but I had been working in the summers and not really spend that money on anything beyond books and comic book so I had enough money saved to become the youngest person in the history of the Miami Dolphins the buy season tickets to the Miami Dolphins. That's impressive I go So what I had done was than I began to use my father's camera and I would take a tripod that camera that long lens invite a new acquaintance from high school to eat game. And I believe my mother had driven been to us down To attend these games and no one ever stopped me. The guards were very kind. They recognize me after a few games. I always went through the same gate that sort of thing and was able to watch Dan Marino or the ball around and make pictures and then make Prince of those pictures and share them with classmates over time developing friendships and of course Getting to know my father again. That's a wonderful beginning there. Is I know an extraordinary event. Though in your early connection to reading and that's possible yes but but I'll let you lead that so when you're asking the extraordinary connection is well. Yeah you you are probably the only you are the only person I know who's ever been bitten by an alligator. Oh this is true this this. I don't know all the people in your life of course who you know but but I'm the only person I know who's been bitten by an alligator and that happened to me in the summer of nineteen seventy six in June of that year. I was of course on summer break from school quite small and my brother and I were playing in the backyard of the home of a friend of my mother in southwest Fort Lauderdale where there are canals and those canals in some cases feed than Their Way West to the Florida everglades and of course. That's where alligators hang out. And some of them sometimes get lost. My brother-in-law had been wrestling. This lady's backyard was time to come into the House for lunch. I had asked the Lady of the House. If we could use your host wash our feet persons they were full of dirt from the grass and the young lady had said no actually better just a spicer feed off the dock and then it'll be quicker and I went I. I remember sitting at the dock. Enjoying splash on my feet and looking at my brother and my brother's twenty months younger than me made his eyes get bigger and he looks down on my foot. I looked at my foot and I saw the alligator close. Its mouth around my right foot and I went to some degree of shock. The allegation let go. He caught the outside artery of my ankle and bloodshot out. Allah a bad money iphone sketch. And my my brother then began to grab my body to try to pull my body up and my mother and my mother's friend of course had come out of the house at this time and they were lifting me from the document onto the grass. The allegation had gone back under the dock. And I don't know how much more time passed or how much blood I lost but I then at some point found in the emergency room of a hospital where my brother was born. Only a few blocks away and doctors worked in saved my foot. Save my leg. There was concern for infection loss and I was very lucky to have for the balance of the summer. Have Gone to the hospital every day to get my foot. Epsom salts to save it and that meant of course not being able to play games at not being able to enjoy summer camp not being able to do sports do much of anything involved mobility and that deepened my reading and then with it of course my drawing and my reading and drawing through my childhood in and beyond began with comic books and then onto more challenging books More INTERESTING BOOKS. Maybe more interesting stuff. The right word say because books are wonderful. And they're very very interesting. Otherwise we wouldn't have these films adaptations of stories that now the masses is seen film but the the books of course comic books would come out once a month and it was great to go to seven eleven after school and pick up those books but I would devour them so quickly and then I really wasn't in the mood to wait another month for the next book to come out so I would just draw stories myself. The drawing worked its way over time of course into photography. But that's a longer compensation which I'm happy to have

New York Miami Dolphins Fort Lauderdale New York University Scott Olsen Magnet High School Beowulf Sheehan Oprah Winfrey Bill Dan Marino Wrestling Morrison Patti Smith Florida Everglades Yale Margaret Atwood Patrick Stewar Paul Simon Getting